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4

In the sentence The player appears to have not connected. connected is the focus of negation, and thus not can appear directly before it, as here. However, not can also appear directly before the beginning of any constituent containing its focus. Connected is in the Verb Phrase have connected, so not can go before that, too The player appears to not ...


4

I would use: The player appears not to have connected or The player does not appear to have connected


3

The usage of "which were a size too small" is correct in this sentence- Mr Boxell had deliberately sold the man a pair of shoes which were a size too small, knowing he would return them next day! "A" here indicates one size small. If you take a look at this lifestyle blog, there is a similar usage of "a size too small"- Ever go to the store ...


2

Nothing seems wrong with word order in 'Which were a size too small.' Substitute the word "one" for "a" to get implied meaning. The second choice which could be written as "which were too small" is less specific. How many sizes too small?


2

He is saying that the shoes were one size too small (e.g. were a size 10 instead of the size 11 that the customer required). Your other example could also be used, but would have to be whose size was too small, but the wording in the original sentence is more correct.


2

Although grammatically (I think) it's correct, personally I might change it. The more repetitive this action becomes, the less sincere it is. But you could very well say, "The smaller an object gets, the denser the object gets", though again it would sound better as "...the denser it becomes."


2

There is absolutely no grammatical reason to avoid starting a sentence with these adverbial phrases: as I noted in my comment above, all of your query sentences are well-formed and idiomatic. Stylistically speaking, such phrases are useful devices for creating a context for the subsequent description that is a little more sophisticated and nuanced than the ...


1

Stuart: Ooh, Sheldon, I’m afraid you couldn’t be more wrong. Sheldon: "More wrong"? Wrong is an absolute state and not subject to gradation. Like wrong, so is absolute. "So much" means literally "exactly this much", and you cannot be "very exactly" anything. Stuart: Of course it is. It’s a little wrong to say a tomato is a vegetable, it’s ...


1

Yes and No. If you just want to be understood, then yes, go ahead and use them interchangeably. If you want to show your English teacher that you understand the difference between subject and object, then unfortunately you'd fail at convincing her. In this sentence, "Are you okay with that?" "You" is the subject and "that" is the object. Whereas, ...



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