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5

There is (but it isn't in common use). Magnitudinous: The adjectival form of magnitude. Having the quality of greatness in size, amount, importance, etc. Wordnik


3

Is "politically zealous" proper to negatively describe someone ... obsessed by some political ideology ... I would feel fairly comfortable saying that the term, “Politically zealous,” probably evokes, in the minds of many, certain religious and political fanatics who are currently dominating cable news coverage, world-wide and 24/7. So, the short answer to ...


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Magnificent? Impressively beautiful, elaborate, or extravagant; striking Oxford Dictionary It doesn't really imply anything about size, but it does derive from magnus.


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It feels better at the end of the sentence. I would prefer to take both parts of the test on Monday, please. But a rewording offers a better request. May I please take both parts of the test on Monday?


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The second is correct. Rarely would you ever put 'a' before gravity.


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I dare say that there are many people who are politically zealous but not in the sense of how Nazis were zealous about their evil politics ( mass killing innocent people just because they were Jewish or Polish or Gypsies or mentally/physically challenged, " useless eaters" as the Nazis called the mentally/physically challenged). The word to describe such a ...


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The services company Halliburton's trademarked strap-line is "Solving challenges". I share the original questioner's queasiness with this but I suspect that the elasticity of English probably allows it.


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It is correct, but I would have expressed this version if I were you: I humbly request you to allow me to take both parts of the test on Monday. (You can also use sincerely or kindly instead of humbly) Or this one: It would be my pleasure If you can allow me to take both parts of the test on Monday. (you can also use a delight in place of my ...



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