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location New York, New York
age 57
visits member for 3 years, 1 month
seen 14 hours ago

Sep
16
comment generic term for “A-hed”? (quirky article at the bottom of the front page of the Wall Street Journal)
@Eldross: Pot pourri can refer to a collection of THINGS as well as flowers. (At least it did on an American TV show called Jeopardy.
Sep
8
comment What is “o-matic”?
Nice bit of history. Upvoted.
Sep
7
comment How to use “pickpocket” as verb
I believe this question is misunderstood. It is NOT "What does pickpocket mean," (a general reference question). It is "How do you use it?" (Answer, by splitting the verb "pick" and the noun "pocket" around the object, e.g. a tourist: "Pick a tourist's pocket.")
Sep
7
comment “Salty” in place of expensive?
I believe these are "figures of speech," as opposed to "accepted" English usage.
Sep
3
comment Looking for idiom/expression to describe an instance where one makes something seem better than it really is
Welcome aboard the site. An upvote to get you started.
Sep
1
comment Figuring the SVO of the sentence “I'm Tom.”
@myqlarson: I was talking about predicate nouns. You're talking about predicate adjectives. But you did give me an opportunity to clarify my stance.
Aug
30
comment What does “turn off” mean here?
Welcome to the site. An upvote to get you started.
Aug
23
comment British and American slang words for immigrants?
A reference has been added. I omitted some others that even wiki conceded were less trustworthy.
Aug
22
comment Is it true that the 100 most common English words are all Germanic in origin?
@alian pannetier: There are two of A LOT of things in English. e.g. stool (German), chair (French); hen (German), poultry (French) etc.
Aug
22
comment Etymology of “unhinged”
@Wesley: If a door is "hinged," it's likely to stay in place. If it is "unhinged," it is likely to come apart (from the doorway). The "etymology" of this to people would be the metaphor.
Aug
7
comment What is the meaning and etymology of “ruthless?”
@unreason: That's a good link. But it probably took the answer below to produce the "light bulb" moment in my head.
Aug
7
comment What is the meaning and etymology of “ruthless?”
@Mark T: I was doing what I call a "permutation analysis (searching possible permutations; the reference to Ruth was another example).Rücksichtlos is quite plausible in this regard. "No look back" could be construed as remorseless, if not cruel. But rue and "rueless" is the better root word.
Aug
5
comment Does this situation have a name?
"G" was a reference to the woman's MARRIED name, so I don't think it was done on purpose. More of an accident, or curiosity.
Aug
5
comment What is the meaning and etymology of “ruthless?”
So the correct root word could be "rue," and "ruthless, would mean "rueless." Makes perfect sense.
Aug
1
comment Why does “sucker” mean “unexpected” in “Sucker Punch”?
Dempsey may not have coined the term, but he popularized it. That's why it is associated with him.
Jul
30
comment Is “chubby” offensive?
+1 for "curvaceous. Welcome to the site.
Jul
30
comment Is “chubby” offensive?
@RegDwight: This appears to be a two-part question: 1) Can "chubby" be used, and 2) If not, what can replace it. The "fat" question addressed only the second part.
Jul
30
comment Is “chubby” offensive?
+1 for "voluptuous." And welcome to the site.
Jul
29
comment Why does “fishwife” mean “mean woman”?
@matt: Not really. Just friends of my 88-year old mother.
Jul
29
comment What does “I'll go you one better” mean?
Welcome aboard. I upvoted you to get you started.