Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

In American usage, "store" is a place where goods are kept for sale. Ex.: Walmarts is a discount store. In British use, "store" can be a place where supplies are kept for future use, in other words, for "storage." Ex: As it was summer, she decided to put her fur coat in storage.


0

"aye" might be connected in some way with an old Latin defective verb "aio" meaning "I say yes". I haven't checked if this connection holds water, it is a first idea, but I think it might be possible. I'll do some research. Added:Etymonline says: origin unknown. Three hypotheses: from I, variant from yes, from aye 2, adverb. ...


3

The opposite of pogonotrophy is of course pogonotomy. The OED provides these citations, amongst others: 1897 Columbus (Ohio) Dispatch Jan., ― Pogonotomy is what the Greeks used to call the gentle art of self-shaving. 1942 Berrey & Van den Bark Amer. Thes. Slang §125/3 ― Pogonotomy, shaving. 1960 Times 28 Sept. (Advertising Suppl.) p. iii/2 ― This is ...


2

Both terms can be used interchangeably; however in former times, a couch was a low, bed-like piece of furniture for lying on. A sofa is more benchlike with full arms and back.


-1

It is about the shape of the instruments. The format of a double bass (acoustic bass or upright bass) is reminiscent of a woman's silhouette. Contrast it with a treble refers to the treble flute, i.e. only as treble. The most common flute in conscert orchestra.


1

I came here looking for and expecting to find that the two uses were broadly synonymous, and not even having an idea that there may be a difference with (actual or anticipated) repetition! However, as I have been reading I am reminded of 'recursion' in my own field (of programming) where a routine calls itself; thus (potentially) re-running the same ...


0

Perhaps immaterial? Unimportant under the circumstances; irrelevant: the difference in our ages is immaterial


0

I've tried to find a word or phrase that fits your examples. I can suggest the following: For your first sentence, you could use "at random" "at random" - without definite aim, direction, rule, or method. - Merriam-Webster "I don't care about the color, just choose at random." "We tasted the wines at random and then rated each." "Choose a card ...


1

These terms are usually used in a relative sense. Within certain contexts poverty may be specifically defined. The term 'Poverty line' is used to describe the 'minimum income level of income deemed adequate' for a particular country; this means that the term 'poor' might actually refer to a specific threshold within the context of technical economic ...


1

It isn't really that contradictory - the first line is advertizing a non-standard service, that of giving change in especially pretty notes and coins for gifts or some such. Many banks will not do this, just giving change out of the till. The second line just warns that this is a extra service that isn't always offered, so don't get upset as you might if ...


2

It's not an oxymoron, as it is not a phrase which contradicts itself. It is, however, redundant, which may be the adjective you are looking for to describe this poorly-phrased sign. It's likely a case of legalese boilerplate being tacked on to an already awkwardly-phrased sentence. In America, a sign would typically make the first sentence much more ...


2

Using 'them' makes 'fears' the garnish for meals. Presumably the intended meaning. Using 'it' makes the bottle itself the garnish (surely not). It also contadicts the clearly uncountable popcorn ('some').


1

According to Trainor herself, it's a reference to the difference between the shape of a bass and treble guitar. A treble guitar is about the same width on the bottom and the top, while a bass guitar is much bigger on the bottom. Thus it's about having a big booty.


0

I would use the second; "She has said but a few words to me since last winter." This means "she has only said a few words to me since last winter". "She hasn't said but a few words to me since last winter" doesn't really mean anything at all.


0

"folk" is just alother word for people. "pitting" here means "to set against" So in your example you are saying "setting those (people/folk) with gun racks against those (people/folk) with bike racks"


2

A 'pit' is an arena for combat. More generally, it's a hole in the ground. The idea is that one cannot escape from the pit while in the midst of combat. When animals are fought for sport, they are placed in arenas from which they cannot escape: pits. A 'pit bull' dog carries that type of imagery. Even today in the US Marine Corps Infantry (and potentially ...


3

In formal technical writing, normally it is written for example The directory contains a .exe file because you are typing the shorthand for dot-exe. However, you could write: The directory contains an exe file. However, this does NOT feel good, and IMHO, I would say that it is probably better to write: The directory contains an executable ...


