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2

If is were missing from the position shown, the sentence would be badly formed. The phrase before the semi-colon is an independent clause with subject and verb; for parallelism, an independent clause should follow the semicolon. You might consider the following wordings. It has nothing to do with logic; it functions to prevent us falling completely ...


5

It might appear to be possible to omit the is because there already is an implied is in the it's function. But this is a spelling mistake. It should be its function. So, its function is the subject of the clause, which needs a verb (in this case the copula is) as the essential part of the predicate or complement. You also need the -ing form of the last ...


-1

How about just, "Thank you," Amir? Of course, if you were writing a letter to a customer who was seriously in arrears, you might say, "Thank you for acting on this matter before midnight tonight." But if you're just being thankful for the time it took them to the bottom of your letter, a simple, "Thank you" will do it.


1

Either of these: Thank you for the time you spent reading this letter. Thank you for taking the time to read this letter. The preposition on isn't needed.


1

In this part of Canada (southern Ontario), pass me the flipper will get you a turner, pass me the spatula will get you a turner or a scraper, and pass the scraper will get you a rubber spatula. No consensus. Spatula seems to mean anything you want but in my kitchen a turner is called a flipper and a scraper is called a spatula. Don't know why - ask my ...


0

The second example, from Apple, reads as if it were missing quotation marks. I parse it thus: "Most importantly", Gallo said, "It shows that Cook cares deeply about Apple." I suspect the writer was not using a sentence adverb to convey that what Gallo said was most important; but rather, he was trying to say that Gallo himself said "most importantly, it ...


-2

The most formal, respectful and deferential way of addressing a person today is Respected Sir, or Respected Madam. Use it when the other person is clearly not your equal in any way, and stands very much higher than you. Ex: The President, a Minister, The Pope, your professor, etc.


0

This must be a very regional occurrence to call it a "tea towel" here in the United States. I have lived in California, Arizona, and Connecticut and have NEVER heard it referred to as a tea towel. Washcloth, dishcloth, dish towel, hand towel, kitchen towel, and dishrag are the only ones I have used or heard to it referred to as. If any of the previous ...


0

Hawkeye, The problem with America is it is so wide spread that we don't always call items by the same name. We have pop, soda, and coke for referring to a carbonated soda depending on where you are from. I have heard of tea towels all my life but I have heard then called wash clothes, cheese cloths (even if that isn't technically correct), hand towels, ...


6

Mirroring John Deters' answer, here is an inventory for the British kitchen (well, Home Counties English - I'm sure there are further local variants): Tea-towel, or drying-up cloth - [=JD's Dish towel] clean, thin, absorbant, passed from generation to generation until disintegrating. Commemorative pictures, flowery patterns, rude phrases. Hand towel - ...


18

As an American, I can tell you that we have many different absorbent materials in our kitchens. Here's an inventory of ours, along with the typical uses. Dish towel - always kept clean of food or hand contamination, used only to dry clean dishes after washing them. Sometimes known as flour-sack towels, they are flat, 100% cotton. They are often printed ...


0

As a native french speaker, I can confirm you that the guy who told you "Thank you for your disponibility" wanted to tell you "Thank you for your availability!". This mistake is often made by french people. As hunter said, "disponibilité (french word)" => "availability".


29

I guess they are called: Dish towels: a rectangular piece of absorbent cloth (or paper) for drying or wiping A tea towel or drying-up cloth (English), or dish towel (American) is a cloth which is used to dry dishes, cutlery, etc., after they have been washed. In 18th century England, a tea towel was a special linen drying cloth used ...


30

I am American and familiar with "tea towel", but I think more commonly you'll see them called "kitchen towels". I would be surprised to find them in a gift store - they don't strike me as very collectible items. That may be the larger cultural disconnect.


1

I am joining this conversation very late, but generally let me add a couple of comments. First, perhaps you need more than one word to get at the meaning in English that you need. Somewhere I saw a great descriptive phrase "prodigal tongue". A prodigal (think of the biblical story of the prodigal son) is basically a "spendthrift"; a person who cannot help ...


-1

According to the Encyclopédie, ou Dictionnaire raisonné des sciences,from 1750,the universe is a common noun,naming the idea,not specific in a way The Universe,described as"nom collectif",i guess,of the world and all stars of the sky above. My impression,is that the interess for the physical view of the Universe grow old in the years of the french ...


