597 reputation
26
bio website
location Thailand
age 33
visits member for 4 years, 2 months
seen Apr 14 '13 at 8:49

Dec
26
comment What's the correct way to write the general location of someone in the USA?
@tchrist Teenagers tend to be a remarkably conformist bunch, even (or perhaps especially) in their non-conformity ("rebel" against society, but still a follower within a subculture).
Dec
26
answered What's the correct way to write the general location of someone in the USA?
Nov
3
comment “Translated in” vs. “translated to”
Google ignores stop words like "in" and "to" (but not "into"), so your usage figures may not be correct.
Sep
5
awarded  Yearling
Jul
8
comment Is it ever correct to have a space before a question or exclamation mark?
You have correct intuition that this is more of a typography than a correct language usage question. In the "lol !" case, the space is just a hack, better kerning is the real solution.
Sep
6
awarded  Yearling
Aug
29
awarded  Nice Answer
Jul
11
comment Does the verb “Unstar” exist?
Verbing nouns weirds the language. Unverbing them is worse yet.
May
22
comment How does one use the Latin word “cum” in a sentence?
I like the subtle double-entendre in the second example.
Apr
24
comment “Push” is to “pushable” as “enable”/“disable” are to what?
Perhaps "supports enabling" and "supports disabling". There is no one-word word equivalent.
Feb
25
comment How would you define “Fluent” level in English?
Nice list. However, I'm not sure an average native speaker would do particularly well on #9 or #11 (at least when it comes to English).
Jan
28
comment Is there an informal way to describe a woman that can not have a baby?
Good manners. Analogous to how "seeing a psychiatrist" means "stark raving mad".
Jan
26
answered Is a whole cake still a “piece”
Jan
19
answered Can “his/her” be replaced by “his”?
Jan
18
awarded  Editor
Jan
18
revised Does apologizing entail recognizing being at fault?
added 63 characters in body
Jan
17
answered Does apologizing entail recognizing being at fault?
Jan
8
comment Is there a canonic term for “the one whose birthday party is being celebrated”?
I've heard this used before, but it feels highly colloquial.
Dec
27
comment Is there a word which means “having a frequency of decades” or “per decade”? What about century and millennium?
On the other end of the spectrum, "hourly" is fine, but "minutely" and "secondly" have an unrelated meaning.
Dec
7
comment Are there any examples of cross-language redundancy (e.g. “kielbasa sausage”)?
The type is called "plaid shirt" in English. Dress shirts also qualify, but not T-shirts, sweaters and such. Yes, "chert" is from English, as Thai doesn't have the "sh" sound (btw, Thais borrow English words quite easily).