New answers tagged

-3

Why can't you just answer the question first, before going on some rant about every rule related to it? The person asked if it's "Whatever happened to..." or "What ever happened to..." And not once in your answer did you address that answer. Unbelievable.


0

States parties is a term of art in public international law. It refers to the states that have signed a particular treaty. For example: states parties to the Treaty of Versailles. It may not make sense from a purely grammatical perspective, but it is regularly used in international law. The first and second options are not commonly used in international ...


3

Perhaps you are thinking of expletives: Expletives are phrases of the form it + be-verb or there + be-verb. Such expressions can be rhetorically effective for emphasis in some situations, but overuse or unnecessary use of expletive constructions creates wordy prose. Take the following example: "It is imperative that we find a solution." The same ...


-1

I think that if you call your record company "German Records" then you will spend a lot of time having conversations like "Oh no, that's just a name, we release records from everywhere, not just Germany". "Oh - why did you call it German Records then?" "German Records" sounds like an overly literal name for a company which releases records from Germany. ...


1

What you have there is good, but i will add my "perception" on the difference between those 2 words, "comprehension" and "perception", and also propose a few other ways you could say or mean "I understand what you just said". Comprehension, a more long term understanding, as in "reading comprehension", to understand what new words mean, and knowing that ...


-1

"Overrun" and "infested" are essentially synonyms in this case, meaning that they are interchangeable in your example. You can say both Our kitchen is overrun by cockroaches. and Our kitchen is infested with cockroaches. Remember, however, that overrun is usually followed by "by" and not "with" when used passively. I would say though that in ...


1

'If I was' suggests you don't think you ever will be a software engineer. Grasp the nettle and choose 'wheniamasoftwareengineer.com'. otherwise your dreams will stay as dreams. Good luck in your career!


0

I would use 'same date' if both visits took place on (for example) 3rd March. I would however use 'same day' if I was referring to an anniversary of an event, which would be linked to a fixed date. I would also use 'same day' if I had referred to the previous occurrence by something other than a date, such as 'the first Saturday of March'.


0

The two meanings are subtly different, I think. "the same date last year" is clear enough, and unambiguous - you mean the 27th of June 2015 for example. "the same day last year" could refer to a specific date, OR it could refer to the special status of a particular day, which might not always be on the same date: for example, "Easter Monday" or "Martin ...


0

i would say same date, as the day represents monday to sunday. Btw, you missed the conjunctions - we went to that place on the same date last year.


1

In the context of a person speaking, chime means to either interrupt a conversation with an unwanted opinion, or to participate harmoniously in a conversation. Given that the two meanings are polar opposites, it is well to understand it in the general context of the text!


0

"If I were" is generally used for things you'll most likely never actually be, like in "if I were you" or "if I were in her shoes". "If I was" doesn't carry such a connatation. In your case, I would go with "was". EDIT: Using "were" here makes the clause have a subjunctive mood, which actually means nothing for the future likelihood of the clause, as ...


0

The connotation probably derives from its Latin origin, which referred to showing that something was good, credibile: Prove (v.): late 12c., pruven, proven "to try, test; evaluate; demonstrate," from Old French prover, pruver "show; convince; put to the test" (11c., Modern French prouver), from Latin probare "to make good; esteem, represent as good; ...


2

Children and/or animals who "perform" for attention are often described as "a (little) ham." http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/ham


0

If you're keeping to those particular phrases, then the correct usage would be 'too'...'too'. Both parts of the sentence are describing an excess. "Too" means to a higher degree than is desirable, permissible, or possible; excessively. Since you are declaring the trip might be excessively long or short, 'too' is the proper choice. 'To' is a preposition, ...


0

M-W licenses the broadening of the application of 'legible' to include other 'readable language': Full Definition of legible 1 : capable of being read or deciphered : plain 2 : capable of being discovered or understood ... an anxious mood that was clearly legible upon her face As does AHDEL, Plainly discernible; apparent: ...


1

Regarding the first part of your question: is the usage of 'prevarication' as a synonym for 'vacillation' common, acceptable, and/or preferable? The two words are not synonymous, so to use them as synonyms is very uncommon, generally unacceptable and certainly not preferable. Prevaricate -- ODO Speak or act in an evasive way: *'he seemed to ...


0

In summary, "legible" is not the idiomatically correct term to use to indicate that audible voice sounds are intelligible. If you use the term it might be understood as you desire, but could cause confusion. You can, as described above, use "audible","intelligible", "discernible", "hearable", "recognizable", "readable", "loud and clear", and a few others ...


