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0

It should be a 'Solecism' which means " a nonstandard or ungrammatical usage - e.g. "unflammable", or "they was"


0

The former example, "two types of user are identified", is correct. You should say "This type of user...", or "This color car...", or "This species of tree...", not "This type of users..." or "This color cars...", or "This species of trees." So then, the plural of "type of user" is "types of user".


2

It is very closely related to 'take to heart' and has largely been replaced by it. Ngram take to heart vs lay to heart It means 'to internalise'. Verb 1. internalise - incorporate within oneself; make subjective or personal; "internalize a belief" http://www.thefreedictionary.com/internalise


0

A shortcut I like to use, is to break it down to bare bones first, and then see which way sounds best. For example, "I was privileged with many opportunities..." is reduced to "I had chances" (of/for) "time with my profs." See? Clearly it sounds better as "I had chances for time with..." rather than "I had chances of time with..." Not exactly scientific, but ...


0

The word toilet is viewed by the speaker as a kind of reverse shibboleth. Its usage would mark one out as not belonging to the English aristocracy. There is no indication in the passage that there is any difference in meaning. In fact, quite the reverse.


2

Merriam-Webster's Dictionary of Synonyms (1984) includes explicate and expound—together with elucidate, interpret, and construe—in a group under the heading word explain. Here is its treatment of expound and explicate: Expound implies careful, elaborate, often learned setting forth of a subject in order to explain it (as in a lecture, a book, or a ...


0

"Explicate" from the Latin ex (out) + plicare (to fold), means to make clear and intelligible. "Expound" from the Latin ex + ponere (to put) means to explain. It's possible to expound (put your explanation out to an audience) but not so clearly that you explicate the matter (unfold the meaning) for your listeners.


4

It’s on the far side of the first–class lounge. It is indeed a matter of social class. For the historical background to the passage in your question, you might like to read about "U" and "Non U" language in this Wikipedia article which also includes the particular example from your passage. "U and non-U" was an entirely artificial construction of ...


4

In that passage, the speaker was referring to a class distinction in the usage of the words. He was saying, in essence, that an upper-class (hence upper-deck) Englishman would never use the crass word "toilet", he would always say lavatory (that's pronounced LAV-a-tree in British, LAV-a-Tor-ee in American). To use "toilet", in his view, marks one as being ...


3

Toilet (Online Etymology Dictionary): 1530s, earliest in English in an obsolete sense "cover or bag for clothes," from Middle French toilette "a cloth; a bag for clothes," diminutive of toile "cloth, net" (see toil (n.2)). Toilet acquired an association with upper class dressing by 18c., through the specific sense "a fine cloth cover on the ...


3

It would mostly mean that he'd like to be clothed or wrapped up in some garb,like in this case the bandage.My take is that either he is averse to seeing the food's naked passage through him or maybe seeing himself manifest by the presence of an article or cloth on him while eating psychologically comforts him.


1

"Tomorn" is still heard in the more rural parts of my native Shropshire, although mostly by an older gneration. It is taken to mean, specifically, tomorrow morning (and usually very early at that), and is not a substitute for "tomorrow". The OED has it listed as being near obsolete in literary English by 1500, revived in the mid-19th Century for poetic ...


0

Also Time described in relation to another time. Anniversary and birthday. An octave is the day which occurs one week later, A lunaversary occurs one month later. A Jubilee which is usually now 25yrs. The eve of a day is the day before. Also the four Seasons, or the Four Quarters with their Quarter Days: Spring, Summer, Autumn, Winter. An Equinox is the ...


-1

In addition to the comment by Hot Licks Semester can be used for a six month period: either of the two usually 18-week periods of instruction into which an academic year is often divided a period of six months http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/semester


0

Since quite refers to intensity and few/many refers to quantity, it is grammatically correct, but rarely used. Example I saw quite many cars parked" So you would use it instead of few to indicate the opposite


0

Google ngram viewer suggests the first instance of "quite many" in 1826, with a frequency of 0.0000000465%. In 2000, the recorded frequency is 0.0000007440%. So it's still a very rare usage, but appears to be on the increase. As you might expect, it's much less common than "quite a few". If it increases in frequency over the years, it will eventually become ...


