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Mar
31
comment What do you call the the effect that causes people to miss the “the the” in this title?
I had forgotten until this minute that the movie "Attack of The The Eye Creatures" has exactly this same error in its title.
Mar
10
comment A word or idiom for being offended for someone else
@Benjol, right - I was slightly unclear. I have noted a tendency to assume offense was taken when a solecism is mentioned when in fact the motivation was only dispassionate editorial observation. "That term is kind of mean." "Oh, and when did you become the enforcer of standards?" and so on.
Mar
9
comment A word or idiom for being offended for someone else
I'd note that most of the terms proposed here are implicitly stating that pointing out that a term is disparaging is inherently unreasonable to do. It is perfectly possible to observe that a term being used - "trailer trash" as the provided example - is generally considered to be insulting or judgmental without being angry or upset about it.
Sep
24
comment Is “rare anomalies” correct to use?
If you were speaking about software, "frequent anomalies" would mean "this is seriously buggy and acts weird a lot"; "rare anomalies" would mean "every once in a while it does something strange" - so that usage seems reasonable.
Sep
16
comment Which is correct: 'leaving at…' or 'leaving by…', '..end of this week'?
Or to put it another way, "by the end" declares an open interval finishing at the end of the week, during which you might leave at any time. "At" declares a point at which you will leave, not before.
Sep
11
comment Did “courage to work” used to mean “must be willing to stay sober during working hours”?
Having lived through that period, I call shenanigans.
Jun
26
comment What quality does a person lack who cannot understand another's point of view?
This doesn't speak to the inability to see the other person's viewpoint; it merely implies that the person has a set of values that aren't easily influenced from the outside. An inner-directed person could strongly have the value that "considering the needs of others is important", and be hard to shake on that; an other-directed person might think this but be shaky on it because all the cool kids are stealing bikes.
Jun
24
comment Why is white noise called 'static'?
Further searching finds the Free Dictionary in agreement: "Interference or noise, such as crackling in a receiver, produced when static or atmospheric electricity disturbs signal reception."
Jun
24
comment Why is white noise called 'static'?
All I have is conjectures; this is a fascinating question! My guesses are: the noise doesn't change, so it's "static"; static electricity discharges cause radio noise, so the continuous noise was called "static". Last guess: this is a "standing", unchanging noise, so it's "static". There seem to be no good online etymologies that address this.
Jun
19
comment What's the name of this boat?
The cormorants definitely have the rings around their necks, so he's a cormorant fisherman for sure.
Jun
18
comment Reduce the number of characters in a sentence
Actually, let's back up a step. Why are you trying to save characters?
Jun
18
comment Reduce the number of characters in a sentence
You've made it ambiguous. Are these people experts in Sweden's economy, or are they economic experts who happen to be in Sweden?
Apr
21
comment Finding Grammatical Error In A Model SAT sentence
Yes - as a caption, there's an implied "This is" as a subject and verb.
Oct
8
comment Active or passive?
Sven, yes, that is probably more technically correct than my choice. I struggled with rewording that and went for the description that focused on the paper rather than its contents, as I felt that the scene-setting was more critical.
Oct
2
comment Active or passive?
I think you're right, and thanks for the correction.
Jun
20
comment Is “can exceed up to X” some form of colloquialism?
Agreed - this is "I am trying to write legalese to sound official and have blown it badly".
May
28
comment What's the origin of the idiom “to cut your teeth on something”?
Yep, agreed - it's the same "from early on" meaning. Thanks!
May
23
comment Capitalization of “sister” and “brother”
This is correct when they're being used as honorifics, as you say, but I think @Barmar's answer is closer to what the original question was trying to resolve.
May
23
comment What's the origin of the idiom “to cut your teeth on something”?
I'd be interested to see the usage in question, which seems very unusual.
May
12
comment A word for a book or list of people that you need to contact
No, the Rolodex (as I remember them) was contact organization only, so maybe not exactly applicable. I do remember my older co-workers at NASA using a pocket calendar to remind them who to call, but keeping the name and phone number (this was pre-email) in their Rolodex so they'd not lose track of it.