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1

Hope this table clarifies the usage. Note that in these examples, words smaller and greater perform two functions whereas less and lesser perform one function each. It is incorrect to say 3 is lesser than 5.


1

Those are all ok, although I think I like your first choice best: Queueing twice for a cup of coffee is once too many. One time sounds a bit funny to use instead of once, although there are places where it can work.


1

"Fine results" reminds me of "good enough for Government work". Your problem is that sloganeers do not go in for subtleties; this is a field in which hyperbole is the norm and you are in danger of sounding ambivalent, unambitious or even litigiously careful. I would say "excellent results". Go for gold.


1

"Fine" is understood to mean exceptional quality when used in common phrases such as "fine art" or "fine furniture". It loses its "punch" outside of these expressions, however. When composing a slogan, alliteration is often used for mnemonic purposes - also, temporally speaking, you might want to put "process" before "result". I'd suggest: "Simple Methods, ...


1

The way that people interpret fine depends on context and dialect. In BrE, fine is often used to mean something of high quality, but in AmE it often means meeting expectations, but nothing more. In a slogan fine results, simple methods, I understand the results to be OK, but not really that good, they are nothing special. That may not be the message you ...


0

Martyr means witness in Greek, so martyr to should reasonably mean one who suffers for a cause — for example, a martyr to non-violence.


3

There are plenty of synonyms for 'Good' that you could use, but 'fine' probably isn't strong enough. In some contexts, it could be understood as meaning less than average. You'll see on the Cambridge Dictionary's website that 'fine' can mean bad in many contexts. If you don't want to use good, then Satisfactory might work well, as it has a clear meaning and ...


0

When we talk about units of time such as days and tomorrows we often use psychological time and not dictionary time. So if you say "see you tomorrow." (and who hasn't stayed up till 2, 3, or 4?) you are meaning the next psychological day. You will go to sleep and wake up to a new day at work, school, or whatever. This doesn't really work for week, month, ...


1

Whatever time it is, it's always after midnight. As in, after some midnight that went before. Seriously, this is a choice of being figurative or literal. Whenever people correct this they do it teasingly. We all know what is meant. We're having fun with the fact that our expectations fail us when in an unfamiliar situation. A student going home at ...


0

Date is defined as changing at midnight, so any time after midnight is technically the next day, or "tomorrow". However, your intuition is partially correct. For instance, if you've been working all night with a colleague, or studying with a fellow student, and it is now 1 AM and you are both bleary-eyed, it is entirely normal to say, "Oh man, I'm beat. ...


1

I'd probably write the sentence as either 3 or 4: More students are emerging with A grades in A level exams - perhaps as a result of sheer hard work and competition. or More students are emerging with A grades in A level exams as a result of, perhaps, sheer hard work and competition. houstonrahoyt


1

I'd describe that person as opportunistic: Taking immediate advantage, often unethically, of any circumstance of possible benefit. The following saying also comes to mind: Practice what you preach: Prov. Cliché You yourself should do the things you advise other people to do. Dad always told us we should only watch an hour of television ...


0

More of the same thing that is addition already there In addition to In this context 'adding to' implies that there is already,in this case, a carpet of flowers. 'Adding to' implies that the Norwegians will be putting more flowers with the ones already there. It is time to eat! Mother is setting the food on the table, adding to the feast. More info ...


0

I think you might mean 'like finding a rare coin.' عملة can mean 'coin' or 'currency' in English. (Sorry if that is presumptuous--bas ismak howa arabi!)


2

The words are acceptable but the punctuation is not. Your two options for correct comma placement would be: "Could you, please, let us know when …" "Could you please let us know when …" The version with two commas is somewhat outmoded; the version with none is readily understandable and more contemporary. One comma alone, however, is incorrect.


0

"Adding to the carpet of flowers outside the cathedral" is called an adverbial present participle. An adverbial participle comes from an adverbial dependent clause. Subject(main) + Verb(main) CONJUNCTION subject + verb. --> Subject(main) + Verb(main) verb+ing. However, when we change the dependent clause into a participle, before we take out the ...


0

The meaning might be clearer as: As the day drew to a close, Norwegians continued to add to the carpet of flowers outside the cathedral, paying their tribute to the dead. Does that help?


1

I would possibly suggest that prolong just means, almost literally, "add length" or "make longer". (Note that indeed it can be used, unusually, by - say - designers or engineers in the sense of making some part longer, like a piece of metal or the like.) "prolong" is somewhat "value free" - it just means "add length". Whereas protract is sort of a ...


3

No, they are not directly synonymous. Protract comes from the Latin "to draw out, to pull" (the same root as for tractor). Hence it suggests that the activity has been artificially stretched, i.e. lengthened but not overall enlarged. One may wish to prolong a pleasurable experience, but not protract it.


0

Dislike is stronger than don't like. Don't like is passive; it's an absence of liking. You could for instance be neutral or disinterested. Dislike is active. It means you expressly do not like it and are therefore by definition not neutral about it. If you imagine a scale going from dislike at -1 to like at 1, "don't like" is in the middle at zero. Or at ...


2

Saying that you dislike something means you have a distaste for or hostility towards it. When you don't like something, it means that you would prefer something else over it. You would want this to not happen. Source: Apple's dictionary. 'Don't like' means that even though you would prefer the other thing you can still adjust to this happening. But saying ...


1

The only non-obsolete meaning that the OED finds for "dislike" is "not to like," so I think it's safe to say there's no difference.


0

Rare currency is a collectible. I think your sentence is okay, but I would omit "today".


1

"Can I" is directly asking if (whatever), where as "Could I" is more of a hypothetical situation.


