Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

1.Italian Peninsula 2.Iberian Peninsula 3.Balkan Peninsula 4.Jutlan Peninsula 5.Scandinarian peninsula


0

If you want to use Google to check frequencies for a word/phrase, I have one suggestion and one warning. First, the suggestion. I have found "Google Fight" an easy way of checking the frequencies of 2 words/phrases. You just enter the two words you want to compare and then click on "Fight" and it shows a bar graph of the frequencies. If you want to use ...


0

I hope things are going well for you. No troubles for you and yours.


0

It is not possible to disillusion ourselves just as it is not possible to administer CPR to ourselves. But we can become disillusioned, i.e. have our illusions taken away.


0

"To have a good command of English" is correct modern British usage, "to command English" is not. SOED has "command of language", meaning "skill in speech, articulacy" (SOED noun sense 3). Oxforddictionaries.com has "he had a brilliant command of English" (noun sense 2) as an example of "the ability to use or control something". That's using "command" as a ...


4

The Alethic (or 'able to') sense of can, has -- predictably for a modal -- lots of strange grammar. In this situation, specifically, Subj can Verb means the same as Subj Verb. This is true of sense verbs (e.g, see, hear, feel, sense, smell, taste). With most sensations, if you can sense something, at some place and time, then you are in fact sensing ...


0

To me both are grammatically correct. However, the main difference lies in their certainty. One of them is more likely to happen than the other. What I'm saying is that if you use "I can see" it means that by this moment, there's an empty both, but perhaps there won't be none later. On the other hand if you say "I see" it's more common because you can see ...


-2

-s suffix may be a morpheme too. Inanimate thing takes possessive s so that it's understandable lucid therefore the modernity makes it simple for clarity otherwise so many prepositions needed the bonnet of the car in the rear. How the car's rear bonnet!


1

'No pun intended' IS a pun! Not so much a contradictory answer, however, I do miss another aspect of the phrase "no pun intended". Thanks to Jeff Richards on episode 135 of the Probably science podcast I can now never hear the phrase without hearing: Nope, unintended! Thought that side of the phrase had to be told here as well. This does underline ...


1

Prop the door open sounds correct, and open here is an adverb, not a verb. I would say it is the same structure as Hold the door open or Keep the door open We (well, at least I) don't say Hold open the door or Keep open the door.


0

No, it is not. The word is 'deceive' ourselves.


0

The issue is whether and is joining a compound verb or a compound sentence. There should not be a comma before and when it joins a compound verb: Alice picked up one of the books and read it. Usually a comma should be used before and when it joins a compound sentence: Alice picked up one of the books, and then she walked out the door with it. You may use ...


-2

If the word before the 'and' is a noun, and the next word is not a noun (or a noun phrase), use a comma. Otherwise you are combining things that don't belong together. 'I want some bread and wine' 'I want some bread, and could you bring me some wine too?' 'I went to get a paper and a cigar'. 'I went to get a paper, and to take a walk'. (Not 'a paper and ...


0

Generally we don't use commas before AND. Since Commas are used in pairs to enclose phrases that interrupt a clause or that are intended to function parenthetically, a writer may choose to place a comma before "and" (or any of the seven coordinating conjunctions) when the conjunction launches such a phrase: e.g. Sarah told him again, and really meant it ...


-2

Does the noun pass the 'silly' test? A countable noun should not sound silly when a numeral immediately precedes it. e.g., 1 evidence, 2 evidences (this is silly). 1 car. 2 cars (this is not silly). Uncountable nouns usually come in 'containers'. The weight of evidence; two cans of coffee, 3 loaves of bread. 4 bottles of wine, and so on. The containers are ...


1

It's interesting that so many people think of Latin as a foreign language; they may be surprised how much of the English language is still Latin! It is of course unkind to use language to make others aware of their own educational shortcomings. But when someone does, it reveals more about the lack of education of the person who uses the phrase, than those ...


