New answers tagged

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When I used to help out in an Italian family-run restaurant in London, the coffees ordered by American tourists were either called acqua sporca ("dirty water") or acqua nera ("black water") by the waiters. Nowadays, long black coffees served in Italian restaurants might be called American coffee, or a long black. As for cappuccinos, if too much water (or ...


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As a speaker of American English, I would use the word weak to refer to the kind of coffee you describe. I might also call it watery or watered-down, but, while they mean the same thing, they're less common than weak in these circumstances.


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Cappuccino is diluted. Cappuccino is poor and weak. we can use both sentences.


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I’m thinking that you haven't asked quite the right question here, but I’m trying to figure out a better way to ask it. The bottom line is that of course it's a word, and to my mind also the right word to use here. As for something or someone telling you it wasn’t, I have to ask: Did an actual human being tell you it’s not a word, and was this person a ...


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The flip side means — TFD (Music, other) another term for B-side Now B-side means — TFD n (Music, other) the less important side of a gramophone record. Also called: flip side. It is the less important side because it has the relatively bad songs. That's the main idea. However, "the flip side" can also simply mean "on the other ...


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I don't particularly believe either are wrong. However, one does say "Software engineering firm" which gives the noun in its action, which is probably more valid and applies to the noun "intern" as well. Saying "Software engineer firm" will basically be a colloquial way of saying a firm full of software engineers. This may not apply to "Software engineer ...


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"In its own right" is an idiom meaning, roughly, "based on its own merits". You are right that it seems a little nonsensical in the quoted usage, but it means that the novel itself is excellent, and does not depend on, say, the reputation of the author to give it merit.


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As far as I know, none of the authors of the following examples are considered to be "first-rate" by anyone (which helps make whatever "evidence" that's contained below fall well short of the "best proof" that you seek), but I’m most familiar with hearing and seeing “fluke” used negatively when the subject is disappointing performances, grades, or test ...


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The OP said: To me, the best proof in support would be an example of the broader use by a first-rate writer Here is an example of fluke being used, first as an unlucky accident, and second, as a lucky accident. The quotation is perhaps too long, but it illustrates that the first speaker used fluke as unlucky, and the second as lucky. From E. ...


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It does mean exactly what it says. By contrast, here are some descriptions of novels that might not be excellent in their own right: It is an excellent novel for understanding the seventeenth century. It is an excellent novel for a beginning author It is an excellent novel for reading at the beach it is an excellent novel because it became such a great ...


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I think you can go into more detail when describing the fun experienced by describing how fun it is. For example, engaging can be used to describe that its not only fun, but maintaining your interest. When I write, phrases like having a blast can also flavor the text beyond "it was fun" and evoke certain impressions in readers. I have also personally come ...


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Use synonyms like: Joy. Merry. Mirth. Having a good time. Having an enjoyable time, or even "enjoying yourself".


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"Fairweather fan" does the trick in the case of a sports team. A person who is supportive of and enthusiastic about a sports team only when that team is performing well. "I've been rooting for the home team in their playoff run, but I'll admit I'm just a fair-weather fan." TFD


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You could call it a [help] vampire. From Urban Dictionary: A term used most frequently by chat room programmers for blood suckers who aren't interested in the functions or inner workings of a solution but rather the end result. They normally mask themselves in chat rooms pretending to ask for "help." See also: The help vampire problem and slash7.


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"Domestic" has more "family" connotations: it refers to the family home. For example, "Domestic violence" means "violence from one family member onto another". "residential" simply refers to where someone lives. "Residential" could refer to a care home, where old people live together for example. In this sense, using "domestic" with a refugee camp is ...


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"Damn" was considered a curse word in the 1930s, when the film "Gone with the wind" was released. The word is used in the final sentence of the film, and caused a lot of trouble with the censors at the time. My mother saw the film, and she tells me that a shock ran through the whole theatre when that sentence was spoken. It was a stunning end to what was to ...


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It may be stereotyping, but mainstream US family (e.g. television) audiences, in particular, seem to prefer euphemisms for common low-level "cursing" - so darned, heck, gosh, dang and all the way to freaking as a not-so-mild option. These remove some of the potential for offence in mainstream use, particularly where children might be present, and then almost ...


