Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

After giving a second thought on this topic, i came to the conclusion that i have mixed up two different things when comparing what a pump does (injecting something) against how a pump does something. (with an continuous operation) Therefore, the act of injecting something is not applicable as a mode of operation to a pump. From a technical point of view, ...


0

If I am reading your explanation properly, we are talking about a pump that is either in continuous operations, or it is waiting to be "actuated." A good example would be a sump pump with a paddle float switch. When the paddle float is submersed in water, it floats to the surface. This action turns the actuator on the pump, which causes the pump to turn ...


-1

Its plain wrong grammatically i think. I know what they mean but its like the formalization of a concatenation. Its like another one i hear: "shooting death". Who is doing the shooting? - subject verb problem i think. Fatally shot is the correct way to express that thought grammatically.


1


1

My original suggestions didn't apply after reading your clarification in your comments. In this case, I would use burst to describe the mode of operation. The term burst is often used to describe the occurrence of a sudden event. Since it is a pump, it should be implied the sudden event is the pump discharge. The pump is in burst operation mode. Since ...


4

If you feel that each of these sentences needs a transition word, you can use three different ones appropriately enough: Mary thought the man was nice-looking. Nevertheless, that wasn't enough to lower her defenses. Tom crossed his arms on the table. Unfortunately, he did it so hard that he hurt his elbows. Sophie stopped finding meaning in ...


-1

It means: the procedures or sequence of actions that someone will follow to accomplish a goal. Examples: a. I plan to follow a course of action that will produce the best results. b. The board planned a course of action that would reduce costs and eliminate employees. However 'action' is a very general term for the state or process of ...


-1

The inclusion of course of in front of action has the effect of abstracting it, removing any implication that the action is atomic (unitary or indivisible) or, sometimes, discrete (with clear temporal boundaries—a clear start and end). In other words, "course of action" is like "action or sequence of actions", where the action(s) could be relatively discrete ...


2

Mary thought the man was nice-looking, but that wasn't enough to lower her defenses. Tom crossed his arms on the table. He did it so hard that he hurt his elbows. Sophie stopped finding meaning in things. Not in a spiritual or philosophical way; things simply ceased to make sense to her.


3

This question came up in Ben Zimmer's "On Language" column in the New York Times of May 21, 2010. Zimmer does a nice job of outlining the history of the with-less fraught. In particular, he points to the 1920s as seeing the first occurrences of fraught "without even a hint of an object": The earliest example I've found so far comes from a 1925 serialized ...


1

Maybe, but I don't think so. Fraught -- (of a situation or course of action) filled with or destined to result in (something undesirable). Google Dictionary This suggests that it requires two other things - a situation and a unpleasant noun. For example: The stunt          was ...


1

Probably. One of the meanings of Fraught is "distressed", how ever the word is used so rarely that except for special circumstances, I might suggest using a different word.


3

nonetheless is most often used as a replacement for however, in spite of or despite that so it doesn't sit well in your sentence. For nonetheless to be useful in your sentence, the second part really has to be in opposition to the first as in I was so down and unmotivated, nonetheless, I clambered on to the chair with the spriteliness of a chimp. Or a ...


0

Using is over has in general is a sop thrown to King James Bible English. If you do not intend to make that reference, avoid it.


3

There are examples of is risen in both North American and British writing, but they are rare and almost always refer to Jesus. Nevertheless, it is very occasionally used for the sun or moon.


0

"In the case being" simply does not make sense, here or elsewhere. In the case would be acceptable though imperfect in your example; the verb would have to be were involved rather than were to be. I think the journalist is just too much of a hurry to think of the best construction, "if ISIS were to become involved". And as per is a horrible construction. It ...


-1

It's not real complicated. If you're talking about problems in industry X, that is industry problems. (Example, "petroleum industry problems.") If you're talking about industrial problems, that is industrial problems. (Example, "The USA and UK have industrial problems, but Japan and China have no industrial problems.")


-1

This article by Wikipedia (reformatted) discusses the choice between noun adjunct and attributive adjective (when the choice is available): Use of noun adjuncts when an adjectivally inflected alternative is available. It is a trait of natural language that there is often more than one way to say something. Any of the options that is logically ...


