Unanswered Questions

14
votes
0answers
719 views

Graphotactics of possessive: the true reason for the apostrophe

I have some hypotheses for English graphotactics: 〈w〉 and 〈y〉 are optional positional variants (i.e. allographs) of 〈u〉 and 〈i〉, respectively, in digraphs that correspond with diphthongs or vowels: ...
10
votes
0answers
729 views

Dictionary of English constructions

There is a family of grammars called construction grammar that started perhaps in the 80s with the work of Fillmore & Kay among others. Examples of constructions include: the time + away ...
5
votes
4answers
646 views

Expression for two people whose similar personalities makes it difficult for them to get along?

I am aware of the concept of "personality clash", when two people can't get along because their natures are too different, but what is it called when two people can't get along because their ...
4
votes
2answers
47 views

Antonym for 'bound'

What is the opposite of the term London-bound (meaning heading/travelling to London) - i.e. moving away from London?
4
votes
5answers
250 views

What is the origin of the phrase, “I'm Game”

I'm trying to understand the origins of the phrase, "I'm game". Now, I understand how the phrase is used in everyday English, but what are the origins of this phrase? How did it come to imply a ...
3
votes
0answers
14 views

On the origin of 'blizzard '.

Blizzard is probably the most used word to indicate a violent snowstorm. Despite its popularity the etymology of the term is quite unclear. Some well-known sources hint at its onomatopoeic sound as ...
3
votes
3answers
144 views

Is “I am not about this week” correct

We had an English test today and the correct answer to one question was "I am not about this week. I work in Romania" Is this correct and if yes what does it mean?
3
votes
3answers
70 views

time spent, places been

Is "time spent, places been," in the following sentence grammatically correct and if so, is that usage common? I take it to mean "time she had spent and places she had been to." Maynard is ...
3
votes
2answers
108 views

the verb 'declare' without a person who declares

Someone declares that the changes are aimed at combating untimeliness and incompleteness in [name of tax] tax assessment and withholding by tax agents. How would you express the said idea without ...
3
votes
4answers
135 views

Even though + Adverb usage

I'm not sure if these sample sentences below are grammatically incorrect, but they sound very odd to me. I couldn't see the man even though actually he was there. He still got hit even though ...
3
votes
3answers
202 views

How does the word “gas” relate to cheating and deception?

According to A Collection of College Words & Customs by Benjamin Homer Hall, written in 1856 I believe, gas is defined as cheating or deceiving someone. Any ideas why that may be?
2
votes
0answers
51 views

Spelling of one syllable changes pronunciation of another

I've been fascinated by word pronunciations where changing the spelling of one syllable doesn't change its pronunciation, but rather changes another syllable in the word. The only two examples I can ...
2
votes
1answer
47 views

Which one is correct “Facilitate easy operation” or “Facilitate operation”?

The dictionary says Facilitate means ease and I have seen many people using facilitate easy operation, facilitate easy learning etc. What is the correct usage??
2
votes
2answers
60 views

Plural or singular noun when it refers to two things in a list

I wonder which of the two is correct: I have a red and a blue car. I have a red and a blue cars. or Everyone has a left and a right arms. Everyone has a left and a right arm. ...
2
votes
2answers
72 views

What's the official rule regarding use of “welcome” versus “welcomed”?

Which is correct, and why?: Growing my business has been a welcomed challenge. OR Growing my business has been a welcome challenge.

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