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visits member for 3 years, 4 months
seen 17 hours ago

Apr
12
comment What is the difference between “compound” and “complex” sentences?
OK, it seems like my basic idea was right. "Coordinate" =compound, "subordinate = complex, and those are the ways you make sentences out of clauses. The examples were helpful. +1 possibly an acceptance, but I like to wait a day or two for the latter.
Apr
12
comment What is the difference between “compound” and “complex” sentences?
@KitFox: Are coordinating/subordinating conjunctions used in compound/complex sentences or clauses? Do I have my terms "backward?" Examples? Sorry for the "matrix" format of this question but I think in those terms.
Apr
11
comment Is describing someone as “higher-educated” awkward?
I said that "highLY educated" was "smoother" than the other term. I did NOT say that it was a "good" term. It's not great, but apparently it was "good enough" for the OP (as of his first comment).
Apr
9
comment Are alpha and omega common abbreviations for birth and death?
If you spelled out the symbols using an "English" alphabet, "alpha" and "omega," instead of Greek letters, this question would be on topic IMHO. I have made this change, and nominat the question for reopeoning in its current form
Nov
9
comment Opposite of “turnaround”
I vote for "nosedive."
Nov
9
comment Word for change of opinion
@asymptotically: Your version of the word would be "conversion."
Nov
9
comment What's the difference between “diary” and “journal”?
I remember reading this in the Henry Reed (children's) series by Keith Robertson. A diary is more of a day-to-day writing, a journal is more topical.
Oct
7
comment “Gadhafi forces retreat” - how do you understand that?
If this were about "standard" English, it would be a bad question. But it is about a newspaper headline, or "non-standard" English.
Aug
17
comment “Space” as a synonym for industry, sector or business segment
@bib: Yes, fixed.
Jul
6
comment A word for: Taking a godlike concept and bringing it down to earth
I've been through this with a woman also. But better to have dated and "lost" than not at all. english.stackexchange.com/questions/54487/…
Jul
6
comment English equivalent of the Italian “Mannaggia!”, “Che peccato!”
@A_nto2: Ok, fixed.
Apr
30
comment Better way of saying “Go-to man”?
@helen melichar: My understanding is that the point person (actually a point man) is the one who "leads a charge" in the military. Is this the sense you want?
Apr
29
comment Is there a word for temporary-but-may-become-permanent?
@dotancohen: They're evaluating you, you're evaluating them, but it seems like at least one is "trying out" the other.
Apr
28
comment What is the meaning of “I read a book once”
@jwpat7: The speaker seemed to be saying, "I was reading this book, and X happened." And most stories begin with "once upon a time..."
Apr
27
comment What is the opposite of gem-like?
@I edited the question by changing "jewel" to "gem." I believe that the new question can be answered (as it was before closing), and nominate it for reopening
Apr
27
comment What is the meaning of “I read a book once”
Welcome to the site. An upvote to get you started.
Apr
26
comment Why “the Sun Tzu” instead of just “Sun Tzu”?
@Hugo: May be the writer thought that Sun Tzu was a "title," e.g., "the Count of Monte Cristo.
Apr
25
comment What does “I believe in making America safe for old-fashioned light bulbs and not those weird curly ones,” mean?
@Wfaulk: English SE isn't the place for a political diatribe. But it is the place for WORDS and expressions used in a political diatribe IMHO. So you're OWN diatribe is off-topic, but questions about someone ELSE's (particularly a presidential candidate) should be acceptable.
Apr
24
comment Generic name for places like village, town and cities
Your suggestion sounds like the German Platz.
Apr
23
comment Generic name for places like village, town and cities
It's true that "urban area" is "not commonly" used to describe villages. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Urban_area. But in Anglo-Saxon countries like Australia, Canada, and the United States, they are used to describe collections of people in certain population densities, e.g. 1,000 or 1,500 people over so many square kilometers or miles. That includes SOME villages. In English idiom, "Never say never."