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location New York, New York
age 57
visits member for 3 years, 3 months
seen 2 hours ago

Apr
30
comment Better way of saying “Go-to man”?
@helen melichar: My understanding is that the point person (actually a point man) is the one who "leads a charge" in the military. Is this the sense you want?
Apr
29
comment Is there a word for temporary-but-may-become-permanent?
@dotancohen: They're evaluating you, you're evaluating them, but it seems like at least one is "trying out" the other.
Apr
28
comment What is the meaning of “I read a book once”
@jwpat7: The speaker seemed to be saying, "I was reading this book, and X happened." And most stories begin with "once upon a time..."
Apr
27
comment What is the opposite of gem-like?
@I edited the question by changing "jewel" to "gem." I believe that the new question can be answered (as it was before closing), and nominate it for reopening
Apr
27
comment What is the meaning of “I read a book once”
Welcome to the site. An upvote to get you started.
Apr
26
comment Why “the Sun Tzu” instead of just “Sun Tzu”?
@Hugo: May be the writer thought that Sun Tzu was a "title," e.g., "the Count of Monte Cristo.
Apr
25
comment What does “I believe in making America safe for old-fashioned light bulbs and not those weird curly ones,” mean?
@Wfaulk: English SE isn't the place for a political diatribe. But it is the place for WORDS and expressions used in a political diatribe IMHO. So you're OWN diatribe is off-topic, but questions about someone ELSE's (particularly a presidential candidate) should be acceptable.
Apr
24
comment Generic name for places like village, town and cities
Your suggestion sounds like the German Platz.
Apr
23
comment Generic name for places like village, town and cities
It's true that "urban area" is "not commonly" used to describe villages. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Urban_area. But in Anglo-Saxon countries like Australia, Canada, and the United States, they are used to describe collections of people in certain population densities, e.g. 1,000 or 1,500 people over so many square kilometers or miles. That includes SOME villages. In English idiom, "Never say never."
Mar
28
comment Is the phrase “for free” correct?
@zpletan: The expression is "I got it free of charge" (no for).
Mar
12
comment Why is a lieutenant general higher than a major general?
Could we "migrate" this question to say, the history site?
Mar
1
comment What is the word that describes ethical smartness?
Welcome to the site. An upvote to get you going.
Mar
1
comment What is the word that describes ethical smartness?
I would be looking for a word like "ethicality," but maybe such a word doesn't exist.
Mar
1
comment What is the word that describes ethical smartness?
Welcome to the site. An upvote to get you going.
Feb
14
comment What is the meaning and etymology of “ruthless?”
Welcome to the site. Thanks for your answer. An upvote to get you going.
Jan
30
comment Term for an insincere invitation..?
Welcome to the site. An upvote to get you going.
Jan
26
comment Meaning of “the waft of”
I don't consider this "general reference," since it has a "figurative" meaning (smell), that is decidedly different from its literal meaning "movement through air."
Jan
21
comment What does the end of sentence “eh” tag mean in Canadian English?
@Mitch: Changed "British" to "Canadian." I honestly thought the English used it also, but maybe not.
Jan
21
comment What does the end of sentence “eh” tag mean in Canadian English?
@Mahnax: But I am American (for full disclosure).
Jan
18
comment What is the verb for dividing something into regions?
@KevinCathcart: That is exactly why it is my choice.