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location New York, New York
age 57
visits member for 3 years, 2 months
seen 15 hours ago

May
11
comment “I'm only grandfathering you in because of Serena.”
@Jay: You're on the right track. Actually, this was for WHITE people. "If your grandfather could vote, so can you." Meaning that blacks would have to pay poll taxes or pass literacy tests to vote, because their grandfathers could vote, while equivalent whites would not.
May
8
comment Is “vindicate” a form of “indicate”
@JohnLawler: My understanding is that etyonline is a DUAL purpose tool. Or is it?
May
8
comment Is “vindicate” a form of “indicate”
@PeterShor: OK, you looked at the problem from a DIFFERENT angle, and came up with your conclusion. Very interesting. If you made your comment into an answer, I'd probably upvote it.
Apr
30
comment Could the term “elephant” have derived from “olfactory?”
@KristinaLopez: I'm "bad" today. I was recently hospitalized, and am back on the site after a hiatus. Am still not fully my former self, and that may be reflected in the fact that the quality of my recent posts is probably below the historical level.
Apr
30
comment Could the term “elephant” have derived from “olfactory?”
@JohnLawler: Linguistic connections are often derived from "physical" connections.
Apr
30
comment Could the term “elephant” have derived from “olfactory?”
"seems to counsel against this" fair enough. But it might be possible to close the loop further if we could establish a connection between "tooth" and "nose."
Apr
30
comment Could the term “elephant” have derived from “olfactory?”
@BillFranke: I checked those sources and came to the "opposite" conclusion (that is, that my theory, while not supported by those references was also not "contraindicated").
Apr
15
comment How long has the f-word been in use as an abusive term?
Could this word be in any way related to "pluck"?
Apr
12
comment What is the difference between “compound” and “complex” sentences?
OK, it seems like my basic idea was right. "Coordinate" =compound, "subordinate = complex, and those are the ways you make sentences out of clauses. The examples were helpful. +1 possibly an acceptance, but I like to wait a day or two for the latter.
Apr
12
comment What is the difference between “compound” and “complex” sentences?
@KitFox: Are coordinating/subordinating conjunctions used in compound/complex sentences or clauses? Do I have my terms "backward?" Examples? Sorry for the "matrix" format of this question but I think in those terms.
Apr
11
comment Is describing someone as “higher-educated” awkward?
I said that "highLY educated" was "smoother" than the other term. I did NOT say that it was a "good" term. It's not great, but apparently it was "good enough" for the OP (as of his first comment).
Apr
9
comment Are alpha and omega common abbreviations for birth and death?
If you spelled out the symbols using an "English" alphabet, "alpha" and "omega," instead of Greek letters, this question would be on topic IMHO. I have made this change, and nominat the question for reopeoning in its current form
Nov
9
comment Opposite of “turnaround”
I vote for "nosedive."
Nov
9
comment Word for change of opinion
@asymptotically: Your version of the word would be "conversion."
Nov
9
comment What's the difference between “diary” and “journal”?
I remember reading this in the Henry Reed (children's) series by Keith Robertson. A diary is more of a day-to-day writing, a journal is more topical.
Oct
7
comment “Gadhafi forces retreat” - how do you understand that?
If this were about "standard" English, it would be a bad question. But it is about a newspaper headline, or "non-standard" English.
Aug
17
comment “Space” as a synonym for industry, sector or business segment
@bib: Yes, fixed.
Jul
6
comment A word for: Taking a godlike concept and bringing it down to earth
I've been through this with a woman also. But better to have dated and "lost" than not at all. english.stackexchange.com/questions/54487/…
Jul
6
comment English equivalent of the Italian “Mannaggia!”, “Che peccato!”
@A_nto2: Ok, fixed.
Apr
30
comment Better way of saying “Go-to man”?
@helen melichar: My understanding is that the point person (actually a point man) is the one who "leads a charge" in the military. Is this the sense you want?