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  • 0 posts edited
  • 1 helpful flag
  • 101 votes cast
Jan
29
comment Is the word “repeat” really used as a synonym of “vomit”?
There's little more annoying than a language teacher who insists on claiming something wrong about the language they're supposedly qualified to teach...
Jan
7
comment What is the antonym of the verb “equip”?
In a gaming context I always simply used "remove". It clearly makes sense for items that would be equipped by being worn, and worked well enough for weapons that might be in different places (in hand, on back, in holster, etc.) depending on state of use too.
Nov
30
comment Which is more wet: ‘moist’ or ‘damp’?
May those who have a problem with the word "moist" be cursed never to enjoy anything moist.
Nov
21
comment Image is to pixelated as a song is to ___?
Indeed, only very bad audio processing will introduce aliasing. What's more likely is that the high frequencies have just been lost.
Nov
21
comment Image is to pixelated as a song is to ___?
Undersampling and downsampling are vastly different. An undersampled signal will have all sorts of distortion from high-frequency components folding back down as lower frequencies. A downsampled signal will just be missing the high-frequency components.
Nov
17
answered Is the term “aspie” derogatory?
Nov
14
comment How do I express “clockwisality”?
Despite that association, both forms have traditional usage.
Oct
1
comment What is an adjective for something that is both offensive and funny?
@Nakaan: I think the point is that it actually lacks any humor; the person who wants to say the "joke" just thinks it has some, due to bad taste.
Sep
20
comment What does 'cold belief' mean?
Funny - I would tend to read "cold belief" in the same sense of "cold" as "cold reading" - a belief informed not by specific knowledge of the subject area, but rather by a set of general principles that apply fairly well to lots of subject areas. But I don't have any references for this so I'm not making it an answer. I would be interested in hearing if anyone else read it that way or has evidence to support such a reading.
Aug
27
comment Idiom meaning diverting somebody's attention from a topic which you don't want to talk on
This is probably the closest to capturing the meaning of OP's example.
Aug
27
comment Idiom meaning diverting somebody's attention from a topic which you don't want to talk on
Your example is hardly "diverting attention". It's outright refusing to answer the question or acknowledge that you're not answering, and it's rather passive-aggressive. Is this really the sort of situation you want to describe? I ask because the body of your question strikes me very differently from the question title.
Aug
7
comment Single word that combines the meaning of fascination and hate?
@JATerroba: The connotation is negative towards the person who is described as having a fixation, but that doesn't necessarily imply a negative attitude towards the thing they're fixated on.
Jul
28
comment What do you call a person who is always noisy on the Internet?
@L0j1k: Being an insult to the person it's applied to has nothing to do with the reasons why it would get you kicked out of a well-managed conference.
Jul
26
comment Negative-connotation word for someone who is straight-edge?
I've never heard it used that way in American English. It's listed as a secondary definition in my link, though.
Jul
24
answered Negative-connotation word for someone who is straight-edge?
Jul
23
comment What do you call a person who is always noisy on the Internet?
To elaborate, this word choice might be perfectly fine to have a character in a book or screenplay use, but would easily get your speaking invitation revoked if you used it in slides for a conference except in very specific situations.
Jul
23
comment What do you call a person who is always noisy on the Internet?
@L0j1k: I don't see how that response is relevant. Coverage of connotations and attitudes implied by word choice are relevant to someone seeking a word to use in speech or writing, and most importantly, mentioning them is descriptive, not prescriptive.
Jul
22
comment What do you call a person who is always noisy on the Internet?
I think this word does the best of any answers I've seen so far without seeming archaic or having unwanted connotations. Being "too modern" is an advantage IMO when the intended meaning is a modern phenomenon. As an alternative, use my answer, exhibitionist.
Jul
22
answered What do you call a person who is always noisy on the Internet?
Jul
22
comment What do you call a person who is always noisy on the Internet?
This term also conveys an assumed negative attitude towards sex workers (and perhaps towards female sexuality in general), which makes it inappropriate in many contexts and arguably preferable not to use at all.