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6

From the Cambridge Dictionary: There are two negative forms of let’s: let’s not and don’t let’s. Let’s not is more common: Let’s not argue about money. We can share the costs. Don’t let’s throw away the good books with the damaged ones. We can sell them.


4

The two usages of such are not equal in meaning in the given contexts. This isn't the time to delight oneself with such a fine luxury. Here such causes the end to mean "so extreme a fine luxury." (such - see definition 4) This isn't the time to delight oneself with a fine luxury as such. Here such causes the end to mean "a fine luxury of this ...


4

Neither one of the sentences you posted is definitively wrong. However, applying the rules of parallelism, since you say "MDA-MB-231 cells are," it becomes preferable to likewise follow that same ordering by saying "neutrophils are." I'm not sure why you think one sounds strange and the other doesn't. If the one of you who thinks ending the sentence ...


3

According to the Cambridge Grammar of the English Language (Huddleston & Pullum 2002), there are two dialect usages within Standard English with regard to let's. One of these has let as a verb taking a Direct Object us, and then a Catenative Complement, an infinitival clause. The second has let's as a phonologically and syntactically fused item ...


3

So Aux NP -- as in so do I, so are you, so has Mr. Smith -- is a formulaic tag construction that indicates a deletion, and must be preceded by a clause containing the deleted material. You believe that he lost the race, and so do I. She's an idiot, and so are you. I've been there frequently, and so has Mr. Smith. In the first sentence, so replaces ...


3

In a corpus of about 1.5 million words of poetry I found 214 instances of conjoined colours, where the colours were the 12 commonest colour terms in the U.S. frequency dictionary. Red and white occurred 12 times, and white and red 10 times. A 12 by 12 chart of all the possibilities exhibited a roughly symmetrical pattern of results with one exception: green ...


2

Yes, it makes perfect sense. It's a gerund phrase. When you say "having" in this context, you are using the present participle "having" as a gerund. A gerund is the noun form of a verb. By taking the gerund "having" and adding the phrase "10 percent of the population" after it, you are making what is called a gerund phrase, which functions as a noun. ...


2

It's whatever your particular grammatical sect calls the word which introduces the back half of a comparative construction: [As you do,] so do I. Just like "As Maine goes, so goes the nation".


2

It's a pronoun of some sort. The exact syntactic category of it is not so obvious, but it's very unlikely to be an adverb. do so as a whole is a pro-verb-phrase, with do taking the place of the verb and so taking the place of its object. We can see this when we ask questions about verb phrases. The question word that combines with do is what not how, ...


2

"Start date for period of aggregation".


1

Consider the sentences: The method is less efficient and secure against hackers. The method is less efficient and less secure against hackers. Both sentences can work to communicate the same thing, but (1) suffers from a structural ambiguity, whereas (2) does not. (2) is perfectly unambiguous. The reason (1) is structurally ambiguous is because there ...


1

Number 1 is the proper order. In this case, "what kind of person he is" is the noun phrase that defines the object of curiosity. If you were asking a question about this person, you might say, "What kind of person is he?" In this case, the verb comes first because it's a full interrogative sentence, and not just a descriptive phrase. We could ...


1

The alternative most certainly isn't correct, and your realization about comparing a verb-adjective to a verb-noun pair is correct. In the second example, the pair ought to be highlighted as "It doesn't matter what is correct", and the word order is preserved.


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It’s an adverb. In this context, so means something similar to “equally; in the same way; to the same extent”: He likes cakes; so do I. He likes cakes; I like them as much as he does.


1

Having... sounds very natural. Without it you have two structures as adjectives, "10 percent of" and "left-handed". Without having, the sentence does not have the ground. On the other hand, "10 percent of the population was left-handed", is natural. To place an adjective after such a long construction 10 percent of the population, where another adjective ...



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