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Feb
20
comment I sightsaw London. Is this correct?
@Elian: "Six of one, half a dozen of the other."
Feb
20
comment I sightsaw London. Is this correct?
@Elian: That is ok also.
Feb
20
comment I sightsaw London. Is this correct?
This might be a better fit for ELL.
Dec
22
comment What is the origin of the phrase “Eastern Seaboard”?
@KitZ.Fox: "Three of their four" does NOT include Maine.
Dec
22
comment What is the origin of the phrase “Eastern Seaboard”?
@phoog: OK, changed it to "four" offshoots to include Kentucky.
Dec
22
comment What is the origin of the phrase “Eastern Seaboard”?
@phoog: Pennsylvania abuts on the Chesapeake Bay which leads to the Atlantic, close enough. I said it "faces" the Atlantic, not that it was "on" it.
Nov
10
comment Etymology of “corny”
"I'm as corny as Kansas in August, I'm as normal as blueberry pie."
Nov
10
comment Why did Napoleon III coin the term “Latin America”?
A Hapsburg could qualify as "Latin" because the Hapsburgs ruled Spain (in the 16th century).
Oct
2
comment What is the term for a Monarchy with only a King or a Queen, but not both?
I don't think it had to do with "tired of the strict monarchical system." More likely it was a result of William's Dutch army representing the balance of power in an otherwise English "civil war" between Mary II and her father James II.
Sep
25
comment What's a better way to say, “there wasn't much to do”?
@NeilFein I (an English Language user with some reputation), improved the question somewhat, giving it a chance for it to be accepted there. You might also try ELL.
Jun
14
comment What is the origin and meaning of conniption dido
Even my detractors concede that "some" sources support the theory of the connection with Dido the Queen of Carthage. They just choose not to believe them. I do. Just because pieces of information aren't readily available on the internet today doesn't mean that they aren't buried somewhere in "antiquity."
Mar
3
comment Is there an English expression from Latin for “in writing”, “written”, etc?
@SimonB: That's your contribution. I was just giving examples (of where to look.)
Mar
2
comment A way of describing the lesbian parent that is not pregnant?
That's a "modern" usage. I never heard it before 1990.
Feb
20
comment What is a common word that describes men who don't attract women
@dwjohnston: "Friend-zoned" is the linguistically correct, (although not politically correct) answer. This is an English, and not Politics site. +1.
Feb
20
comment What is the subject of a cynic called?
Answer: "Reality."
Feb
20
comment Noun for the quality of being a “femme fatale”
Actually I believe "femme fatality" came from me (see my comment to David Garner). John Lawler's comment was amended after the fact.
Feb
20
comment Noun for the quality of being a “femme fatale”
Not bad. An upvote. You (indirectly) suggested another one: "femme fatality."
Feb
20
comment Noun for the quality of being a “femme fatale”
@JohnLawler: Actually, my audience was a group of women, who applauded my comments (except the offender). It was a case of "all against one."
Nov
25
comment Is “the best thing since sliced bread” supposed to be taken sarcastically?
I remember hating "sliced bread" as a child (preferring rolls), so telling me that something was "the greatest thing since sliced bread" was a real "turn-off to me, even well into my adult life.
Nov
25
comment Teaching of smuh?
I made the question more objective by asking if teachers DO teach children such words, rather than "should" they, and wonder if it can be re-opened in its current form.