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seen Oct 11 at 2:42

May
12
comment A word for a book or list of people that you need to contact
No, the Rolodex (as I remember them) was contact organization only, so maybe not exactly applicable. I do remember my older co-workers at NASA using a pocket calendar to remind them who to call, but keeping the name and phone number (this was pre-email) in their Rolodex so they'd not lose track of it.
Apr
28
comment Relative Clause Extraction from Subordinate Clause - Compare and Contrast These Sentences
I'd be interested to know why this answer was downvoted.
Apr
17
comment Common ground between Deck and Graveyard in trading card games
I might suggest CardStack.
Apr
15
comment Polite way to suggest talking about something
A more colloquial way might be "That reminds me of a flying cat - want to hear about it?" More formally "would you like to hear about it?" "It" is the choice if you're talking about a particular flying cat - "Would you like to hear about that?" is better if it's a topic instead of an example.
Apr
15
answered Polite way to suggest talking about something
Mar
4
comment Where would the commas go in a sentence like this?
Good explanation of what I left out!
Feb
28
answered Where would the commas go in a sentence like this?
Feb
28
answered Relative Clause Extraction from Subordinate Clause - Compare and Contrast These Sentences
Feb
20
comment “In case” or “in cases”?
And don't forget to vote for your preferred answer; helps the next person along who's searching.
Feb
20
comment A word for a book or list of people that you need to contact
Woops! So I should. Short explanation and link added.
Feb
20
revised A word for a book or list of people that you need to contact
added 208 characters in body
Feb
18
awarded  Critic
Feb
18
answered A word for a book or list of people that you need to contact
Feb
18
answered “In case” or “in cases”?
Feb
13
comment Use of plural pronoun to avoid mentioning of gender
And despite the "meaning" of the word "they" being singular, it is a plural syntactically, so it requires a matching plural verb - "they get", not "they gets".
Feb
13
comment Use of plural pronoun to avoid mentioning of gender
It's amazing how complex the concepts these words actually hide! The ambiguity comes from misinterpreting the "they" of the "what they get" as referring to "everybody" as a whole; this is a singular "they", meaning it applies to a single person - one member of the set "everybody". "Pays" is plural, because the number of members of the set named "everybody" is assumed to be at least two. So the final meaning is "each member of the set "everybody" pays (note the plural, we assume more than one element in this set by definition) the appropriate amount for whatever that person (singular) gets".
Feb
8
awarded  Commentator
Feb
8
comment Use of plural pronoun to avoid mentioning of gender
They are not the same actor. "Everybody" is "each individual member of the set of all people" and "they" is "every member of the set of persons who get something".
Feb
4
answered Use of plural pronoun to avoid mentioning of gender
Aug
5
comment Usage of verb “sounds” in written text, when not referring to an actual sound or sounds
I agree with FumbleFingers - with the one note that if you're writing to someone who knows you well, and you tend to prefer a particular sensorial mode, use that one, as it will read more like you writing = so I very often will say something like "Sounds great - see you at 7."