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1

In Finnish palaveri, not very surprisingly derived from the English palaver, is widely used as a somewhat informal synonym for a meeting, and I believe the Danish have derivation of it too. I personally notice it from time to time being used by some Scandinavian people when they discuss in English, likely because of the familiar word in their mother tongue. ...


3

This is basically lifted from the German Wikipedia entry -- the term is not that uncommon in German, though with negative connotations. The word has its origins in Greek (παραβολή), and from there was adapted by Latin (parabola), Portuguese (palavra), and eventually, English. The general meaning is "idle talk". In many African cultures, this is ...


1

I'm from Chicago, since you ask, but have lived all over the US. I've never had occasion to use it myself, but I've seen it a lot in writing, particularly in the work of nineteenth century English explorer Richard Francis Burton. As someone has mentioned, it is rather pejorative, has racist overtones, and in almost every use I've seen, is used to describe ...


1

The only place I have ever seen that word used in the wild (before this question) is in Prime Palaver, a series of published correspondence and essays from Eric Flint, in his capacity as "librarian" of the Baen Free Library. So yes, somebody uses it. Eric Flint uses it. As for biographical info, I believe he grew up in California, but has lived the last few ...


12

This is a very commonly used word in the West of Scotland (Glasgow etc.). We use to mean a disturbance - usually about something inconsequential. So you might say, "there was a big palaver on the bus when the inspector came on and some guy couldn't find his ticket". It is marginally colloquial (I don't think a police officer would use it in court, "we were ...


5

Palaver is mildly pejorative. It's often used to mean idle chat that's leading nowhere, too much talk and not enough action; sometimes it refers to talk that is intended to distract attention from the issue at hand. I hear it used now and then, as a noun. The ngram. Here's my planetary location on the Dictionary of American Regional English map (they ...


22

Yes, I use it and so do many people that I know. Nowadays it usually comes in the idiom A bit of a palaver, which refers to an argument. Usually an argument involving more than two people. I suspect that nowadays its use amongst younger people is dying out but it is used by my fellow Britons in our decrepitude.


4

It's basically used to describe an informal chat. Depending on your intonation, you could be stressing the irrelevance of the topic of discussion (e.g. when something more important should've been addressed, or you found the topic of discussion a waste of time), or you could be stressing you just talked for hours on end with a friend. It's not just an ...


1

The first is in the past tense, the second in the present. They are both equally 'correct', but only semantically correct in the correct tense. I would suggest that the past version be used to give a sense that the thing being made with the ingredients is no longer made, or is now impossible to make (i.e. a recipe that was made in the past perhaps). The ...


0

I was going to suggest wayside but have realised the word you may be looking for is Quay or quayside. Definition: "a stone or metal platform lying alongside or projecting into water for loading and unloading ships. synonyms: dock, wharf, pier, harbour, berth, jetty, landing, landing stage, landing place, slipway, marina, waterfront, sea wall, ...


2

The word said can also be used as an adjective to refer to something that has been previously introduced. (vocabulary.com) Its use as an adjective comes mainly in legal and business writing. In that vein, the word offers a reference to something that was mentioned earlier. The judge may tell you that if you can't provide said evidence, ...


1

A related word is "berth". Berth is basically a verb meaning to dock, and a generalized noun for anything a ship can pull into and tie off on. (quay, dock, pier, etc.). This isn't a single word, but: Another possibility is "port of call". If a ship has ports of call, it has scheduled, regular stops at these ports.


2

As other answerers have pointed out, "pass by me" simply describes the movement of a thing or things past the speaker, as in I stand in the doorway of the notary's office, and watch the stream of pedestrians pass by me. The sense of the phrase is straightforward and doesn't possess a significant idiomatic component. Pass means "move, proceed, go"—its ...


2

At least in some parts of the United States, the word is landing. See Ngram.


8

pass someone by You passed (me) by ~ you left me out of something. Happen without being noticed or fully experienced by someone: sometimes I feel that life is passing me by pass by someone You passed by me ~ you went past me. something to go past. A car slowly passed by the front of the house. (macmillandictionary.com) Edit : The ...


