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22

The cheapening of psychiatric terms is not restricted to OCD, look at what has happened to "psychopath". (Where I used to live, it has come to be identical with "ex-husband".) As HotLicks says, we can go to its root with "obsessive", or if exercised on language (if the cap fits, wear it) we have "pedantic". In general, "niggly" and "picky". Area51's "fussy" ...


8

Fussy could serve the purpose. too concerned or worried about details or standards, especially unimportant ones [Oxford]


6

I suppose you could use anal, for someone who has an obsessive attention to detail but I'd say that's stronger than just being fussy. Source: The Free Dictionary


6

Unfortunately, the phrases aren't necessarily metaphorical. A quote of literal use, which also provides the answer to what is an alternative expression, is taken form Inferno: the life and death epic struggle of the USS Franklin in World War II page 155, quoting Stan Butryn (who had just walked up stairs to the aircraft carrier deck) All off a sudden ...


5

“Shoot me now” (origin?) Nathaniel Thomas Haynes Bayly (1797 – 1839) an English poet, songwriter, dramatist, and miscellaneous writer, in 1837 penned Kindness in Women. In the following passage, taken from the story entitled Kate Leslie, the phrase ‘shoot me now’ appears to be idiomatic; a mild curse which the speaker utters in mock frustration as he tries ...


4

I love the word "pernickety" (which is an alternative form of "persnickety"): per(s)nickety overparticular; fussy Source: Dictionary.com Mr. Pernickety from the Mr. Men series


4

No it's not common as far as I'm aware of. Numb generally refers to the loss of feeling. Either physical or mental: From The free dictionary: Deprived of the power to feel or move normally; benumbed: toes numb with cold; too numb with fear to cry out. Emotionally unresponsive; indifferent: numb to yet another appeal. I myself would use the ...


4

mortify (v.) late 14c., "to kill," from Old French mortefiier "destroy, overwhelm, punish," from Late Latin mortificare "cause death, kill, put to death," literally "make dead," from mortificus "producing death," from Latin mors (genitive mortis) "death" (see mortal (adj.)) + root of facere "to make" (see factitious). Religious sense of "to ...


3

I was always under the impression that chai tea referred to a certain blend of tea, usually lightly spiced. Masala Chai As opposed to the variety that would usually be drunk in Britain (I can't speak for the US) with milk - and sugar for the heathens - referred to simply as 'Tea'. English Breakfast Tea So while you are correct in stating that ...


2

My opinion: Chai (tea) is nothing but rechristening of the Indian chai for the export market under the name of chai tea. The "chai tea" usage would be understood but frowned upon in India. Similar usage- Numerous United States coffee houses use the term chai latte or chai tea latte for their version to indicate that the steamed milk of a regular ...


2

Many American English speakers understand chai to refer to a way of preparing tea, and for them it is natural to use chai adjectivally. If you understand chai to mean "tea prepared in the Indian manner" then chai tea can strike your ear as pleonastic.


2

The word Systemically would cover the entire body and its subsystems. In your example, you could say, "Drugs are systemically bad," or "Drugs are a systemic problem."


2

The symptoms associated with the trivial use of "OCD" tend to match the definition of obsessive-compulsive personality disorder (OCPD). Rephrasing the DSM-5 definition of OCPD gives several words for describing aspects of OCPD. Legalistic; preoccupied with rules so as to lose the point of an activity. Perfectionist; letting the perfect be the enemy of the ...


2

My wife says, "Are you Monk?" though that might fade from public consciousness since the show finished. I think the TV show has made such affectations more readily shown in front of others, and seen as endearing rather than "strange".


2

For the record, the word that Obama used wasn't bemused but bemusement. Here is the transcript of his relevant remark from April 27, 2011: THE PRESIDENT: As many of you have been briefed, we provided additional information today about the site of my birth. Now, this issue has been going on for two, two and a half years now. I think it started during ...


2

It's a pleonasm to me, an InE speaker. Other phrases that seem redundant because the foreign word means the same thing as the English word: •Gobi desert (Gobi means "desert" in Mongolian.) •Naan bread (Naan is a type of bread in many countries.) Chai means "tea" in Hindi, so when we order "chai tea," we're asking for "tea tea," at ...


2

Notwithstanding my tongue-in-cheek comment above, Moses’ use of the expression (translated as “please kill me at once”/ “please kill me here and now”) as reported in the Book of Numbers is probably not directly related to the current use and meaning of “Please kill me” in English today. However, I do think it is possible that Gloria Beatty’s (played by ...


2

The English Oxford Dictionary cites coin (without pl.) Coined money, esp. that in circulation or current; specie, money. In slang use this has passed into ‘cash, money generally’, as in ‘I haven't the coin to do it’. 1406 Hoccleve Misrule 133 Lak of coyn departith compaignie. 1530 Palsgr. 487 He hath clypped the kynges quoyne. ...


2

Usually it is referred to as a must when something is mandatory. Also you could say, Tomorrow's meeting is a "must-attend".


1

I think you're looking for "handheld". handheld : designed to be used while being held in your hands Merriam-Webster reference


1

A baby shower is thrown before the child is born, and I think it's typically thrown by a friend of the expectant mother. A welcome baby party is thrown shortly after the child is born. There's some discussion of the etiquette of the two here. The ones supporting welcome baby parties seem to be those where the mother is having a difficult pregnancy, so would ...


1

No it isn't common. You got just 3 results because being hit on the head usually makes you feel a lot of pain, which isn't at all what numb the verb means. Oxford defines numb as: Deprive of feeling or responsiveness: Cause (a sensation) to be felt less intensely; deaden: Something (like medication) can numb your pain after you're hit on the ...


1

M-W (sense 3) defines moot as "not certain : argued about but not possible for people to prove." Based on this, differentiating between an argument and its "point" seems, well, pointless (at least in terms of everyday use). Some Google results below: "Question is moot" » 186,000 results "Answer is moot" » 143,000 results "Distinction is moot" » 156,000 ...


1

I have a hunch that the InEng (IE/IndE) usage is derived from the polite valediction, Best wishes, i.e. “I hope everything goes well for you”, and the phrase “send her/him my best wishes”. In both expressions two objects are not required, it is understood that the speaker is saying ‘I would like to send you the best of luck today.’ The InEng usage of ...


1

Do native speakers use wish like this? I haven't heard this use before (British English). The way you are using wish - preferring not to specify the wished-for thing - sounds very like the way I would use the word 'bless' (which I don't use often). Does this sound right to them? It's unfamiliar but not off-puttingly so, and certainly thought-provoking! ...


1

Both refer to things that are not known. unknown (adj.) - not known; not well-known; not famous unknown (n) - a place, situation, or thing that you do not know about or understand; a person who is not famous or well-known; something that is not known or not yet discovered


1

Unwilling doesn't necessarily mean that you didn't do something, but refusal suggests so. An example Google gives as part of its definition is "unwilling conscripts". Being unwilling to serve in the army could mean you grumble while you're there, whereas refusing to serve in the army implies you'll be thrown in prison.



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