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15h
comment Is “denigrate” a racist word?
One difference versus "blacklist" is that there's a vocal contingent of sociopaths/trolls/whatnot who make an active attempt to use words containing "nig" as a form of coded racism. I don't think this means the word "denigrate" is racist, but it does mean it's usable in this pattern of encoded racist speech.
15h
comment Is “denigrate” a racist word?
Ironically, the only people I've ever seen use the word "niggardly" are actively hostile to racial justice and use the word intentionally as an attempt to provoke a response, which they'll then use as evidence of "political correctness run amok".
2d
comment Word for a task which is flawed or doomed to failure but which you have to do anyway?
FWIW, "death march" could be highly offensive to some readers by trivializing actual instances of death marches as part of genocide, etc., similar to how it's offensive to use "nazi" to describe a petty tyrant or person whose views you disagree with, or "rape" as an analogy for some trivial (often purely monetary) perceived violation.
Nov
16
answered Past passive tense for smite without connoting infatuation, or an alternative
Oct
21
comment Why is this sentence: “Additional nine features were added…” incorrect?
@WS2: That's the answer.
Oct
18
comment Alternative expression for “xyz Nazi”
@JoeBlow: If "grandpa who's a Sheriff" isn't aware that there's a risk for police to be frivolous, and that this is a real problem for many people, he probably needs to be offended.
Oct
7
comment Is “homophobic” a noun?
@WS2: I don't think those forms are in current usage by medical professionals. The correct forms would be "a person with epilepsy" or "a person with diabetes", etc.
Oct
7
comment Is “homophobic” a noun?
Regarding the last paragraph, it should be noted that this usage is going out of style, and is actively rejected by some people as dehumanizing. This is especially the case with words that name a person according to a disease or disability they have or where the adjective-as-noun form has been used to actively dehumanize ("illegals", "homosexuals", etc.).
Oct
4
comment What does it mean when Americans say “We love you” in an email?
Also, giving the types of answers it's receiving and OP's search for a culturally appropriate way to respond from a presumably non-native-speaker position, is it possible that this question would be more appropriate on ELL than English.SE?
Oct
4
comment What does it mean when Americans say “We love you” in an email?
@ChrisSunami: Is answer content that's putting the language in cultural context off-topic for this site? I felt this answer went a bit overboard on that, but in general it seems like a very reasonable thing to do.
Sep
30
comment Is there any “swearword” in English not associated with excrements, the genitals, sexual activity or religion?
Although there are different theories and no clear evidence as to which one is right, I think most (all?) of them fall under either religion or sexual/genital categories.
Sep
30
comment Is there any “swearword” in English not associated with excrements, the genitals, sexual activity or religion?
Bitch and bastard are non-examples. Even if they are "swearwords" (this is questionable), bitch specifically refers to a female dog in the context of a sexual/reproductive role, not just in general, and bastard refers to the target's mother's sexuality as a means of causing offense.
Sep
8
answered correct antonym for individualistic
Sep
1
awarded  Nice Answer
Jul
29
comment Appropriate word for internet name of a person
A plus to "handle" is that it will be immediately understood by CB users. ;-)
Jul
23
comment 'The company I work for' cannot be shortened to 'My company'?
@FumbleFingers and Kevin, the analogy is not valid because there is no potential for ambiguity when "my" is being used with a noun that you couldn't possibly own. With "my company" there are two possible interpretations. As long as your audience knows the context, I think "my company" is okay to refer to a company you work for, but when in doubt, it's best to be clear and avoid this usage.
Jul
3
answered What is a word for annoying behavior which decreases enjoyment for the other players in a game?
Jun
29
comment What causes the euphemisation of medical terms?
If anything, the old words were the euphemisms, at least at the time...
Jun
29
comment What causes the euphemisation of medical terms?
@l0b0: I'm saying that your examples are definitely not euphemisms, so even if medical euphemisms do exist, your question, as stated, is not really about them. The first definition for euphemism I turned up was "a mild or indirect word or expression substituted for one considered to be too harsh or blunt when referring to something unpleasant or embarrassing". However your examples are all replacements of misleading, erroneous terminology with precise terminology.
Jun
28
awarded  Commentator