1,589 reputation
49
bio website kaldrenon.brandyourself.com
location Philadelphia, PA
age 26
visits member for 2 years, 10 months
seen 2 days ago

My name is Andrew Fallows - I hold a B.S. in Software Engineering from RIT. Currently on the job just outside Philadelphia. Particular areas of interest are programming languages and personal productivity, but I'm still very much in "learn everything, try anything once" mode when it comes to technology.

If you see the name 'kaldrenon' somewhere on the internet, odds are good it's me!


2d
comment Is there one word for both horizontal or vertical, but not diagonal, adjacency?
Fails the "one word" criterion, but considering the question I think of the word perpendicular, as well as the phrase "cardinally adjacent" (that is, adjacent in a cardinal direction).
Apr
16
comment What exactly is the difference between “misinformation” and “disinformation”?
Would this suggest that disinformation is a subset of misinformation (that is, all disinformation is misinformation, but not vice versa)?
Apr
15
answered What does this mean: To come in a close second or third
Feb
12
answered What is the neutral way of telling someone to “do whatever you want”?
Feb
7
comment This / that week
Both are technically correct but, if you are referring to the current week, using this is much more common and will be more easily understood.
Feb
6
comment In terms of betting, how would you say “You will get 5× in return if you win”?
The phrasing "five to one" implies that for every one you put in, you will get five back if you win (including your stake). This means that a bet of £1 at 5:1 returns £5. It doesn't matter if you exchanged money beforehand or not. If you put your 1 in before, you get 5 back including the 1. If you didn't put your 1 in before, you get 4 or pay 1 depending on victory. In a situation where one winner gets the pot, the odds are N:1 where N is the number of players (assuming all players ante the same amount).
Jan
31
answered “So many weapons and armor!” What is wrong with this sentence? And how would one fix it?
Jan
31
answered “Thus” vs. “so” in formal English
Jan
31
answered “I didn't know you liked her” or “I didn't know you like her”
Jan
24
comment How do students respond to the “roll call” and how do you pronounce it?
@WS2 I'm reading "yoo gurt" with yoo pronounced like yew, do, or through. The most common pronunciation (at least in regions I've live in) pronounces 'yo' as in owe, know, or throw. If that's what you meant, then you've got it. We do not pronounce it the British way, in either case.
Jan
24
comment How do students respond to the “roll call” and how do you pronounce it?
@WS2 As an American, I've never heard anyone say "yoogurt'. At least in the Northeastern US (PA, NY, NJ, New England), roll is pronounced with o as in owe.
Jan
24
revised Be proud of vs Take credit for
suggested additional details to improve distinction between phrases; readability
Jan
24
suggested suggested edit on Be proud of vs Take credit for
Jan
22
revised Usage of “be able to”
formatting, clarify the question being asked
Jan
22
suggested suggested edit on Usage of “be able to”
Jan
22
comment What's the word for HTML Coder profession?
That would make sense as a description for a position like the one described in the question, if one existed. Because it doesn't exist, this phrase is not already a known/developed term for a job.
Jan
22
comment Which is correct, “shot with an iPhone” or “shot on an iPhone”?
To be honest, I don't think I'd bat an eye at either wording. Both are grammatically correct, and both are semantically meaningful.
Jan
21
answered what does “shout cat calls at me” mean?
Jan
20
answered Pauses and Punctuation
Jan
20
comment Writing: Word vs. Character Count
This isn't significant, but I would find it somewhat interesting to compare a word count to a character count to get an estimation of my average word length. This would only work if the char count didn't include spacing and punctuation, though, and I suspect those are included, so that might not help much.