315 reputation
18
bio website
location New York, NY
age
visits member for 3 years, 4 months
seen Oct 1 at 9:19

Began life as a writer, but have been in IT/NYC financial industry etc. for about 20 years, starting as a Paradox/Clipper/DBase guy around 1990. Done some serious work with Paradox, Delphi, SQLServer, C++, C#, XML-XSD and Python over the years, and have touched all phases of the SDLC.

Right now getting up to speed with C++11, gtkmm3 and WT.

History-Law-Math-Literary-Science Dilettante;


Oct
1
revised Is there a proper way of talking about a negative “privilege”?
added 1 character in body
Sep
30
answered Is there a proper way of talking about a negative “privilege”?
Sep
24
awarded  Autobiographer
Aug
2
answered Appropriate word for internet name of a person
Aug
2
comment Is there an equivalent of “reverie” where one is lost in unpleasant thoughts?
@trlkly Please debate the merits of my argument : I did - I explained that you missed the point entirely - there's nothing to argue. :)
Aug
1
comment Is there an equivalent of “reverie” where one is lost in unpleasant thoughts?
@bib "Broodings" would be appropriate in the example sentence: "the noise outside shook her from her broodings"
Aug
1
comment Is there an equivalent of “reverie” where one is lost in unpleasant thoughts?
@trlkly - Please don't explain to me what my points were... :)
Jul
31
comment Is there an equivalent of “reverie” where one is lost in unpleasant thoughts?
@trlkly - rumination refers only to cud chewing ??? Nowhere did I say such a thing. I simply cited the information regarding the Latin root. I do know English... See the whole entry there - it's about the best online dictionary out there - brings from Oxford and several others.
Jul
31
comment Is there an equivalent of “reverie” where one is lost in unpleasant thoughts?
+1 - This is the right answer. Accepted answer is incorrect IMO, as per my comment there.
Jul
31
comment Is there an equivalent of “reverie” where one is lost in unpleasant thoughts?
-1 Despite the Wikipedia, if true, it's a clinical definition of "rumination", not the vernacular: To chew the cud, as a ruminant - it is from the Latin "rūminant", and it's the same root as ruminant - animals who chew their cud. IMO it's safe to assume that cows are not focusing on their distress when chewing their cud - generally they look content, just very busy... I upvoted "brood" which is a far better choice.
Jul
5
comment What do you call someone who shoots fireworks professionally?
A Firecracker! - "He's a real firecracker, that one." Politics and the entertainment world are of full of people who "shoot fireworks professionally"... :P
Jun
17
revised What is a word or expression to define that you have reached the limit of your capabilities?
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Jun
17
comment What is a word or expression to define that you have reached the limit of your capabilities?
@MarkKasson I may have to downvote myself - no need to go to extremes! You could edit though, if you care to. I didn't downvote you. In particular, plateaued is excellent. I just upvoted you for that one.
Jun
16
revised What is a word or expression to define that you have reached the limit of your capabilities?
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Jun
16
comment What is a word or expression to define that you have reached the limit of your capabilities?
@BigHomie maxed out is not mine! It's from the first answer, as cited in my answer.
Jun
16
revised What is a word or expression to define that you have reached the limit of your capabilities?
added 14 characters in body
Jun
16
answered What is a word or expression to define that you have reached the limit of your capabilities?
Jun
16
comment What is the prototype of “Place blame where it is deserved / Blame where it’s due / Blame only where blame is due”?
Like the NYT, the folks at the NYer have forgotten how to write. Obviously it should be as you said: Give (place) blame where blame is due. The NYer's version is clumsy.
May
30
comment What metaphor or phrase can describe an object that is aesthetically pleasing yet totally useless?
I have to down-vote this answer. The question asks for a "conventional metaphor". Both of these suggestions are quite archaic today, and by no means conventional. Most people would probably not know what you were talking about if you used them, and those who did would probably be chuckling to themselves...
May
30
revised What metaphor or phrase can describe an object that is aesthetically pleasing yet totally useless?
added 4 characters in body