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18

I don't think there is any rule, but the normal pattern tends to be that when we have a common pair of words, the word with fewer syllables goes first. For example, we say aunt & uncle, men & women, sons & daughters, and ladies & gentlemen. For boys and girls or girls and boys it doesn't matter as both words only have one syllable. It ...


17

You can write "my aunt and uncle" or "my uncle and aunt" and the meaning is exactly the same. However, according to Google Books the trend is definitely towards "aunt and uncle"


8

The DuoLingo translation is grammatically correct and faithful to the literal meaning of the Spanish text, but it doesn't use the most usual collocation in English to describe the relatives. Rather than "My uncle and my aunt", it would be better to say "My uncle and aunt", or (most idiomatic of all), "My aunt and uncle" -- even though the last version ...


6

The last version listed is correct: "Amazing Spider-Man 2, The" adding the 2 at the end is confusing and non-intuitive while omitting it entirely does not resolve conflicts between sequels. Additionally, adding the number before the comma still keeps sequels ordered intuitively and is also easier to read. The only reason people move 'the' to the end of ...


3

"My aunt and uncle" is more common in English. In fact I've noticed that most "couple" relationships put the female first: aunt and uncle, mum and dad, mother and father, grandma and grandad, etc. Husband and wife is the only exception I can think of offhand - and that's slightly different because it's describing their relationship to each other, not the ...


2

The meaning of the sentence differs depending where you put a lot. A lot can refer to the measure of your enjoyment in playing with your dog, or to the amount of play that you enjoy. 1) I like to play a lot with my dog. This means that you like lots of play with your dog, since a lot modifies the verb play. 2) *I like a lot to play with my dog. ...


2

It depends on what you're trying to say. In learn English better, better is an adverb that modifies learn -- it means you'll improve your learning process. In learn better English, better is an adjective that modifies English -- it means that you will learn a more proper version of English. For instance, In England, public school English or King's English ...


1

Would you not open the door? I wonder if you would mind not opening the door? I want you to not open the door. You can also add please. ;-) And you can use I would like instead of I want. These are a bit more polite: Would you please not open the door? I wonder if you would mind not opening the door, please? I would prefer that you not open the door, ...


1

Ask him what becomes of the dogs. He claims to have rehabilitated them on the show. But after the show ends, he leaves them in the hands of their ignorant owners.


1

I don't think the sentence is excessively long, but you could reduce the ambiguity by moving one of its elements to the front: After the show ends, ask him what becomes of the dogs he claims to have rehabilitated on the show and he leaves them again in the hands of their ignorant owners. You could also simplify the "leaves them in the hands" part: After ...


1

"Customer technical support" is a common term that means "technical support for customers." This distinguishes it from internal technical support for the business. "Technical customer support" is a far less common term, which makes me have to think for a second about its meaning. I doubt that I'm going to take the time to think it over as you answer the ...


1

“I'm no more hungry” I would only use this construction in something like “I'm no more hungry than I was yesterday”. I would never use it to mean "I am not hungry" or "I am no longer hungry" “I'm no longer hungry” This means I was hungry but now I am not hungry It is the usual way of saying this. “I'm hungry no more.” This too means "I was hungry ...



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