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Jan
6
awarded  Yearling
Jan
5
awarded  Nice Answer
Jan
4
comment Grammatically correct sentence where “you're” and “your” can be interchanged?
@user21820: I don't follow that convention though I suppose I've seen it. But yes in spoken English the distinction goes away. FWIW, in my dialect of spoken English, the two sentences are not pronounced the same either. They have different vowels and "you're" is "sesqui-syllabic", the only differences from "you are" being the timing and weakened/missing vowel from "are".
Jan
4
answered Grammatically correct sentence where “you're” and “your” can be interchanged?
Jan
1
comment Forcing someone's choice through malicious or careless timing
It should be noted that "a designing woman" is inherently a sexist phrase, since there's no corresponding "a designing man" and part of the meaning is clearly an implication that this is a feminine behavior.
Dec
22
awarded  Nice Answer
Dec
21
awarded  Yearling
Dec
20
comment What do you call a response which does not address the question?
Much like the answer giving non sequitur, this answer seems to be out of context. A red herring is specifically a fallacy used in making an argument. It's not a term for a non-answer in a general context.
Dec
19
answered What do you call a response which does not address the question?
Dec
19
comment What do you call a response which does not address the question?
Despite OP's acceptance, I don't think this is an answer to the question. Rather it's an example of what OP was talking about. :-)
Dec
17
comment A word for “intimate friends” without any kind of romance?
I agree with @GreenAsJade here. Platonic carries a connotation that's the opposite of intimate, not just in the sexual sense where that's the whole point of the word, but also in the sense of lessening the non-sexual intimacy of the relationship.
Dec
9
comment What happened to “You're welcome?”
I think we're seeing a serious generational gap in these comments.
Dec
7
comment What happened to “You're welcome?”
@Vality: I agree completely.
Dec
7
answered What happened to “You're welcome?”
Nov
23
comment Is “denigrate” a racist word?
One difference versus "blacklist" is that there's a vocal contingent of sociopaths/trolls/whatnot who make an active attempt to use words containing "nig" as a form of coded racism. I don't think this means the word "denigrate" is racist, but it does mean it's usable in this pattern of encoded racist speech.
Nov
23
comment Is “denigrate” a racist word?
Ironically, the only people I've ever seen use the word "niggardly" are actively hostile to racial justice and use the word intentionally as an attempt to provoke a response, which they'll then use as evidence of "political correctness run amok".
Nov
21
comment Word for a task which is flawed or doomed to failure but which you have to do anyway?
FWIW, "death march" could be highly offensive to some readers by trivializing actual instances of death marches as part of genocide, etc., similar to how it's offensive to use "nazi" to describe a petty tyrant or person whose views you disagree with, or "rape" as an analogy for some trivial (often purely monetary) perceived violation.
Nov
16
answered Past passive tense for smite without connoting infatuation, or an alternative
Oct
21
comment Why is this sentence: “Additional nine features were added…” incorrect?
@WS2: That's the answer.
Oct
18
comment Alternative expression for “xyz Nazi”
@JoeBlow: If "grandpa who's a Sheriff" isn't aware that there's a risk for police to be frivolous, and that this is a real problem for many people, he probably needs to be offended.