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13

The question is to some extent a matter of opinion. However, I would say that your examples are not examples which are widely considered outdated, especially in written English. We must is used in formal speech and in writing. In informal speech, it has been largely replaced by we need to, we have to and we've got to. Gotta is slang for have got to, and ...


7

Womb owners is not an idiomatic expression, but it's absolutely clear who Jerry Lewis was referring to. As a woman, I don't find the expression particularly insulting nor offensive, but neither do I find it amusing. I do, however, interpret the comedian words as being snide and sarky in nature. To be brief he is saying that women shouldn't waste their time ...


7

We must -> We have to These are both in common usage still - as a native speaker I would use "must" for emphasis, or to talk about things we should consider doing rather than absolutely are required to do. For example "We must get around to getting you that new dress..." In this context "have to" wouldn't work. Incidentally note the difference between ...


6

My speculation is that "relations" now carries a rather negative connotation. The most common use of "relations" that I can think of is of a sexual nature. Usually, trying to sound more tactful, media and other outlets will basically use this type of terminology over anything more direct. I personally would not feel comfortable using this word for this ...


5

"Where's Waldo" is a game where you have to scan a sketch of a crowd, looking for a particular person. By using where's-waldo as a verb, I think the writer means the student is not going to read the passage, but just scan over it, looking for a few words that resemble the question.


4

In the Law of Wills, "relatives" are legitimate and "relations" are related by blood whether lacking legitimacy or not: Source The popular meaning of the word "relatives" or "relations" is that of all persons within any degree whatever of consanguinity or affinity. But when the word "relations" is used in a will to denote a class of beneficiaries, it ...


3

Growing up in rural southern Louisiana, we looked forward to an annual fair called Lagniappe on the Bayou and the meaning was given as "a little something extra." Lagniappe on the Bayou I think that its popular meaning would still be some association with this famous old food fair. It now gives its name to restaurants and cook books throughout the south. ...


3

The word is I think best known to the world outside New Orleans from Mark Twain’s mention in Life on the Mississippi, and I was credibly informed forty-odd years ago that Twain’s description of its use still obtained at that time:   We picked up one excellent word—a word worth traveling to New Orleans to get; a nice limber, expressive, handy ...


3

I think it literally means a stick of cheese, such as string cheese. However, in New York Mozzarella sticks would make sense; many small companies specialize in making a particular type of food in a small building. This reminds me of a recent article in the New Yorker about fresh mozzarella making in NYC a few decades ago. Since Mozzarella sticks are what ...


3

The phrase you are looking for is: As rich as Croesus. It comes from the legend of the excessively wealthy king Croesus who is said to have so much gold that he had every guest take as much gold as he could carry, upon leaving. One fellow asked Croesus if he could take his gold at a later date, to which Croesus assented. The man return a few weeks ...


3

Latter is at the end. Being the second of two persons or things mentioned; near or nearer to the end. It has more to do with placement, so to speak. Location, real or figurative. Between captain and major, the latter is the higher rank. My favorite is the latter part of the book. Later has more to do with time. She arrived an hour later than expected. ...


3

First of all, you can't say "I give you a call". I gather you meant "I will give you a call". As far as phone calls are concerned, there is little, if any, difference in meaning or register. However, the first sentence: I will call you. is much more generic and, without proper context, may have meanings other than phone calls. For example, when you ...


3

If someone says using 'gotta' as proper English, as a rule of thumb, I would recommend doing the exact opposite of everything they say. Gotta is phenomenally terrible English. Seriously, every recommendation that you've listed is wrong. We must ➙ We have to These are similar but they say different things. Many people will treat must as a stronger ...


3

Is it true, and if so, to what extent? An axiom of communication is to understand (expect and accept) a wide range of forms from other people. I'd agree with your teacher if he says that those second forms are often used instead of the first forms. I'd disagree with your teacher if he says that those first forms are "outdated" meaning obsolete or ...


