Reputation
Top tag
Next privilege 250 Rep.
View close votes
Badges
4
Impact
~5k people reached

  • 0 posts edited
  • 1 helpful flag
  • 22 votes cast
Jan
24
comment Why is “any ancient civilization” supposedly wrong in this sentence?
Well, perhaps you'll judge me a pedant, but “in it's rightful place” does seem ungrammatical. ;-)
Oct
27
comment Is “to boil down” formal enough to be used in scientific writing?
I've seen it several times in very well written mathematical papers.
Sep
4
awarded  Citizen Patrol
Dec
9
comment When should I not use a ligature in English typesetting?
I don't believe that Knuth was thinking to a rule: he just says that "shelfful" looks better without a ligature. And adds that it's a rare word.
Dec
9
comment When should I not use a ligature in English typesetting?
It has examples of words with two ligatures: fluffier firefly fisticuffs, flagstaff fireproofing, chiffchaff and riffraff. Notice "fluffier" and "fireproofing" where you would not ligate the ff in the former and the fi in the latter.
Dec
9
comment When should I not use a ligature in English typesetting?
I'm not sure that suffixes constitute what you call a "morpheme". Exercise 2.3 of the TeXbook shows quite different rules from yours. :)
Dec
5
comment When should I not use a ligature in English typesetting?
Can you show examples where a non final "ff" doesn't span two syllables?
Dec
5
comment When should I not use a ligature in English typesetting?
Also in "efficient" the syllables are "ef-fi-cient", but the ligature is used. You probably meant a ligature spanning components of a compound word.
Oct
3
awarded  Supporter
Aug
1
comment Origin of “zero”
@ShreevatsaR The acceptance of zero as a number came way after Fibonacci. Until the 17th century there were great mathematicians who didn't accept negative numbers other than "tricks for computations".
Jul
1
awarded  Teacher
Jun
21
answered Origin of “zero”
Jun
21
awarded  Autobiographer