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3

My answer is based not on research, but on education and experience, and more than 50 years of writing. First, you are correct in questioning your first choice. There is no real problem with the noticeable difference in the length of the "either" and "or" phrases -- in fact, such a juxtaposition of a long, complex phrase with a short, simple one can be ...


2

Only in June was it creating repositories. Only in June it was creating repositories. (ungrammatical) In example (1) we see the auxiliary and subject change places. In example (2), the auxiliary and subject are the same as they would be in a normal sentence. It is ungrammatical. Only in June did it create repositories. Only in June it ...


2

Therefore - (adverb) "because of that", "for that reason". Not a word I would use in ordinary conversation, but very useful in the written language. "I, therefore, suggest that..." x "Therefore, I suggest that..." Semantically speaking, I can see no difference between them. The former, however, seems to emphasize the subject.


1

I suggest rewording the relevant segment thus: "...either of one's inability to [...], or simply of pure stupidity." However, there is another problem that you haven't asked about. This is that the segment "And the question was immediate to a point of self-acknowledgement" is incomprehensible.


1

I (as a native speaker) agree with all your judgements, including your placement of commas. I suspect that "mainly" works like "only", which McCawley discusses in his textbook The Syntactic Phenomena of English. "Only" has a scope and a focus, the latter being compared or contrasted with something else (usually given special stress in the pronunciation) in ...


1

These structures, given in your second set of examples, are often known as "extraposed relative clauses". Both corpus studies (i.e. studies of naturally occurring data) and experimental studies have found that relative clause extraposition is more common or more acceptable when the relative clauses are significantly longer than the verbal phrase (predicative ...


1

As TRomano observes in a comment above, the simplest way to resolve an awkward sentence structure involving a passive construction is to put the wording into active voice. More often than not, doing so reduces the number of words in the sentence and brings the verb and its object closer together. In the OP's example, a number of verbs would work in the ...


1

I think the problem with this phrase is not the "leave me alone" part but the "the ghost of you" part. It seems you're trying to use "the ghost of you" as a metaphor for a memory. I have never come across this particular metaphor and it seems it's not exactly a common phrase. If you still want to use this phrase I would go with something that plays both on ...



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