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6

Yes it's perfectly possible for a quote to be one word, and this is done frequently in reporting. The leader called the attacks "disgusting". In this sentence the word "disgusting" is a quote, and is the only thing the leader is actually stated to have said. Even simple words can be a quote. Asked if he was intending to run as a candidate, the ...


4

Both its origin and current usage (see examples below) do not suggest that the term has a gender bias. Airhead: "empty-headed person," 1972, from air (n.1) + head (n.). Earlier as a term in mining (mid-19c.) and as a military term based on beachhead (1950). From the Collins Dictionary: Airhead : If you describe someone, especially a ...


3

What we're witnessing is the process of losing the verb 'to discriminate', meaning exercising the capacity to tell one thing from another, while keeping that form to use in the verb's second meaning, which is embedded in the context of the current fashion for prioritising racism above other social ills. People used to know that as Irene says, when we mean ...


3

As @V0ight points already out losing someone is more the by than the from way. Mostly kids are lost for a few reasons. You can try to specify it a bit more clearly. Maybe the kid has wandered away from her parents, or maybe the kid has simply been forgotten by her parents. You can however stay with lost and the kid's perspective, if you write The kid, who ...


3

You don't become lost from someone/something, but rather someone loses you. A more natural way to write this sentence is: "The child, who has been lost by her parents, is crying as she watches thousands of strange people pass by." Or we can use the phrase separated from. "The child, who has been separated from her parents, is crying as she watches ...


3

All evidence seems to point at this particular usage of narrative originating in the mid 1980s American political media and popularizing in the 90s.: Google Ngram on "competing narrative(s)" Google Ngram on "media narrative(s)" Google Books search of "competing narratives" Here's a result from the Time magazine corpus from 1986: It's ...


3

Merriam-Webster's New International Dictionary, Second Edition (M.W.N.I.D 2) with a copyright date of 1953 does have such a sense of the word, but it marks it as obsolete. (Obs.) Since; considering that; inasmuch as. B. While on the other hand. However, what I think they meant is that it means whereas, which Oxford Dictionaries Online marks as ...


2

They are referring to an open source project called plumbing. It likely got its name from the common usage of plumbing to mean 'inner workings', like the plumbing in the walls, it's there, and you don't typically see it, but it's just back there working.


2

Although the word airhead is found in every edition of The American Heritage Dictionary, the pejorative sense of the word only entered the lexicon with the third edition, which has a copyright date of 1992. The second college edition, from 1982 and the first edition of the book only have the word in its militaristic sense as an arial territory secured by ...


2

Your example should read "ten years' time" and I think that should explain a bit for you. "Time" in this case refers to the time contained in ten years. For singular you would put the apostrophe after the R making it "One year's time".


2

Honoured is not the next level of pride. You have pride when you acknowledge your own accomplishment. You are honored when someone else acknowledges your own accomplishment and communicates this fact. Consider If one student is proud of knowing one thing, then a school is pleased to have a thousand students who know many things. It's not the next ...


2

It's not a common word, but that doesn't mean it's a bad choice. Writers often use uncommon words. However, according to the dictionary, salvific means "Having the intention or power to bring about salvation or redemption", and it seems that the usage here implies that the noise of it hitting the ground ("thud") is the thing that saves or redeems the ...


2

As a noun, you would use the article referring a specific context: (the) mainstream​: the way of life or set of beliefs accepted by most people: The new law should allow more disabled people to enter the mainstream of American life. In the mainstream of modern literature. As an adjective, as in your examples, it is used to refer to ...


2

The fix is a tiny one. The child, who has been lost by her parents, is crying as she is watching thousands of strange people passing by. I would go further with: The child, who has been lost by her parents, is crying as she watches thousands of strange people passing by. Less is more with: The child, lost by her parents, is crying as she watches ...


1

Generally, it belongs to speech called circumlocution (talking around something); if the idea is to lessen the impact of the negative - say, telling someone their idea is bad - you could classify it as a euphemism or understatement. Also relevant, if conditions are involved, is the idea of contrapositive. A contrapositive is an equally-true restatement of ...


1

Let's start out by listing out the meanings in the current context. Refer-to: Turn to, for aid or information. Defer-to: To yield respectfully in judgement or opinion. Now let's examine the meanings in the statement. People referring to John's decisions: People take John's decision as one of the factors in making their own decision on a specific ...


1

A learner's dictionary might be of more use in your case than a regular one. They elaborate more on usage. There are many free online learner's dictionaries such as the Cambridge, Oxford and Merriam-Webster learner's dictionary. An other useful resource is a collocation dictionary (an on line example http://www.ozdic.com/).


1

Michael Swan in his book "Practical English Usage" states the following: If there is a conjunctive adverb linking two independent clauses, you should use a semicolon before otherwise. The inhabitants were warned not to leave their houses after 12.00pm; otherwise, they will be shot.


1

I would say "even prouder" - If one student is proud of knowing one thing, then a school is even prouder to have a thousand students who know many things. "honoured" doesn't have exactly the same meaning as "proud" and so shouldn't be used to mean "even more proud".


1

Every dictionary I'm looking at here says "spake" is simply an (archaic) past tense of "speak." Variations happen. They used to happen more than now, especially in spelling.



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