Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

7

I'd like to highlight a slightly larger chunk in your sentence: Somatization disorder also causes challenge and burden on the life of the caregivers or significant others of the patient. "Significant other" is a strong collocation; together, these words take on meaning beyond the two words separately. As explained on Wikipedia: Significant other ...


5

I think the way you're thinking of secure is right on the edge of what the word means. To secure something provides assurance that that something is safe, or true. I think the word you're looking for is more like: "The state ensures that people do not have any emotions" "The state assures there are no emotions" To use the word secure in a sentence like ...


4

It never occurred to me to use these words in the same way. (Although some do.) One would "give kudos" (like offering congratulations) on/for a job well done. *Bravo, or brava, is almost always used to laud a performance of some kind. (Including falling down an entire flight of stairs and landing on one's feet, or even having a baby.) "Kudos," is more of ...


2

Many things other than evidence can be circumstantial in the sense of a detailed account, for example: circumstantial narrative circumstantial journal circumstantial account circumstantial memories circumstantial deliveries However this meaning does seem to be mostly seen in older texts. Looking at recent documents shows a predominance of the meaning ...


1

This is just me talking from 30 years as a florist... (seen a lot of funerals) The only time I've heard "drape" a medal, is when someone puts it on a dead body lying in state, or on the casket. (Or, on a likeness of the recipient.) I don't think you use "pin" or "award" in the case of actually presenting it posthumously.


1

I don't believe to pin and to drape differ at all in terms of register or formality. The difference is semantic: pin (v): attach or fasten with a pin or pins in a specified position. drape (v): arrange (cloth or clothing) loosely or casually on or around something. You may find examples of "drape a medal around someone's neck," but the action you ...


1

In each of the example sentences of the OP, someone chose a word that approximated a more complex thought, and presented the language in a sentence. Then someone reads the word, and chooses an interpretation of the speaker's thought. In some examples, the OP interpretation may be closer than others. Only the original writer could confirm the actual meaning, ...


1

The two constructions are syntactically distinct. In the first case the by-phrase is an indication that the sentence is a true verbal passive (although this diagnostic is not completely foolproof.) In the second case it's most likely that 'amazed' is an adjective and not a verbal passive. I'm amazed by how friendly these people are. I'm amazed how ...


1

You already have your answer from the source you cited. Ostentatious involves showing off. Ostentatious is conspicuous, but conspicuous is not necessarily ostentatious. So you are correct, they overlap but are not exact sunonyms.


1

It is definitely a word: yessir Syllabification: yes·sir Pronunciation: /ˈyesər, ˈyesˈsər Definition of yessir in English:EXCLAMATION Used to express assent: “Do you understand me?” “Yessir!” 1.1. North American Used to express emphatic affirmation: 'yessir the food was cheap' I tend to think that it ...


1

One of the Urban Dictionary entries asserts that "owly" is common in Nova Scotia: Urban Dictionary s.v. owly (punctuation and capitalization edited) Out of sorts; grumpy Used widely in Nova Scotia When my mother called me to get up and get ready for school, I yelled "Do you have to be so loud?" She said, "Oh, feeling owly this morning, are we?" ...


1

It is actually related to how owls look. They look grumpy! (at least most of them). There is a strong evidence that it might be originated from Nova Scotia or around that region in colloquial usage: [South Shore Phrase Book: New, Revised and Expanded Nova Scotia Dictionary By Lewis Poteet (2004)] [Dictionary of Prince Edward Island ...


1

Myself with family from Southern Ohio, along the river, and from West Virginia, I endorse the opinion that the sense of "ornery" should not be underestimated. "Ornery" is a very common descriptive word in Appalachia for both children and certain adults (applied often to me). And I think the comment that not all adults are ornery misses the theological ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible