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0

It is rude, but the ones asking were rude first, so no objection. I would ignore the question and walk away.


7

I'd like to highlight a slightly larger chunk in your sentence: Somatization disorder also causes challenge and burden on the life of the caregivers or significant others of the patient. "Significant other" is a strong collocation; together, these words take on meaning beyond the two words separately. As explained on Wikipedia: Significant other ...


0

You already have your answer from the source you cited. Ostentatious involves showing off. Ostentatious is conspicuous, but conspicuous is not necessarily ostentatious. So you are correct, they overlap but are not exact sunonyms.


1

One of the Urban Dictionary entries asserts that "owly" is common in Nova Scotia: Urban Dictionary s.v. owly (punctuation and capitalization edited) Out of sorts; grumpy Used widely in Nova Scotia When my mother called me to get up and get ready for school, I yelled "Do you have to be so loud?" She said, "Oh, feeling owly this morning, are we?" ...


-2

One cannot tell whether they have the same meaning, because none of them are clear enough; mainly because none specifies whether the time mentioned is a departure or arrival time. To make it clear, include "scheduled to depart" or "scheduled to arrive". (That is, if you actually want to be met at your destination city, when you arrive, rather than at your ...


1

It is actually related to how owls look. They look grumpy! (at least most of them). There is a strong evidence that it might be originated from Nova Scotia or around that region in colloquial usage: [South Shore Phrase Book: New, Revised and Expanded Nova Scotia Dictionary By Lewis Poteet (2004)] [Dictionary of Prince Edward Island ...


0

They could have the same meaning, depending upon context. Generally, though, the latter two (..."for New York") are slightly more ambiguous, as it's not clear whether the flight is originating in New York, or whether it is terminating there. There is less ambiguity in the first choice.


1

It is definitely a word: yessir Syllabification: yes·sir Pronunciation: /ˈyesər, ˈyesˈsər Definition of yessir in English:EXCLAMATION Used to express assent: “Do you understand me?” “Yessir!” 1.1. North American Used to express emphatic affirmation: 'yessir the food was cheap' I tend to think that it ...


2

Many things other than evidence can be circumstantial in the sense of a detailed account, for example: circumstantial narrative circumstantial journal circumstantial account circumstantial memories circumstantial deliveries However this meaning does seem to be mostly seen in older texts. Looking at recent documents shows a predominance of the meaning ...


0

Per Oxford Dictionaries: (Of a description) containing full details: The picture was circumstantial and therefore convincing. I can't say I hear/read it used much outside of a legal context, but that doesn't mean it's not acceptable; you may run the risk of misinterpretation by the audience if that is a concern.


1

Myself with family from Southern Ohio, along the river, and from West Virginia, I endorse the opinion that the sense of "ornery" should not be underestimated. "Ornery" is a very common descriptive word in Appalachia for both children and certain adults (applied often to me). And I think the comment that not all adults are ornery misses the theological ...


5

I think the way you're thinking of secure is right on the edge of what the word means. To secure something provides assurance that that something is safe, or true. I think the word you're looking for is more like: "The state ensures that people do not have any emotions" "The state assures there are no emotions" To use the word secure in a sentence like ...


0

In Australia, we would definitely say The passport will expire in 2 years. as though time followed years, and in is understood to mean about or approximately. It is with some surprise that I read the comments from esteemed users @Janus and @Edwin, hence my qualification in Australia - perhaps this is regional usage.


1

The same criteria for choosing between whichever and whatever apply here as for choosing between which and what. This is a question that has been asked several times on ELU, including : "Which" vs. "what" — what's the difference and when should you use one or the other? In summary, which is generally to be preferred when choosing ...


0

Scot M gave an exhaustive answer. Here is the simple version: You are correct, they mean basically the same. However, you also guessed correctly that "bate" is nowadays (at least in America) used almost exclusively in "with bated breath", which means "in intense anticipation" figuratively or literally so excited as to refrain even from breathing. As "bate" ...


