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While the word itself doesn't take on the meaning, I think if the word is used in a phrase with another restrictive term it can take on that meaning. "My party is inclusive only of my good friends." makes it a pretty exclusive gathering. Could you, for example, argue that inclusive teaching practices tend to have teachers thinking in ways that restricts ...


1

Crewing and Crewed are modernly used for various sorts of "team effort" machinery. If you google "crew served" and "crewing -boat -naval" you'll see various examples. For obvious reasons most of these will be military usage, but are not strictly naval. You can also find some examples of industry usage regarding teams that are assigned to large-scale ...


0

This is like asking about the choice of "fifty cents" versus "half a dollar". There is nothing wrong with either, both will be understood, and which you pick is determined by where you want to put the emphasis, if any. If I'm discussing billable hours, a third of an hour may be more convenient. If I'm discussing recipes, 20 minutes may be easier to work ...


0

"It is said that...", "It is true that..." Yes, a very common construction.


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"A third of an hour," is not a common expression - probably because it's much easier to say, "twenty minutes." (US) Also, the average person can divide something in half, (like, an hour) then half it again - into quarters - much more adeptly than messing around with "thirds". (It's just easier on the brain.) Conceptualizing "a third of an hour" is too ...


0

(1.) Note that in your example B is arguably not "the opposite of A" but "all possible items in the set with the exception of A. eg Slightly 'strange' but I thinks makes the point - "If I was given the choice of a primary colour I'd choose Red, otherwise I could choose Green or Blue. "Green or Blue" or Green or Blue alone are NOT the opposite of Red. ...


2

A Google search turns up: This page The page the OP mentions Someone saying "the most vapid of slogans" I think it fair to say that everyone's intuition -- that the USDA example is just some bureaucrat mutilating the language -- is correct.


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I agree with Jim and HotLicks that this is a misuse by someone who misunderstands the word and its use. The two examples cited by Josh61 are instructive, and show how the misunderstanding might arise. The first is acceptable: The young heroes are vapid of expression Here the of phrase is a modifier telling us what is vapid: the heroes' expressions. ...


1

What's wrong with place? A building or area used for a specified purpose or activity: EDIT: In your example, destination should work The Wonderland Building Center is the country's main destination for any Wonderlandian seeking advice on building or renovating his or her home. And no, I don't think you can use address in that sense


1

In general with quantities the following are correct and unambiguous: It has increased by half It is increased by half as much again It has increased to one-and-a-half times the amount Note the prepositions. Technically neither of the first two sentences in the question are right. "Increased by half" is less clear because it might mean "increased by half ...


1

Temperatures are tricky. Thirty degrees above zero doesn't represent thirty of anything; starting from the lowest that a temperature can be (i.e. absolute zero http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Absolute_zero), it actually represents nearly 500 units. Thus, an increase of 15 units does not represent a one-and-one-half-fold increase at all. So avoid that ...


1

Half more than X means 1.5 times X.


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Why complicate matters? Simplicity is always appreciated. The temperature was very low, around 30ºF, but now it must be about 45ºF. but, if you prefer, "The temperature today has risen by 50% compared to yesterday". This sounds weird, though.


1

Merriam-Webster online does not seem to offer the most relevant sense of problem: try instead OED s.v. problem, n., sense 3.a.: A difficult or demanding question; (now, more usually) a matter or situation regarded as unwelcome, harmful, or wrong and needing to be overcome; a difficulty. [emphasis added] Many dislike the trend towards using issue ...


1

Sarcasm is actually a subset of irony. To wit: **Sarcasm Sarcasm is yet another popular form of irony where the user intends to wittily attack or make a derogatory statement about something or someone. Often, sarcasm is confused with irony instead of being a recognized form of irony. Example: A beautiful actress walked by a table of talent agents as one ...


3

I am calling this person something that is the exact opposite for what he actually is. .... Is this a misuse of the word "ironic" or does it fit? Overall, I use it humorously It is the correct use of the word: ironic : using words that mean the opposite of what you really think (especially in order to be funny) sarcastic is more malicious(, it ...


1

No it doesn't. Sarcasm is what you're using. From oxford: a way of using words that are the opposite of what you mean in order to be unpleasant to somebody or to make fun of them ‘That will be useful,’ she snapped with heavy sarcasm (= she really thought it would not be useful at all). Go with sarcastic


-1

The word means "contractor", and what your "very significant person in Jerusalem" was saying was simply that Bin Laden was working as Saddam Hussein's subcontractor, i.e., doing the work on his behalf.