0

While they technically all mean the same general thing, each has a slightly different connotation. They are simply wasting their time. This could be used to indicate that the people being referred to are being foolish by wasting time. This could occur as follows: Person 1: Hey, did you hear how Mike and Joe signed up for the tennis team even though ...


1

Language being what it is, a complete ordering is too much to ask for. Nevertheless, I think they can be roughly grouped. "Fan," "geek," and "enthusiast" are aikosha, with "fan" perhaps the least intense, while "fiend," "maniac," and "zealot" are -kyo. I would add that "fanatic," the etymological root of "fan," is in the severe category. User867 rightly ...


2

Straight is a specialized adverb that can pre-modify prepositions. straight in straight past straight up straight out straight home It can't pre-modify adverbs: *straight beautifully Home is usually a preposition in English (- although there is a noun home too). In the Original Poster's example we need: Go straight home. Straight always ...


0

This is just a note on @Barmar's response; but I think many university students will respond with the year they're in ("First year," "second year," etc.). In secondary school, you can get "held back" a year, so you might repeat the 10th grade. In university, you might take more or less time to graduate. So people would also answer "fifth year," if they ...


2

Go home or straight home, is the correct usage of the phrase & home in "go home" is an adverb of place. Examples: Listen my son! Don't loiter after class, and go straight home. Do you go home straight when you get off work early? We do not use a preposition (a word such as 'at' or 'to') before home when it is an adverb: I travel home by bus (NOT- ...


1

This answer refers to American English, I expect it's different in the UK (and perhaps from one UK country to another). If someone is in elementary, middle, or high school, we usually ask What grade are you in? and the answer would either be a number grade First grade through Twelfth grade, or a high school student might answer with sophomore, junior, ...


1

'Inhuman' and 'Inhumane', as per dictionary has the same meaning. But inspite of this fact, they are used in different contexts. Both the words mean cruel and insensitive; but, 'inhumane' stresses on the subject and 'inhuman' stresses on the insensitive behaviour. For illustration, 1) He acts inhumane. 2) He is inhuman towards the boys. In the above ...


-2

Again and again is in usage like much more. The sense differs when only one adjective is used.


-1

I suppose either could be correct depending on the context, but the more common usage would be 'go straight home' which would generally mean to go home without deviating or delaying while en-route.


0

This, that you mentioned is a phrase. You cannot change phrases, grammer used in phrases is irrelevant to the fact that, while speaking they must be left untouched. The modified phrase that you suggested has no fault grammatically, but, it is wrong to change a phrase by adding words between them. So, you can use either of the two: 1) Many many happy returns ...


-1

Think of "more" as meaning "additional" in this case.


1

What makes the sentence correct is what the word "sun" really means. The usual definition refers to the actual entity, the star in the middle of our solar system. The definition of "sun" here does not refer to the star but rather the intensity of heat and light that the sun casts over the environment. Therefore, it is perfectly logical to say "hot sun" ...


0

The answer is YES, it is the right choice. "I don't want to go out in this hot sun" is perfectly gramatical and current usage. Hot - adj - capable of giving a sensation of heat or of burning. In addition to "sun", "hot" (specifically meaning "having a high temperature") is often used with several other nouns: hot dog hot weather hot bath ...


6

"I don't want to go out in this hot sun" is a perfectly acceptable and grammatical English sentence. Hot is simply an adjective describing the effects of the sun.


0

Malapropism: an act or habit of misusing words ridiculously, especially by the confusion of words that are similar in sound. an instance of this, as in “Lead the way and we'll precede.”


0

Of the three sentences you provided, the only one that is correct is: What is the name of the gym you attend? You don't train or practise a gym, you train or practise at a gym. Note that this wording is rather formal. You could also ask: What is the name of your gym? Although the gym does not belong to you, this would be perfectly understood. ...


0

I would use 'from my perspective', 'from my standpoint' or 'in my view'. I personally wouldn't use any of the other variations.


1

Update: As pointed out to me by Araucaria in the comments, my initial examples didn't quite work. So I'll have another go: Yes, both sentences are grammatically correct. The main difference is how "suddenly" is being used. In your first sentence, it's used as an adverb of manner. This means it modifies the verb (feeling): I nodded, my chest gradually ...