0

From the Apple Mac dictionary--which I believe is based on Merriam-Webster. incidence ˈinsidəns noun 1 the occurrence, rate, or frequency of a disease, crime, or something else undesirable: an increased incidence of cancer. • the way in which the burden of a tax falls upon the population: the entire incidence falls on the workers. 2 Physics the ...


0

Here in Canada I have recently heard it used many times by the "hip" crowd on public broadcast radio without any with + something negative. I find that it just doesn't sound right when used on its own. I find myself wanting to know what a situation is fraught with. A radio announcer will talk about a "fraught" relationship in an author's life, etc. It ...


1

Focusing on what one is left with after the initial disappointment, your description is almost the exact definition of regret: Regret (n): a feeling of sadness, repentance, or disappointment over something that has happened or been done (especially a loss or missed opportunity). Although, this may not meet your needs, since regret is often used in ...


0

We say 'Go stand at the corner of 5th Street & Vine'. We say 'Go stand in the corner (of the room)'. Why? At talks about a location. In has the idea of 'being enclosed' or 'contained within'. A street corner does not enclose or contain you. It's merely a location. The corner of the room includes the floor, two walls, and ceiling. There is a ...


0

When saying "I am at a location (e.g., hospital)", it simply means I am physically at that location, could be inside or outside. When saying "I am in a site (e.g., hospital)", a more detailed reference is being made to where you are physically located, specifically inside a designated structure.


0

Passage is fine, consider sub-definitions 5,6 and 7 from Collins Sub-definitions from Collins a journey, esp by ship ⇒ the outward passage took a week the act or process of passing from one place, condition, etc, to another the permission, right, or freedom to pass ⇒ to be denied passage through a country


1

You are looking for the word 'audible'. So if you are asking someone if he/she can hear you on the phone/skype, you'd say: Am I audible?


2

"Wise" itself is a great word for this, but it's not as specific as what you're looking for. Perhaps a synonym like "prudent" would do the trick, though. "Receptive" is a word for someone who is "willing to listen to or accept ideas, suggestions, etc." (Merriam Webster) Example usage: She is receptive to criticism. He is a receptive listener who benefits ...


3

It's not necessarily redundant, just clarifying direction, based on an alternative definition of the word which emphasizes the movement of the subject without necessarily implying that the object is water by the verb itself. According to Oxford dictionaries, an alternative definition of "dive" is: move quickly or suddenly in a specified direction: ...


0

It is redundant, but it is not wrong. You can word it that way if you want to emphasize that he is going downward, or if you prefer the sound of it for stylistic reasons.


0

Both terms could fit in the sentence, the difference is mainly a question of register: The words deny, reject, refuse and decline are often confused. Of these, the words reject, refuse and decline have very similar meanings. Interestingly, the word accept can be the opposite of all of them. To refuse to do something is to say that you won’t do ...


3

No. Although it may adhere to the dictionary definition, so do many other activities such as petting your cat and having a nice relaxing bath and these are not hobbies either. I would argue it isn't a hobby for these reasons: It (reproduction) is one of the 8 life functions and therefore would be biologically considered akin to breathing and eating (...


6

Dictionary.com an activity or interest pursued for pleasure or relaxation and not as a main occupation: Merriam-Webster a small Old World falcon (Falco subbuteo) that is dark blue above and white below with dark streaking on the breast a pursuit outside one's regular occupation engaged in especially for relaxation Cambridge ...


1

You might want to think about comparable words. Does "tally it up" or "hold in place" work better? In your example, both could technically work if you're using "chock" as a replacement for "immovable idea/dogmatic belief" but "chalk" works better because you're outlining the steps of logic you took and tallying - or "chalking" - them up in order to arrive ...


0

Thanks all! Here is a breakdown of the 13 answers I've recieved from native speakers: 4 for the Supersonic, 5 for The Grand Adventure, 1 for either the Supersonic or Grand Adventure, 2 with no answer, and 1 with the Roadmaster. 3 of the 4 respondents who chose the Supersonic also mitigated their answer with things such as "avoid ambiguity/weird ...


2

Undoubtably and undoubtedly do actually carry different meanings, but they are often, erroneously, used interchangeably: Undoubtably and undoubtedly are both well-formed words with clear, distinct meanings, yet the former is often used in place of the latter, giving rise to the mistaken belief that undoubtably is always wrong. It’s not. The ...


