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seen Jul 6 at 18:16

Jun
17
awarded  Nice Answer
Jun
7
awarded  Yearling
Jun
6
comment What is the etymology and reasoning behind the US Military term,“D-Day”?
Yep, though secrecy has been less important in the U.S. space program. :) In space launch sequencing, it's also common for the clock to get started and stopped prior to launch -- more than one hour might elapse between T minus 2 hours and T minus 1 hour. I believe after launch the clock isn't ever stopped, though.
Jun
6
answered What is the etymology and reasoning behind the US Military term,“D-Day”?
May
18
answered down the hall to the left
May
15
comment What is this “Nor”?
This construction is also used in Coleridge's 'Rime of the Ancient Mariner': "Water, water, every where/Nor any drop to drink."
Apr
17
awarded  Nice Answer
Jan
16
comment Meaning of “dog” in the “updog” joke
"Dog"/"dawg" meaning "friend" may have originated in AAVE but now is common slang among young American non-AAVE speakers.
Apr
22
comment What does “E!” mean in the phrases, a show “makes the debut Sunday E! sets in motion,” and “premiers on E! April 21”?
I assume "Jeah" is "yeah", yelled, as a loud and abrupt interjection, so that the 'y' turns into a 'dj' sound; American men performing hypermasculine bonding behavior (often associated with college fraternities) will make such a sound when their favored sports team scores a goal -- hence "frat-thusiastic", which is definitely not a term in wide use.
Mar
28
comment What is a gender-neutral alternative to the expression “man-days”?
What possible ambiguity is there in "people-days"?
Mar
8
answered When to use “nude” and when “naked”
Feb
24
comment Etymology of “half-assed”
I actually used "full-assed" in contrast with half-assed yesterday, but in a humorous way -- I don't think you'd be generally understood using it on its own.
Jan
16
comment Can we call something a “word” if it doesn't have a vowel?
A letter isn't a word any more than a tire is a car.
Nov
3
comment Is it appropriate to refer to a person of unknown sex by “it”?
I recommend the consistent use of "she" in cases where the gender of an example person is irrelevant, particularly in tech writing. Anyone startled or confused at the use of the feminine pronoun probably desperately needs to be startled or confused in that way. If you can't bring yourself to do so, use "they".
Nov
3
comment Is it appropriate to refer to a person of unknown sex by “it”?
"I think it's a little early to be imposing gender roles, don't you?"
Nov
3
comment Why does “it” have a dehumanizing connotation?
@Zairja - Transgendered people preferring "it" may exist, but they are extraordinarily rare compared to homosexuals who call themselves "queer". Do not call a transgendered person "it" unless they have explicitly asked you to. Ditto "queer" for that matter.
Oct
11
comment Friendlier way to express you paid for a person's drink/dinner and expect it to be paid back
Yes, this exactly. To some extent, one's a financial obligation and the other's a social obligation.
Jul
19
revised What does “way” mean in “no way”?
added 41 characters in body
Jul
19
answered What does “way” mean in “no way”?
Jul
12
comment How to avoid ambiguity in “I am renting an apartment in New York”?
Complements aren't antonyms, are they?