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29

You may be looking for socialite: someone who is well-known in fashionable society and is often seen at parties and other social events for wealthy people (Merriam-Webster)


18

If it's a demonstration, the viewer could be the -- viewer.


17

gadabout A habitual pleasure-seeker. I think this is a great, fun word that doesn't get enough play.


13


11

You may be looking for party animal (informal) someone who ​enjoys ​parties and ​party ​activities very much and goes to as many as ​possible: Sarah's a ​real ​party ​animal - she ​likes to ​dance all ​night. — Cambridge


9

A student, if the purpose is to teach.


7

Eventgoer (or event-goer) One who attends an event. This should work just like partygoer: a person who attends a party or who attends parties frequently "chauffeured transportation was provided for those partygoers who had overindulged themselves at the bar" The -goer suffix means: a ​person who goes to the ​stated ​type of ​place ...


7

One important word not mentioned here yet is witness. the person you demonstrate to would witness you "flipping a chair for him". witness also refers to someone who testifies in court for what they have witnessed.


7

The major difference between the verbs steal and rob -- which can both refer to the same event -- is that the object of steal is the thing stolen, but the object of rob is the owner of the thing stolen. Thus He stole $3,000/a Maserati/everything. He robbed the bank/Harry/everybody. but not *He robbed $3,000/a Maserati/everything. *He stole the ...


6

Man About Town A man who frequently attends fashionable social functions, as in Fred is quite the man about town these days. This expression, first recorded in 1734, uses town in the sense of “a sophisticated place” as opposed to rural settings. The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary


5

The way I've heard such people described is as "social butterflys"


5

A hoax is something that encapsulates the idea of deception, typically on a large group of people. Often there is no element of humour in a hoax, instead the principle aim is to confuse or scare. A hoax normally has long term consequences and mysteries that are never resolved. This has created many modern day 'legends' e.g. Loch Ness Monster, Bigfoot, ...


4

I would use the term that fits the role or relationship. Are they there to learn or to evaluate? Or is the demonstration more of a dog and pony show intended for a general audience. Or are you accosting people on the street hawking your toy robots? If you were just looking at the mechanics of demonstrations, I'd probably use recipients, audience, or ...


3

There is the perfectly good word demonstratee ... it's not common but it is part of the English language. Given it's logical connection to demonstrator the meaning should be apparent to people who don't know it and it ties in to your view that you are demonstrating (as opposed to showing or teaching...).


3

I think part of the reason that the ideas of "robbing a bank" or a "train robbery" make sense is the implication that the people inside (or the organization itself) are the real victims of the theft. Corporations are often thought of as entities (e.g. Google says...) but I don't think that most people think of cars as living entities in the same way. I think ...


3

Although normally used to describe being awake when one should normally be asleep, the word wakefulness (the noun form of wakeful, defined below) can work here. Wakeful adjective 1.1 (Of a period of time) passed with little or no sleep - ODO You can say that someone got 10 hours of wakefulness. Here's one instance from a web search (emphasis mine): ...


3

Not really, although the problem is with your overall sentence construction more than the use. "Per se" means "of or in itself", so is really used for reflexive emphasis, e.g. "Religion, while not necessarily advocating violence per se, can be a significant contributory factor." as in "Religion does not specifically call for violent behaviour, but can ...


3

We use that expression in french. I wont say it's the opposite of sin. It's just a good gesture. For ex. in a chess game you may let your opponent start the game. it's a beau geste. Not doing that is not a sin.


2

No, there is no distinction between 'mail and 'post' in British English. 'Post' is used wherever 'mail' would be used in American English. 'Mail' is going to be understood by almost everyone, but 'post' is the common usage. Post boxes are never referred to as 'posts'. Posts are tall thin things stuck in the ground


2

You can have singular and plural, but like this: Does there exist a polical business cycle? Do there exist political business cycles? But (as BillJ said) both keep the infinitive form "exist".


2

my millenial daughter uses the term FOMO. It's a person who suffers from a severe Fear Of Missing Out.


2

The following extract may help undestand what he meant by "dime" novel: In Los Angeles in the early 1950s, Ray Bradbury went in search of a peaceful place to work. "I had a large family at home," he said five decades later. They must have been a particularly lively bunch, because at the time it was just Ray, his wife Marguerite and two young ...


2

There is a difference between these sentences. 1 and 3 appear to be saying that you are showing the quantity using 'n' to find said quantity. 2 means that 'n' is the quantity and you are displaying said quantity with the variable 'n'. If you are attempting to say that you are finding the quantity using 'n' as a factor to find the value of the quantity, I ...


2

"Localite" is not in the Oxford English Dictionary. However, a search in GloWbE (the global corpus of web-based English) gives nine hits for it: eight in Indian sources, and one from Singapore. So it would appear that it is a word which has limited currency in India, and apparently in Singapore, but is unknown elsewhere in the Anglosphere. (I observe ...


2

I think the closest sense of but I can find in the OED is 5b: Whilst 5a applies to: a. Negative and interrogative sentences containing a comparative (esp. more) were formerly followed by but; they now usually take than, or else the comparative is omitted and but retained; modern idiom preferring sometimes one, sometimes the other. 1713 ...


1

Creed - an idea or set of beliefs that guides the actions of a person or group http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/creed Ideology -  1.a systematic body of concepts especially about human life or culture a manner or the content of thinking characteristic of an individual, group, or culture http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/ideology Also ...


1

I am making a wild guess that you mean "We use n to represent the quantity". If so, none of the three options clearly means that, though 2) and 3) could mean it with enough context. I would say "We denote (or represent) the quantity by n".


1

Tutee may be an appropriate description, if the demonstrator can fairly be described as a tutor.


1

The term neophyte may apply depending on the context. Oxford dictionaries has: A person who is new to a subject, skill, or belief: four-day cooking classes are offered to neophytes and experts


1

So, for example, is the following sentence wrong? "She told me that if a fire breaks out, I should immediately call the fire department." No, this is completely acceptable usage in American English and, at least to my ear, is preferable to the alternative you suggested, although I cannot tell you why, other than that it sounds more natural and ...



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