2

abate is related to bate etymologically. Bate Origin late Middle English: from Old French batre 'to beat' (see also batter1). Abate Origin Middle English (in the legal sense): from Old French abatre 'to fell', from a- (from Latin ad 'to, at') + batre 'to beat' (from Latin battere, battuere 'to beat'). The word picture for ...


2

It is not clear to me how literal the scenario you're asking about is. But if you're talking about a non-literal or intangible "weapon", such as a devastating piece of news that can stun a political opponent into submission, then the following metaphors might be useful: "The knives were drawn." "The gloves came off." "The claws are out." "He showed his ...


0

If we're seeking to be booked to do an event I would say: We are now looking for bookings for dates after 24th January.


0

I think I would say: We are now taking bookings for dates after 24th January


0

In your case, specifically when reserving times and dates, you can use to book [something] as a synonymous verb in that context. He is booking the hotel for Sunday. However, I give you fair warning against using the phrase "being booked" (passive voice), as it sometimes gives the connotation of criminal offenses. He was booked on charges of ...


3

One term that describes provocative military or diplomatic conduct that may lead to an escalation in tensions between two nations is saber (or sabre) rattling. Merriam-Webster Online defines the phrase rather narrowly: saber rattling (1922) ostentatious display of military power But taken literally, it refers to rattling one's sword while leaving it in ...


2

Unsheathe: Draw or pull out (a knife, sword, or similar weapon) from its sheath or covering. I'm not quite sure this fits your intended usage; it would be easier if you gave us an example sentence.


0

Not specific to a weapon but I think of the word "unveiled." From Oxford Dictionary Online: Unviel: Remove a veil or covering from, especially uncover (a new monument or work of art) as part of a public ceremony:


1

I suspect that "at a crack" is closely connected to the idiomatic phrase "have a crack at," so let's start with that phrase. The idiom 'have a crack at' From Christine Ammer, American Heritage Dictionary of Idioms (1996): have a crack at Also, get or have a go or shot or whack at; take a crack at. Make an attempt or have a turn at doing something. ...


1

This is a very common idiom in US English. Have no idea as to the origin, but the meaning, in the above context, is simply "in one single action", usually with the implication that other similar actions occur. One might say "He's spending $500 a crack for fancy ties and he doesn't have enough money to pay his rent." Or maybe "The garbage grinder chews up ...


1

"At a crack" is probably from "take/have a crack at". "I never felt such a desire to have a crack at any thing in all my life." A Narrative of the Life of David Crockett, Written by Himself," Philadelphia, 1834 I have used the phrase "at a crack" myself, and have heard it often in Pennsylvania. The meaning is clearly "attempt", and more precisely ...


1

The Online Etymology Dictionary has this explanation for 'crack' as a noun: Adjectival meaning "top-notch, superior" (as in a crack shot) is slang from 1793, perhaps from earlier verbal sense of "do any thing with quickness or smartness" (Johnson). Also, there's the expression 'at the crack of dawn' where 'crack' also suggests a certain immediacy. On the ...


2

"Nothing artificial contained here" can be read as "no artificial thing [is] contained here". The word "artificial" acts as an adjective, modifying the pronoun "nothing". True, it happens to follow the word that it modifies, but it still qualifies that word. If you intended the question "Can artificial be used alone without further qualification?" to mean ...


6

You mentioned food products as an example. 'No artificial ingredients,' or 'all natural' come to mind. These terms are unregulated by the FDA in America (only 'organic' has real meaning on packaging in these terms). So in this sense, these words are meaningless when used in advertising or on packaging. I believe that answers part of your question. The ...


4

Yes it can be use a alone, but the exact meaning will depend on context and in some cases it may be ambiguous. For example in British (and I expect European Union) food labelling law, an ingredient is considered artificial if it includes a chemical compound that was created other than in a living thing or natural process.


3

"Nothing is created or destroyed, but merely transformed." who said that? It is clear that anything comes from what we already have in nature. Transformation (generally via chemical processes) is what characterises something from being natural or artificail The degree of transformation can give rise to debates to the fact that someting is closer to being ...