2

Your instincts are correct: "next to that" is not something a native speaker would use if they wanted to say "additionally". Given enough context, most native speakers would understand what was meant, mind you, but like Robusto said, it's an odd, foreign-sounding locution. (Also, it might be misinterpreted as an attempt to say "besides".) The phrase can be ...


1

It's not wrong in English. You might say, for example, "Bob owns a car and a motorcycle. Next to that he also owns a boat." In a similar way we also say "in addition to that" and "besides that". "Next to that" can also be used literally, to mean that something is physically adjacent. Like, "On the desk is a pencil. Next to that is a pen." The pen is ...


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Actually, a malapropism is the substitution of a word that sounds similar, but not identical, to the intended word (such as when Archie on "All in the Family" referred to the "Women's Lubrication Movement", rather than "Liberation"). In Strahan's example, "bored" and "board" are words that sound identical but are spelled differently. These are called ...


2

Malapropism fits the bill I think. Form oxford: The mistaken use of a word in place of a similar-sounding one, often with an amusing effect (e.g. ‘dance a flamingo’ instead of flamenco). Origin Mid 19th century: from the name of the character Mrs Malaprop in Sheridan's play The Rivals (1775) + -ism. EDIT: I know this doesn't seem to ...


0

In this, perhaps the best, AmE dictionary: policyholder noun : one (as a person or firm) granted an insurance policy — used chiefly in life insurance Merriam-Webster Unabridged Dictionary thus I'd use this form.


0

"Policyholder", written as one word, seems to be the accepted form in both American and British English.


2

The Oxford Dictionary states (informs us) that the use of "inform that" has become obsolete at the end of the 18th century. It is comprehensible that it has remained in current use in former colonies where if became popular before that time.


1

First off, Plethorically isn't even a standard word. See this ngram. It's not even listed as a word derivative in Oxford So no, I wouldn't use it if I were you. Now for using it with obnoxious: "plethorically means an excessive or overabundant amount of something": No it doesn't. You're thinking of plethora. And maybe it's just me, but "a plethora of ...


1

Despite what @Curiousdannii rightly says, I have to put in my 60 francs cfa here, because this precise construction is incredibly common among Norwegians writing English, and I have spent 30 years correcting them. They translate their own verb opplyse (and others) as "inform" and follow it with a "that", as is lawful in their language. And perhaps similarly ...


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A TV is actually composed of many components with specific functions: a radio receiver, a tuning control, a pre-amplifier, an amplifier, a video processing unit, a display screen. In the early days of TV, before the advent of semiconductors(transistors) and integrated circuits, these components were built with tubes, and each component was large enough to ...


1

Set refers to: A group of things of the same kind that belong together and are so used: a chess set. so by TV set you mean all the main parts of it that make it a single product. TV Set : an electronic device that receives television signals and displays them on a screen; "the British call a tv set a telly"


-2

"TV" and "TV set" share the same meaning. They both refer to a television.


1

I think that "visceral" sometimes doesn't relate to what we normally describe as "feelings". It seems that a visceral reaction to something may often also connect with a strong emotional response to the same moment or stimulus. However, it seems as though one could also have a gut response to something which doesn't evoke any strong feelings, other than ...


1

After noon is quite vague. Assuming the context of the 24-hour day, it could mean any time in the day after 12:00 pm, whether that means 12:30, 3:00, or 7:00. EDIT: As Edwin Ashworth pointed out, informally, after noon probably means a short while after 12:00 pm, maybe within the hour. However, if Joe says "I'll pick you up after noon" without specifying ...


1

Does the headline make a correct/sensible use of the verb given the assumption mentioned above about the result? Yes, this is a common term for expressing that a previous mark has been passed, or surpassed. Eclipsed, eclipsing, eclipses: 1 a: To cause an eclipse of. b: To obscure; darken. 2 a: To obscure or diminish in importance, fame, or ...


1

I think the sentence is fine. I feel that both 2a and 2b meanings apply: eclipse verb transitive verb 1 : to cause the obscuration of : darken by or as if by an eclipse 2 a : to reduce especially in importance or repute : cast down (as into obscurity or disgrace) b : to make insignificant by comparison : throw into ...


