New answers tagged

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You cannot replace Pharmaceutical with medicine as according to merriam -webster dictionary Pharmaceutical means - of or relating to the production and sale of drugs and medicine and http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/pharmaceutical meaning of medicine is a substance that is used in treating disease or relieving pain and that is usually in the form ...


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I read this word in a book called The Secret Of Masters. In portuguese. The book says that Agendum is singular of Agenda, @agendum was a list a tasks to be done. Agenda is nothing more than 365 or 366 lists of tasks, not the items.


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eccedentesiast Someone who hides behind a smile, when all they want to do is hide and/or die. ( There is so many, they actually made a word for it.) She's eccedentesiast after she had to break up with Dylan... This was taken from the Urban dictionary.


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'Finna' means 'fixing to,' in the same sense that 'gonna' means 'going to' You really don't have to analyse so deeply like 'I'm gonna go to the store/ I'm finna go to the store' They just apply to different times i.e. finna meaning I'm getting ready to


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One of my dissertation advisees, Geoff Nathan, did his disertation on the acquisition of "there" in English, and found in his research that "there's" with a plural subject has become common (but not the uncontracted version). If you're asking about correctness, I can't help you, since that question is about social prejudice, not about the language.


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"There are" would clearly be correct in that sentence. However, I often hear "There's" in common speech (and have probably said it myself on occasion). P.S. I love Gino's (former Chicagoan).


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You should more properly say "There are several locations..." and this can be contracted to "there're", but this contraction is quite clumsy and not used often (possibly because it sounds almost identical to the long form).


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The general official term , in USA and Canada is Independent contractors from the point of view of the person who pays for their service: People such as doctors, dentists, veterinarians, lawyers, accountants, contractors, subcontractors, public stenographers, or auctioneers who are in an independent trade, business, or profession in which they ...


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How to call a person who is employed by a company? Answer: You can call them employees of the organization employee (noun) a person working for another person or a business firm for pay. [Dictionary.com] How to call a person who is not employed directly be a company, but cooperates with this company, for example, a freelancer? Answer: ...


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Usage can not defeat grammar any more than a tree can defeat its own shadow. However, the movement of the sun can make that dead patch on your lawn a little more visible. Similarly, when current usage does not match authoritative grammar texts it's simply time to update the texts. Of course this leads to people arguing over what "current usage" is. But ...


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sum may refer to the integral of something as well, seeing as when a curve is positive, the integral is the sum of infinitesimally slim squares below the curve adding up to the area below the curve. While sums may indeed be used occasionally to refer to calculations in a broader sense, I should shy away from such usages: It dilutes the accuracy with which ...


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Your first use of contacts is wrong. Contact has many meanings. contact does not have a plural in your context, it would be The more contact the cloth has with the dirty surface, the more spoiled it gets. When speaking of contacts in plural the word refers either to electrical contacts or to people with whom you have a connection. Also, the info cards ...


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The adjective "stony" means covered with or full of small pieces of rock. But in the case of "stone bridge", we're saying "a bridge made out of stone" (As Edwin pointed out, stone in this case is an attributive noun) not "a bridge covered with small pieces of rock". So "stony bridge" wouldn't quite be accurate.


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As a native speaker of English, if I heard someone say "the conversion of his act surprised me" I would be confused, so I wouldn't recommend using "conversion" like this. Conversion when applied to people tends to have a religious meaning, e.g. he converted to Roman Catholicism. I also have a problem with "act" in this sentence because an "act" is a one ...


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The forms of the gerund and participle The gerund has four forms — two for the active voice and two for the passive. The forms for the participles are the same. ----------------Active--------------------Passive Present ----loving-------------------being loved Perfect------having loved---------having been loved From en.wikipedia, gerund Link "about not ...


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'Scenario' and 'worst-case' in Merriam-Webster dictionaries "Worst-case scenario" pretty clearly arose from the cobbling together of two terms that already existed in English: the noun scenario—which Merriam-Webster's Eleventh Collegiate Dictionary (2003) dates to 1875 in the sense of "an outline or synopsis of a play," but which seems not to have acquired ...


