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4

The first sentence is incorrect, because "yet" cannot stand between "been" and the past participle of the verb (in this case, "studied"). The second sentence is not wrong, since "yet" can go last, after "studied," but it still sounds rather clumsy. I'd suggest "...has not yet been extensively studied." You can, however, delete "yet" entirely without ...


4

The let alone construction has been analyzed in great and precise detail in a famous paper by Fillmore, Kay, and O'Connor: "Regularity and Idiomaticity in Grammatical Constructions: The Case of Let Alone", Language, Vol. 64, No. 3 (1988:501-38). EDIT: By request. The two clauses have to be on a certain scale of meaning; one of the clauses must ...


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This is OALD's entry for let alone: let alone used after a statement to emphasize that because the first thing is not true or possible, the next thing cannot be true or possible either There isn't enough room for us, let alone any guests. I didn’t have any clothes, let alone a passport. "let alone" is usually used after a negative statement. After "let ...


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I would use 'not at all bad' to contradict a statement that may have been 'the weather is bad', however I would use 'not bad at all' when making an initial statement.


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Yes, that is correct, though 2nd is an abbreviation. In most cases, you should use second instead. The event is the person's second birthday, and “Happy [event name]” is the usual way to congratulate people, so “Happy second birthday” is correct. Likewise “Happy second anniversary” and “Happy sixty-fifth birthday.”


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So, for example, is the following sentence wrong? "She told me that if a fire breaks out, I should immediately call the fire department." No, this is completely acceptable usage in American English and, at least to my ear, is preferable to the alternative you suggested, although I cannot tell you why, other than that it sounds more natural and ...


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In this case the proposed question is not starting with was, but who. "...and it would have been difficult to decide (the answer to the question) who was the most gratified of the three; certainly Helen was not the least so." secondly, "who the most gratified of the three WAS" is actually ambiguous in the context- it could be interperated as that we know ...


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Adverbial phrases can generally move around English sentences freely. In cases like your sentence, the phrase for a long time can modify only the verb (here, have visited), so beginning or end, both positions in this case are available to mean the same thing. This lets you write sentences like [1] For a long time, I haven't visited Tom, my older ...



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