145 reputation
8
bio website
location Germany
age 48
visits member for 3 years
seen Jun 3 at 19:19

My interests:

  • abstract structures
    (e.g. graphs, groups, polytopes, spaces, ...)

    in the course of this

  • category theory

  • model theory

  • presentations and representations
    (e.g. of abstract structures by or inside other abstract structures)

    next to this

  • philosophy
    (esp. of mathematics, science, and mind)

    especially concerned with

  • atomism
    (i.e. reductionistic or other theories referring to some kind of "atoms")

  • their refutations


Nov
3
awarded  Quorum
Nov
2
awarded  Commentator
Nov
2
comment The hole and the whole
Thank you very much! Especially the link at the end of your answer was really helpful.
Nov
2
awarded  Student
Nov
2
comment The hole and the whole
@Bradd: Thanks for the explanation. Could you give me a hint to an etymological dictionary where I would find an immediate answer to my question? (I am - as a German - not so familiar with English etymological dictionaries.)
Nov
1
comment The hole and the whole
I apologize for not knowing the rules of this forum. Please give me a hint why this question is not appropriate. (Be assured that I was serious about it.)
Nov
1
revised The hole and the whole
added 91 characters in body
Nov
1
asked The hole and the whole
Oct
15
awarded  Scholar
Oct
15
comment OxFORD and CamBRIDGE
Your answer perfectly meets my question. I always had the impression that Cambridge were a little bit more "noble" than Oxford - and you give an "explanation" which has to do with more or less advanced ways to cross a river.
Oct
15
accepted OxFORD and CamBRIDGE
Oct
15
awarded  Critic
Oct
15
comment OxFORD and CamBRIDGE
Without your comment I would not have noticed. But surely it does not.
Oct
15
comment OxFORD and CamBRIDGE
@jwpat: You provide some etymology of "ford" which looks like stemming from "πόρος". Thanks for that!
Oct
15
comment OxFORD and CamBRIDGE
I took this for granted (@skymninge and @Barrie). But anyway, thanks for the confirmation. What I wonder about is whether the Cambridge people ever tried to derive some superiority because their ancestors went over the river while the Oxford people went through the river.
Oct
15
comment OxFORD and CamBRIDGE
I took it for granted that Oxford stems from "ford" - and the joke is that the bridge goes over the river and the ford goes under (resp. through) the river.
Oct
15
asked OxFORD and CamBRIDGE
Jul
22
awarded  Editor
Jul
22
revised Single word for one who is a great fan of movies?
added 55 characters in body
Aug
23
awarded  Teacher