0

A funny way to remember this is One effects and affect by striking a child -- it causes them to be angry with you. It captures the two exceptions, tying them to something forbidden, and that tells you what the normal usage is.


-1

Scientific research If your research based on scientific principles it is called Scientific research. The complete process will actually involve everything from "Thesis" to "Peer Review". The Wikipedia acticle on scientific method sums it all up nicely. Some more clarification or context on the question would help, since there seem to be different ways ...


0

Shove a 'though' on the front of it, and you are fine. I was showering and, though not on purpose, I participated in the #icebucketchallenge. So I would say it is also just fine elliptically omitting the preposition. Since you set it off as a subordinate phrase, the contradistinction that the 'though' imparts is already implied. It would also be ...


3

Birthday: using the stricter definition, a birthday is the anniversary of one's birth. Anniversary: is a word used to commemorate special occasions, like weddings, or first dates ( important job promotions for instance) or important purchases ( a house) and things like that. Interestingly enough, even though we don't usually refer to ...


1

Birthday is generally used for people's birth dates and sometimes for a country's, as you've said. Anniversary, on the other hand, is generally used for a marriage or relationship between two people, for example the day of the year two people got married. It is also used to signify the day an important event happened. For example, November 9th of this year ...


0

Anniversary is for things that are celebrated annually. And this includes birthdays, of course, but a birthday is a special case of anniversary, and you would almost never say birth anniversary, but almost always birthday. However, unless you qualify the anniversary, it is generally taken to mean a "wedding anniversary". If I say, "Today is my ...


0

pre-planning is similar to over-exaggerate and very unique. They are evidence of the cognitive decay of post-modern society, where discipline and complexity give way to flaccid simple-mindedness.


1

Being of the feminine gender myself, I am struggling to see what the problem is with using that phrase. I might instead say - being female, or being a woman. But I doubt if I would say "being of the feminine sex" or "being of the female sex". Other answers open up the whole can of worms of transgender issues, but sticking to the original question, yes it ...


1

Firstly, let's acknowledge that a lot of people don't make any distinction between sex and gender, that is - when they say 'My gender is female', they also mean that their sex is female and vice versa. That may be the case in the context you've given; the writer is simply using an airy way to saying 'As a woman myself...'. However, 'my gender is ...


4

You can say that someone is of the feminine gender, or even a woman, but it doesn't necessarily mean the person is biolologically female. This distinction between biology and social role is not entirely new. Simone de Beauvoir went there in 1949 in The Second Sex ('one is not born, but rather becomes, a woman') and it was expanded on by Judith Butler in ...


10

The distinctions between gender and sex are complex and controversial (to say nothing of the issues of sexual orientation). A discussion of these issues can be found in this article in Wikipedia. The article suggests that there is a differentiation between sex, the biological makeup of an individual's reproductive anatomy or secondary sex ...


3

I've operated a spot lamp in theaters a number of times here on the California side of whatever pond you choose, and if you want to extinguish the light, you "douse" it using the chopper blades, which are operated by a lever, or stick, if you will. Any reference manual for a spot lamp will use the term "douse" to mean to dim or fully extinguish the light ...


4

The way it is written could be improved. As it stands it does suggest that 'your father' happened upon the discovery by chance. But that is largely due to the circumstances of this particular account. Consider for a moment He looked up to see a dodo flying backwards. It could mean either that he had just been told there was a dodo flying backwards, so he ...


0

strategic: adjective relating to the identification of long-term or overall aims and interests and the means of achieving them. "strategic planning for the organization is the responsibility of top management" synonyms: planned, calculated, deliberate; More antonyms: random designed or planned to serve a particular purpose. "alarms are positioned at ...


-1

Since you've clarified you're looking for a word which describes "military relations", perhaps "martial" would suit: martial: relating to fighting or war.


3

Diplomatic is the word you want here. Dictionary.com: adjective 1. of, pertaining to, or engaged in diplomacy: diplomatic officials. Diplomacy: noun 1. the conduct by government officials of negotiations and other relations between nations. 2. the art or science of conducting such negotiations. So your example sentence would be ...


