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You can find the verb "summerize" in the dictionary, meaning to prepare something for summer weather. A car made thus ready has been "summarized." No, wait a minute. I've summarized the description of a summerized car. (Thanks to StoneyB.)


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"Winterized" is a common word in AmE, often used to describe preparing a house or car for winter. But I've never heard its logical opposite, "summerized." An advertiser would most likely use a phrase like "get ready for summer," or entice you to "beat the heat" by purchasing their products or services. The fact that "summerize" is not in common usage ...


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Summerize and winterize. But hardly anybody does that anymore, at least where I live.


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In winter, we call it "winterized" or "winterizing", but we don't have a reverse for summer. Or if we do, I've never heard it in the US midwest. I believe most tune-ups for vehicles are implicit that they're done in summer, or done as routine maintenance, and it's only for winter that you need to put your snow tires on, and make sure your antifreeze is ...


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I don't think there is any definition of "slight" that would bind you to a mere two values, The OED definition, for instance, is Small in degree; inconsiderable: I don't read anything into this that would suggest that it's between two points only, merely that the degree of change is low. If you wanted to avoid ambiguity you could say something like ...


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No, 'slightly' doesn't work there. I think the word you want is 'gradually' gradually /ˈɡradʒʊli,ˈɡradjʊəli/ adverb in a gradual way; slowly; by degrees. "the situation gradually improved" synonyms: slowly, moderately, unhurriedly, cautiously, gently, gingerly, circumspectly, unspectacularly; More


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I've never heard it in the UK. It might have been influenced by an advertising campaign such as this.


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This is a common question in my ESL email writing classes. For some reason, students are very eager to be informal in emails. The usual reason is they want to sound "friendly." Formal writing just means clear communication. It is not unfriendly or heavy or serious or meant to express anger or hide true feelings, etc. Students also feel that in informal ...


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If we wrote each of the clauses in the first sentence as separate sentences and added the implied subject, "I," we'd have: I thank you for your time. I am looking forward to your response. In case (1), we only had to add "I," whereas in case (2), we had to add "I am." As such, I don't believe the sentence is correct. I think that this issue would, ...


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"Thank you for your time and looking forward to your response." For informal discourse, such as may appear in intra-office memos, I would say that this is fine. There is a stylistic problem when considering the two clauses about the conjunction, though. The verb for the first is in the simple present, whereas that for the second is in the progressive. ...


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In the US, the general rule is the ordinal form is based on the last element in the numeral. sixty-eighth one hundred twenty-ninth one thousandth one thousand-seventh This does not change when the discussing the denominator of fractions, regardless of whether the numerator is singular or plural one thirteenth one sixty-first ...


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Definitely a sixty-first and a sixty-second as far as I am concerned - no doubt about it. (Mid to South England) Not that either would come up very often!


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As someone with an above average command of English, I tend to prefer"problematics" in lieu of "the problematic." The first refers to all those questions pertaining to the theme. The second asserts that the question at hand "is problematic."


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It depends on the sentence, but in this case it appears to indicate that only a partial answer to the question is being given, as @snailboat suggested in a comment. Person 2 probably had lots of thoughts about the movie but only wrote a few words. Without the word 'well' the answer would suggest that they had no other thoughts about the movie.


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A sentence is a complete thought. When there is only one clause in a sentence (simple), and you begin it with a conjunction (Coordinate or Subordinate, Correlative, etc.), then you do not have a complete thought. I explained this in a comment and got 3 negative votes! Well, I guess this is why we need more sites like this one because the basic sentence is ...


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I believe the quotes you list are not merely anthropomorphism (aka personification/prosopopoeia). There's something else there, additional kinds of figure of speech: I think that in the language of rhetoric, these are transpositional rhetorical operations. Synecdoche is using a part of a thing to refer to the whole; such as referring to a singer by speaking ...


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the answer is simply anthropomorphism as Channel, and in a comment Sundar, have explained perfectly. Your misconception that anthropomorphism does not mean, what it means - is very simply a misconception. You have exactly the correct word, for the absolutely precise detailed sense you discuss. "It's that simple."


