1,857 reputation
1610
bio website kaldrenon.brandyourself.com
location Philadelphia, PA
age 27
visits member for 3 years, 6 months
seen Dec 21 at 20:50

My name is Andrew Fallows - I hold a B.S. in Software Engineering from RIT. Currently on the job just outside Philadelphia. Particular areas of interest are programming languages and personal productivity, but I'm still very much in "learn everything, try anything once" mode when it comes to technology.

If you see the name 'kaldrenon' somewhere on the internet, odds are good it's me!


Dec
7
awarded  Great Answer
Sep
12
comment What is the word for somebody who does action/is action owner
The accepted answer more directly suits the exact question you asked, but I would add that if the Actor is always a registered user of the system, it will be more clear in your log if you refer to them as User instead of Actor.
Aug
28
answered Meaning of “by” when used with dates - inclusive or exclusive
Jun
21
awarded  Yearling
Jun
20
comment Is there an adjective for someone who can withstand ridicule?
Like @DigitalChris I'm not familiar with a connotation of callousness for the term thick-skinned. I consider it a perfect fit for your context, and tend to regard it as a compliment to people who can endure criticism or ridicule.
Jun
17
answered “Have been through” or “have gone through”?
Jun
17
comment What is the opposite of Optimal?
I agree that worst is probably a good choice, especially with its much higher extent of common usage. Optimal means something like "Most suited to the task/situation", therefore the word desired (and the accepted answer, pessimal hits this on the head) must be one which means "least suited to the task/situation". Worst doesn't mean exactly that, but it's close enough to be suitable, and much more common.
Jun
16
awarded  Constituent
Jun
9
awarded  Caucus
Apr
18
comment Is there one word for both horizontal or vertical, but not diagonal, adjacency?
Fails the "one word" criterion, but considering the question I think of the word perpendicular, as well as the phrase "cardinally adjacent" (that is, adjacent in a cardinal direction).
Apr
16
comment What exactly is the difference between “misinformation” and “disinformation”?
Would this suggest that disinformation is a subset of misinformation (that is, all disinformation is misinformation, but not vice versa)?
Apr
15
answered What does this mean: To come in a close second or third
Feb
12
answered What is the neutral way of telling someone to “do whatever you want”?
Feb
7
comment This / that week
Both are technically correct but, if you are referring to the current week, using this is much more common and will be more easily understood.
Feb
6
comment In terms of betting, how would you say “You will get 5× in return if you win”?
The phrasing "five to one" implies that for every one you put in, you will get five back if you win (including your stake). This means that a bet of £1 at 5:1 returns £5. It doesn't matter if you exchanged money beforehand or not. If you put your 1 in before, you get 5 back including the 1. If you didn't put your 1 in before, you get 4 or pay 1 depending on victory. In a situation where one winner gets the pot, the odds are N:1 where N is the number of players (assuming all players ante the same amount).
Jan
31
answered “So many weapons and armor!” What is wrong with this sentence? And how would one fix it?
Jan
31
answered “Thus” vs. “so” in formal English
Jan
31
answered “I didn't know you liked her” or “I didn't know you like her”
Jan
24
comment How do students respond to the “roll call” and how do you pronounce it?
@WS2 I'm reading "yoo gurt" with yoo pronounced like yew, do, or through. The most common pronunciation (at least in regions I've live in) pronounces 'yo' as in owe, know, or throw. If that's what you meant, then you've got it. We do not pronounce it the British way, in either case.
Jan
24
comment How do students respond to the “roll call” and how do you pronounce it?
@WS2 As an American, I've never heard anyone say "yoogurt'. At least in the Northeastern US (PA, NY, NJ, New England), roll is pronounced with o as in owe.