New answers tagged

2

I think the closest sense of but I can find in the OED is 5b: Whilst 5a applies to: a. Negative and interrogative sentences containing a comparative (esp. more) were formerly followed by but; they now usually take than, or else the comparative is omitted and but retained; modern idiom preferring sometimes one, sometimes the other. 1713 ...


0

It is just meant to put a bit of extra emphasis on "a series of inspired follies". You could read the sentence as "What is life - if not - a series of inspired follies" or "life is nothing - other than - a series of inspired follies". There are a few similar examples here: "Ten to one but the police have got them" (Charlotte M. Yonge). We would ...


1

my millenial daughter uses the term FOMO. It's a person who suffers from a severe Fear Of Missing Out.


2

How about "over-attender" or "social-lot?" (socialot?)


5

The way I've heard such people described is as "social butterflys"


1

Glitterati popped into my head, although it might just apply to the smartly dressed attendees.


3

We use that expression in french. I wont say it's the opposite of sin. It's just a good gesture. For ex. in a chess game you may let your opponent start the game. it's a beau geste. Not doing that is not a sin.


-1

The group of people that go everywhere popular would be the SwagSet, members of whom are SwagSetters. Millenials love swag... and apps... and the interwebs...


7

gadabout A habitual pleasure-seeker. I think this is a great, fun word that doesn't get enough play.


5

MAT A man who frequently attends fashionable social functions, as in Fred is quite the man about town these days. This expression, first recorded in 1734, uses town in the sense of “a sophisticated place” as opposed to rural settings. The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary


6

Eventgoer (or event-goer) One who attends an event. This should work just like partygoer: a person who attends a party or who attends parties frequently "chauffeured transportation was provided for those partygoers who had overindulged themselves at the bar" The -goer suffix means: a ​person who goes to the ​stated ​type of ​place ...


9

You may be looking for party animal (informal) someone who ​enjoys ​parties and ​party ​activities very much and goes to as many as ​possible: Sarah's a ​real ​party ​animal - she ​likes to ​dance all ​night. — Cambridge


0

NO INTIMATE IS NOT SHORT FOR IMPLY,and infer is short for inferred.Debate word,lawyer lingo.my time on this site is short so forgive me if I got it wrong.


-3

You want a new term. How about SYMVANDRA consisting of symvan (greek for a casual event) and andras (greek for human). Translates to event man


16

You may be looking for socialite: someone who is well-known in fashionable society and is often seen at parties and other social events for wealthy people (Merriam-Webster)


0

Just use "local". I also wouldn't use the word "this" twice. This business is local to the area.


2

"Localite" is not in the Oxford English Dictionary. However, a search in GloWbE (the global corpus of web-based English) gives nine hits for it: eight in Indian sources, and one from Singapore. So it would appear that it is a word which has limited currency in India, and apparently in Singapore, but is unknown elsewhere in the Anglosphere. (I observe ...


0

Your (1) can work; (2) and (3) don't. Intimate 2 verb [with object] 1 State or make known: Mr Hutchison has intimated his decision to retire verb [with clause] 1.1 Imply or hint: he had already intimated that he might not be able to continue - ODO In usage, intimating is a hint or statement made intentionally. This precludes ...


2

There is a difference between these sentences. 1 and 3 appear to be saying that you are showing the quantity using 'n' to find said quantity. 2 means that 'n' is the quantity and you are displaying said quantity with the variable 'n'. If you are attempting to say that you are finding the quantity using 'n' as a factor to find the value of the quantity, I ...


1

I am making a wild guess that you mean "We use n to represent the quantity". If so, none of the three options clearly means that, though 2) and 3) could mean it with enough context. I would say "We denote (or represent) the quantity by n".


0

While dogma is apt enough as a metaphor (from religion) for the whole mass of opinion that the mass of people accept all too uncritically, another possible term is bullshit. As philosopher Harry Frankfurt famously declared in his essay on the subject, bullshit is definable by just this lack of critical concern about whether a belief or assertion corresponds ...


0

You're right. The word order is off to my ear, although I'm a native AmE speaker, and I understand that "from $100" is common in BrE. Still "buy from" would typically be followed by the name of a vendor. Depending on the context, you could leave "buy" out. When a price range is listed like that, "buy" can easily be inferred. By the way, the AmE version ...


1

Creed - an idea or set of beliefs that guides the actions of a person or group http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/creed Ideology -  1.a systematic body of concepts especially about human life or culture a manner or the content of thinking characteristic of an individual, group, or culture http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/ideology Also ...


0

Nancy Mitford famously thought 'pardon' was almost a swear word and betrayed hopelessly middle class origins! I would say: 'I'm sorry, could you repeat that?'


0

Simply saying, "Excuse me," or "Pardon me," can also be interpreted as an expression of incredulity. If I need the other party to speak more clearly, I usually say something like: "There's a big party going on here, would you mind repeating that - louder and slower?" This way the other person doesn't have to feel self-conscious about yelling/repeating ...


