6,648 reputation
11237
bio website
location New York, New York
age 57
visits member for 3 years, 5 months
seen Nov 20 at 19:22

Jun
8
comment How would one say “An accent from the Southern States of the USA”?
"Deep Southern" has the correct connotation of (former) "Confederate" state.
Jun
8
comment How would one say “An accent from the Southern States of the USA”?
San Diego, though technically "southern" isn't "southeastern," which is what a U.S. "southern" accent (drawl) refers to. Basically, the former "Confederate" states of the United States. Texas barely qualifies.
Apr
16
comment What is the term for a Monarchy with only a King or a Queen, but not both?
@SteveJessop: Changed that to English Prince. Ok, he was a Greek prince as well.
Apr
16
comment Synonyms / slang words in American English to express “I am very excited for something”?
@RegDwight: I think the OP mixed his metaphors. S/B, I am excited FOR someone, or ABOUT something. I was wondering if you could reopen this question so I can post the above as an answer. Clearing up the confusion could be "constructive."
Mar
24
comment is there a term for “largest possible minority?”
@ermanen:"Anything." I almost cited the example of 49 out of 100 Senators, or 217 out of 435 Congress people.
Jan
20
comment Is there an expression for only offending the recipient?
@Patrick Calinescu: Congratulations on your first (approved) edit.
Jan
20
comment Is there an expression for only offending the recipient?
@rhetorician: My supposition was "how would a third party likely react if s/he overheard the comment?" Or we could even be "schoolchildren" and what would the teacher likely say if the other boy "tattled" and told the teacher, "Tom called me an sob."
Nov
30
comment Etymology of “nick” in, in the nick of time?
@Mari-LouA: In this context, yes.
Nov
21
comment Difference between “dumb” and “stupid”
@NathanFrancy: I'd say it's the difference between active and passive. A "stupid" person says the wrong thing, while a "dumb" person fails to say (or do) the right thing. That is "dumb" is slightly less pejorative thing stupid.
Nov
6
comment How to refer to the position where you bend to the floor with your hands covering your head?
As I remember from my (1960s) childhood, the "atomic scare" days were during the COLD War (against the Russians). The atomic bomb ended World War II.
Sep
10
comment What does the expression “official mom” mean, that forced J&J to apologize and cancel their ad?
@mplungjan: "Succinctness counts." So does commentary "not exactly a cool message."
Sep
8
comment What is a word for someone who intentionally ignores other people a lot?
"Snub" is the correct verb, and a better noun form is "one who snubs."
Sep
7
comment What does the expression “official mom” mean, that forced J&J to apologize and cancel their ad?
I think I've seen you on another site. But an upvote to you for your answer on this one.
Sep
4
comment “Me and Joey's” or “mine and Joey's”
@JohnLawler: It's a "politeness" issue. Other person first. Especially if s/he is your spouse.
May
11
comment “I'm only grandfathering you in because of Serena.”
@Jay: You're on the right track. Actually, this was for WHITE people. "If your grandfather could vote, so can you." Meaning that blacks would have to pay poll taxes or pass literacy tests to vote, because their grandfathers could vote, while equivalent whites would not.
May
8
comment Is “vindicate” a form of “indicate”
@JohnLawler: My understanding is that etyonline is a DUAL purpose tool. Or is it?
May
8
comment Is “vindicate” a form of “indicate”
@PeterShor: OK, you looked at the problem from a DIFFERENT angle, and came up with your conclusion. Very interesting. If you made your comment into an answer, I'd probably upvote it.
Apr
30
comment Could the term “elephant” have derived from “olfactory?”
@KristinaLopez: I'm "bad" today. I was recently hospitalized, and am back on the site after a hiatus. Am still not fully my former self, and that may be reflected in the fact that the quality of my recent posts is probably below the historical level.
Apr
30
comment Could the term “elephant” have derived from “olfactory?”
@JohnLawler: Linguistic connections are often derived from "physical" connections.
Apr
30
comment Could the term “elephant” have derived from “olfactory?”
"seems to counsel against this" fair enough. But it might be possible to close the loop further if we could establish a connection between "tooth" and "nose."