Unanswered Questions

7
votes
2answers
147 views

Can we contract plural nouns with present perfect?

In either in writing or speech, can we contract plural noun with the present perfect? For example, can we say or write: The children've eaten.
4
votes
0answers
69 views

Hyphenation of tidally enhanced wind mass loss

I am correcting my thesis on stellar evolution, and I was wondering what the correct hyphenation of 'tidally enhanced wind mass loss' is. The meaning of it should be mass loss originating from a wind, ...
3
votes
7answers
118 views

What is an appropriate term for being habitually put down by criticism?

When people you encounter tell you that No, you will never be successful. You suck at everything. You're a failure to society. etc. And you are terrified of the fact that they may be right, ...
3
votes
0answers
110 views

A single vs a double consonant issue.

According to The Grammarist: till, until and 'til: Till, as a variant of until, is a preposition meaning up to the time of. Till—not ‘til, an unnecessary abbreviation—has been in the language ...
2
votes
0answers
73 views

Non-standard British use of possessive “me”

Native North American speaker here. It's fairly common in certain British dialects to substitute "me" for "my" (Shiver me timbers) in informal speech. My impression is that some speakers mix the ...
2
votes
1answer
62 views

Using “that” before pronouns

I seem to have a problem with using the word "that" before pronouns and have been told that it is wrong. Examples: They were playing a piece of music that they had only heard once before. I ...
2
votes
0answers
55 views

Can 'surgery' be a count noun in the sense of 'medical procedure'?

This is something that has bothered me for a long time. Several years ago a remember noticing in the media a shift from using "An operation" to "A surgery" when talking about someone who was ...
2
votes
1answer
46 views

Adjective for someone that tries to gloss over past insults?

This person would say things that wound you and then after an hour she comes to you all smiley and tries to make up for the things she said. Not in a serious manner but really lightheartedly, saying ...
2
votes
0answers
44 views

Should a phrase which is the subject of a sentence or paragraph be quoted?

From the Grammarist website: In a manner of speaking is an idiom that means the same as ‘in other words’ or ‘so to speak’. They've bolded the phrase which is the subject of discussion, but ...
2
votes
0answers
59 views

When to use 'al' in front of 'Qaeda'?

I've noticed over the years that certain publications use 'al' in front of 'Qaeda' in certain situations, and others do not. From the little I know, I understand that 'al' is the definite article in ...
2
votes
1answer
103 views

Length of English sentences in comparison to German ones

Today I've heard that when writing an English text, I should try not to use too long sentences. Not because they are easier to write without grammatical mistakes, but because it'd be typical for the ...
2
votes
1answer
41 views

Research on idioms with similar meaning

Could anyone point me to research papers discussing idioms with similar meaning? Are there any algorithms on how to search for a similar idiom? For example, these idioms are somewhat similar - they ...
2
votes
2answers
56 views

Etymology of “amoral”

Many internet sites (like this one) say that the word amoral was coined by Robert Louis Stephenson (1850-1894) as a differentiation from immoral. The thing that is unclear to me is that these sites ...
2
votes
2answers
69 views

Is “have/has got” a perfect for BrE, but not AmE?

In BrE the past participle of get is in most cases got, while in AmE it is almost always gotten. Does that imply that in the context of BrE "have/has got" is a genuine perfect construction, whereas ...

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