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It often happens that there is a Germanic word (to seem, German scheinen) and the Latin/French word (to appear. Latin appare:re, French apparaître). Both words mean the same, "to seem" is the common word, "to appear" a variant, a bit more elevated in style.


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Impression is based off the verb impress and is used as a noun form. To impress is to have a strong and favorable affect on someone; To have a strong a strong affect on someone could be done by charm or amusement. To host a party is to entertain as well. Several synonyms can substitute the meaning of to entertain depending on your use for the term. To ...


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It is actually one of the less known definitions of "impress". As a noun, one of its meanings is "the act of impressing". Although I have had little need to use it, I expect a sentence might look like: The candidate was interesting to watch quarrel, but effort behind his impress was palpable.


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At this late hour and advanced stage of the discourse, perhaps I should remain silent, yet... Background Dictionaries are by nature descriptive, not prescriptive. Lexicographers examine histories of usage to synthesize or 'distill' dictionary definitions from those uses...unless the lexicographer is a mere compiler of definitions from external sources ...


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We are veering into horse breeding terminology. "The foal is out of a mare and by a stallion" (Emphasis Added) http://www.chronofhorse.com/forum/showthread.php?55849-Breeding-Terms-Used-Incorrectly I made this an Answer instead of a comment only because I thought it important to alert the OP to the horse-breeding connotation of his wording. I thought ...


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Yes: You only get one chance to make a first impression.


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Among other things it is quite common and normal to associate the verb "want" with inanimate objects. For instance, one might say "The car wants to pull to the left," or "I tried typing 'glibnix' but every time I do it the computer wants to replace it with 'glibness'." Some folks insist that such statements are invalid syntax/semantics because "car" and ...


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An alternative to "anthropomorphism" is the word personification. It is almost identical in meaning to anthropomorphism, although perhaps a bit less technical. According to Literary Devices, personification is: Personification is a figure of speech in which a thing, an idea or an animal is given human attributes. The non-human objects are portrayed in ...


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Animism would apply to situations where an inanimate object is believed to possess will, choice, and motive. But that's hardly the right word for the linguistic practice you cited, where that which is authored by a human being (a paper, a function, a work of plastic art, music) is made the subject. We treat the created work as a proxy for the author, as ...


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You ask a lot in this question and the two answers at the time of writing address different things and I agree with them both (anthropomorphism would be an apt term for it). Neither addresses your final question: But when it comes to functions and articles assuming things or drawing conclusions, is it ever "OK", even in an informal sense? Yes it is. ...


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Anthropomorphism is not limited to physical appearance, and does not imply specifically a spiritual or soul element. The attribution of human characteristics or behavior to a god, animal, or object (Oxford Dictionaries) So I believe it is the right term.


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I appreciate your differentiation between metaphorical language, which few would question, and non-metaphorical writing. Two things are going on here. A teacher might question "Ultimately, our article draws the conclusion that X and Y is Z," because indeed, the article is not drawing the conclusion, the authors are. In a course in which the teacher's at ...


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This is interesting... (purely based on personal experience) When you scribble something, your brain does not need to be engaged on a conscious level - you may be checking to see if the pen works, or signing your name on 'autopilot'. "Scribble down" means, (IMO) the words that you are scribbling were "up" somewhere - maybe in your mind's eye, or, in the air ...


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The difference is one of intention. To scribble is to write quickly, often not very neatly. To scribble down is to write quickly, often not very neatly, with the intention of being able to refer to the information later. He scribbled on an envelope while on hold with customer service. He scribbled down the flight number and gate. The same difference ...


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If I were you, I would look for another job The speaker is suggesting that looking for a different job is something they would do today in that person's position. We do not know if the person being spoken to is currently working, or has recently found a new job. It's most likely the former; perhaps the person is unhappy at work; their salary is too low; ...


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You may use it. The bottom line in an account is seen as the most concise summary of all above it. By analogy, you may use the bottom line to mean the most concise summary of all your preceding argument.


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In American English, using "the bottom line" in that way would be perfectly understandable. The MacMillan Dictionary defines "the bottom line" as " the most basic fact or issue in a situation," which seems to apply in this situation.