-2

I nodded, all of a sudden, my chest feels heavier..


1

If one looks at the linked article, the opening paragraph says Buried in the 10,000 pages of documents released by the Clinton Presidential Library further ahead you read the following lines. The Library made the documents available Friday, completing the release of 30,000 pages of previously restricted White House records on everything from ...


6

I believe the writer meant token: Something serving as an indication, proof, or expression of something else; a sign. (AHDEL) Googling a totem of the problem yields only one result (repeatedly): that sentence about Hillary Clinton. Googling a totum of the yields: otter, Mother, Northwest, United States, tree, group, horned god, great blue heron, ...


1

Note - as Medica has identified it's simply an error for "token". There's nothing more to it. Regarding "totems" (just for the hell of it...) ie, providing answers to the other questions you ask... Yoichi, I feel (a) that is an extremely poor use of the word "totem". {What word to use there in that sentence? It's not a "symbol" and has no connection ...


2

[Too long for a comment, but might be useful nonetheless] The chemical symbols are symbols because they are universal, as brasshat has stated in his answer. However, they were originally derived as abbreviations — often from Latin. Fe for iron comes from ferrum; Pb for lead comes from plumbum (think plumbing); Sn for tin from stannum; C for carbon ...


1

The Taino people of the Caribbean islands called corn (what we now call corn), "mahiz." The Spanish became the dominant culture on these islands, but took up the word "mahiz" which became "maize." (According to Wikipedia, as the first language encountered by Europeans in the New world, Taino became a source of many new words for the Europeans.) The Spanish ...


4

An abbreviation is a shortening of a word. An example of an abbreviation would be "intro." instead of "introduction". Another example would be the use of "Mr." for the word "Mister". In Medicine, "pre-op." is an abbreviation for pre-operative. Note that abbreviations are followed by periods. On the other hand, the word for the characters representing ...


-2

The term C for carbon symbolises carbon and can be used as a shorthand for carbon in a sentence. It's definitely an abbreviation but technically given the term symbol. Symbol in chemistry == Abbreviation in English


-2

I believe that it is called practicing because the laws are constantly changing, technology is changing, and new medicines are being introduced. Thus, lawyers and doctors are always practicing.


6

You can use the CONCEPT of a tl;dr in a formal mail. just don't NAME it that. Call it "summary" or a similar term. Clients will love a short and to the point conclusion, because it means they don't need to read a 50 line email if they can't or don't want to. If they want to know more, they can read the rest, but if they are preparing for a meeting or are ...


3

I imagine that my internet and email usage is significantly higher than for many of my generation but despite being familiar with most shorthand, I've not previously seen TL;DR . My point is simply that, in a formal letter, you probably want to be certain (not merely "reasonably sure") that the person to whom you are writing will know what you mean. And you ...


8

No. You cannot use TL;DR in a formal email to a client.


3

Looking at the ngrams of both, good night has a more frequent use. Goodnight has only appeared recently, suggesting that it has been introduced – but is correct to use. I would write "Goodnight, sweetheart" and "Have a good night". I also think that "goodnight" is just a shortened way of saying "have a good night".


1

Have you consulted a dictionary? Merriam-Webster lists good night and good-night. Collins, AHDEL, and others list only good night. Oxford online lists goodnight. Looks like you have your pick. In AmE, I most often see good night.


0

Problematic communicates that the idea or topic discussed either causes or has a history of causing a problem. The word problematic is actually in itself problematic. I propose that it should be changed to probmatic - as I have often heard it pronounced.


0

Shockingly, the word mono-use is (literally) unfindable in Google. In Italian it's monouso, do I need to explain its meaning? Isn't it self-explanatory? You use it one time But someone has caught on and given the name mono-use in their patent for a hypodermic syringe Mono-use syringe for hypodermic injections The invention relates to syringes ...



Top 50 recent answers are included