Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

As FumbleFingers observes, both subconscious and subconsciousness can be nouns (subconscious can also be an adjective), so there is nothing to choose grammatically between the two. Merriam-Webster's Eleventh Collegiate Dictionary defines the noun form of subconscious as follows: subconscious n (1886) the mental activities just below the threshold of ...


2

Generally, questions related to programming are off-topic here, and you'll get better answers over at the Usability Stack Exchange, but I'll take a stab: From a usability perspective, the user shouldn't have to interpret the meaning of these labels. They should be obvious. If I were you, I would think about labeling them with more than one word to make it ...


0

There's a subtle difference between the two. Both of them are nouns, in addition to the word subconscious in the adjective form. Subconscious1 (adj.): feelings, desires etc are hidden in your mind and affect your behaviour, but you do not know that you have them: [BrEn] a subconscious fear of failure Subconscious2 (n.): the part of your mind ...


1

As this NGram shows... ...the form "I had rather..." is effectively "archaic". In most spoken contexts it's "I'd rather X", so you can't really tell what verb form the speaker thinks he's contracting, but these days I'm sure it's invariably would. The usage has nothing to do with references to "the past". The now-standard conditional simply means if ...


0

Fully acceptable seems redundant or superfluous, though. In general, acceptable shouldn't need any disclaimer attributes unless there's an understood indication that a warrant might simply be "partially acceptable" in which case it might be exceptable.


1

Let's have a new innovation on ESO! Answering the actual question! :) "What's the difference? Do they mean exactly the same?" 1) there is absolutely no difference 2) they mean exactly the same thing


3

Pouring from the window is poetic license. In my experience, it is not what I hear people say ordinarily (often). It is used here, I'm guessing, to give the impression that the source of light is the window itself (like water comes from a spring), instead of the light coming from outside. The feeling conveyed may be that the room and its occupants are ...


0

"I would think" and "I would have thought" are instances of the common use of the conditional to soften assertions. This can be useful in establishing plausible deniability or saving face in case the assertion proves to be incorrect. It can also help reduce the harshness of a correction (that is, saying "no, three squared is nine" is blunt and might ...


0

I’m sure all of these variations are commonly used and understood to mean roughly the same thing. “I would have thought…” essentially means “I believe you should have understood what I meant,” or “that should be obvious.” “I thought that was obvious” is a simple declaration that sounds more like the speaker actually gave the matter some thought. “I should ...


-1

I am not completely sure myself, but I think this is probably I thought with an added tentative aspect: I would/should have thought. In this situation it's almost equivalent to say I think. If you add the tentative aspect to that you do in fact get I would/should think. (The reason I say I am not completely sure is that there might be another equally valid ...


0


0

I have always considered such a situation where an act "must" be performed although an undesirable outcome is deemed inevitable a Death March. In business, there is a management antitype known as "Management by Death March" in which a project's prospects for satisfactory completion borders on nil but Management insists that rather than call the project ...


0

You might call him or her a true-lover. (Not a true lover.) Yes, I imagine that this was coined just now - no idea whether anyone else has ever used it or ever will. But I'll bet that it will be understood. But no -- it does not imply single love, but rather someone who believes in true love. Closer to what you are asking would be single-lover (also ...


0

no exit boxed in hemmed in at an impasse in a blind alley at a dead end reached a stalemate (not quite the same) deadlocked (not quite the same) dead wrong guilty


0

After all answers given to this question, I have reached on one that is Loyal


0

You can try these words: changeover - a change from one system or situation to another. conversion - the process of changing or causing something to change from one form to another. transformation - a marked change in form, nature, or appearance If you specify your requirement clearly, we can help you better. Source


1

Not sure if there is a single, definite word for what you're looking for. But having worked for a long time in the software industry , the single most used phrase I've seen, that describes the process of "change of requirements" is- "Change Request". According to Wikipedia, "change request" is defined as- A change request is a document containing a ...


0

I don't think there is a word for this. "Respecification" is tempting, but only exists in Wiktionary with dubious etymology ("re" + "specification"). It does not have any entry in the OED or any other dictionary I could find. It also yields a mere ~85,000 Google results, which these days is not an indication of common usage. Personally, I am a software ...


