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0

Your options mean different things, so you can't say that one is better than another. So/consequently/therefore: using these would mean that the first phrase is the reason for the second Because/as: using this would mean that the second phrase is the reason for the first When: using this joins the phrases together to mean that English isn't difficult when ...


0

You might say such a person works "tirelessly". tire·less·ly adverb not yielding to fatigue Source: The Free Dictionary


0

"Regardless of whether or not..." is correct, but it can be shortened to "Regardless of the weather",..." but can also be improved with "Regardless of whether it rains or not..." It does seem long, but the awkwardness is negligible, in my opinion. The idiom is like "in spite of"- the "of" is necessary; unlike "despite" which does not need the 'of'. ...


0

Wrong can be an adjective, adverb, verb, or noun. When used as a noun it means An unjust, dishonest, or immoral action: I have done you a great wrong [ODO] As a countable noun, it routinely takes the indefinite article, a.


0

I would say: "I drink a copious amount of coffee" (non native, correct if wrong) cf., http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/copious "The storm produced a copious amount of rain."


1

Copious means abundant... when used with amount it shows emphasis on the abundance of the quantity implied... just like scarce amount would be an emphasis on the lack of amount implied... it helps to measure amount.


1

You can use any of these: sycophant - a person who acts obsequiously towards someone important in order to gain advantage. talebearer - a person who maliciously gossips or reveals secrets. tattler - a person who engages in gossip or who tells tales. gossiper / gossipmonger - a person who enjoys talking about other people's private lives : a person ...


-1

Although many synonyms have been given above, I believe the literal translation for chugli is bitching. "Chugalkhor" is a hindi slang, the meaning being "gossiping with malicious intent". For example an approximate translation of "wo mere dost ke samne meri chugli kar rahi thi" (sorry, I could not find the exact Devanagari script) would be "they were ...


-1

Anorexia is a condition where a person... To my ears where sounds wrong here, but whereby would be acceptable. I'm guessing that use of whereby has turned into use of where over time. On the other hand, A phobia is where you have a fear of... cannot be fixed by simply substituting whereby, unless you say something like is a condition whereby... ...


2

You could, but you probably should not. There's certainly a meaning of the word so that matches perfectly. But is it the meaning that immediately and clearly comes to mind? I don't think so, and I strongly suspect that this is not just my reading of it, but would be common to other readers too. As such, you could argue that your use was correct, but what's ...


0

As it were, where is semantically incorrect in all of these situations. Let me explain. In every definition of where, the word refers to place, situation, or condition. The latter two are actually the destination of an action (as much of a destination as an action can have!). While where is used informally quite often in this situation, it is still wrong. ...


3

Usage of where: It was formerly considered incorrect to use where as a substitute for in which after a noun which did not refer to a place or position, but this use has now become acceptable: we now have a situation where/in which no further action is needed Source: Collins English Dictionary


1

This 1889 book about dialect has a passage that translates "a grungy" (noun) in the Mid North Lowland dialect of Scotland into "a deep, revengeful, feeling" in standard English. But I wouldn't call it slang. I would call it a word used regionally in dialects of Scots.


1

I checked a number of reference works that focus on slang and didn't find anything in them related to the use of grunge or grungy before the 1960s. Both the Fifth Edition (1961) and the Eighth Edition (1984) of Partridge, A Dictionary of Slang and Unconventional English, have no entry for grunge or grungy; but Beale, Partridge's Concise Dictionary of Slang ...


0

If you have a quantity of discrete things you can count, like people, cows, cups, plates, books, apples, or rules (to name a few), use many; If you have a quantity of something that you can't count, like sand, flour, sugar, tea, hay, water, or homework, (again, to name a few examples), use much. Or consider the following exchanges: Student 1: The ...


0

OED's first citations for both grunge and grungy are both from The N.Y. Times in 1965, so I think there's no chance it was 1920s slang.


2

I just searched several paid and free databases of 1920s books, newspapers, and periodicals and was unable to find any examples of the word "grungy" meaning jealous or anything like that. It's possible that it was used orally in some areas, but even occasional slang would be expected to show up somewhere. My guess is that the sources that indicate it was ...


-2

I myself use the word "problematic" in the sense of a theoretical concern or a subject needing discussion which is what i saw scholars doing in seminars and conferences. I think you are using the word correctly. Those who rush to dictionaries every now and then may not be always right. Words are fast acquiring new meanings in specialized academic fields and ...


1

The word you're looking for might be bespoke, which means made to custom requirements. "Tailor-made" (or just "tailored") is a common allegory with the same meaning. "Custom" as an adjective is fine too. Customized probably does suggest "modified from something else". "Personalized" would be an odd choice of words if your customers are businesses rather ...


5

To help out is a phrasal verb meaning: to assist or aid (someone), esp by sharing the burden to share the burden or cost of something with (another person) help out - be of help, as in a particular situation of need; "Can you help out tonight with the dinner guests Source: Collins English Dictionary


16

First thing I would like to point out - chugalkhor doesn't seem to just mean 'can't keep a secret'. More like somebody who is actively complaining about / revealing others' wrongdoings, not 'not keeping secrets'. So the question's premise itself seems wrong. Now going on to an English word: An English word meaning the same thing as chugalkhor: ...