0

I suspect hypothetical is being used in an ironical sense here, or at least a duplicitous one. Let's say your job depends on having a security clearance, and that claiming to know of a cage full of little green men will probably cause you to lose said clearance, and that your co-workers are technically supposed to report this sort of thing. It's going to be ...


0

You would only use "hypothetical" in this context if you were referring back to something that had already been mentioned, ie that had already been established as being hypothetical. Since, in your text sample at least, NASA's wishes have not been mentioned, you're referring back to something that doesn't exist, and this will cause confusion. As @silenus ...


1

I reckon it's (3) the Supersonic and here's why. Some people are saying there's ambiguity in "soon" and I agree but I think ambiguity could also lie in "available": Whom exactly are we waiting for it to be available to? The Supersonic will be available to the car salesman immediately, but to the man and woman soon. So the question is: Is the question ...


0

An interesting and perhaps more correct adverbial form of cowardly is cowardlily. This rule works for other -ly adjectives too: And yet the busy men found time to greet him friendlily : "H'are you!" http://www.dictionary.com/browse/friendlily


2

Of course, there are other ways to say it, such as cravenly (suggested by commenters) and timidly. However, many dictionaries do indeed list cowardly as both an adjective and an adverb. Google (Oxford Dictionaries Online, as pointed out by @EdwinAshworth) (lists adverb form as archaic) Wiktionary (also lists adverb form as archaic) Dictionary.com Merriam ...


-2

Cowardly is not an adverb. A correct adverb would be cravenly. http://www.thefreedictionary.com/cravenly


4

Drop and give me zen is a currently popular meme featured on t-shirts and inspirational posters. It is likely a play on the expression drop and give me ten or its more popular variant drop and give me twenty. These are stereotypical orders given by drill sergeants to soldiers, instructing them to drop to the ground and do ten or twenty push-ups. Here is a ...


3

Dictionary definitions and discussions of 'whistleblower' Since the early 1970s, whistleblower does indeed seem to have had a strongly positive connotation in most popular usage, at least in the United States. William Safire, Safire's Political Dictionary (2008) has an interesting entry for the term: whistleblower A government employee who "goes public" ...


0

"Should", "need to", "have to" and "must" are all fine auxiliary synonyms (in increasing order of urgency). (Incidentally, your "of" should be "for" and "that you are allowed to stay until 27/06/2016" should be "by 27/8/2016 in order to stay past that date" or "by 27/8/2016 to forestall your eviction")


1

Such a disappointment would deserve a word like bringdown, bummer or bitter pill (to swallow). bringdown a disappointment or disillusionment; letdown: It was quite a bringdown to find myself running last in the mayoral race. bummer A disappointing or unpleasant situation or experience: the team’s relegation is a real bummer bitter pill ...


0

Yes. All binary star systems are multiple star systems; not all multiple star systems are binary.


3

To judge from the comments, it's a calque of the word ही (hee) in Hindi and the other northern languages and of தானே (tāṉē) in Tamil and the other southern languages. It's easy to see how ही (meaning "nothing else") was translated into only (meaning "nothing more"), since only is 25 times more common than a more precise translation like exactly. Given that ...


2

My first reaction was to say that even was being used with the whole clause under its scope, for scalar focus on the truth value of the proposition (paraphraseable as It's even the case that I have a bachelor's degree, etc.). The question being updated with additional examples, I suspect that even is being to mark term-level, assertive focus, without ...


1

Can the child distinguish between right and wrong? Can the child distinguish right from wrong? I find it hard to distinguish these two twins. I find it hard to distinguish these twins. (Twins come in pairs.) I find it hard to distinguish one twin from the other. I find it hard to distinguish between these two twins. I find it hard to distinguish ...


11

The earliest occurrence in print of hackamore I have found, in this cowboy story from 1850 (very likely the source alluded to by Wikipedia and Etymonline), explicitly associates it with the Spanish term. ('Pete' is 'Dutch' or German, the 'old man' is apparently Mexican.) “When a broncho is lassed, he is fust choked down, then a hackamore is put on ...


2

I am guided by the OED, which finds various meanings of distinguish, all of which are ultimately grounded in the sense of classification of things by their characteristics. In a simple division into classes based on some, possibly unnamed, set of standards, we may say English grammar distinguishes dependent clauses into relative, comparison, content, ...



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