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36

The root word drama fits: "This is due to the drama of the day." Drama 3 a : a state, situation, or series of events involving interesting or intense conflict of forces b : dramatic state, effect, or quality - the drama of the courtroom proceedings - M-W


8

It isn't in any official dictionary, though it does appear on community dictionaries like Urban Dictionary and Wordnik. Merriam-Webster offers dramatism as the appropriate word to mean dramatic manner or form.


5

One traditional term was renaissance man, after the example of Leonardo DaVinci, an expert in many areas --that may be too gender-specific for modern usage. A more recent term is multihyphenate, used often in a showbiz context for an "actor-singer-director" or similar.


5

You can, but it has nothing to do with accuse. You are simply using for instead of because. I was accused of negligence because I was lazy. I was accused of negligence for being lazy. It is a matter of style, and I would not say I would definitely accept it, since it makes you doubt just the way you explained: which preposition is it? did the author use ...


5

If you're trying to describe how people would overreact, then "melodrama", "histrionics", "theatricality" or even dramatics might be close, instead of "drama". Which one you use depends on the context around your line - if you're referring to a society or large group of people, the above words fit better. If you're describing a situation between a few ...


4

The adjective "stony" means covered with or full of small pieces of rock. But in the case of "stone bridge", we're saying "a bridge made out of stone" (As Edwin pointed out, stone in this case is an attributive noun) not "a bridge covered with small pieces of rock". So "stony bridge" wouldn't quite be accurate.


4

Ah, this stems from teachers telling students that nouns represent things, verbs represent actions and so on and so forth. Unfortunately, none of this is true. It's a seemingly handy generalisation for helping students intuitively identify nouns before you actually get down to discussing nouns with them properly. Otherwise it's pretty misleading. Nouns ...


4

I interpret it as, Delta emailed them and inside the email there was an apology. If it was just; emailed an apology, I would assume that the whole email was an apology. But from that sentence I understand that there was some other content together with an apology in the email.


3

The OED entry would suggest that it originated in Australia. At least, that is the first example they have. The action or practice of sending or exchanging sexually explicit or suggestive messages or images electronically, esp. using a mobile phone. Cf. sext n.2 2005 Daily Tel. (Austral.) 2 July 87/3 A telling aspect of his sexual ...


3

They're all grammatically correct; the difference between them is emphasis. each of us and each one of us Are basically identical. The former is merely removing a redundant word, but it's conveying the same thing. each and every one of us puts more of an emphasis on making sure the document is received by everyone. It makes the focus of the ...


2

Let's consider one of the definitions of Contact (noun) an acquaintance, colleague, or relative through whom a person can gain access to information, favors, influential people, and the like. [Dictionary.com] So if you lose your phone, you eventually lose all your contacts figuratively since you won't be able to communicate with them. This seems to ...


2

In this context, the person is saying they are satisfied with the care they received, so it is considered "their" care. Telling Baymax "I am satisfied with your care" although it could be used to mean "I am satisfied with the care you have provided" is a less common way of saying it and would probably confuse the listener.


2

According to a number of historians whose books appear in Google Books searches for Saracen + pejorative, the term Saracen was indeed a pejorative term back in the (medieval) days when English Christians widely used it. Hunt Janin & Ursula Carlson, Mercenaries in Medieval and Renaissance Europe (2013) offers this brief discussion: "Saracen" is a ...


2

Instead of conceptual extension or expansion, let's first talk about physical extension or expansion, starting with the example in Ricky's answer. Saying that a forest extends beyond the lakes is a description of how far you can go and still be in the existing forest - you can go beyond the lakes and still be in the forest even if the forest never increases ...


1

The obvious answer would be: Prejudiced: having an unreasonable dislike of or preference for somebody/something, especially based on their race, religion, sex, etc. Synonyms: narrow-minded, bigoted, intolerant Biased: having a tendency to show favour towards or against one group of people or one opinion for personal reasons; making ...


1

How about a universalizer? Those who universalize typically make sweeping generalizations.


1

Though one seldom sees the plural of "incidence", here is an example of its use: “The incidence of measles in the U.S. was ‘x’ people per thousand in 2015. The incidence of mumps was ‘y’ people per thousand in 2015. These incidences were much worse than they should have been.”


1

You could say, items include but are not limited to [list]. Or, at some point before or after the list, you could simply say, this list is not comprehensive. EDIT: I realise that I haven't really answered your question, sorry! I think the phrase this list is short of being exhaustive conveys that almost all the items are included, or at least ...


1

How about "versatile", or perhaps "a polymath"? "Jack of all trades" would be a somewhat more colloquial and lengthy alternative.


1

You may say that the person is eclectic, i.e. interested in various different domains. Example: Ashley Bryan is an eclectic artist who uses painting, poetry, music, collage, and prose to tell stories. Bryan fuses these seemingly separate art forms within his books for children.


1

In this very technical context, the transport refers to a method and protocol for sending data over a network from one machine to another. It is a layer in the communication stack well described here.


1

The word metaphysician has been in use since a time when physician could also mean a physical scientist. The distinction between physician and physicist has later hardened only to avoid ambiguity. But in the case of metaphysician there is no danger of confusion: there is no study that comes after the study of medicine like metaphysics come after physics. ...


1

'Scenario' and 'worst-case' in Merriam-Webster dictionaries "Worst-case scenario" pretty clearly arose from the cobbling together of two terms that already existed in English: the noun scenario—which Merriam-Webster's Eleventh Collegiate Dictionary (2003) dates to 1875 in the sense of "an outline or synopsis of a play," but which seems not to have acquired ...


1

Usage can not defeat grammar any more than a tree can defeat its own shadow. However, the movement of the sun can make that dead patch on your lawn a little more visible. Similarly, when current usage does not match authoritative grammar texts it's simply time to update the texts. Of course this leads to people arguing over what "current usage" is. But ...


1

Inconspicuous things are easily overlooked. Inconspicuous Not clearly visible or attracting attention - ODO


1

Negligible conveys the meaning you are referring to: of little consequence as to warrant little or no attention : trifling a negligible error (M-W)


1

This question needs more specifics to answer properly. Overlook has several senses. In the sense of 'look over' ("this room overlooks the ocean') you could use 'dramatic' or 'scenic' to say it is worth overlooking. In the sense of 'choose not to see' ("we will overlook your persistent lateness") you could use 'unimportant' or 'trivial'. In the sense of ...


1

"For each animal, we count how often it occurs in both articles and how often it occurs more in one article than in the other." "How often it occurs in both articles" is asking for a sum (i. e., 8 times). "How often it occurs more in one article than in the other" is ambiguous. As an less ambiguous alternative, how about, For each animal, we count ...


1

Does "how often it occurs in both articles" really mean that it occurs individually in article A and in article B? Or can this wording be confused with in total, like summing up the occurances in both articles? It can be interpreted either way, though I'd favour the sum. Is there a better way to express ''how often it occurs more in one article than ...


1

You could say We examine [or count] the common incidence of the use of the animal's name between the articles as well as the differential incidence. Collins defines incidence as degree, extent, or frequency of occurrence; amount a high incidence of death from pneumonia



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