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11

The earliest occurrence in print of hackamore I have found, in this cowboy story from 1850 (very likely the source alluded to by Wikipedia and Etymonline), explicitly associates it with the Spanish term. ('Pete' is 'Dutch' or German, the 'old man' is apparently Mexican.) “When a broncho is lassed, he is fust choked down, then a hackamore is put on ...


6

Dictionary.com an activity or interest pursued for pleasure or relaxation and not as a main occupation: Merriam-Webster a small Old World falcon (Falco subbuteo) that is dark blue above and white below with dark streaking on the breast a pursuit outside one's regular occupation engaged in especially for relaxation Cambridge ...


4

Drop and give me zen is a currently popular meme featured on t-shirts and inspirational posters. It is likely a play on the expression drop and give me ten or its more popular variant drop and give me twenty. These are stereotypical orders given by drill sergeants to soldiers, instructing them to drop to the ground and do ten or twenty push-ups. Here is a ...


3

It's not necessarily redundant, just clarifying direction, based on an alternative definition of the word which emphasizes the movement of the subject without necessarily implying that the object is water by the verb itself. According to Oxford dictionaries, an alternative definition of "dive" is: move quickly or suddenly in a specified direction: ...


3

No. Although it may adhere to the dictionary definition, so do many other activities such as petting your cat and having a nice relaxing bath and these are not hobbies either. I would argue it isn't a hobby for these reasons: It (reproduction) is one of the 8 life functions and therefore would be biologically considered akin to breathing and eating (...


3

The likely quote is a bit different: The thing that used to worry him most was the fact that people always used to ask him what he was looking so worried about. He worked in local radio which he always used to tell his friends was a lot more interesting than they probably thought. It was, too – most of his friends worked in advertising. - The Hitchhiker'...


3

Dictionary definitions and discussions of 'whistleblower' Since the early 1970s, whistleblower does indeed seem to have had a strongly positive connotation in most popular usage, at least in the United States. William Safire, Safire's Political Dictionary (2008) has an interesting entry for the term: whistleblower A government employee who "goes public" ...


3

To judge from the comments, it's a calque of the word ही (hee) in Hindi and the other northern languages and of தானே (tāṉē) in Tamil and the other southern languages. It's easy to see how ही (meaning "nothing else") was translated into only (meaning "nothing more"), since only is 25 times more common than a more precise translation like exactly. Given that ...


2

My first reaction was to say that even was being used with the whole clause under its scope, for scalar focus on the truth value of the proposition (paraphraseable as It's even the case that I have a bachelor's degree, etc.). The question being updated with additional examples, I suspect that even is being to mark term-level, assertive focus, without ...


2

[Arthur Dent] was about thirty as well, dark haired and never quite at ease with himself. The thing that used to worry him most was the fact that people always used to ask him what he was looking so worried about. He worked in local radio which he always used to tell his friends was a lot more interesting than they probably thought. It was, too – most of his ...


2

"Wise" itself is a great word for this, but it's not as specific as what you're looking for. Perhaps a synonym like "prudent" would do the trick, though. "Receptive" is a word for someone who is "willing to listen to or accept ideas, suggestions, etc." (Merriam Webster) Example usage: She is receptive to criticism. He is a receptive listener who benefits ...


2

Of course, there are other ways to say it, such as cravenly (suggested by commenters) and timidly. However, many dictionaries do indeed list cowardly as both an adjective and an adverb. Google (Oxford Dictionaries Online, as pointed out by @EdwinAshworth) (lists adverb form as archaic) Wiktionary (also lists adverb form as archaic) Dictionary.com Merriam ...


2

I am guided by the OED, which finds various meanings of distinguish, all of which are ultimately grounded in the sense of classification of things by their characteristics. In a simple division into classes based on some, possibly unnamed, set of standards, we may say English grammar distinguishes dependent clauses into relative, comparison, content, ...


2

Undoubtably and undoubtedly do actually carry different meanings, but they are often, erroneously, used interchangeably: Undoubtably and undoubtedly are both well-formed words with clear, distinct meanings, yet the former is often used in place of the latter, giving rise to the mistaken belief that undoubtably is always wrong. It’s not. The ...


1

You are looking for the word 'audible'. So if you are asking someone if he/she can hear you on the phone/skype, you'd say: Am I audible?


1

I reckon it's (3) the Supersonic and here's why. Some people are saying there's ambiguity in "soon" and I agree but I think ambiguity could also lie in "available": Whom exactly are we waiting for it to be available to? The Supersonic will be available to the car salesman immediately, but to the man and woman soon. So the question is: Is the question ...


1

Can the child distinguish between right and wrong? Can the child distinguish right from wrong? I find it hard to distinguish these two twins. I find it hard to distinguish these twins. (Twins come in pairs.) I find it hard to distinguish one twin from the other. I find it hard to distinguish between these two twins. I find it hard to distinguish ...



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