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location New York, New York
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visits member for 3 years, 5 months
seen 2 days ago

Sep
11
comment Why would the “wind blowing in the East” be considered a bad thing?
"The eastern wind, the Russian wind, is not so nice. When the eastern breeze flies through the trees, it's full of ice."
Aug
30
comment Is there any reason for saying “he is good-looking”, instead of “he is well-looking”?
@fdb: Yes, the combined word "goodlooking" is an adjective. But individually, looking is still the noun, and good is the adjective.
Aug
28
comment Is there a word for a non-geek?
@Philip: The British word that I was taught as the equivalent of "regular guy" is "sound fellow" (not normal).
Aug
23
comment Can someone explain the phrase “All is fair in love and war”?
"ongoing love between two people is akin to a battle." Or, as the song says, "Love is a battlefield.
Jul
27
comment Terminology for “New Yorker” vs “lives in New York”
I clarified the question and voted to reopen it in its current form.
Jul
27
comment Why do german speakers use word “moreover” more frequently than others?
"Word choice and usage" is on topic here. And the question is about why a group of people use the word "moreover" more often than other English speakers.
Jul
21
comment Word: Tacky Rich People/Trashy Wealthy People
"Nouveau riche" is French for "new money." And decades ago, there was an American TV show, the "Beverly (new-rich) Hillbillies" about this phenomenon.
Jul
20
comment A word for paying attention to detail
@MartinSmith: OK, fixed.
Jul
20
comment Word or expression for someone who intentionally says false statements to bring someone else down?
@Pete855217: Statements aren't made in a court of law (other than by the judge or the lawyers) except under oath. So everyone that lies in a court of law is a perjurer (that all perjurers are liars). I did not assert the converse (all liars are perjurers).
Jul
19
comment Why do you survive 'by the skin of your teeth'?
In "The Battle For Stalingrad," General Chuikov related how badly injured, "diehard" Soviet soldiers would pull grenade pins using their teeth, then "throw" them at the enemy with their remaining arms or legs.
Jul
14
comment Are there any names of food that are associated with political correctness other than Fried chicken?
Add "sushi" to the list. A friend of mine was slapped with a discrimination suit for calling a Korean-American subordinate "sushi."
Jul
11
comment Word for words that sound like the sound
FWIW, I vote for migrating this question to ELL.
Jul
6
comment What's the origin of the term “call” in card games?
@PeterShor: I'm not sure which came first, "the chicken or the egg." All I know is that they mean the same thing.
Jun
22
comment Someone who enjoys statistics
And an American equivalent is something like "stats geek."
Jun
19
comment What is the origin and meaning of conniption dido
Dido's actions would be described by many in OED terms: "a caper; a disturbance, ‘row’, ‘shindy’; esp. in phr. to cut (up) didoes.:
Jun
12
comment Context of “when?”
@ColinFine: That doesn't surprise me, but that's good to know. That would explain the notion of "upward mobility," which is more ingrained in the American psyche than elsewhere.
Jun
12
comment Context of “when?”
@FumbleFingers: Yes, "way back when" works. But there is an element of "way back when..." things weren't so good as today.
Jun
12
comment Context of “when?”
@fumbleFingers: Yes, "way back when" or "long, long ago."
Jun
12
comment Hypernym for “film” and “TV series”
@J.r.: And nowadays we have "internet videos," so we really need the hypernym.
Jun
11
comment What do you call the activities between actual work?
Interesting word, "ancillary." Derived from the Latin for slave, I believe. (This would be with reference to the e.g. administrative "duties," in relation to the main task.)