1

According to this, mixing "one" with "he/his/him" in a sentence is more common in AmE than BrE, but even in the US this habit is decreasing. So while you may hear it such mixed pronouns, personally I would avoid them. One is a an immensely useful pronoun and English would be a poorer language if one were allowed to wither and fade. Use it, celebrate it, ...


1

When describing an impersonal character performing something, one has several options. Which option is selected depends largely on personal preference or the preference expressed in any style-guides the author has to follow. You can use the second person: if you keep travelling in a certain direction, etc. This is quite informal and tends to appear as a try ...


2

It is grammatically correct to use the same pronoun consistently throughout a sentence, rather than shifting persons. I suspect that you were bothered by the first instance of "one", and more bothered by the author's consistently repeating it.


3

The word you are looking for is "commonality".


-1

This is not a single word but an idiom. drag your feet/heels as in: The government promised to provide universal health care, but now it's dragging its feet over the issue. We expected the company to drag its heels when it came to paying compensation to the injured workers, but now it doesn't want to pay anything! Examples from EnglishClub. ...


-1

I am from Australia, with my mother's generation from Devon. When living in the UK in the 1970's I was intrigued to hear the cook at the hotel where I was working refer to breakfast as break fast, which is no doubt the original pronunciation. She was from Yorkshire, I think. One of my landladies in Carlisle served us a high tea in the early evening, which ...


0

If this fear of asking a girl out gives an almost pleasurable sensation of fright: Why not- thrill tingle


1

This kind of fear or phobia is also called: Dating anxieties: Dating, by its very nature, is a situation in which two people have not already committed to a permanent relationship. So, for many people, if not most people, dating relationships are experienced as insecure attachments and therefore anxiety producing. (from psychologytoday.com) ...


1

Although the sentence works very well without "each other", I believe the author was influenced by the era before liberalized divorce. The 1960s will do as a general era, but the exact date varied from one USA state to another. I don't know when this occurred in the UK, which would be the relevant date for the article you cite. Before that time, one ...


0

Omitting "each other" in this particular sentence is perfectly acceptable, but so is the original statement. In this case, it can be argued that including "each other" results in a pleonasm.


1

It is called love-shyness colloquially. The person is called a love-shy. It can be applied to women also but it is usually associated with men. The term can cover the fear of any romantic interaction with the opposite sex. love-shy men are unable to get girlfriends/wives either because they don't know how, or they are too affraid. it means ...


0

If you want to ask a girl out and have no fear of rejection, you have self-confidence. If you are scared to ask a girl out, it is probably because you are shy.


1

I suppose it's fine if the narrator goes on to explain how the lying started, and uses the "when" answer to let the reader know the context. For example: So how did this lying issue start? Well, it began the night of my wedding. She told me she put some beer in the fridge, so I checked and there was none!


0

This remind me of the impression when I struggled through "What is the life?: Physical aspect of the living cell" by Erwin Schrodinger. We call the continuation of action without any more interest, but because of habit or previous efforts "惰性的に...する (do job, read, speak, run on inertia, or on inertia force)" in Japanese. I wonder the concept of inertia can ...


8

Awhile is an adverb: Bear with me awhile. A while is the use of the noun "while": We've been here for a while. So in your example you can use either: I've been wondering this awhile. Or: I been wondering for a while.


6

When you decide to continue a task until completion, you decided to see it through.


3

I don't think it's inherently incorrect. Depending on the context you could use in case in a sentence in a past tense (e.g. Please check your phone's pictures in case you have seen this man but didn't notice). I think it's just the sentence you chose makes it hard to find a fitting context. With this I don't mean to imply that if and in case are ...


13

Completionism is how this is described in the video-gaming community. If a game has collectables and sidequests, a completionist will feel the urge to collect every item and complete every quest. It's done to earn the 100%.


1

A completist Feels compelled to finish a collection or series. Since the book is by a favorite author and that provides motivation to persevere, it could be called completism. Definition



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