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Yes, this is referring to a single linked list. The problem is saying that you will need to create/maintain in memory a single linkedlist. You need a function capable of inserting values into the list (which will involve changing to the pointer to the new items). You will then need to write a function that iterates over the list, item by item, finding the ...


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I'll answer your two questions in turn: Yes, if you write both articles that could be interpreted as meaning the total appearances in both articles combined - better to say each article. Rather than how often it appears in one article more than another, you could say the difference in number of appearances between the two articles. Taken together, with a ...


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Since the context is machine learning, there is a well known discipline that goes by its abbreviation, tf-idf. tf–idf, short for term frequency–inverse document frequency, is a numerical statistic that is intended to reflect how important a word is to a document in a collection or corpus. Wikipedia Perhaps one could borrow these terms: term term ...


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We all know English language just like every language is living. If the phrase is not yet recognized in English Language but is very convenient, I guess it is high time we used it even more often. By that it will surely get the recognition it needs.


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You could say We examine [or count] the common incidence of the use of the animal's name between the articles as well as the differential incidence. Collins defines incidence as degree, extent, or frequency of occurrence; amount a high incidence of death from pneumonia


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Does "how often it occurs in both articles" really mean that it occurs individually in article A and in article B? Or can this wording be confused with in total, like summing up the occurances in both articles? It can be interpreted either way, though I'd favour the sum. Is there a better way to express ''how often it occurs more in one article than ...


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"For each animal, we count how often it occurs in both articles and how often it occurs more in one article than in the other." "How often it occurs in both articles" is asking for a sum (i. e., 8 times). "How often it occurs more in one article than in the other" is ambiguous. As an less ambiguous alternative, how about, For each animal, we count ...


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You might be using “mercantilistic color” correctly, but only if the aforementioned words actually imply a “mercantilistic color.” Note that “mercantilist” is a really old, antique word that is going to be meaningless to most people who read or hear it.


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You could say, items include but are not limited to [list]. Or, at some point before or after the list, you could simply say, this list is not comprehensive. EDIT: I realise that I haven't really answered your question, sorry! I think the phrase this list is short of being exhaustive conveys that almost all the items are included, or at least ...


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If you're trying to describe how people would overreact, then "melodrama", "histrionics", "theatricality" or even dramatics might be close, instead of "drama". Which one you use depends on the context around your line - if you're referring to a society or large group of people, the above words fit better. If you're describing a situation between a few ...


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That is just the first instance of the word in a print publication. The first use of the word likely happened years before that. I don’t think you have any evidence at this point for what country it started in. The Australian article reads like they are using a common term, not coining the phrase or celebrating its novelty. The best bet is to try and get ...


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We see that Oald says the words illness and disease are synonyms, the University of Ottowa wants to see semantic differences, but I am sure that such distinctions are unknown to almost any speaker. My experience is that illness is preferred in spoken language and disease is often used in texts that have medical topics such as Alzheimer's disease. But you ...


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The root word drama fits: "This is due to the drama of the day." Drama 3 a : a state, situation, or series of events involving interesting or intense conflict of forces b : dramatic state, effect, or quality - the drama of the courtroom proceedings - M-W


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It isn't in any official dictionary, though it does appear on community dictionaries like Urban Dictionary and Wordnik. Merriam-Webster offers dramatism as the appropriate word to mean dramatic manner or form.


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Example: If you have any questions, please contact Robert or Phil at 412-000-000, Extension 3555 or 3567, respectively. You're giving the reader the information that Robert is at Extension 3555 and Phil is at Extension 3567.


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The word metaphysician has been in use since a time when physician could also mean a physical scientist. The distinction between physician and physicist has later hardened only to avoid ambiguity. But in the case of metaphysician there is no danger of confusion: there is no study that comes after the study of medicine like metaphysics come after physics. ...