0

One way we can understand your question is by examining "the writer's purpose": "Additionally, although the quality is..." Part 1: "Additionally" and "although" are linking/transitional adverbs as you have stated. See link for more of other kinds of transitions- https://writing.wisc.edu/Handbook/Transitions.html. Part 2: The writer's purpose of using ...


0

it is a rare currency today. sounds rather like it is a rare occurrence today occurrence: something that happens : the fact of happening or occurring - Merriam Webster So, a rare occurrence is something that rarely happens. Is it possible this might have been intended in the original sentence?


0

I have two guesses: The firing line, which was the line of infantry using single-shot rifles, or a betting table, where the bet would be placed on a line.


0

A currency is never rare, especially in its own country. You may want to use something like 'obsolete' instead of 'rare', indicating something that is no longer in use and hence can't be obtained easily.


0

In precise mathematical language, some just means more than 0. In particular, every is a special case of some. In a sense this is also true in normal language, though there is a general (not absolute) rule that whenever there is a more specific and equally or more common word, it should be preferred. Just like you usually don't say parent when talking about ...


2

If the sentence with "most" instead of "some" is true and that matters, you shouldn't use "some". This is due to Grice's maxim of quantity: Make your contribution as informative as is required (for the current purposes of the exchange). Do not make your contribution more informative than is required. from Cooperative Principle. However, what ...


1

The Grammarist explains the origin and usage of the two terms: People vs persons: In modern English, people is the de facto plural of person. People and person have separate Latin origins, and they came to English at different times by different paths, but there are examples of people used as a plural of person from as early as the 14th century. ...


0

"Persons" and "people" are both accepted forms of the plural of "person". Generally, "persons" is used when the intended meaning is "multiple individuals", while "people" generally means a large group of individuals. Even so, you rarely here the word "persons" used in everyday speech. Use "people" for the plural if there is no specific reason you need to be ...


4

In all of the dictionaries that I checked, "some" is used for unspecified amounts and quantities, and also for "a considerable number or quantity." (AHD) In none of the examples did it make sense to ask "what percentage are they talking about?" Because it's used for unspecified things I don't think it makes sense to talk about number or percentage, even in ...


2

Mathematical probabilities and history aside, "some" has an uncertain feeling which would lead to the assumption that it meant: 'less than the majority.' To refer to more than 50%, it would be more common to use "most of...". (US)


31

Ignoring the fact that the word "university" doesn't mean the opposite of "diversity," your logic has a flaw: The "di-versity" comes from the Latin di(s)vers-, which has the same "dis" as in the Latin synonym divertere, namely "apart." Both words mean "to turn away." "Dy-," meaning two, comes from Greek. "Twice" in Latin is bis.


2

Tear and rupture seem to be interchangeable https://coastalorthopedics.com/differences-tear-rupture/ . Seems like a rupture is the same as saying a complete tear. Perhaps partial tears of ligaments are more common than of tendons, so 'tear' is more widely used.


1

I learned there's: transparent; translucent; and opaque. I learned those three are meant to cover everything. So the word you are looking for is either "translucent" or "opaque" (depending on the phenomenon, one or the other will be the correct adjective.) I am sorry, I don't remember what textbook I would have learned that from so I cannot quote a ...


0

Electrical engineers will regularly use the letter 'u' as the greek letter 'μ' (mu) to replace 'micro' as in: uOhm (microohm) or uA (microampere).


2

"Xmas" is the only word I know of, where a Greek symbol can replace some (but not all) English letters and still be understood by the majority of readers. Something like "arXve" would not be correctly decoded by most people. I am familiar with many entire English words that have been abbreviated by Greek letters in the areas of math and science. Some are ...


0

There are some English words that can be replaced by Greek symbols (letters): for example: Pi I don't know of any English words containing mixed English/Greek alphabets.


2

Non-transparent. Or you could use another word for non-transparent, such as "opaque" or possibly "murky," although if something is murky, there is implied some possibility of sight, though far from transparent.


1

To take refuge has both literal and figurative meanings. Among the literal meanings are to seek safety in a place and to seek safety in the company of another person or persons. With the former we tend to use "in": In the storm, they took refuge in a train station. When referring to the latter, we tend to use "with": The police determined that the ...


1

I got this far: If refuge refers to safety one would use in. One finds safety in an [Omniscient being] (Unless you are hiding under the table together with [Omniscient being]). If refuge refers to shelter one could use any preposition of place: Homeless people take refuge in subway shelters. Julian Assange has taken refuge inside an embassy. I ...


1

If you take refuge with someone then that means that you both take refuge. Example I took refuge with my family until the storm had passed. It is a matter of philosophy whether you take refuge in an omnipotent being. I would say that, for example, you take refuge in God's mercy. Google ngram: take refuge in God


1

No, 'younger' already has the meaning of 'more young'. The phrase 'more younger' would mean 'more more young'. If there are two people in the photo you can say, Who looks younger, me or you? If there are more than two people, you say, Who looks youngest?


1

Long-term or short-term is rather associated with goals, plans, objectives etc. and not with dreams. For dreams the word 'lifelong' is much more suitable. Hence you should choose It's been a lifelong dream of mine to do... You could refer to this n-gram from Google which compares occurrences of 'long-term goal', 'long-term dream', and 'lifelong ...


1

It's fine. Think of drawing and paint programs, where you highlight a certain region and then apply the fill or bucket tool to apply a color to the entire selected region. If it bothers you, I suppose you could say The shape was solidly colored blue, except for a white etc. But, really, it's fine. Even before computers, you could say It was a truly ...



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