5,690 reputation
1830
bio website
location New York, New York
age 56
visits member for 2 years, 10 months
seen yesterday

Jul
22
comment How to express that one is making the conversation long for fun
@djclayworth: Fair enough. But the CONVERSATION can linger. I described this as a "phenomenon."
Jul
22
comment How to express that one is making the conversation long for fun
@user395881: will you upvote this answer?
Jul
22
comment What would you call her actions here?
@fumblefingers: That probably wasn't the case "originally." Perhaps it is true today. But I'd certain accept provoking as a reasonable synonym.
Jul
21
comment What does “it takes a tough man to make a tender chicken” mean?
@z7sg: A "tender" chicken is a good chicken. But it may take a "tough" CEO to run a company that makes a good chicken.
Jul
19
comment What does “in the saddle” mean?
Actually, the American idiom is "in the DRIVER'S seat." Otherwise an upvote for you.
Jul
18
comment Origin of the term 'bastard sword'
And the typical bastard CHILD is often the product of a high-born father and a lower born mother, and is an irregular, suspect issue considered neither one nor the other, with a "misleading" pedigree.
Jul
15
comment What is the origin of the phrase “beyond the pale”?
It probably had similar meanings in different parts of the world.
Jul
13
comment What is the meaning of “run someone out of town”?
@simchona: Just watched a lot of "Lone Ranger" and other "westerns" on TV when I was a kid in the 1960s.
Jul
12
comment Someone told me “fair” is the “F” word, they don't like it in their house. Should I avoid using it?
@martin: To a "states' rights" person, yes.
Jul
11
comment What does “default” mean in financial sense?
Default isn't exactly bankruptcy, but it leads to bankruptcy. Specifically, default is a failure to pay that might be "cured" tomorrow or the next day. But bankruptcy is basically a CONTINUED failure to pay, at least for the foreseeable future.
Jul
11
comment “Hooker”, “whore”, “prostitute”, when to use which?
@malvolio: Fair enough. I'm just giving the American interpretation. So General Hooker was a "reinforcement" eh? In the war, he was best in that role (sometimes tipped the balance). He always lost as a "front line" man.
Jul
11
comment Non-sexual meaning of “to have a hard-on for someone”
@benjol: A "boner" in this kind of context would refer to a "faux pas." As in having one in public (even through one's pants). It would basically be at least as embarassing as "flatulence."
Jul
5
comment What does “double-down” mean when used in a context other than Blackjack?
@Kit: I know that in blackjack, you can only "double" down on the first draw. I also stated my belief that OTHERS took it out of context (blackjack) and (wrongly) used "double down" on follow-up bets. If I'm right, that's how double down would be used in a "context other than blackjack."
Jul
2
comment “At the drop of a hat”?
And to "throw one's hat into the ring" meant to enter a competition, even for President of the United States.
Jul
1
comment Are there English sayings that correspond to Japanese old saying, ‘There is no wild pig larger than the mountain from where he emerges’?
@kit: I think I understand where the issue might be. I didn't exactly address the expression Oishi-san was PRESENTING (in the body). I did address the original quote (in the title). The two are not incompatible because if you live in a "bad" neighborhood, you are (somewhat) "used" to bad things. 'God's mercy' (according to Oishi-san), is that he will not make things worse than you are "used" to, and can reasonably handle. My version is "the child (criminal) won't be worse than the parent." I believe one follows from the other.
Jun
30
comment Military personnel normally put their badges on their shoulders - what is that area called?
@Kit: I've done the same myself from time to time.
Jun
30
comment Military personnel normally put their badges on their shoulders - what is that area called?
@kit:Is that worth an upvote? Valued more from you, than from most.
Jun
30
comment Military personnel normally put their badges on their shoulders - what is that area called?
@Kit: Military practices have varied over the years. The (modern) picture does show the badge just below the shoulder. And in fact, the caption says "SHOULDER sleeve insignia."But the concept of "epaulettes" goes back some time, at least to the "Three Musketeers."
Jun
30
comment Are there English sayings that correspond to Japanese old saying, ‘There is no wild pig larger than the mountain from where he emerges’?
@vgv8: I believe that the reference is to "Murphy's Law": If anything can go wrong, it will.
Jun
30
comment Are there English sayings that correspond to Japanese old saying, ‘There is no wild pig larger than the mountain from where he emerges’?
@Kit: @Rhodri: I am Chinese-American, and I know that there is there is a Chinese (and probably Japanese) saying, "no pupil is greater than his teacher." Taking Oishi-san's Japanese background, I believe this to be his frame of reference. That also applies to "bad things" like wild pigs. Hence it's not incompatible with his statement that "God is merciful."