1

Riding a motorcycle is more acceptable in current usage than driving it, although you do drive a motorcycle while riding it. This is analogous to how people rode a horse before the invention of motorcycle, sitting on top of it (motorcycles were also called steel-horse initially). With cars it is more like driving a team of horses, analogous to driving a ...


0

You book a room, you don't book a number. It's therefore more common to ask “Can I have the key to room 30, please?” especially in a large hotel than “Can I have the key to number 30, please?” The first is idiomatic, the second is only grammatical. Examples: Room 101 is a room introduced in the climax of the novel Nineteen Eighty-Four by George Orwell. ...


3

In an appropriate (though sometimes necessarily extremely contrived) context, most nouns can replace most other nouns. There are a number of natural contexts in which number can replace hotel room without causing any confusion, and some speakers will actually do this: As far as I know, the president will be staying in number 1. - No, he won't. Since ...


-1

Talking like this : Which room do you have? The number 4. will be understood. But if you are trying to contact the owner of the hotel to describe a problem in the room number 5, I think you should not save your words.


1

I wouldn't object to seeing slew in a formal paper, it does however sound slightly exaggerated in connection with illnesses. If the person in question was indeed randomly and violently hit by a host of illnesses, I would leave it. Otherwise, may I suggest the following: He had a series of mental and physical illnesses. He had a succession of mental ...


0

You have a valid point. This definition of as of is given by Wiktionary: From, at, or until a given time. Most dictionaries give the first two senses, but Garner [A Dictionary of Modern Legal Usage; Bryan A. Garner] disagrees: But as of now does not mean 'at present'; rather it means 'up to the present time'.... [It] is today totally ...


1

I would say Bracketing commas are a pair of commas used to . . . ". It's obvious that "commas" is plural, but not so obvious as to whether "pair" is plural; some might argue that using the plural "pair of commas that are" de-emphasizes that the pairing is what is important. So taking out the is/are avoids that weakness. If you don't like that option, ...


-1

Not in a formal context. Use "multitude." And surely there's statistical evidence for the above statements. E.g. at Google Books: "slew of factors" "ieee transactions" About 1 results "multitude of factors" "ieee transactions" About 32 results or: "slew of other agents" 4 results "multitude of other agents" About 691 results


1

Your goal is to describe the value you added to the company, not the company's history. Save the specifics for how the company got into trouble for the interview. Use power words. Reduced risk, created and maintained a rock solid bookkeeping process for a small business. This is a perfect setup for an interview question. "I see you reduced risk, can ...


0

As at, means any occurrence previous till a given time period, or date, whereas, as of, means any occurrence from a given time period or date onwards. The former is a destination whereas the latter is a starter. E.g. 1. Uche had left office as at 5 o'clock I arrived. 2. The parties hereto, have caused this agreement to be duly executed as of 27th of April, ...


1

Do you think *"they is a pair" works? I don't, but be my guest, test it and "they are a pair" at Google Books (not vanilla Google), and compare the results.


0

Is it tautology that no one (except yourself) is making you do something? What I mean is (as far as I know) mind control does not exist. No, it's no tautology: no one is making you do something = no is making you through explicit /steps/measures/ do something The implicit social pressure, or the pressure of tradition, can still be there, and you may ...


2

In "the coach made me run an extra lap", the verb means "to compel". It doesn't imply, as you seem to think, that the person compelling had physiological control of the mind and body of the person. In the example, it is understood that the narrator considered himself to be in a position of submission to the authority of the coach.


0

singular: It's a kind of drawing e.g. sketching colloquially: They are a kind of drawing plural: There are different kinds of drawings; e.g. sketching, pencil, cartoons, and draughting. Interrogative: (i) Is etching a kind of drawing? (ii) Is there any kind of drawing you prefer? (Is there any one kind of drawing) (iii) Are computer graphics and ...


0

Either all-time high or record high (suggested by Centaurus) are perfect phrases to use. You can see both of those phrases used when describing the American stock market, which is as high as it's ever been and probably will continue going higher. Here's a recent article talking about Netflix stock: Netflix stock hit a record high for the third straight ...


0

It sounds more graceful if you decline the request, and deny and even recuse are possible. But if you say "I am unable to do that (at present)", it carries more of a connotation of regretful inability than outright refusal. Of course, for just this reason it is often used by those who are in fact refusing; if you want to make your position absolutely clear ...



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