4

stop If you're looking for a single word, "stop" may indeed be appropriate, although the association may not be as obvious as for "bus stop". Here are some examples that show it being used for a variety of vessel types: Set sail for the unspoiled natural wonders of Alaska on cruises that include stops in Sitka, Skagway, Juneau and Ketchikan, among ...


3

Each statement is correct but has different meaning or connotation. Passed by me means they simply moved past you. Passed me by can mean that you were ignored or disregarded.


2

port a town or city with a harbor where ships load or unload, especially one where customs officers are stationed.


-1

Admirer is a term with less negative connotation.


4

If your boat is some kind of ferry with a circuitous route and multiple points of passenger transfer just like a bus, then each point could be safely referred to as a stop along its route for the same reasons the term works for buses. More often, all of a boat's passengers are travelling between the same two points, all embarking at the origin and all ...


0

"Can one, ever?" - It simply means "Can one ever (do so)?"


4

dock, pier, wharf, wharfage.... a platform built out from the shore into the water and supported by piles; provides access to ships and boats. A wharf is a platform built on the shore that extends over the surface of the water. On the wharf, you saw people preparing to set sail. (dictionaries)


5

You could say "point of disembarkation" or,"port of call" or, "We pulled into port at..." (These are used for ships w/ passengers - a freight liner or small craft usually "docks".)


1

In American English, "my lovelies" usually appears in contexts where an evil witch or sorceress queen of fairy tale is addressing her minions. It would be very difficult to use the phrase here without irony.


1

You might come across something like: "The third annual meeting of The Exalted Poobahs of the Order of the Sighing Buffalo took place last Thursday. Said meeting was held in the Grand Ballroom of the Podunk Marriott." In this case, "said" is used to avoid having to say, "The third annual meeting of The Exalted Poobahs of the Order of the Sighing Buffalo," ...


-1

As with most questions of colloquial language, the answer is highly subjective. I've heard Americans and Finns (speaking/writing in English) use "thanks, my lovelies!" (and "bye, my lovelies" etc.), but I've never heard Irish people use it, for example. Personally, I think it's charming and warm, but it really depends on your audience, and if it's not in ...


2

If all the people are social contemporaries, you can say what you wish. If your relationship to some of the people is subordinate in some way, the best phrase would be, "Thanks to all.." (for the lovely whatever)


2

The word "said" in "the said X" is a noun-modifier that specifies what kind of "X" it is referring to, namely "the X that has been mentioned". So in official documents "said" is often used to avoid having to repeat the specification. It usually can be omitted without any ambiguity. It is unlikely that an official document would use the phrase "the said ...


2

If you're saying to get rid of an object and fill its place with a new one, then you would use the second one (replace the object). If you're saying to move the object (change its position) you would modify the first sentence to make it reposition the object.


0

Yes, you can use melancholically if you want in that place, without changes to the sentence structure. As the sentence is right now I would not use melancholic, as that is the wrong form, but with editing it could be a useable alternative. If you really want to use melancholic, then I would suggest the following, although without context it is hard. ...


1

I find three definitions of surgery in Merriam-Webster's Eleventh Collegiate Dictionary (2003) for which the plural surgeries seems eminently reasonable: 3 a Brit : a physician's or dentist's office b : a room or area where surgery is performed 4 [...] b : OPERATION That a room where physicians receive and examine or operate on patients may be called ...


1

There's lots of references to people being stalked in the 19th and 20th century texts, though there's no suggestion of it being an on-going behaviour pattern, just a one time event. Here is a slightly earlier 1985 usage, that fits the modern sense. ... For weeks he stalked her on the streets, threatening to kill, though we'd laugh at him, and he'd ...


0

Could someone maybe help me out if I'm wrong about this? If not, what is the term for this type of phonic 'phenomena'? Haha Personally, I would use the first option, only because it sounds like there is an over-use of plural words. (Remarkable number s of user s vs. A remarkable number of users) See how the first sentence sounded like there are too many ...