2

I think respecification as a general term may convey the meaning: The act or process of respecifying; a change from a previous specification. Specification/Specifications: An explicit set of requirements to be satisfied by a material, product, or service. Ngram shows an increasing usage of the term since the 50s. Source: ...


0

Responding to the updated question where you've clarified that you're hopelessly trapped and cannot escape, I suggest the most idiomatic description is: They've got you cornered Which is self-explanatory. Please note the distinction from @Joseph Neathawk's Painted yourself into a corner In the former scenario, they cornerned you; in the latter ...


0

Both are grammatically correct, so that leaves you to choose based on other grounds. My personal preference would be the latter because it feels slightly awkward that "with" is that many words away from "spending time" in the former, versus having them juxtaposed, which seems more natural, and easier to comprehend.


0

What about at mercy All of these answers are suggesting that the author is trying to describe a negative outcome. To me he seems to be trying to describe a situation where he is 'at the mercy of' an authority/situation/weather, having extinguished all of his possible action points. "At mercy" is not inherently desperate, it just shows acceptance and ...


3

I looked up the OED's entry for crib-biter, and found the following citation: 1860 J. C. Hotten Dict. Slang (ed. 2) 124 Crib biter, an inveterate grumbler; properly said of a horse which has this habit, a sign of its bad digestion. The relevant meaning of crib is defined thus: A barred receptacle for fodder used in cowsheds and fold-yards; also in ...


5

It is definitely not common, and just as you suspected it is a play on the previous two examples in the list of "Travelers" and "Givers". It doesn't quite perfectly follow a trend: Traveler, Giver, Artist -- because the first two use the English language -er suffix to suggest the "actioner" of a verb (an action), and "Artist" is not "Arter". But this is ...


2

No, it is not common. In this usage, "art" is being used as a joke. It is poking fun at the English language because the other forms are correct. A traveller is someone who travels. A giver is someone who gives. But an artist is an exception because "art" isn't a valid verb (even though most people will understand what is meant despite the misuse).


0

The answer is 2 because more loudly is an adverb modifying the verb sing while the adjective louder modifies nouns and noun phrases. Generally, people use the adjectival comparative form when what's required adverbial comparative form. Adjective: Loud (positive), louder (comparative), loudest (superlative) Adverb: Loudly (positive), more loudly ...


2

They are both well-formed and idiomatic sentences. Whoever insisted on that quiz answer alone is trying to specify a very particular standard, where modifiers of verbs must outwardly look like an adverb (using '-ly'). But that is not the case as 'louder' works as an adverb, too.


0

The direct grammatical feature to your question, is that in typical English usage an adverb (like highly) does not directly modify a gerund (participating). Further, construction you propose is not very direct, which I don't think is the best form for a CV. If it were me I'd use Team member developing X.


0

All these words can be used more generally and applied to atypical situations, so in principle each word could be used for everything else. But normally the core meanings apply, at least to some extent. Where they don't, it may be for historical or strange technical reasons, or because the organisation wants to mislead the public. Therefore I will only ...


0

Though Assembly and Association tend to have overlapping meanings: A group of persons gathered together for a common reason, as for a legislative, religious, educational, or social purpose. an organization of people with a common purpose and having a formal structure. Assembly has also a more specific usage: a number of people gathered ...


1

'Hobson's Choice'--means one is given a choice but permitted only one choice. Named after Thomas Hobson (1544-1631) a livery stable owner in Cambridge England. To rotate his horses Hobson gave his customers the choice of taking the stall nearest the stable door or taking no stall at all. Hobson's choice is no choice.


0

There are two aspects in which monogamous isn't exactly right: Monogamy is explicitly about spouses or at least partners, not about the first and last love of your life who maybe doesn't know about her luck yet, or worse, isn't as thrilled as she should be. Even serial monogamy is monogamy in the proper sense of the word. If 1 is not a problem, I would ...


5

If I may submit a couple of Ngrams for comparison. Corpus: British English Corpus: American English I was not surprised to see that the usage of the word 'delicious' more or less follows the same trend between both lexicons corpora. I was a little surprised to see that the term is slightly more popular in American usage than across the pond. I cannot ...


