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seen Jan 9 at 11:13

Nov
2
comment Good websites to help improve usage of prepositions
A possible approach is to Google both phrases, e.g. "knowledge of coding" and "knowledge in coding", and see what occurs more often.
Oct
20
comment Word for “all the groups an item belongs to”?
Perhaps roles?
Sep
22
comment Does “end up with something” always mean possession? (Harry Potter spoilers)
@drɱ65 δ Oxford, Merriam-Webster and Cambridge do not list this phrase at all. OneLook lists a single meaning (no guarantee that it's the only one). Plus the slightly ambiguous context. Hence the question.
Sep
18
comment What do you call a pair of words which would be meaningless without one of them?
Most phrases would still make sense if a word is dropped.
Sep
18
comment All X are Y. Then Some Y is X?
@John That's a good point. Updated the answer.
Sep
11
comment “Wear off” or “ware off”
@Mark A couple of million Google hits for "Currently online now", which is redundant in most of the cases: english.stackexchange.com/q/41251/10341
Sep
6
comment “Dear Professor” vs “Dear Mr”: differences between British and American usage
J.K.Rowling comments on the 'cultural adaptation' issue: "Very few changes have been made in the manuscript. Arthur Levine, my American editor, and I decided that words should be altered only where we felt they would be incomprehensible, even in context, to an American reader. I have had some criticism from other British writers about allowing any changes at all, but I feel the natural extension of that argument is to go and tell French and Danish children that we will not be translating Harry Potter, so they'd better go and learn English."
Sep
6
comment “Dear Professor” vs “Dear Mr”: differences between British and American usage
Everywhere else in the book, he is still "Professor Dumbledore". This letter seems to be the only exception. If he normally calls him "Professor", why he would write "Mr" in the letter?