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Some people will be offended by it. So, there is a risk of causing offense. Conversely, some people might respond well to it, feeling that you are "speaking their language". Like any writer, you need to think about your audience, ie who will be reading your text, and adapt your language accordingly.


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It isn't technically wrong, but it's almost certain to be misunderstood by the listener. Consider instead: frugal (the opposite of wasteful) unassuming modest humble unpretentious


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They both sound okay to me. "Have" is okay, it seems, because it agrees with a second person singular "you", and each one of you is a "you" -- second person singular. This predicts that if I were addressing a person not in the group, since none of the group was addressed, "have" could not be used. Even though "have" is plural and there are several people ...


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beyond means on the far side of, they have passed through a state of reasonableness and out the other side. The phrase acknowledges that the person has known a state of reasonableness, English does have a concept of a person being 'beneath reason', but that would be a rarely used application for a person of restricted mental development who has never ...


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If one is 'beyond reason to deal with' then wouldn't this mean that they are more than reasonable to deal with? No, it means the person is beyond the point where it's possible to reason with them. Perhaps they're in a hurry, or drunk, or in a fever of pain, etc. "Below reason" is not used in English. If I'm less smart, then this could also mean ...


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As I had stated on my comment, time-frame is the difference. the word Always is an adverb that changes its meaning depending on how you use it on sentence. According to cambridge the word Always can be: Every time: every time or all the time: It's always cold in this room. 2 Forever: for ever: I'll always remember you. 3 Until now: at all times ...


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The way I would read it is as the following: The fraction of Vishal's monthly income that he invested in stocks was 2/11, and the fraction he invested in mutual funds was 4/11. If the author prefers to include "that of," perhaps he'd word it like this: The fraction of Vishal's monthly income that he invested in stocks was 2/11, and that of mutual ...


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Dictionary coverage of 'terminate' and 'with prejudice' The phrase "with prejudice" is a legal term of long standing. Black's Law Dictionary, fourth edition (1968): offers this entry for it: WITH PREJUDICE. The term, as applied to judgment of dismissal is as conclusive of rights of parties as if action had been prosecuted to final adjudication adverse ...


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The word which is used in relative clauses: That's the car which I bought yesterday. Notice that the relative clause which I bought yesterday is giving us more information about the car in question. So we have a noun car, which is being postmodified by a relative clause. We say that the noun car is the ANTECEDENT for the relative clause. The relative ...


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meanwhile adverb (also in the meanwhile) In the intervening period of time: 'meanwhile, I will give you a prescription for some pills' 'President Eisenhower was furious and the Soviets, meanwhile, threatened to intervene on behalf of Egypt.' 'And in the meanwhile, they managed to reach the 2.6GHz frequency.' 'But in the meanwhile, ...


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I'm not a fluent English speaker and so my opinion might not be reliable, but I might provide a reasonable answer using my sole understanding and knowledge. Meanwhile means (as in the dictionary): "During or in the intervening time". While means (as in the dictionary): "During the time that". The actual difference it is that "while", when used an adverb is ...


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The following are three propositions but reworded slightly different. The first proposition is the OP's one Should any (whoever) employee of Company X be allowed to assume absolute authority in any (whatsoever) project with Company X's name associated? In other words, does it matter who has the authority in a project, as long as the person is an ...


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"...to add an extra point after many points have been written," the conjuction to use is not morever, but in addition or also. I subscribe to item no. 2 on this page Conjunctive Adverbs (#4): Showing Added Information to use moreover or furthermore "When the added information is stronger than the information preceding it." On the same page, you will find ...


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Your wording very strongly suggests; for any employee, e, and any project, p, e may assume absolute responsibility for p. If you mean anything else you should reword it.


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The question Should any employee of Company X be allowed to assume absolute authority in any project with Company X's name associated? does indeed permits at least two very different readings. To simplify the analysis, let's consider a similar question that uses any just once: Should any employee of Company X have the authority to turn off the ...


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Entering "alone" into http://www.oldenglishtranslator.co.uk/ comes up with a few: syndrig 1. separate alone single not joined with others distinct ánhaga solitary being lone dweller recluse one dwelling alone ánstapa lonely wanderer Further looking about comes up with usages, here's ánstapa in lines 12-15 of The Panther: ... Is þæt ...