-3

I've personally seen more cases of "quite a few", and I don't remember seeing "quite many".


1

If you're saying it took you too long to find the book, try Hofstadter's Law: It always takes longer than you expect, even when you take into account Hofstadter's Law. If you just want to point out that the universe works in weird ways, you can say Finagle's Law: The perversity of the universe always tends toward a maximum.


0


2

Pilot was at first the word for the helmsman of a boat and then transferred to the pilot of an aeroplane. See etymonline.


3

I would say the the word multitude makes sense in this context, being defined as: multitude (noun) A large number of people or things. However, in this sentence I think that the use of "vast" is a tautology, and you should use one or the other; rather, one or the other will suffice. Source: Oxford Dictionaries Online


0

Both of the options are grammatically correct but the first one is in my opinion slightly more colloquial. I would also be tempted to reiterate the word option as in: You can choose either option A or option B. Of course there are situation where one or the other will have slightly different connotations. For example if you say You can have either ...


0

The top of your body excluding your head is upper torso and the lower part of your body below your waist is the lower torso.


4

To specifically divide a (human) body you would need to draw a plane. The plane you are referring to is called transverse, axial or horizontal plane (they are synonyms). You can't go wrong if you say that this plane divides you into superior and inferior part (those are used as directions in the body). Cranio-caudal is also used to refer to direction in ...


1

From an etymological standpoint, verbal means 'pertaining to words' and oral means 'pertaining to the mouth'. The two can have different meanings in some cases (e.g. the other connotations of oral) but overlap in their common usage to mean spoken word. In this meaning, the two are synonymous and used interchangeably, as reflected by Oxford's definition of ...


3

Oral and Verbal: ( grammar.about.com) The adjective oral means pertaining to speech or to the mouth. The adjective verbal means pertaining to words, whether written or spoken (though verbal is sometimes treated as a synonym for oral). Usage notes: Oral communication is speech, conversation. Verbal ability is one's skill with words, ...


1

From an American English speaker's point of view, I would have phrased your second sentence as, "She and her husband had a perverse plan to spread cannibalism to others." To use perverted in a non-sexual sense but in a common comparative sentence, consider the following sentence. "The local culture of sharing burdens among the village was perverted by the ...


0

Small/large refer to size. One number is not smaller than another unless you are talking about font size. 2 is less than 1. You would use "lesser" in cases where "greater" would be appropriate in the reverse. 5 is greater than 4, so 4 is lesser than 5. But it would also be appropriate to say 4 is less than 5. Regarding debt, a debt of $2 is greater than a ...


0

It is not grammatically incorrect, although there is a lot of opposition to its use. Usually it is (in my humble opinion falsely) maligned as being non nutritional filler; ungraceful noise used to fill the period before someone is really ready to speak. What is probably irking you, is that you're hearing "so" as a conjunction apparently missing it's former ...


0

Actually, you're quite right about the ambiguity inherent in the word sorry. If you wanted to avoid the ambiguity, you can consider using the word sympathise in place of "sorry" when you want to connote that you don't feel personally responsible for the adverse outcome. Example: "I heard about you losing your job and I completely sympathise." Note that ...


0

It would help if you told us in what context you wish to use the word "corpus," but it's probably a bad idea to use it to mean an amount of money. The word is a legal term of art for the property held in an estate or trust. That's all property, real and personal, which includes many more categories than money. For a definition that the Internal Revenue ...


0

I don't know if it is a better use of sorry, but in the first way of using sorry, you can use upset instead. Example: "I'm really upset that your letter was lost in the mail."


0

It will be 'deliver'. Mindie has... strategies to maintain...and [to] deliver...service. The to before deliver is absent, but the verb remains an infinitive.


1

To my ear, either is fine depending on your meaning: 'Mindie has also cultivated strategies to maintain customer and distributor relationships and deliver extraordinary customer service' conveys that Mindie's strategies both maintain relationships and deliver customer service. 'Mindie has also cultivated strategies to maintain customer and distributor ...


-1

"none of them was" is correct as "none", when it stands for not-one, is considered to be singular. I think the confusion arises due to placement of "was" next to "them"; but "none" remains the subject in the sentence.