3

The a/an distinction depends on the pronunciation of the next word, not the letter it begins with, e.g. an X-ray, a unit vs. a xylophone, an uncle. If you intend it to be pronounced a dot e-x-e then write it as such.


1

There are several examples of crouch[ed] along if you google it. For example, from Hatari by Ernie Palamarek: Throwing myself over, I joined Lauren on the deck. We crouched along the bulwarks as we made our way forward in the darkness. Revenge of the Golden Dragon by GoodLoe: Two imposing large dark figures emerged over the wall from the fire ...


2

It's not common... a better way to impart your image would be to say: "I crawled/climbed/made my way to the edge of the cliff and crouched there, still."


2

Answer: yes, but that said, crouch is usually not used in combination with forward or backward motion, i.e., one doesn't usually walk in a crouch or with a crouching posture. crouch (krouch) verb. crouched, crouch·ing, crouch·es, intransitive verb. a. To stoop, especially with the knees bent: crouched over the grate, searching for his keys. b. To ...


1

Several U.S. style guides recommend a treatment of the prefix mid- that closely resembles the one in Chicago. For example, from The Associated Press Stylebook and Briefing on Media Law (2002): mid- No hyphen unless a capitalized word follows: mid-America, mid-Atlantic, midsummer, midterm From The New York Times Manual of Style and Usage (1999): ...


0

In music composition typically the bass cleft line is used to write music for the tuba, baritone, trombone, etc. and the treble cleft line is use to write music for the clarinet, flute, etc. and hence this song appears to be looking at body type not necessarily a part of the body. A person versed in only treble would not only have to overcome the ...


0

Out Of vs From Among merriam-webster Out of: (preposition) 4.—used as a function word to indicate choice or selection from a group--one out of four survived. From: (preposition)—used to indicate the starting point of a physical movement or action—used to indicate the place that something comes out of. 2.—used as a function word to indicate ...


1

Out Of vs From Among merriam-webster Out of: (preposition) 4.—used as a function word to indicate choice or selection from a group--one out of four survived. From: (preposition)—used to indicate the starting point of a physical movement or action—used to indicate the place that something comes out of. 2.—used as a function word to indicate ...


1

Out of order is another common expression: Fig. [of something] incapable of operating; [of something] broken. The elevator is out of order again. My stereo is out of order.


1

Such an object is often described as broken or as having failed. Other possibilities are busted, unserviceable, faulty or simply in need of repair. These terms can all refer to non-functioning electronic devices, and none of them necessarily imply that the object has been physically smashed or damaged. Electronic components or devices are especially likely ...


4

There are at least two aspects to this question: will people understand what you mean? will native speakers regard you as a competent user of the language? You might be concerned with the first and only the first, or you might be concerned with both. You have formed a word by analogy with other abstract nouns, tacking -ness on the end of an adjective. That ...


0

One more detailed definition gives: To make easy or easier. To help bring about To preside over (a meeting, a seminar) It's easier to see how "help bring about easy learning" works than "ease easy learning". There are other dictionaries that give even more detailed definitions than that. Still, as a tool to understanding, a dictionary that only listed ...


0

Reach out is a useful expression: Lit. to extend one's grasp outward. He reached out, but there was no one to take hold of. I reached out and grabbed onto the first thing I could get hold of.


0

American here. I've had people catch me using "mine" and "yours" rather than "my place" or "your place." I think I started saying it because it's faster to type. Maybe? Either way, I haven't run into anyone who didn't understand what I meant. However, my gf is a writer and studied english in school. When she brings it up that I say this, she mentions it's ...


12

Both extend and offer are correct and current usage. "As we were walking I offered her my hand." "I offered my hand and he shook it." "I approached him and extended my hand." "He stared at me for a moment and then reluctantly extended his hand."


3

"Extending your hand" is indeed correct, understood exactly in this way, and of long use for precisely this. At least one dictionary even lists "extend your hand" as a phrase with precisely that meaning. The OED doesn't, but does have a definition: To stretch forth (the arm or hand). Also, to hold out, put forward (a staff, etc.). And includes examples ...


