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How common is the usage of the term hysterical meaning “funny” in BrE and AmE? It's fairly common in American English, less common than it used to be. Does hysterical actually carry a negative connotation as suggested in the above extract, or does it only convey a neutral meaning? Hysterical has never contained a negative connotation from my ...


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The Corpus for NOW Data that may help in discovering the answer to your question were recently released at corpus.byu.edu. Among other corpora, the NOW Corpus (News on the Web), with data from 2010-2016, can be used to analyze use of 'hysterical' in the sense of "funny" in the overall middling-formal English commonly found in online newspapers and journals. ...


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The only time I hear "bugged" used around software is when used as "DEbugged". For example, "She debugged my code." Code may be "buggy", not "bugged". Code may be "debugged", not "bugged". Code is never "bugged". Don't say that that. It's weird. Any examples to the contrary are examples of people doing it wrong. Tell them to stop. Don't follow their ...


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I've been programming professionally for over 20 years, and I've never heard of "bugged" code... And as for bugs, my actual preferred term is "undocumented feature". :)


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Entering "alone" into http://www.oldenglishtranslator.co.uk/ comes up with a few: syndrig 1. separate alone single not joined with others distinct ánhaga solitary being lone dweller recluse one dwelling alone ánstapa lonely wanderer Further looking about comes up with usages, here's ánstapa in lines 12-15 of The Panther: ... Is þæt ...


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in·form·ant inˈfôrmənt/ noun a person who gives information to another. another term for informer. In this case it would be plural informants I could be this single word choice. As informants take part in the "acting" of an investigation.


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Dictionary coverage of 'terminate' and 'with prejudice' The phrase "with prejudice" is a legal term of long standing. Black's Law Dictionary, fourth edition (1968): offers this entry for it: WITH PREJUDICE. The term, as applied to judgment of dismissal is as conclusive of rights of parties as if action had been prosecuted to final adjudication adverse ...


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The word which is used in relative clauses: That's the car which I bought yesterday. Notice that the relative clause which I bought yesterday is giving us more information about the car in question. So we have a noun car, which is being postmodified by a relative clause. We say that the noun car is the ANTECEDENT for the relative clause. Regarding ...


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If one is 'beyond reason to deal with' then wouldn't this mean that they are more than reasonable to deal with? No, it means the person is beyond the point where it's possible to reason with them. Perhaps they're in a hurry, or drunk, or in a fever of pain, etc. "Below reason" is not used in English. If I'm less smart, then this could also mean ...


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"...to add an extra point after many points have been written," the conjuction to use is not morever, but in addition or also. I subscribe to item no. 2 on this page Conjunctive Adverbs (#4): Showing Added Information to use moreover or furthermore "When the added information is stronger than the information preceding it." On the same page, you will find ...


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The question Should any employee of Company X be allowed to assume absolute authority in any project with Company X's name associated? does indeed permits at least two very different readings. To simplify the analysis, let's consider a similar question that uses any just once: Should any employee of Company X have the authority to turn off the ...


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The following are three propositions but reworded slightly different. The first proposition is the OP's one Should any (whoever) employee of Company X be allowed to assume absolute authority in any (whatsoever) project with Company X's name associated? In other words, does it matter who has the authority in a project, as long as the person is an ...


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The term for software with faults is at the boundary between the specialized language used by software developers and the language used by everyone. Laymen and laywomen talk about bugs in software. Software developers will call a single software fault a "bug", software that doesn't have such faults "bug free" (although that happens only very rarely), ...


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The comments from Phil Sweet and sumelic match my intuitive sense of the words and the definitions in my dictionary (Summary: impair = to weaken; impede = to obstruct). It's a clean distinction in theory. A car that is blocked by a boulder in the road is clearly impeded and not impaired. But in practice, I think it can be muddy, esp. as you get more ...


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To me, it suggests that people in the gameworld know about it; to say "You're a fourth-rank wizard" suggests that there is something like a wizard's academy in the world, and that they have exams or tests to determine progress. The same way that army 'ranks' are official levels, rather than representing whether the soldier is a veteran or not. I think ...


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Extension of Steve Cooper's point: Rank suggests an official title, whereas level suggests merely a certain degree of aptitude or the like. For example, a soldier is only a sergeant if they are recognised as such by the military. Poor soldiers can become sergeants and good soldiers can fail to do so. Contrast this with at least the most common use of ...


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The parallel construction placeless is a perfectly respectable word: lacking a fixed location indistinguishable from other such places in appearance or character -http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/placeless


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I think that ubiquitous captures both meanings , timeless and placeless. ubiquitous - existing or being everywhere, especially at the same time; omnipresent: -http://www.dictionary.com/browse/ubiquitous


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'TRON' is an early BASIC programming language debugging command, short for 'TRACE ON', which tells the computer to trace the programs run-time execution and report various variables back to the programmer. To turn the feature off, use 'TROFF'. See TRON command on Wikipedia



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