2

Context is key. You use hyphens when the compound words are really a single word that don't make sense by themselves. Suppose "month to month" modifies another word, as in: My lease is up, so now I'm on the month-to-month portion of the contract. You should hyphenate month-to-month because it becomes an indivisible adjective to describe portion. (You ...


0

Context is all important in defining how long "a while" might be (see other answers). Without any further context, in my experience it is most likely the phrase "a while ago" means "not recently". Example: "Have you just bought that big TV?" "No, I bought it a while ago." If you want an alternative phrase for "a few minutes ago" you could say "a ...


0

"Minute" and "while" both are nouns in the context as above. *Minute is the known factor of time,and to me,a bit prosaic and down-to-earth. **While, on the other hand, an uncertain period of time, duration of time with an additional sense of softness and mystery. "Minute" & "While" within the fencing of 'a few____ago' & 'a______ago' mean almost ...


0

It turns out that the combination is not an uncommon trope. The words in tandem get hundreds of thousands of hits in the google. Here's one that caught my eye from The Inspired Wisdom of Abraham Lincoln by Philip Ostergard: Admittedly, early Americans like Lincoln had a strategic advantage, entering a land with virgin forests and hills of minerals; a land ...


2

It will depend on how a person experiences that something. For example an amusement park thrill-ride definitely can be both. Same for bungee-jumping, parachuting, base-jumping, cave-diving. For the thrill-seeker extreme sports can be irresistible. The name for it? Challenge. [EDIT] About parachuting, there's an article here. From my personal experience, ...


0

As per their dictionary meanings are concerned, yes they are mutually exclusive. I can't imagine using them in the same sentence otherwise the sentence itself would sound paradoxical.


3

http://dictionary.reference.com/ defines while as: a period or interval of time: to wait a long while; He arrived a short while ago. There is no inherent duration - that must be determined from context. For example: The solar system formed a while after the big bang In which case while is about 10 billion years. The bus is due in a little ...


3

There is a Russian jargon term «децл», pronounced as /'dɛtzɘl/, which means exactly «a little» and is thought to be originating from the word «deciliter». Here's the Wiktionary page, which might be helpful if you either know Russian or are willing to feed the link to Google Translate. I doubt it's what you're looking for since this word is unlikely to be ...


1

In addition to confirming that lurk is a fairly negative term, I'm not sure whether "insights" can be used in this fashion either. There is, I think, a fundamental issue with your overall point. Traditionally, insights are of internal nature. They come from within as an intellectual discovery or awakening of understanding. As such, the idea of insights ...


23

Jargon, apparently. According to David A Cory (emphasis mine), Although not found in Dorland's Medical Dictionary, the term ditzel is universally recognized among radiologists as a very small nodule found in the lung. ... The origins of this word are obscure. The only similar word I could find, ditz, emerged in the 1970s to describe a silly or inane ...


2

As you mentioned, to lurk generally suggests the idea of something bad or thought to be bad. OLD suggests a usage, a more recent one, that does not necessarily have a negative connotation: [intransitive] (computing) to read a discussion in a chat room, etc. on the Internet, without taking part in it yourself. I think in your sentence, ...


5

From "The Yiddish Handbook": bissel Or bisl – a little bit. My mom used to use all kinds of Yiddish words that I thought she had made up. This one rang a bell with me. :-)


1

"In his letter he explains how the book has a great plot and is generally enjoyable." If it is a mere statement/assertion we would join the clauses with 'that'. But when the speaker does not stop simply mentioning its greatness or enjoyability, but goes on to elaborating or detailing some aspects of the plot and its ways of providing enjoyment in his ...


1

Polearm has a precise definition which sets it apart from spears and the like: A pole weapon or pole-arm is a close combat weapon in which the main fighting part of the weapon is fitted to the end of a long shaft, typically of wood, thereby extending the user's effective range. A pole-arm is differentiated from a spear in that the penetrating 'edge' is ...


0

I should start by admitting that although I can describe a usage distinction between Did you [verb] when [context]? and Have you [verbed] when [context]?, I can't explain exactly why it applies. Consider... 1: Did you ever go to the opera when you were a drunk? 2: Have you ever been to the opera when you were drunk? ...where #1 probably refers to ...



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