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The term for software with faults is at the boundary between the specialized language used by software developers and the language used by everyone. Laymen and laywomen talk about bugs in software. Software developers will call a single software fault a "bug", software that doesn't have such faults "bug free" (although that happens only very rarely), ...


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in·form·ant inˈfôrmənt/ noun a person who gives information to another. another term for informer. In this case it would be plural informants I could be this single word choice. As informants take part in the "acting" of an investigation.


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The Corpus for NOW Data that may help in discovering the answer to your question were recently released at corpus.byu.edu. Among other corpora, the NOW Corpus (News on the Web), with data from 2010-2016, can be used to analyze use of 'hysterical' in the sense of "funny" in the overall middling-formal English commonly found in online newspapers and journals. ...


0

Hysterical comes from the medical Latin word hystericus, which described a female neurotic condition, thought to be caused by a dysfunction of the uterus. Hysterical is still used today by psychiatrists, though in a broader way, to describe someone suffering from a psychological stress condition. Hysterical can also mean "extremely funny," even more so than ...


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'TRON' is an early BASIC programming language debugging command, short for 'TRACE ON', which tells the computer to trace the programs run-time execution and report various variables back to the programmer. To turn the feature off, use 'TROFF'. See TRON command on Wikipedia


5

How common is the usage of the term hysterical meaning “funny” in BrE and AmE? It's fairly common in American English, less common than it used to be. Does hysterical actually carry a negative connotation as suggested in the above extract, or does it only convey a neutral meaning? Hysterical has never contained a negative connotation from my ...


0

A person can "go off the rails", which means they may have started to behave out of line, in an unacceptable way, or they are not conforming or performing to the standards expected of them (by society). Example: If a child starts skipping school and falls in with a bad crowd, you might say they have gone off the rails.


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Well as a naive speaker of American English I would write program. My colleagues from the UK, however, write programme. Our policy at this university is to tell the students that either British or American English is acceptable as long as the student is consistent. Having said that, the idea of one spelling being correct, really depends on the purpose of ...


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The only time I hear "bugged" used around software is when used as "DEbugged". For example, "She debugged my code." Code may be "buggy", not "bugged". Code may be "debugged", not "bugged". Code is never "bugged". Don't say that that. It's weird. Any examples to the contrary are examples of people doing it wrong. Tell them to stop. Don't follow their ...


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The comments from Phil Sweet and sumelic match my intuitive sense of the words and the definitions in my dictionary (Summary: impair = to weaken; impede = to obstruct). It's a clean distinction in theory. A car that is blocked by a boulder in the road is clearly impeded and not impaired. But in practice, I think it can be muddy, esp. as you get more ...


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I think that ubiquitous captures both meanings , timeless and placeless. ubiquitous - existing or being everywhere, especially at the same time; omnipresent: -http://www.dictionary.com/browse/ubiquitous


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The parallel construction placeless is a perfectly respectable word: lacking a fixed location indistinguishable from other such places in appearance or character -http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/placeless


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In the fine tradition of verbing nouns, software can "bug out". Naturally, the past tense of using "bug" as a verb, is "bugged". Software bugs out, or bugs up a process. I don't hear the term very often, but I have come across it. I've typically felt that such usage was rather informal. The word, used as a verb, simply means to experience/demonstrate a ...


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"Read" is two different words -- one pronounced "reed" and one pronounced "red". (I'll leave it to someone else to edit in the IPA if they wish.) The first means to scan text and interpret it as language. The second is the past tense of the first. But, in addition, the verb "read" (either version) can be used in a context where the subject is not the ...


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Unarguably- When you want to give a solid, definitive approach. Makes you sound more confident. Arguably- When you want to include all stances on an issue. Makes you harder to disagree with.


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I've been programming professionally for over 20 years, and I've never heard of "bugged" code... And as for bugs, my actual preferred term is "undocumented feature". :)


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Extension of Steve Cooper's point: Rank suggests an official title, whereas level suggests merely a certain degree of aptitude or the like. For example, a soldier is only a sergeant if they are recognised as such by the military. Poor soldiers can become sergeants and good soldiers can fail to do so. Contrast this with at least the most common use of ...



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