35,121 reputation
15137247
bio website stackexchange.com/users/…
location Pennsylvania
age 18
visits member for 3 years, 1 month
seen yesterday

“There are moments, Jeeves, when one asks oneself, 'Do trousers matter?'"
"The mood will pass, sir.”


Jul
28
awarded  Famous Question
Jul
24
revised Is “Daily Sport Stream” grammatically correct as a website name?
added 1 character in body; edited title
Jul
24
comment What meaning does “hardly” impose in this context?
Did you look the word up in a dictionary? It's hard to answer properly unless we know what you already understand.
Jul
21
revised What word can fulfill the most parts of speech?
added 2 characters in body
Jul
20
awarded  Popular Question
Jul
20
accepted Why is saying “cr@p” more socially acceptable than saying “sh!t” is?
Jul
20
comment Why is it “have someone wrapped around your LITTLE finger”?
Um, why downvote? What part of "does not show any research effort; it is unclear or not useful" applies to "this question"?
Jul
19
awarded  Notable Question
Jul
14
comment Is there a word for a comment which makes no sense or adds nothing to the current discussion?
@stephenbayer: The definition given here is correct: does not follow. The statement may have subject matter in common with the conversation and still be a non sequitur.
Jul
12
reviewed No Action Needed “obstacle to developing '” vs “obstacle in developing”?
Jul
12
reviewed Looks OK English equivalent of komorebi (木漏れ日) — “sunshine filtering through leaves”
Jul
10
reviewed No Action Needed Single word for thing which will never repeat in life
Jul
10
reviewed Looks OK Does “clandestine ignorance” make sense?
Jul
7
comment Why is saying “cr@p” more socially acceptable than saying “sh!t” is?
I like your answer, but it doesn't address the specific history of crap/shit, why one is more vulgar.
Jul
6
comment Can you “regret” someone else's action?
OK, that's a reputable source. In the interim here, I also remembered that the noun regret might bear more of this usage than the verb, in the phrase "to the regret of". It sounds quite natural to me to say "The teacher had to cancel the pageant, much to the regret of the students."
Jul
6
accepted Can you “regret” someone else's action?
Jul
5
comment Can you “regret” someone else's action?
@Kris yes you could replace regretted with resented, but that would mean something different. Resentment is not sorrow or remorse.
Jul
5
comment Can you “regret” someone else's action?
I'm not sure I follow you; I'm not looking for a better word, I'm asking about regret. Is the usage I exemplified up there a correct usage?
Jul
5
comment Can you “regret” someone else's action?
I know it's rare, but are there any sources to cite on the precise usage of regret, or must I understand it's allowed but unused?
Jul
5
asked Can you “regret” someone else's action?