-1

Phrases can confuse us because they are wrongly used, and also because they use the very same word pairing. "Everyday" is a perfect example. Sometimes a merchant's sign reads, "Everyday low prices." But why would a merchant voluntarily associate him/herself with banality? No, it must be that the writer-merchant meant that the prices are low every day of the ...


0

This isn’t the “in anger” that you mean, but I think that anything that we can do can be done “in anger,” even “fall” and weirdly enough, maybe even “love”: “The parachutist, whose one true love was still parachuting in spite of his chute’s failure, quickly understood what it meant to love in anger while falling in anger to his death.” Anyway, here’s a stab ...


-1

He is so kind to his fellow people (that) people started to consider him like saint. The meaning of this sentence is He is kind to such a degree that people started to consider him like saint In the quoted sentence the use of That is optional. Your quoted sentence in your question bear the same pattern.construction like that of my quoted sentence. In ...


2

Use can mean to treat someone in an unfair way, for example by pretending to care about them so that they do what you want You know he's just using you. use someone for your own ends (=to get what you want): Liz has always used people for her own ends. http://www.macmillandictionary.com/dictionary/american/use#use_17 In that ...


3

"I was used" is perfectly good English but may not have quite the meaning you are looking for. It is quite a common phrase in crime thrillers and soap operas, where it is used to convey the meaning "I, as a person, was used. I was tricked into doing or believing X, when the deceiver only wanted to take advantage of me. I feel exploited and cheapened." If ...


2

You use problematic if you want to impress people. I mean, why say problem when you could much more fancily say problematic. Fifty years ago, almost no one used problematic. It's like resonate today. Everybody who wants to be impressive, must use that word. Ten years ago, no one used it. When someone says, "That resonates with me," I just hear gongs ...


-1

It is contextual. Here is a link to an article: Universe Or universe? It All Depends On The Multiverse, which helps to clarify. The reader can easily check, after glancing at a handful of books and articles, including here at 13.7, that the word "universe" sometimes is capitalized and sometimes not. How is that decided, exactly? And who decides ...


1

It is correct but I would say "one of my childhood dreams come true" if I had more than one dream. If only one, then "I'm about to make my childhood dream come true"


3

pro sale... an outcome is assumed that is of benefit to the vendor he could have recommended.... he could have encouraged me to try... he could have suggested as an alternative... he could have highlighted (or pointed out) as being less spicy... he could have served me... (not strictly same gist or meaning as involves mis-delivery or forward looking ...


1

"Dream" should be "dreams", but other than that, your sentence is correct. "Come true" is used properly here.


1

Edit (more friendly) According to Google define: deter verb Discourage (someone) from doing something by instilling doubt or fear of the consequences. define: defer verb Put off (an action or event) to a later time; postpone. Thus, neither "deter" nor "defer" seem to fit in this context.


2

I only say "Is that any good?" when I don't expect the thing to be good. To me, "Was that movie any good" means "it didn't look good to me but I'd like to hear your opinion." Can't think of a way to use the phrase "any good" outside of a question. So when asked "Is that any good?" a person would reply that it's good/bad, but not that it's "any good."


9

I believe you mean to say, "...he could have referred me to." To deter you would mean he would stop or prevent you from eating the hot/spicy item. To defer you would mean he would prevent you from eating the hot/spicy food item, with the implication of postponement until a later time. You may have said "there were a lot of other things on the menu he ...


2

By itself, good means (in this usage) Having the required qualities; of a high standard: a good restaurant The phrase any good means: Have some merit: tell me whether that picture is any good ODO definitions So good generally implies a higher level of quality than any good. E.g. if a food is good, you look forward to eating it; if it's just ...


0

I think the correct is 'universe', not 'Universe' (except the word is placed as the first word of sentence, we must use 'Universe'). This word is like star and moon that doesn't use capitalization because universe is not scientific name like The Big Bang. I'm sorry if my answer is wrong.


2

You could write enables or disables the functionality or activates or deactivates the functionality or, less comprehensibly toggles the operation of the functionality


1

The modifier "any" can be read as a logic check for non-zero values. "Do you have any apples?" --> Do you not have zero apples? With that in mind, I'd say "is that any good" is a gentler inquiry along the same lines of "is that good" "is that any good?" --> is this even a little bit good "is that good?" --> is this good I think it's an issue of the ...