2

Amber and yellow are two different colors, technically. Yellow is one of the CMYK primaries (0,0,100,0), while amber has a bit of magenta in it (0,25,100,0). On the color wheel yellow is at hue 30 and amber at 45. RGB values are 255,0,0 for yellow and 255,191,0 for amber. In LCH space, which encodes perceptual brightness (L), chroma (C, richness) and hue ...


1

In the U.S. the DMV and DOT classify the traffic light as yellow and any light on a vehicle that signals caution as amber. Certain instances require obtaining an 'amber light permit'


0

Regarding Project Management. You can have a RAG status (Red, Amber, Green) but in speaking terms, everyone refers to a project as being "Yellow" if certain risk/issues exist.


0

"Of" on its own is a more economical usage. When used at the beginning of a phrase or sentence, "out of"/"of" tends to suggest that there is a large number of whatever is being described, and as such, the word "all" is usually added. This also elevates the importance of the individual in the following clause. For example: "Of all the courtiers, James ...


0

Inland trips means trips to the part of the country away from the coast, without specifying who is taking those trips. Such trips may let the world know about your country, or they may not. Foreign trips. on the other hand, is fatally ambiguous. It can mean, and has been taken by others here to mean, trips by foreigners to your country, which would be what ...


0

"inland" - (adj) of, relating to, or in the part of a country that is away from the coast or boundaries. MW If you want to increase tourism in your country, you might say: "If we improve road conditions, inland tourism will certainly increase." "If we improve our airport conditions, the influx of foreign tourists will be greater." "An ...


0

I think "effector" is right, along with drivers (in CPU operating systems).


1

I thought that she was meaning: All about that bass (I care what men find attactive) No treble (I don't care what women think of my body). Clearly she beleives that men like curves. I have not seen the video, my opinion was formed strictly on hearing the song.


2

Though cooker also means: A person employed to operate cooking apparatuses in the commercial preparation of food and drink. In more common terms, Cook and Cooker: are two words in the English language that are quite often confused. The word ‘cook’ refers to a person who cooks food or prepares food. On the other hand a cooker is a kind of ...


3

We call them "gamblers", if they are placing bets for themselves, "bookies" if they are placing bets for others. (US) Interestingly, the verb to gamble is not used as often in this sense - but usually more figuratively. One lays (or places) bets, and plays the horses - in the same way that one would "play" poker or blackjack.


2

Better, bettor, punter, gambler- someone who bets. Reference: Oxforddictionaries.com Punter- informal , chiefly BrE, a person who gambles, places a bet, or makes a risky investment. Bettor- chiefly AmE, a person who bets, especially on a regular basis.


0

In the UK those betting on horse racing etc are almost universally known as punters. The OED attests this use since its first example from 1860 . Punter is also used for one who bets against the bank at a number of card games. This is perhaps from the French ponte, but the etymology of both uses is uncertain, and it is not even known if they are from a ...


1

Allegory of seems to be overwhelmingly favored over allegory for, per this Ngram. The Ngram utility does not allow my attempted comparison of “Pilgrim’s Progress is an allegory for/of,” but with the “Pilgrim’s” removed it showed no hits at all for the for option and some for the of option. Trials of “read/interpreted ...


-1

According my university textbook, "situation where" should be correct, although they do not say "situation in which" would be possible to use, however I would say it would be – but it sounds less formal to me in any case (but I'm not a native speaker).


0

@Saravanan, In English, when describing geographical location in a specifically named city, state, or country, we use the preposition "in." I'm in Dubai. (city) I'm in Florida. (state) I'm in Australia. (country) Questions of this nature are considered "general-learning questions" and are better-suited to http://ell.stackexchange.com/. Please post ...


1

"Hone in" is usually referred to as an "eggcorn", which is a mis-rendering based on mishearing the original expression. There are dozens, if not hundreds, of these. They are frequently discussed by the American Dialect Society: http://www.americandialect.org/publications/ads-l-the-american-dialect-society-email-discussion-list


1

There are a couple of phrasal verbs you can consider: model oneself on Take (someone admired or respected) as an example to copy: he models himself on rock legend Elvis Presley [OD] pattern yourself on sb/sth (BrE) to copy something or someone: She patterns herself on her big sister. [Cambridge] There are common phrases ...



Top 50 recent answers are included