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81

Generally, the word personal is used in these scenarios to indicate (or just emphasize) that the matter is, in fact, personal (from themselves without any other context to affect it). Let's take a look at your example sentences. She is a personal friend of mine. Without the "personal" there, there's no telling exactly how they're friends. A friend from ...


12

Personal is being used in at least three non-redundant ways in these examples To distinguish a personal opinion from another opinion, for example a professional opinion, given by a professional person. It's my personal opinion.... As emphasis that the opinion is mine, and may differ from others. Personally, I would advise you... To express a connection ...


11

The connotation is not just LGBT-related. You can come out as a bronie. You can be outed as a spy. However, your friend is right. If your documentary is not about LGBT people coming out of the closet, then it is a bad choice for a title if your documentary is meant to play in US and EU. For example, this hugely popular song works for all kinds of coming ...


7

I cannot see the word OUT without thinking outing/coming out It does by the way not sound very idiomatic to say out of bias, out of borders, out of propaganda Apart, Beyond, Besides even Without sounds better to me - more here


7

I imagine that your US colleague was referring to the expression, "out", used when a LGBT (lesbian, gay, bi-sexual, trans-sexual) person goes public with their alternate-lifestyle orientation. It's referred to as "coming out of the closet", and has been morphed into "outing" or "outed" when it's done to someone by someone else: "He was outed by his ...


4

I find both unhighlight (and dehighlight) on-line with substantial use and both sound fine to me. Because un- is a standard prefix that can be applied to a wide swath of words and generally be readily understood, dictionaries won't include many (most?) un- words, even well attested ones, unless their un- version has become lexicalized and has shades of ...


4

Consider a person whose job it is to be the public face of an organization. Naturally, he has opinions of his own -- i.e., his personal opinions. However, because of his position as an official spokesman for his employer, whenever he makes a pronouncement, especially among strangers, he must make it clear whether he is speaking for his employer or for ...


3

I wouldn't; but I might tell them I could allay their {worries / concerns} or misgivings (as JLG suggests).


2

In speaking, the addition of 'personal' to 'my opinion' is a tactic of discourse. You might say 'my personal' opinion to poke an interlocutor who is not taking responsibility for her own opinions, but is rather claiming to spout universal truth. Or, you might say it rather pompously in mock modesty, to emphasize that the people listening to you are obliged ...


2

According to Oxford Dictionaries the answer is yes they are interchangeable, but they also offer some style advice about word selection that indicates you might be better off chosing "Until." till - Less formal way of saying until. Usage In most contexts, till and until have the same meaning and are interchangeable. The main difference is ...


2

One point that seems to be missing in the other answers is that in some of these examples, the function of the word “personal” or “personally” seems to be connotative. For example, opinions are arguably always personal. Taking a (too) literal view of the meaning of the word, it would therefore appear that “personal opinion” is a redundant phrase. But at the ...


2

This word is often used purely as a "filler", but sometimes is used as a way to show emphasis to distinguish the person's views from the organisation they work for, or from any other affiliation they may be perceived to have. However, this usage may also sometimes be used merely out of politeness, especially in British English. In British English it is ...


2

Personally, although I'm not ure it's wrong, I wouldn't break up your sentence with the phrase on a website, so I'd use either of your other alternatives. But if your website is going to have sections dealing with at least some of the other things, I would probably leave it out entirely.


2

The phrase "in my humble opinion" is too much of a colloquialism nowadays. Taken literally, it might have acted as a softener once, but idiomatically, as others have pointed out, it comes off as rude and sarcastic. Personally, I would use something like "I believe", or just "in my opinion" without the word humble. Simply stating explicitly that your opinion ...


2

The phrase in my humble opinion and its acronym IMHO have become trite and virtually meaningless. In context, they often seem disingenuous. The speaker often seems to be very sure of the rightness of his or her point of view. I urge losing the phrases completely. There are standard alternatives that are not so canned sounding: I think my proposal may ...


1

At the computer magazines where I've worked, we consistently used the term deselect to refer to clicking a highlighted option in a menu so that the highlighting went away, indicating that the option was no longer the active one for that particular program parameter. Unhighlight would work just as well, in my opinion, though we never used it. I was surprised ...


1

Just say, "My proposal is interesting because . . ." We already know it's your opinion, because you're the one stating it. The rest is filler.


1

Most commonly it would be called a Ticklist. It can also be sent as Tick list.


1

Most likely the term originated with The Dozens, an insult game that African American children used to play to toughen themselves up for the verbal abuse they had to put up with as adults to survive. Its mostly known in wider culture for being the source of most "Yo' Mamma" jokes. The individual one-liners themselves, if they are good enough, are referred ...


1

Your question highlights a specific example that may use personal unnecessarily or incorrectly - then follows it with a general question. There are some uses of personal that are incorrect, superfluous or ridiculous, as your question shows. A person can hold opinions they form for themselves (rare) or that they get from their community (common). When people ...


1

It is an exclamatory phrase which indicates surprise, misfortune, or insult. The Mysterious Origins of “Oh Snap!” Is it possible that the 1910 children’s novel, The Bobbsey Twins at School, was a prescient influence on hip-hop? “Oh, Snap! Snap!” cried Freddie. “Don’t go there!” But Snap kept on, and Freddie, afraid lest his pet dog be ...


1

According to Wikipedia and Ngram: Oh snap The first known use of the expression "oh snap" was in 1984 in a book about breakdancing. Its origin is not certain. The following link offers a few hypotheses: http://www.edrants.com/the-mysterious-origins-of-oh-snap/


1

While RHK Webster's lists the above usage of 'with' as a prepositional one, it flags the peculiar usage, calling it a 'function word'. Though this is rather misleading (all prepositions lie somewhere along the lexical word --- function word continuum, their actual location dependent on the actual context they're used in), RHKW are right to imply that this is ...


1

The manner of with used in your sentences is 2. having or possessing (something). "a flower-sprigged blouse with a white collar" wearing or carrying. "a small man with thick glasses" You write: There are a lot of people, with many wearing tuxedos. I find this construction a little bit odd, but I doubt that it's ungrammatical. More commonly I'd ...



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