11

I do not often use delicious myself, but neither do I consider it unusual or "foreign" in any way. It may not be that popular in your friend's circles, but the Corpus of Contemporary American English has twice as many results for delicious as it does for tasty and yummy combined. The relative numbers are not very different from those in the British ...


22

In my experience as an American: We do use the word delicious fairly often. It is not at all unusual or strange. Its use compared to the more general words "good" and "great" is dependent on context. For example, if my friend asked me "how's the food?" and I enjoyed the food, I'd more likely use "it's good!" or "it's great!" and reserve "it's delicious!" ...


0

It's not exactly about the situation itself, but about the action. There's nothing left but to bite the bullet. Biting the bullet is an idiom for accepting the simple, obvious negative consequences. It's the opposite to worming your way out. You got in trouble, you plead guilty and accept the punishment.


2

Impossible to avoid or prevent inevitable adjective impossible to avoid or prevent unavoidable adjective impossible to stop from happening inescapable adjective impossible to avoid or ignore unstoppable adjective impossible to prevent or stop uncontrollable adjective if a situation or event is uncontrollable, you cannot stop it, change it, or improve it ...


0

I suppose there is a consensus that a single-word solution is not as easy as it sounds. I tried to find ones that would be close fits, but maybe these examples can lead to a hybrid that does take care of your needs. Soulmate seems like it would be a close single-word solution. However, I don't believe it guarantees love. Soulmate: a person ideally ...


1

Such circumstances are often referred to as a fait accompli, borrowing from the French. A situation which cannot be changed and has been imposed by others.


1

I'm going to suggest inextricable as an adjective. It is used with situation or fate also which fits well to the idea. It is also used in technical contexts. Unavoidable; inescapable: bound together by an inextricable fate. Source: http://www.thefreedictionary.com As a noun, I can suggest impasse. It is often used in bargaining and discussions ...


1

What you would want is to mitigate the consequences of your behaviour, meaning make (something bad) less severe, serious, or painful (Oxford dictionary). But, to make it one word, the situation is unmitigable (found in a few dictionaries, usage examples).


1

FUBAR is a neologism created from the informal military acronym for f@#$ed up beyond all repair, referring to a situation where there is no solution that will provide positive results. There are bowlderized versions for sensitive ears, such as fouled up beyond all repair/recognition. And there is the TARFU variant, meaning totally and royally f@#$ed up. ...


-1

Maybe a checkmate situation accurately defines what you want to say. If you wish to be particularly vulgar, you could use the colloquial term 'clusterfuck'


1

Google comes up with 24K results for disproportional vs disproportionate. Quite a battle seems to have been waged on at Berkeley four years ago (see Sources below). Both words seem to have been in use from the 14th century. Despite the subtle differences in meaning, both seem to have been used quite interchangeably. Based on the sources given below and ...


1

The adjective unfulfilled might be used to describe this kind of person. of persons; marked by failure to realize full potentialities; "unfulfilled and uneasy men" Source: http://www.thefreedictionary.com/unfulfilled It is related to not realizing rather than effortlessness, but you might not realize your potential if you do not show any effort. ...


0

Here are some examples from Beseech in a Sentence - sentence examples: As soon as I reach the driving age, I will beseech my parents to buy me a car. The walkway was filled with fans who sought to beseech the actor for his autograph. Source: Sentence Dictionary


1

Replacement of terms doesn't always have to be the answer. For example, you could omit "as" and rearrange the sentence as follows: "Opening the door slowly, John looked over his shoulder." If you want it left in its original order, you can replace "as he" with "and," as seen below: "John looked over his shoulder and opened the door slowly."


0

The only difference is that "disproportional" is non-standard, meaning that it's not considered standard English (at least not standard American English). This really only matters when you are speaking or writing formally. Standard English is defined by what the majority of educated speakers consider proper. So use 'disproportional' sparingly if you're ...


1

John looked over his shoulder and slowly opened the door. And is simplest of all when combining things, even actions.


1

As the page you link notes, the more current version and near-perfect synonym of perchance is perhaps (though oddly enough, “it may chance” is way more current than “it may hap”). Neither perchance nor perhaps is reliably interchangeable with by chance. “By chance I met him on the street” is not at all the same as “Perchance/Perhaps I met him on the street.” ...



Top 50 recent answers are included