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11

In the US, the general rule is the ordinal form is based on the last element in the numeral. sixty-eighth one hundred twenty-ninth one thousandth one thousand-seventh This does not change when the discussing the denominator of fractions, regardless of whether the numerator is singular or plural one thirteenth one sixty-first ...


10

Definitely a sixty-first and a sixty-second as far as I am concerned - no doubt about it. (Mid to South England) Not that either would come up very often!


4

None of them are correct. Lack can be two things: Verb In its verb form, it is a transitive verb. This means that is takes an object, you lack something. Using it as a verb in your examples, you could say: You lack an idea. You lack ideas. Noun As a noun lack means something that you do not have or do not have enough of. You can have a ...


3

It can be very dangerous to cycle in the night. This indicates that there are certain circumstances that make it dangerous, e.g. It can be very dangerous to cycle in the night, for example: if you are cycling without any lights, if you are cycling through a rough area, if you are cycling after a night at the pub. It may be very dangerous to cycle ...


3

Summerize and winterize. But hardly anybody does that anymore, at least where I live.


2

I don't think there is any definition of "slight" that would bind you to a mere two values, The OED definition, for instance, is Small in degree; inconsiderable: I don't read anything into this that would suggest that it's between two points only, merely that the degree of change is low. If you wanted to avoid ambiguity you could say something like ...


2

No, 'slightly' doesn't work there. I think the word you want is 'gradually' gradually /ˈɡradʒʊli,ˈɡradjʊəli/ adverb in a gradual way; slowly; by degrees. "the situation gradually improved" synonyms: slowly, moderately, unhurriedly, cautiously, gently, gingerly, circumspectly, unspectacularly; More


2

There is nothing wrong with either term given that they relate to a web site; it could be argued that it is a blog about a "career" as a subject, or a blog about various different "careers". On a practical level I would strongly advise registering both, because you know that people will make typos. Pick the one which is most appropriate to your content. ...


2

If you are making it better by adding onto it upgrade would be an apt description Upgrade- 2. an increase or improvement 3. a new version, improved model, etc. 4.an increase or improvement in one's service, accommodations, privileges, or the like 5. something, as a piece of equipment, that serves to improve or enhance Upgrade- Raise ...


1

Perhaps "refactoring" the code would fit your need? refactoring - Improving a computer program by reorganising its internal structure without altering its external behaviour. Or you "extended" the program. The definition fitting this usage is... extend - to increase the scope, meaning, or application of


1

"From this time forward" isn't really used in standard English. Even henceforth is somewhat archaic. People frown upon it as American English but "going forward" is becoming popular. "From now on" would probably be the most common phrase used to mean henceforth. Regarding the origin - hence means from now and forth means onward, i.e. from now onwards.


1

In terms of a domain name, "career" and "careers" are the same. Anybody visiting your website, whether it's "careerblog.???" or "careersblog.???", will most likely not be influenced by the difference in wording. Where the difference will really matter will be in selecting the best TLD. If "careersblog.com" is available to register (it's not, but I'm just ...


1

I've never heard it in the UK. It might have been influenced by an advertising campaign such as this.


1

If we wrote each of the clauses in the first sentence as separate sentences and added the implied subject, "I," we'd have: I thank you for your time. I am looking forward to your response. In case (1), we only had to add "I," whereas in case (2), we had to add "I am." As such, I don't believe the sentence is correct. I think that this issue would, ...



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