0

This is a fairly new usage of tease, but I've seen it all too often in recent years at the online tech publishing sites where I've worked. Essentially the word "Teases" in the headline "Gigabyte Teases LED-Lit X99-UD4 Motherboard" means "promotes in a teasing fashion." Why "a teasing fashion"? Because the product isn't ready for actual previewing yet, so ...


0

This is shown by the weakening of his monarchy, posthumously.


2

"Posthumous" connotes events/effects that refer back to the dead guy, so it's the wrong word here. Simply say the monarchy weakened after [his] death.


3

I think that use of the word "swag" in that sentence is a slang abbreviation of the word "swagger" which is itself slang for "show off". So a rough translation would be "if you are going to show off in a post, you should at least attempt to use the right spelling [else it would undermine your swagger]".


-1

I think there's a larger difference between use 3 and the other two in your list. Let me address 1 and 2 first. The word "loud" is an adjective and "loudly" is the related adverb. In this situation, the difference has do with what you are associating the "loudness" with in the given context. You might use "speak loud" if you were assessing loudness by ...


4

I think non-native speakers would probably be well advised not to use yonder in any contexts (though as a native speaker myself I'm okay with yonder=afar, over there and yon=those, that). From oxforddictionaries online: yonder ADVERB - ARCHAIC or DIALECT At some distance in the direction indicated; over there: DETERMINER - ARCHAIC or DIALECT ...


1

I know xyz has water scarcity, but is abc having water scarcity too? This is the more correct usage. You can put too closer to the noun in certain cases, but it is limited and tends to sound more aloof. "abc too suffers from water scarcity." for example. In these cases also is more natural and understood.


2

In addition to sheep and lemming, which others have suggested: Single-word adjective: Enchanted or charmed. Single-word noun: follower. Adjectival expression: to have drunk the kool-aid or to be under the spell.


2

If you wish to emphasize the thrall under which the piper holds his subject, consider minion A follower or underling of a powerful person, especially a servile or unimportant one. [Oxford Dictionary Online] If the innocence of the adherent is the focus, perhaps the noun, naif (or naive) One who is artless, credulous, or uncritical. [American ...


2

Yes, one could say "He is the epitome of corruption". Indifference, to me, is the epitome of evil. Elie Wiesel, in US News & World Report (27 October 1986) When it is phrased 'an epitome' the noun refers to its second meaning of 'a condensed account', as in: In the first part the greatest freedom has been used in reducing the narration into a ...


1

In the sense of a perfect example It could be used for something positive or negative. As to the definite or indefinite article, it depends on the context.....you will see the epitome more frequently in colloquial usage.


1

It means (this was your question, no?) to turn off the highlighting of something that is highlighted, so that it is no longer highlighted. Some people use dehighlight; some use unhighlight. They are synonymous, as far as I know. The Emacs manual, for example, uses dehighlight, but various 3rd-party Emacs libraries use unhighlight (to mean the same thing). ...


0

At the computer magazines where I've worked, we consistently used the term deselect to refer to clicking a highlighted option in a menu so that the highlighting went away, indicating that the option was no longer the active one for that particular program parameter. Unhighlight would work just as well, in my opinion, though we never used it. I was surprised ...


6

I find both unhighlight (and dehighlight) on-line with substantial use and both sound fine to me. Because un- is a standard prefix that can be applied to a wide swath of words and generally be readily understood, dictionaries won't include many (most?) un- words, even well attested ones, unless their un- version has become lexicalized and has shades of ...


17

The connotation is not just LGBT-related. You can come out as a bronie. You can be outed as a spy. However, your friend is right. If your documentary is not about LGBT people coming out of the closet, then it is a bad choice for a title if your documentary is meant to play in US and EU. For example, this hugely popular song works for all kinds of coming ...


2

The phrase "in my humble opinion" is too much of a colloquialism nowadays. Taken literally, it might have acted as a softener once, but idiomatically, as others have pointed out, it comes off as rude and sarcastic. Personally, I would use something like "I believe", or just "in my opinion" without the word humble. Simply stating explicitly that your opinion ...



Top 50 recent answers are included