3

The phrases have an oxymoronic quality to them a figure of speech in which opposite or contradictory ideas or terms are combined (Ex.: thunderous silence, sweet sorrow) In the examples given, the modifiers are incongruously linked to terms that belie them. One is generally immune to bad things, not good, and one celebrates the positive, not the ...


3

Your genocidal dictator might not be megalomaniac in having a "clear understanding of what they were and weren't capable of", as you put it. But that is only true in terms of his immediate methods. That is not where his megalomania lies. You have to look at his objectives. Stalin was rational in thinking that he had millions under his physical control—he did ...


2

The fact is that the term relations is ambiguous in American English. Relations can mean people in your family, it can mean people that you have had relationships with, and it could mean people that you have had sex with. It is often used as an innuendo for sex. Usage: "So what's up with Liz and you? Have you guys had relations?" So that is issue ...


2

The only example I can find where the two are not interchangeable is in the expression no relation". When two people have the same surname but there is no family tie, the words no relation are often inserted e.g. G. Smith, K. Smith (no relation). It is used to negate, to separate, not to link. In French, the word relations exists, but it means contacts in a ...


2

"as" is a function word which has multiple uses. So it is necessary to get a survey about its uses. As a conjunction introducing a clause it can have temporal, causal and comparative use. As already said it can be a preposition and an adverb. And there are special word groups with "as", eg such as, as to, as if/as though and others. The best way to study ...


2

A more scientific word would be ambulation. ambulation: the action of walking, moving about. As in: "...has a mechanism which simulates ambulation." If you want to use gait you need to say what kind of gait is simulated: "which simulates a natural gait." or "which simulates a human gait."


2

What comes to mind is "to gain in importance." gain: to gradually get (something) or more of (something) as time passes. South East Asia is gaining in importance as Japanese investors seek to balance risks...


2

It refers to the fact that stars have been existing for millions of years, and their light takes millions of years to reach us, to be visible to us. So, when we see theirs light, are the stars form which the light is sent still in existence? If not, can we say that they still exist because we see their light at present?


2

Actually their use as synonyms appears to be still an issue: Usage Note: The distinction in meaning between healthy ("possessing good health") and healthful ("conducive to good health") was ascribed to the two terms only as late as the 1880s. This distinction, though tenaciously supported by some critics, is belied by citational evidence—healthy has been ...


2

'Small' doesn't make sense here because the adjective referring to the length of time (duration) of a nap. Small is more of a descriptor for the overall size of something rather than length in particular (such as the saying, "it's a small world"). 'Short' is better because it is an adjectives used to describe length (of time or of objects). You might say ...


1

Merriam-Webster defines the word 'gate' as "a manner of walking or moving on foot" and typically refers to specific characteristics of the way a person walks. If you use this word, you should use a modifier like Aaron K suggested. Of course, which phrase you use depends upon your audience and the purpose of the writing, but I would keep it simple and ...


1

Let's try some minimal pairs: I walk rather than run I walk instead of running I eat apples rather than oranges I eat apples instead of oranges I walk quickly instead of quietly I walk quickly rather than quietly I don't really think there's much of a difference, except perhaps rather than implies preference whereas instead of implies substitution. But ...


1

Jerry Lewis was using slang and why would Time not publish his authentic voice? He has a history of politically-incorrect work, and controversial comments that spans his career. I saw an interview were Andrew Dice Clay claimed he based his disrespectful persona on a Lewis performance. ...


1

I agree with the presumption of your question: you go to the store to meet, satisfy or answer your battery needs, not to acquire them. The problem is simply the sloppiness with which the sign was worded. Someone verbose, but more careful (or fluent) in their use of English, might write something like: Find the answer to your battery needs here! Better ...


1

I think it probably said (or should have said) All your battery needs can be found here Notice the use of your instead of you And it means much as you have written All your requirements, with respect to batteries, can be satisfied here. i.e. Whatever kind of battery you require, you will find it here at the battery sales stand. I'm assuming ...


1

The term exists in the field of software engineering: Composability is a system design principle that deals with the inter-relationships of components. A highly composable system provides recombinant components that can be selected and assembled in various combinations to satisfy specific user requirements. It is not a "standard" English word and many ...



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