2

The following extract may help undestand what he meant by "dime" novel: In Los Angeles in the early 1950s, Ray Bradbury went in search of a peaceful place to work. "I had a large family at home," he said five decades later. They must have been a particularly lively bunch, because at the time it was just Ray, his wife Marguerite and two young ...


0

You could say, Excuse/pardon me, would you mind repeating that?


1

Here is the design intent of fill_parent and match_parent, taken from your link: Special value for the height or width requested by a View. FILL_PARENT means that the view wants to be as big as its parent, minus the parent's padding, if any. Special value for the height or width requested by a View. MATCH_PARENT means that the view wants to be as ...


0

monitor, onlooker, inspector, receiver/recipient, beholder, examiner ..... The wealth of possible terms offered emphasizes the value of Phil Sweet's advice of April 25: each of the candidate terms has nuanced meaning that fits its context; select the one that best fits the role or relationship you are describing


1

The term neophyte may apply depending on the context. Oxford dictionaries has: A person who is new to a subject, skill, or belief: four-day cooking classes are offered to neophytes and experts


3

I think part of the reason that the ideas of "robbing a bank" or a "train robbery" make sense is the implication that the people inside (or the organization itself) are the real victims of the theft. Corporations are often thought of as entities (e.g. Google says...) but I don't think that most people think of cars as living entities in the same way. I think ...


7

The major difference between the verbs steal and rob -- which can both refer to the same event -- is that the object of steal is the thing stolen, but the object of rob is the owner of the thing stolen. Thus He stole $3,000/a Maserati/everything. He robbed the bank/Harry/everybody. but not *He robbed $3,000/a Maserati/everything. *He stole the ...


1

Tutee may be an appropriate description, if the demonstrator can fairly be described as a tutor.


1

Legally, robbery is a particular form of theft the direct taking of property (including money) from a person (victim) through force, threat or intimidation. law.com Breaking into a house at night, with no one home, is not robbery. Nor is the taking of a car (or its contents) when the owner is not around. Carjacking, on the other hand, is robbery. ...


-1

The "Streams" are full of stars, similar to the night sky. It is saying that the Streams full of stars("Full of stars" is describing the streams), and it is comparing the streams to the night sky.


1

So, for example, is the following sentence wrong? "She told me that if a fire breaks out, I should immediately call the fire department." No, this is completely acceptable usage in American English and, at least to my ear, is preferable to the alternative you suggested, although I cannot tell you why, other than that it sounds more natural and ...


0

I think Iain's answer is very apposite in pointing out the difference between 2D and 3D objects. Also, having read the two articles on the Android SO that you have linked to, it seems to me that the very reason that Google are deprecating the term fill_parent in favour of match_parent is because of the very mis-understanding between the two terms that you ...


1

You understanding seems to be confused due to a lack of connection with the geometry involved; fill here is suggestive of colouring in, rather than filling with water. You are referring to a 2d plane, the rectangle; thus it is an area and not a volume. The padding is also a two dimensional addition to the box-plane, created by the padding rules, however they ...


3

There is the perfectly good word demonstratee ... it's not common but it is part of the English language. Given it's logical connection to demonstrator the meaning should be apparent to people who don't know it and it ties in to your view that you are demonstrating (as opposed to showing or teaching...).


0

In many education contexts these days, the word learner is used.


0

I agree that many a is archaic. However, I feel there is a slight difference in meaning when compared to 'many'. Example: Many geniuses had failed to crack the Enigma. Many a genius had failed to crack the Enigma. Hasn't the second sentence imply each of the geniuses failed individually and singly? The first sentence does not have this meaning. This ...


0

I feel like "In summary, we will spend 28-30 days on the trip, which is neither too short to enjoy nor too long to be good for you" is good if you want to use "too ... to ..." "be good for you" is the least awkward way I could think of saying "not cause damage to your health". Synonyms include "benign" and "wholesome", but I feel like both of them carry ...


4

I would use the term that fits the role or relationship. Are they there to learn or to evaluate? Or is the demonstration more of a dog and pony show intended for a general audience. Or are you accosting people on the street hawking your toy robots? If you were just looking at the mechanics of demonstrations, I'd probably use recipients, audience, or ...


13


5

A hoax is something that encapsulates the idea of deception, typically on a large group of people. Often there is no element of humour in a hoax, instead the principle aim is to confuse or scare. A hoax normally has long term consequences and mysteries that are never resolved. This has created many modern day 'legends' e.g. Loch Ness Monster, Bigfoot, ...


9

A student, if the purpose is to teach.


7

One important word not mentioned here yet is witness. the person you demonstrate to would witness you "flipping a chair for him". witness also refers to someone who testifies in court for what they have witnessed.


18

If it's a demonstration, the viewer could be the -- viewer.


41

Audience could also work in some contexts, especially if you are doing something to delight or entertain others. E.g. David's card tricks were a hit at the party, because his audience was willing to go along with his silly antics.


34

That person would be called observer. What is observer? Well, a person who watches or notices something.



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