0

Personally I would say "MPs Income" - but seriously I would say "Illegitimate Income" - i.e. any income from sources that are not those that are Legitimate. The other phrase that is often used is "under the counter".


1

I suppose it depends on the context. If the person in question has sworn in to his country, and breaches security via communicating secret information, they'd be called an oath-breaker, or traitor. If they were communicating information the country did illegally, they might be considered a Whistleblower. If it's in a social setting, a formal descriptor ...


1

I think "(work) frenzy" fits your description the best, specifically in the definition of "a bout of wild or agitated activity [eg]: a frenzy of preparations", which implies the sleepless nights. A sentence describing the situation could be "The employees were in a frenzy these past few days trying to make the deadline". Another way to put it would be "The ...


4

One expression for the activity is "to burn the candle at both ends," meaning that not only are you expending energy at one end of the day, but at the other as well, leaving precious little time for sleep. OED cites a particularly metaphorical meaning of profligacy with money, rather than effort. It's interesting that the current usage, while still ...


3

I'm fairly sure you won't get closer than workaholic: work·a·hol·ic noun (informal) a person who compulsively works hard and long hours. [Google] (AHD does not have the 'informal' tag)


1

It would appear to have started taking off circa 1970—surprise, surprise. See NGram for “give myself/yourself/herself/himself permission.”


1

Most of the time, in my opinion, if one goes to the extent of pointing it out by saying 'no pun intended,' it was intended, and the reason they are pointing it out is so the other party 'gets' it, because in many cases, the other party doesn't 'get' it unless one points it out, since it is a double entendre. In writing, I write, 'pun intended.' When ...


0

Dire straights man. Or an "impossible situation" - a situation where no resolution or victory is possible.


0

Not a one word, but from the context it sounds like it's "time to face the music."


0

The best word I can think of is that it would be inevitable. It means certain to happen, or unavoidable, which fits the bill.


1

sounds like you painted yourself into a corner http://idioms.thefreedictionary.com/paint+into+a+corner


0

I believe you would call that a "foregone" conclusion. (From before+gone, as in the conclusion was gone before the discussion started.)


0

Can it be called "Faithful"? That would be the solution. To be devoted to one person only without being married is emotionally and not loyalty.


1

The words "hopeless", "fruitless", or "futile" come to mind for me. Given the definitions below, futile seems to best fit your needs. def: hopeless: feeling or causing despair about something. fruitless: failing to achieve the desired results; unproductive or useless. futile: incapable of producing any useful result; pointless eg: Given my ...


-1

A word that comes to mind for this situation is the word paradox: A self-contradictory statement, which can only be true if it is false, and vice versa.


2

A fallacy is an argument which is logically invalid, either because it is internally inconsistent or because it relies on postulates which are false or unsupported. A word on its own cannot be said to be a fallacy, unless that word stands for some kind of argument. As user84593 says, "banks" cannot be a fallacy, because simply saying "banks" is not an ...


2

The usual meaning of the term fallacy is a type or class of error in reasoning, or an instance of that class. OED sense 3.a.: a flaw, material or formal, which vitiates a syllogism; any of the species or types to which such flaws are reducible. An organization could conceivably be (and indeed many are) characterized by fallacy in OED sense 2.b., ...


0

A statement can be a fallacy, but not an organization. "Only some people are mortal" is a fallacy. "Banks are a fallacy" is an incorrect usage of fallacy, whatever you may think of banks.


3

Personally, I'd call the case in question a blame game (“A situation in which people attempt to blame others rather than trying to resolve a problem” – wiktionary) or blame fest on the basis that it usually is someone else's fault when I'm blamed for a problem. But more generally, when one cannot avoid something, one may refer to an inexorable fate (where ...


0

grift. As in a 'grifter' or 'grifting', money obtained via a swindle. http://www.thefreedictionary.com/grifting


1

Such a situation is sometimes referred to as a "cul-de-sac" or a "dead end."


2

To flee would not be appropriate to substitute in the idiom running away from your problems. To run away could be used in place of to flee in most cases, but to flee coneys a sense of immediate, tangible danger that to run away does not. For example, fleeing the scene of the crime is more powerful than running away from the scene of the crime.


2

How about fate, destiny, pre-ordained, or another word along those lines? They all embody the concept of a future that is already written.


0

How about 'life monogamist'? ('life-monogamist' maybe?) Or, if you wish to explicitly include informal relations: (life) monoamorist/-amorous, monoromantic (by analogy with 'polyamorous' & words for so-called romantic orientations). However, none of these seems to be widely used. Oh, and they are of course more general than your question, so might have ...


10

Possibly obscure, but Kobayashi Maru? Although some might argue, in a Kobayashi Maru situation, a trick is exactly what is called for.


-4

How about "dilemma"? That refers to a situation that's a real stickler.


15

I think "lost cause" fits your description the best. PS. I just reread the examples of your description and I think you should use "no way out" in those situations.


4

There are numerous phrases that convey the acceptance of blame, such as come clean own up 'fess up (for confess up) take your lumps take the blame make amends [all from ODO] If you are just talking about the situation rather than the guilty persons response, you could say where the rubber meets the road ...



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