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I am an English teacher and a native speaker of American English.


Oct
29
awarded  Scholar
Oct
29
accepted Is there an incorrect use of “infer” in “Absalom, Absalom!”?
Oct
27
comment Is there an incorrect use of “infer” in “Absalom, Absalom!”?
@Robusto 初夢: yes, but I think this situation is different from those examples which I would consider "trivially nonstandard"; even when Faulkner omits punctuation or writes in dialect, his word choice in Quentin's stream-of-consciousness passages is usually standard and very precise.
Oct
27
comment Is there an incorrect use of “infer” in “Absalom, Absalom!”?
So did the modern reluctance towards using "infer" in this sense come to prominence after Faulkner wrote AA? Because, despite my reluctance to align myself with prescriptivism in this case, I can't imagine a modern writer of Faulkner's eminence would use (or be allowed to use) infer in this way.
Oct
26
awarded  Student
Oct
26
asked Is there an incorrect use of “infer” in “Absalom, Absalom!”?
Jun
22
awarded  Supporter
Jun
22
comment Origin of phrase “I slept at”
Though the sense is clear in the above example, a related phrase can cause some confusion: I have noticed that some non-native English speakers (primarily those whose first language is Chinese) will use "I slept late" to mean that they went to bed late, whereas to me "I slept late" can only mean that I woke up late.