0

It depends on what you mean by "accepted"—everyone would understand what you mean, but "dickishness" is still a nonce word: a word that has been invented in order to render some concept more easily or efficiently communicable. (In this case, it's a perjoration plus an abstraction: dick becomes an insult, then the insult becomes a quality or an abstract ...


1

After a service, I asked a priest about the creed which reads, "one holy, catholic church" and said I thought I was attending an Anglican church. He replied, "'Catholic' with a small c." That was 20 years ago, so it would be understood in religious settings at the very least.


6

I don't think it would be universally understood, chiefly because most English speakers don't realize there is a meaning to "catholic" other than "the Christian church that recognizes the Pope in Rome as its spiritual head". That wouldn't make it a useless thing to say though. For instance my (non Catholic) church occasionally has us recite the Apostle's ...


2

I'd understand it right away (but I cannot claim to be representative of what people would "generally" understand). As an alternative, I eat anything I'll try anything [once]! I'm omnivorous I'm easy to please I'd like what you're having I'm a flexitarian <-- a new favourite It wouldn't occur to me to describe a taste in food as "catholic", though: ...


1

While I agree with previous answers that the distinction in the sentences in the question has to do with adjective vs. adverb usage, I also think it's useful to note a related issue concerning the adverbial usage of the specific word importantly, especially in the phrases more importantly and most importantly. For some reason, importantly was (probably ...


0

I don't really even know if I should wrote this as an answer, but it's something I've actually thought about before reading your question so I had to take the opportunity to say it since it's likely the only time I'll run across people getting deep about this (admittedly not-so-deep) song. WWhen I first heard the song, it of course opened with her saying ...


0

It seems to me that to accuse someone of "having an attitude" is making a person look bad without giving specifics.


1

According to the Judeo-Christian Bible, the “Day of the Lord,” which includes all the events of the end times, involves both the triumph of good over evil (or God over Satan) and the destruction of the heavens and the earth. This destruction does not signal the end of human existence as we know it but the beginning of a new kind of human existence, the kind ...


1

"All About That Bass" is about the attractiveness of full-figured women, to whom bass clearly applies here. The song and its music video emphasize "booty" (large hips and buttocks), so we might suppose that bass = booty; i.e., lower notes correspond to the lower body. I would offer a different interpretation, however. If bass corresponds to the lower body, ...


2

bass is being used metaphorically to refer to the buttocks. I think the juxtaposition of bass and treble refers to the clefs in musical notation: the bass cleff is on the bottom, the treble cleff is on the top, and bottom is another euphemism for the butt, while top is often used to refer to a woman's breasts. And the low and high tones can represent the ...


5

It doesn't sound unnatural to me at all, although the simple present tense might be more appropriate than the present perfect if the question was posed in the present tense (which suggests that you might still be feeling regret up to the present moment): Q. Do you regret doing it? (or Do you regret having done it?) A. Why would I regret it? The ...


1

Is the empty line following the text in the box or can it be interstitial? If it is after the existing text, then: "[To add text] Click (or position the cursor in case a keyboard is being used) on a blank/empty (no material difference) line following the text." [interstitial] "[To insert text] Click [position the cursor] on any blank/empty line. ...


23

The Greek word ἀποκάλυψις, which we transliterate apocalypse, originally meant 'revelation'. That's the sense which the book title gets its name from: The Apocalypse of John = The message revealed to John. The word apocalyptic is also used to refer to a genre of Hebrew texts which use a lot of surreal symbolism and often talk about the end of time. In the ...


1

The meaning of the comment depends on the context in which it is made. If the adviser is reviewing a draft of a paper or some other type of preliminary work, and says "You could do it better," the clear implication is that you could improve the work in one or more ways before turning it in for grading; presumably the adviser will then tell you generally or ...


3

Rascal is also used with the following meaning : (from Collins English Dictionary) an affectionate or mildly reproving term for a child or old man: you little rascal; the wicked old rascal kissed her. A mischievous or cheeky person, especially a child or man (typically used in an affectionate way): a lovable rascal you are such a rascal! (from ...


5

Respirable is the right word. It is used in medicine and toxicology also. fit for breathing respirable air http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/respirable Though, you can use breathable in the right context too.


-1

The language of the UK's Health & Safety at Work Act is non-hazardous.



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