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5

It is a slightly uncommon construction, but your alternative is not grammatical at all. That's because so here does not mean Portuguese muito but rather Portuguese tão. This is a common confusion between English speakers and speakers of Iberian languages, because the mapping isn’t what one might otherwise expect. Think of this as a chopped-off so . . . as ...


2

"So say I" (sometimes rendered as "so says I") is an idiomatic expression, it can't be taken as a general pattern to follow. In general, when writing dialogue, your goal should never be for all the variations on "he said, she said" to stick out. They are there to perform a necessary function, but you want them to remain in the background. Using an ...


2

The difference, it seems to me, is that Old World rivers have their own names (often personified as a god or nymph) but colonists typically named rivers after something (e.g. Hudson River after Henry Hudson; Swan River, formerly Black Swan River, where someone saw such a bird for the first time) or descriptively (Little Twisty Green River). "Mississippi ...


1

The simplest way of dealing with this (I find) is to remove the second object (in this case Mary) and then rework the sentence atound a single object (in this a disputed first person singular pronoun) and check which works and substitue that into your original sentence. If that method doesn't work, perhaps becuase it sounds clumsy, then just reword then the ...


1

Shamelessly taken from Grammar Girl after a very short Google search: Between is a preposition, just as on, above, over, and of are prepositions. Because prepositions usually either describe a relationship, or show possession, they don’t act alone; they often answer questions like Where? and When? For example, if I said, “Keep that secret between you and ...


1

The "Autism Spectrum" consists of a number of disorders which appear to lie along a continuous "spectrum" from mild to severe. There are various severities of outright autism, plus what was once called Asperger's disease (now a blip on the ASD spectrum) and even milder conditions that are starting to look like ADHD. So a person does not "have Autism ...


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Adverbial phrases can generally move around English sentences freely. In cases like your sentence, the phrase for a long time can modify only the verb (here, have visited), so beginning or end, both positions in this case are available to mean the same thing. This lets you write sentences like [1] For a long time, I haven't visited Tom, my older ...



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