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visits member for 2 years, 10 months
seen Apr 17 at 1:32

May
1
answered Where does the “I brake for” idiom come from?
Oct
16
answered Word or expression for comments that are technically correct but unhelpful
Oct
16
comment Word or expression for comments that are technically correct but unhelpful
From "periphery", the outer part or edge - essentially, "out on the edge", so a very good choice here.
Jun
29
comment Give Signs Of Uncertainty
Or "There are too many uncertainties in this project."
Jun
29
answered “Style Cream”: what is it?
Jun
17
awarded  Yearling
Apr
14
answered Difference between “purpose” and “goal”
Apr
14
answered What's a better word to use instead of “nicheification”?
Apr
14
comment Meaning of “I'm kind of on a clock here”
In New York English, especially informally spoken (specifically a Brooklyn accent), a "the" following a word ending in "n" will often be pronounced as if it were n-schwa, giving the resultant sound of, "Hey, I'm onnuh clock here," with an emphasis on "clock" and a rising tone from "on" to "clock".
Mar
9
comment What does “slicker than snot on a doorknob” mean?
It's likely, as tchrist notes below, that the original alliterative substance was bowdlerized to "snot".
Mar
9
comment Looking forward
To me, "Look forward" describes a static continuous state; "looking forward" is more transient. "I'm looking forward to your call, but if someone shows me a LOLcat I'll probably forget about it."
Jun
24
revised Can a noun (such as “duct tape”) be used as a verb?
Corrected punctuation, added a couple similar examples.
Jun
24
answered What's a Denver accent sound like?
Jun
24
suggested suggested edit on Can a noun (such as “duct tape”) be used as a verb?
Jun
24
comment Is “guy” gender-neutral?
In Texas, you've got the "y'all" equivalent. I sometimes find myself using this instead of "guys", even though technically I grew up above the Mason-Dixon line by a few miles.
Jun
23
answered What is the meaning of “drains” in here?
Jun
21
comment Intention of rising pitches
Yes, the "are you listening" pitch is approximately a whole step; the "frustrated" pitch shift is a fourth or fifth; the "uptalk" pitchshift is often nearly an octave.
Jun
20
answered When to use “I was … ” and when “I had been … ”?
Jun
20
awarded  Supporter
Jun
20
answered “When the internet first got kicking”?