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A practitioner of physics is known as a physicist. Well, yes. A practitioner of the modern science called 'physics' is known as a physicist. But 'physic' is an ancient term and until the Enlightenment, 'physic' (or 'physick') was what we would now call 'medicine'. And a practitioner of 'physick' is a 'physician'. Hence, a practitioner of 'metaphysics' is a ...


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In this very technical context, the transport refers to a method and protocol for sending data over a network from one machine to another. It is a layer in the communication stack well described here.


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They can be called cross-disciplinary artist, though like renaissance man, the term may relate to non-art disciplines as well. Cross-disciplinary : of, relating to, or involving two or more disciplines - M-W Usage example: David Byrne also produces visual work – not just music. So, today, if I go to David Byrne’s website, I can peruse the Art ...


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According to a number of historians whose books appear in Google Books searches for Saracen + pejorative, the term Saracen was indeed a pejorative term back in the (medieval) days when English Christians widely used it. Hunt Janin & Ursula Carlson, Mercenaries in Medieval and Renaissance Europe (2013) offers this brief discussion: "Saracen" is a ...


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Well, you could say that Tommy is a triple threat: he is an actor, director, and screenwriter for big budget films. Or, Sally is a quadruple threat: she sculpts, paints, dances, and writes haiku.


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Actually, "Saracen" was used at one time by the Romans (Roman Empire) to describe Arabs who lived in the desert around Syria. Later in the Crusades it re-emerged as a word to describe any Arab who fought against the crusaders. It is not directly a name given to all Muslims as such. However, the Crusades were Roman Catholic Christianity versus Islam so ...


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You may say that the person is eclectic, i.e. interested in various different domains. Example: Ashley Bryan is an eclectic artist who uses painting, poetry, music, collage, and prose to tell stories. Bryan fuses these seemingly separate art forms within his books for children.


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Someone who is gifted at all or many artistic pursuits could be called a creative genius.


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What about "multi-faceted"? I've heard it used to describe performing artists.


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One traditional term was renaissance man, after the example of Leonardo DaVinci, an expert in many areas --that may be too gender-specific for modern usage. A more recent term is multihyphenate, used often in a showbiz context for an "actor-singer-director" or similar.


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How about "versatile", or perhaps "a polymath"? "Jack of all trades" would be a somewhat more colloquial and lengthy alternative.


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They're all grammatically correct; the difference between them is emphasis. each of us and each one of us Are basically identical. The former is merely removing a redundant word, but it's conveying the same thing. each and every one of us puts more of an emphasis on making sure the document is received by everyone. It makes the focus of the ...


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In this context, the person is saying they are satisfied with the care they received, so it is considered "their" care. Telling Baymax "I am satisfied with your care" although it could be used to mean "I am satisfied with the care you have provided" is a less common way of saying it and would probably confuse the listener.


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Both words are close synonyms. In day to day usage, amid is popularly used. However, when it comes to literary usage, amid and amidst are both used by the British English speakers without a problem. However, the American English speaker prefers the term amid to amidst. It is because amidst with its extra –st sound at the end, sounds more as a word ...


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I interpret it as, Delta emailed them and inside the email there was an apology. If it was just; emailed an apology, I would assume that the whole email was an apology. But from that sentence I understand that there was some other content together with an apology in the email.


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Ah, this stems from teachers telling students that nouns represent things, verbs represent actions and so on and so forth. Unfortunately, none of this is true. It's a seemingly handy generalisation for helping students intuitively identify nouns before you actually get down to discussing nouns with them properly. Otherwise it's pretty misleading. Nouns ...


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To be able to refer to a specific group, you would need to modify 'banned' in such a manner that it referred to that group: Handguns ought to be banned among left-handed Tagalog-speakers in the United States, for example. However, your statement does indirectly refer to a group by specifying private owners; other owners/users such as the police would not be ...


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The OED entry would suggest that it originated in Australia. At least, that is the first example they have. The action or practice of sending or exchanging sexually explicit or suggestive messages or images electronically, esp. using a mobile phone. Cf. sext n.2 2005 Daily Tel. (Austral.) 2 July 87/3 A telling aspect of his sexual ...



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