0

The correct English word is ignorant, which means to have a lack of knowledge about something. Unfortunately many people believe the word means 'stupid' (it doesn't) and so take offence if described that way. If you don't think the person described will have a problem with it, that's the word to use.


2

You could go with "illiterate". illiterate displaying a marked lack of knowledge in a particular field Source: Dictionary.com


2

There may have been several different terms used to describe the behaviour of a stalker creeper 1. b. fig. One who moves stealthily, timidly, or abjectly, or proceeds in a mean and servile way. c 1605 Rowley Birth Merl. iii. vi, A gilded rascal, A low-bred despicable creeper. 1631 R. Brathwait Eng. Gentlew. (1641) 360 They were..no strutters in the ...


2

There may not have been a specific, well-understood noun to describe the stalker prior to the word "stalker" taking on a specific meaning under the law. "intimidator", "harasser", "nuisance" or in specific cases,"Peeping Tom" may have been used to describe that person. Per the New York City Alliance Against Sexual Assault website, anti-stalking laws first ...


1

Answering the 'activity' part: I've seen the verb shadow being used this way. Meaning "to follow like a shadow" is from c. 1600 in an isolated instance; not attested again until 1872. (Etymonline) As in: He shadowed her through the trees for fifty yards before she squatted again... [Example usage from google books] However, shadow was certainly ...


1

Aubade literally a Song for Dawn, is used figuratively. Auden's lovely poem which does what you say is called Lullaby: "Lay your sleeping head my love "Human on my faithless arm...


0

The use of "coin" to mean money, is actually a figure of speech called metonymy. In this figure of speech an example or a related word, in this case coin, which is a type of money, is used to represent the original concept -- money. This usage is similar to the use of the word "press", which is an instrument for printing newspapers, to represent the ...


-1

If someone in literature uses coin for money I would say it is a tradtional figure of speech with the artistic effect of a different way of expression. I would say "coin" for "money" is a synecdoche (Greek term) or pars pro toto (Latin term). The Latin term means using a word that denotes only part of a whole. And coins are only part of the term money. A ...


2

In its literal use, close the distance between means to move one thing closer to a second thing that is at a distance: close verb 4 Gradually get nearer to someone or something: distance noun 1 The length of the space between two points: In The Handbook of Foil Fencing, by Allan Skipp, the attacker closes the distance between ...


0

Here the 'distance' refers to a distance in knowledge or understanding, rather than a spatial distance. So, 'closing the distance' would mean reducing the difference in knowledge, or making all parties come together in terms of understanding. Synonyms: to bring on the same page, to bridge the [knowledge] gap


3

For the record, the word that Obama used wasn't bemused but bemusement. Here is the transcript of his relevant remark from April 27, 2011: THE PRESIDENT: As many of you have been briefed, we provided additional information today about the site of my birth. Now, this issue has been going on for two, two and a half years now. I think it started during ...


3

The English Oxford Dictionary cites coin (without pl.) Coined money, esp. that in circulation or current; specie, money. In slang use this has passed into ‘cash, money generally’, as in ‘I haven't the coin to do it’. 1406 Hoccleve Misrule 133 Lak of coyn departith compaignie. 1530 Palsgr. 487 He hath clypped the kynges quoyne. ...


-1

It is not entirely wrong. Must is a noun here, not a modal verb. From Oxford: [usually singular] (informal) something that you must do, see, buy, etc. His new novel is a must for all lovers of crime fiction. Trips to Pompeii and Naples are absolute musts. You can say: It is a must for everyone to attend the meeting tomorrow (You ...


2

Usually it is referred to as a must when something is mandatory. Also you could say, Tomorrow's meeting is a "must-attend".


0

No, it's not. You could say Everyone must attend the meeting tomorrow The meeting tomorrow is required The meeting tomorrow is a must (this is an informal usage; note the article a which is required here It is a must for everyone to attend the meeting tomorrow


0

"I'll be back directly" is common in the rural South Carolina coastal region. It means "I will return soon."



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