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4

To nod may also refer to an unconscious movement: To nod: (intr) to let the head fall forward through drowsiness; be almost asleep: the old lady sat nodding by the fire. (Collins)


4

The U.S. Army Field Manual FM 7-21.13 Section 4.18 states: 4-18. A soldier addressing a higher ranking officer uses the word sir or ma’am in the same manner as a polite civilian speaking with a person to whom he wishes to show respect. In the military service, the matter of who says sir or ma’am to whom is clearly defined; in civilian life it is ...


3

There are plenty of synonyms for good that you could use, but fine probably isn't strong enough. In some contexts, it could be understood as meaning less than average. You'll see on the Cambridge Dictionary's website that fine can mean bad in many contexts. If you don't want to use good, then satisfactory might work well, as it has a clear meaning and will ...


2

Hope this table clarifies the usage. Note that in these examples, words smaller and greater perform two functions whereas less and lesser perform one function each. It is incorrect to say 3 is lesser than 5.


2

I'd probably write the sentence as either 3 or 4: More students are emerging with A grades in A level exams - perhaps as a result of sheer hard work and competition. or More students are emerging with A grades in A level exams as a result of, perhaps, sheer hard work and competition.


2

"Fine" is understood to mean exceptional quality when used in common phrases such as "fine art" or "fine furniture". It loses its "punch" outside of these expressions, however. When composing a slogan, alliteration is often used for mnemonic purposes - also, temporally speaking, you might want to put "process" before "result". I'd suggest: "Simple Methods, ...


2

Those are all ok, although I think I like your first choice best: Queueing twice for a cup of coffee is once too many. One time sounds a bit funny to use instead of once, although there are places where it can work.


2

You want the bare infinitive here: "makes the received signals have." The use of the to-infinitive was once more popular, and it survives in religious contexts where it has an archaic feel: he maketh me to lie down in green pastures (It's hard to tell what's going on in the sentence because of the "xxx," but I'm willing to bet you want "xxx ...


2

I would suggest honorarium: a payment in recognition of acts or professional services for which custom or propriety forbids a price to be set. (from dictionary.com) It is paid as as a favour, making it distinct from a wage or fee for service of a more commercial arrangement.


2

It is an advervial use of out that adds emphasis to some actions: Out: without inhibition; boldly: speak out. aloud or loudly: cry out The Free Dictionary


1

Remuneration It can refer to a regular wage or salary as well as (irregular) ad-hoc payments, but I've often seen it used in the context of attendance fees.


1

The OED uses the words "abruptly," "eruptively," "impulsively," and "burst out" to define "blurt" for verbal expression. So the word by itself contains enough of a propulsive sense so that "out" is redundant. However, the word "out" is appended often enough the combination is almost a set phrase. The google, for instance, finds 775K uses of "blurt" and ...


1

'once' in fact means 'one time', and may thus always be used interchangeably. Ordinarily one would prefer 'once too often' or 'one too many'. Often refers to time, hence 'once', where as 'many' refers to counts (or numbers if you will), thus 'one too many'. However, in this case you may argue that 'many' is better suited to accompany queuing for a cup of ...


1

A time slot, is a regular time during the day, it may be several hours, however, never longer than 8 hours. In general a time slot more or less an hour, and you may set more than one aside for something. A time slot is recurring daily, weekly or monthly.


1

"Fine results" reminds me of "good enough for Government work". Your problem is that sloganeers do not go in for subtleties; this is a field in which hyperbole is the norm and you are in danger of sounding ambivalent, unambitious or even litigiously careful. I would say "excellent results". Go for gold.


1

The way that people interpret fine depends on context and dialect. In BrE, fine is often used to mean something of high quality, but in AmE it often means meeting expectations, but nothing more. In a slogan fine results, simple methods, I understand the results to be OK, but not really that good, they are nothing special. That may not be the message you ...


1

Whatever time it is, it's always after midnight. As in, after some midnight that went before. Seriously, this is a choice of being figurative or literal. Whenever people correct this they do it teasingly. We all know what is meant. We're having fun with the fact that our expectations fail us when in an unfamiliar situation. A student going home at ...


1

I'd describe that person as opportunistic: Taking immediate advantage, often unethically, of any circumstance of possible benefit. The following saying also comes to mind: Practice what you preach: Prov. Cliché You yourself should do the things you advise other people to do. Dad always told us we should only watch an hour of television ...


1

I think you might mean 'like finding a rare coin.' عملة can mean 'coin' or 'currency' in English. (Sorry if that is presumptuous--bas ismak howa arabi!)



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