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The first statement, If I were you, I would look for another job. suggests that the advised action is something that the person to whom the sentence is addressed can perform to beneficial effect right now. The second statement, If I were you, I would have looked for another job. implies that the action would have been appropriate in the past, ...


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While one can't be BORN by one's mother, all of us are BORNE by or of our mothers. One could, however, say that one was sired or begot by their father and BORNE by their mother, both of whom are their progenitors. Your examples: 1) I was born John Smith by Jane Doe and Dave Smith; 2) I was born John Smith by Jane Doe to Dave Smith – neither example is ...


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Google Books searches reveal various competing expressions that begin with "content is better than"—including ones that refer to each of the two main senses of content. By far the most common of these aphorisms is the one that Julie Carter identifies in her answer: Content is better than riches [or wealth]. According to W. Gurney Benham, A Book of ...


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AHD defines provenance as: the history of the ownership of an object, especially when documented or authenticated. Used of artworks, antiques, and books. The term is actually used to refer to he origin of words, mainly in academic contexts: From Education, Conviviality, and the Formation of Roman Readers: .. be reacting against what he ...


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'Content is better than riches' (Chinese proverb): Source: China.com The proverb is also seen written as: 'Contentment is better than riches', the first recorded citation being in 1566 Source: A Dictionary of American Proverbs. New York: OUP,1992 The saying may have originated from the Bible (New Testament): 'But godliness with contentment is great ...


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@jimreed is on the scent. Most English speakers are familiar with 'occur' etc., so when they need a word for the same thing happening more than once, they just follow standard (linguistic) English custom and put 're' in front of occur etc. Latin isn't taught much in schools today, so 're' in front of 'cur' ;-) isn't really an option that could occur to most ...


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The New Jersey Estate Law says a divorced spouse is considered predeceased to that of the testor. Therefore it is clear that predeceased can be used in conjunction with an event. In this case, a divorce was the event that regarded the spouse predeceased to that of the testor's death even though the spouse lived on past the testor's death. Alive ...


0

The adverb often belongs to a class of words called Adverbs of Frequency (like daily, weekly, yearly, sometimes, and rarely), words which indicate how frequently something happens. Words like daily describe DEFINITE frequency and are considered Adverbs of Definite Frequency, whereas words like often convey only an approximate or INDEFINITE idea of frequency ...


3

I don't know where you see "reply my mail". I don't encounter that in America. Some dictionaries show reply as only an intransitive verb (one that does not take a direct object). Some mention a_transitive_ usage, but only with a "that" clause (She replied that she was going to come.) http://www.thefreedictionary.com/reply Those that include a transitive ...


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Whether one uses often can be relative to how often a normal person does it. Normal people don't travel abroad twice a year, but everybody (should) go to the dentist twice a year. Normal people don't say I go to school often, unless they think of school as a waste of time, going twice a week. TLDR: It's relative based on the person and the action.


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If you have actual evidence that comes from experience, consider saying it directly - "in our experience," or "our tests show."


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You seem to be asking several questions more than just the single word request and with the word-usage tag, I am somewhat inclined to believe they are not implicative rhetoric. How Believable If we have evidence or experience to support our position, then isn't it more than a belief? It is not. First there isn't anything strictly "more" than a ...


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I agree that saying "We believe..." sounds a bit like wishful thinking. Economists are fond of saying "should" a lot, as in "Things should pick up in Q4..." But then again, you probably don't want to sound like an economist. If it's truly the case that you have evidence or experience to support your position, then perhaps that's what you should say. ...


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"Peta-" and "tera-" are prefixes in the International System of Unites. The former comes from the Greek word "πέντε," meaning five because "peta" means 10005 or 1015. Tera comes from the Greek word for monster, "τέρας," and it means 10004 or 1012, also known as a trillion. So a petabyte is 1015 bytes or 1000 trillion bytes.


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Depends on where you want the power of your statement to reside and the context within which the word resides.... you could use.... "A confluence of research leads us to support..." - uses confluence, which is nice, and implies that many people have worked to find this solution.... Reserve the words 'believe' and 'think' for statements from which you want ...



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