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Nov
30
comment Etymology of “nick” in, in the nick of time?
@Mari-LouA: In this context, yes.
Nov
21
comment Difference between “dumb” and “stupid”
@NathanFrancy: I'd say it's the difference between active and passive. A "stupid" person says the wrong thing, while a "dumb" person fails to say (or do) the right thing. That is "dumb" is slightly less pejorative thing stupid.
Nov
6
comment How to refer to the position where you bend to the floor with your hands covering your head?
As I remember from my (1960s) childhood, the "atomic scare" days were during the COLD War (against the Russians). The atomic bomb ended World War II.
Sep
10
comment What does the expression “official mom” mean, that forced J&J to apologize and cancel their ad?
@mplungjan: "Succinctness counts." So does commentary "not exactly a cool message."
Sep
8
comment What is a word for someone who intentionally ignores other people a lot?
"Snub" is the correct verb, and a better noun form is "one who snubs."
Sep
7
comment What does the expression “official mom” mean, that forced J&J to apologize and cancel their ad?
I think I've seen you on another site. But an upvote to you for your answer on this one.
Sep
4
comment “Me and Joey's” or “mine and Joey's”
@JohnLawler: It's a "politeness" issue. Other person first. Especially if s/he is your spouse.
May
11
comment “I'm only grandfathering you in because of Serena.”
@Jay: You're on the right track. Actually, this was for WHITE people. "If your grandfather could vote, so can you." Meaning that blacks would have to pay poll taxes or pass literacy tests to vote, because their grandfathers could vote, while equivalent whites would not.
May
8
comment Is “vindicate” a form of “indicate”
@JohnLawler: My understanding is that etyonline is a DUAL purpose tool. Or is it?
May
8
comment Is “vindicate” a form of “indicate”
@PeterShor: OK, you looked at the problem from a DIFFERENT angle, and came up with your conclusion. Very interesting. If you made your comment into an answer, I'd probably upvote it.
Apr
30
comment Could the term “elephant” have derived from “olfactory?”
@KristinaLopez: I'm "bad" today. I was recently hospitalized, and am back on the site after a hiatus. Am still not fully my former self, and that may be reflected in the fact that the quality of my recent posts is probably below the historical level.
Apr
30
comment Could the term “elephant” have derived from “olfactory?”
@JohnLawler: Linguistic connections are often derived from "physical" connections.
Apr
30
comment Could the term “elephant” have derived from “olfactory?”
"seems to counsel against this" fair enough. But it might be possible to close the loop further if we could establish a connection between "tooth" and "nose."
Apr
30
comment Could the term “elephant” have derived from “olfactory?”
@BillFranke: I checked those sources and came to the "opposite" conclusion (that is, that my theory, while not supported by those references was also not "contraindicated").
Apr
15
comment How long has the f-word been in use as an abusive term?
Could this word be in any way related to "pluck"?
Apr
12
comment What is the difference between “compound” and “complex” sentences?
OK, it seems like my basic idea was right. "Coordinate" =compound, "subordinate = complex, and those are the ways you make sentences out of clauses. The examples were helpful. +1 possibly an acceptance, but I like to wait a day or two for the latter.
Apr
12
comment What is the difference between “compound” and “complex” sentences?
@KitFox: Are coordinating/subordinating conjunctions used in compound/complex sentences or clauses? Do I have my terms "backward?" Examples? Sorry for the "matrix" format of this question but I think in those terms.
Apr
11
comment Is describing someone as “higher-educated” awkward?
I said that "highLY educated" was "smoother" than the other term. I did NOT say that it was a "good" term. It's not great, but apparently it was "good enough" for the OP (as of his first comment).
Apr
9
comment Are alpha and omega common abbreviations for birth and death?
If you spelled out the symbols using an "English" alphabet, "alpha" and "omega," instead of Greek letters, this question would be on topic IMHO. I have made this change, and nominat the question for reopeoning in its current form
Nov
9
comment Opposite of “turnaround”
I vote for "nosedive."