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 Yearling
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  • 0 posts edited
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  • 16 votes cast
Aug
6
comment “Horicontal” etymology—mistaken foreign spelling of horizontal?
A corruption of horiçontal is also possible.
Aug
4
comment I am looking for a word to describe a person who takes joy in creating (food, art, etc.) and loves to learn about the world and its cultures
Possibly, a bon vivant.
Jul
17
comment “It works for you” vs “it goes with you”
"It fits you" is an alternative sentence.
Jul
17
suggested rejected edit on Confused by “comes down to” and similar phrases
Jul
17
comment Confused by “comes down to” and similar phrases
When it comes down to eating more vegetables in order to live longer, I guess I'm going to die young.
Jul
2
awarded  Yearling
Jun
25
comment Looking for the word which covers the eye lid of the horses and led the horse to run straight
Or blinders
May
13
comment How can I improve this sentence stylistically
"some rebel attitude" doesn't sound like native AmEnglish. Alternatives could be "show a rebel attitude" (eh), "show a rebellious attitude" or "begun to rebel against her strictures."
Apr
27
comment A more elegant way of writing “attempt to replicate them” for Teaching Statement
more colloquial: pay it forward
Apr
22
comment Is there a correct abbreviation for “Interest” or “Interested”?
The abbreviation "Int." is strictly for the money earned on a deposit. There is no standard abbreviation for interested/not interested (except maybe a checkmark and a X!).
Feb
26
awarded  Nice Answer
Jan
28
comment “Batchy” indicating a bad taste?
Where is she from/where does she live?
Oct
23
comment Does anyone know the origins of “lucks a mussy” ( phonetic as I don't know correct spelling).
Where did you mother grow up and/or live? My guess would be lord-a-mercy or as you guessed Lord-have-mercy or Lord-ha-mercy were mercy is pronounced something like muh-cee.
Sep
24
awarded  Autobiographer
Jul
2
awarded  Yearling
Jul
2
awarded  Yearling
Mar
17
awarded  Informed
Jul
2
awarded  Yearling
Jan
9
comment “The” before superlative
I would say 'all' is the superlative of 'most' or 'many.'
Jan
9
comment “The” before superlative
"Most" is not a superlative, so the examples aren't appropriate. Now if you said "The biggest tuna...", yes, "the" is required. You might be able to say "Biggest tuna..." but it sounds awkward to me (native AE speaker).