Unanswered Questions

7
votes
4answers
256 views

“As I am wo/man” in Twelfth Night, II, 2 (Shakespeare): a case of indefinite article omission or no?

Are "As I am man" and "As I am woman" in Shakespeare's Twelfth Night, II, 2 examples of indefinite article omission or not? This question is (e)specially directed towards those familiar with ...
6
votes
1answer
124 views

Where does “contango” come from?

Contango is a very common term in financial business that originally referred to: (on the London stock exchange) a fee paid by a buyer of securities to the seller for the privilege of ...
5
votes
2answers
59 views

The “wrought /wreaked havoc” misunderstanding

According to the American Heritage Dictionary: the past tense and past participle of the verb to wreak is wreaked, not wrought, which is an alternative past tense and past participle of work. ...
5
votes
6answers
100 views

In sentences with “too” and “enough” what word does the to-infinitive modify?

When a to-infinitive is used with words like "too" and "enough" what word does it modify? For example The animal moves too quickly to be captured. The bag is too heavy to lift. He is ...
5
votes
0answers
123 views

Why does “alcohol” end with /ɔl/ for some American speakers? Which ones?

For American English speakers, the written sequence "ol" usually corresponds to the pronunciation /oʊl/ (like in cold), /oʊ/ (like in yolk), or /ɑl/ (like in collar); or to /əl/ when unstressed (like ...
5
votes
0answers
116 views

Why is the transliteration of names so strange at the beginning of Genesis?

Many names in the Old Testament are transliterated and used today. The names from later books -- such as Jonathan (Yonatan), Samuel (Shemu'el), and Joshua (Yehoshu'a) -- all seem to follow basic rules ...
5
votes
4answers
187 views

“From hands, I pray, will never bereave”

When someone dear serves you a drink or a cup of tea/coffee, the recipient may offer this polite saying. It's very difficult to translate it to English. It should be something like: "From hands that I ...
5
votes
4answers
141 views

Is there a term for using one language's syntax with another's words?

I'm trying to remember a word the Mac OS X Word of the Day screensaver showed me a few days ago. It's something along the lines of "using one language's words with another's syntax or grammar". This ...
5
votes
1answer
231 views

How does the present participle work in a sentence like “He is seven feet tall, making him the tallest person in the room.”

I am unsure of what usage the present participle uses in a sentence like "He is seven feet tall, making him the tallest person in the room." I checked the wikipedia article for participles ...
5
votes
4answers
394 views

Indirect object? Direct object? In active voice? In passive voice?

The following sentence has an active voice verb and an indirect object (IO) me and a direct object (DO) book: "Jeff gave me a book." As I understand, a passive voice verb comprises (1) a form of the ...
5
votes
3answers
300 views

Do you capitalize “My Queen” in dialogue?

I've seen some questions discussing the capitalization of "queen" in general, but I'm wondering if you would ever capitalize the "my" in "my queen," particularly in a line of dialogue such as "Very ...
5
votes
1answer
1k views

plural possessive form of a mutated plural?

Here are two examples of mutated plurals: more than one goose= geese; more than one man= men 1)Say you had 2 or more groups of geese. I.e. group #1= African geese & group #2=buff geese. If you ...
4
votes
1answer
59 views

Assessing Formality via the Root of the Word

Firstly, I'd point out that as this is a slightly open-ended question I'm not certain how well it fits in with the guideline. I'm hoping that the fact there's a way to define an answer means that it ...
4
votes
5answers
161 views

“Has a value of” vs. “has the value of”

The basic problem The following types of expressions are ubiquitous, especially (but not only) in scientific and technical literature; note the indefinite article in the construction "...has/with a ...
4
votes
2answers
149 views

Why does a pronoun as the predicate of an indirect object (e.g. “I gave her it”) sound wrong?

Forgive me if I've used the wrong terms in the title, I did my best given my middle-school grammar lessons and Wikipedia. "I gave her the book" sounds just fine, but "I gave her it" sounds stilted ...

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