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5

Without any more context, "thank you" as a response to "Would you like some coffee?" would mean an affirmative. Generally, in such a scenario, the context would actually matter more than the phrase. For example, if I wanted to decline such an offer, I would wave the asker away while shaking my head. If I wanted to accept such an offer, I'd gesture to the ...


4

The Alethic (or 'able to') sense of can, has -- predictably for a modal -- lots of strange grammar. In this situation, specifically, Subj can Verb means the same as Subj Verb. This is true of sense verbs (e.g, see, hear, feel, sense, smell, taste). With most sensations, if you can sense something, at some place and time, then you are in fact sensing ...


4

Shakespeare also used worser in Sonnet 144: Two loves I have of comfort and despair, Which like two spirits do suggest me still: The better angel is a man right fair, The worser spirit a woman colour'd ill. It also appears in The Taming of the Shrew and Antony and Cleopatra. Does this mean that using worser is grammatically correct today? Not at ...


3

The use of relatively and comparatively is the same; in both cases, the two 'entities' must either be stated or be obviously inferrable for the sentence to make sense. Note the definition of relatively and comparatively: In a relative manner; in comparison with something else (TFD) Relating to, based on, or involving comparison; in a relative manner; ...


2

It actually is in the Merriam Webster: http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/worser That said, I think people will frown upon it unless you are writing to achieve an "old/early English" effect. They might (incorrectly) assume you are using a non-word. Also it sounds bad.


2

The appearance of the word 'aye' twice is to signify that the order has been understood and will be carried out. Per the wikipedia article you cited: It differs from yes, which, in standard usage, could mean simple agreement without any intention to act. ... This might be a matter of life and death for a ship at sea. The Navy heritage FAQ also offers ...


1

As other answers have noted, the first scandal ending in "gate" was the Watergate scandal. The Oxford English Dictionary says that other scandals having a "gate" tacked on happened reasonably quickly Only a year after Watergate, the scandal had become so well known that -gate became detached and was used to create names for other scandals. The OED’s ...


1

To "resolve" means "to make solvent again"; to "be solvent" is to be provided with cash (or at least buying power). Since purchasing turns liquid assets into hard assets, and conversely liquidation turns those hard assets back into liquid assets, "resolve" is a applicable and defensible word, even if a bit unusual in that context.


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'No pun intended' IS a pun! Not so much a contradictory answer, however, I do miss another aspect of the phrase "no pun intended". Thanks to Jeff Richards on episode 135 of the Probably science podcast I can now never hear the phrase without hearing: Nope, unintended! Thought that side of the phrase had to be told here as well. This does underline ...


1

Prop the door open sounds correct, and open here is an adverb, not a verb. I would say it is the same structure as Hold the door open or Keep the door open We (well, at least I) don't say Hold open the door or Keep open the door.


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It's interesting that so many people think of Latin as a foreign language; they may be surprised how much of the English language is still Latin! It is of course unkind to use language to make others aware of their own educational shortcomings. But when someone does, it reveals more about the lack of education of the person who uses the phrase, than those ...



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