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4

As an addendum to Janus' answer, patient used indeed to be a verb. It hasn't been since the middle of the seventeeth century. †patient, verb Etymology: < patient adj. Compare Middle French, French patienter to be patient, show patience (1557 used reflexively, 1573 used intransitively), Italian pazientare (a1527, used intransitively). ...


4

More or less any word can be verbed in English—that is, turned into a verb by zero-derivation. That includes patient. The trouble with patient, though, is that it is both an adjective and a noun, and the two mean quite different things (“able to accept or tolerate waiting, delays, etc.” vs. “a person who is ill or receiving medical attention”). Given enough ...


4

According to n-gram it's been around for about a century, and getting more popular all the time.


3

It absolutely does have a negative connotation—one of bait and switch. Phrases like "After luring her into his house, ..." and "The victims were lured into following..." are common in the news. If you want to attract people using real content, then this is a very bad name for the project. On the other hand, if cheap tricks and memes are your means to ...


3

"Brainwave(s)" is more commonly used in reference to an electrical impulse(s) in the brain, though Google does list its informal usage for a sudden clever idea. For a more established and common term you could go with "flood," as in “a flood of ideas.” As to its frequency of usage, I found many Google hits, one of which I have linked, below. Classic ...


3

Depending on your particular context, you might be looking for Sherpa: 1.1 informal A civil servant or diplomat who undertakes preparatory work prior to a summit conference.


3

A view of the corpus indicates that sorry excuse for is more idiomatic. It seems that the corpus from the great island over the sea is more decisive than the one from American English.


3

Try AHDEL (sense 2 below): inform ... v.tr. a. To impart information to; make aware of something: We were informed by mail of the change in plans. The nurse informed me that visiting hours were over. b. To acquaint (oneself) with knowledge of a subject. a. To give form or character to; imbue with a quality or an essence: "A ...


3

Drudge comes to mind: noun A person made to do hard menial or dull work: she was little more than a drudge round the house


2

One should not forget the obvious slave: 1.1 A person who works very hard without proper remuneration or appreciation: ODO


2

Different phrases seem applicable to people in the two situations you name. For "someone who does all the work," I suggest the phrase little red hen—refering to the folk tale of the hen who can't get anyone to participate in the work of producing a loaf of bread until the work consists of eating the bread. For "the person who is exploited when someone else ...


2

Well the word definitely exists. I think its origin would be technical, eg. it is heavily used in software engineering. I'm not sure it's made the leap into common usage for "something or someone that validates ...". That said, I'm sure you would be understood. As a double-check: what's your thesis about? Would the word normally be used in that context?


2

Lure - defined as to tempt - I s often associated with negative connotations. Fishing lures are fake baits. Offenders are often referenced as having lured their prey to a dark or secluded location for example. Depending on the nature of the website, allure could be a good alternative: the quality of being powerfully and mysteriously attractive or ...


2

It's not too welcome, IMO. At Google Books, one can test the waters injecting relevant extra words in the search, say "dissertation," which limits the search environment to publications containing "dissertation": "provide the best guess" "dissertation" About 0 results "provide the best estimate" "dissertation" About 9 results


2

In "discrepancy" the stress is, IMO, on showing a "discordant" difference. Related to DISCREPANT Synonyms: clashing, conflicting, disagreeing, discordant, inconsistent, incompatible, incongruous, inconsonant, inharmonious, mutually exclusive, repugnant Merriam-Webster Unabridged Dictionary


1

Perhaps an expert in graphs and curve patterns could give you a better answer but I suggest "so far it's been an upward curve pattern" and "X marks my record high" or "marks my best achievement so far".


1

Paper dictionaries will use the accepted "dictionary" form of the word, whether it is the singular form of a noun or the bare infinitive of a verb. The dictionary will typically show the transformations these words undergo, much as you noticed with the online dictionaries. You may see the gerund form of a verb if that form has a meaning distinct from the ...


1

"Motoring" is for quite some time past this kindergarten stage of words that you're talking about :-) Also, use the proper Merriam-Webster:-) motoring noun plural -s : the act or recreation of riding in or driving an automobile Origin of MOTORING from gerund of 3motor Merriam-Webster Unabridged Dictionary "Motoring" is a ...


1

In the US it's meet: meet noun 1 b : a sports meeting consisting of competitive events especially in track and field, swimming, or gymnastics contested by individuals and often by relay or other teams c : a sports contest of any of various other kinds basketball meet trapshooters' meet sports car meet d : ...


1

The reasons are specifically because of the niche "anymore" plays in speech. We have more popular adverbs that serve the positive definition: nowadays, typically, usually, normally. The use of anymore is certainly common to midwestern (spoken) dialects and would certainly be correct. But as with anything dialectical, it's best to use a more broadly ...


1

ODO gives, under the definition of an excuse for examples for both excuse for and excuse of, which would imply that they can be used interchangeably. Although I have to agree, Google Books did give over 33,000 hits for sorry excuse for a vs. somewhat less than 2,500 for sorry excuse of a.



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