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32

You were right and your editor was wrong. Your question was Can anyone tell me X? and you properly expressed X as a free relative clause, which always acts as a nominal constituent. You asked, in effect, if anyone could tell you an answer. Your editor inverted the auxiliary verb and the subject of the free relative clause, transforming it into a ...


11

I posted a question somewhere that said: 1.) Can anyone tell me how I can solve this? but someone edited it to: 2.) Can anyone tell me how can I solve this? and it was accepted. That's wrong isn't it? Can someone explain how that's wrong? The difference between the two versions is that the subordinate interrogative ...


5

Using the form "Sir [insert name]" implies that the person has been Knighted (or, in some countries, possibly other positions, not sure). This applies even in the United States. Bill Gates has not been Knighted, so you should not use it in this form to address him. Doing so would be an interesting faux pas. If you wish to formally address someone, you ...


4

Almost. Your first comma is in a bad spot. Move it to after "advertisements" - like so: The content analysis study our group undertook clearly indicates that television advertisements, and possibly the media as a whole, present children as exhibiting gender stereotypical behaviour. Here's a rule of thumb. When you're putting in an interjection like this, ...


3

This dependent clause is a participle carrying NP, (which is) derived from the nonrestrictive relative clause (which was) carrying NP. Relative clauses modify nouns; this one modifies the noun phrase the plane, and therefore should come immediately after it. There are several different kinds of subordinate clauses: some (complement clauses) have to go ...


3

Because never is a negative, so you have the instance of obligatory subject–auxiliary inversion called negative inversion: In linguistics, negative inversion is one of many types of subject–auxiliary inversion in English. A negation (e.g. not, no, never, nothing, etc.) or a word that implies negation (only, hardly, scarcely) or a phrase containing one of ...


2

A synonym for anastrophe is hyperbaton, but anastrophe is referred to as a more specific instance of hyperbaton in that the changing of the position of only a single word changes its emphasis. In this case, anastrophe is the most specific term and the best one. There are other terms used to describe unusual order (or disorder) of words. These are: ...


2

It looks like your question is about a noun being postpositively modified by an adjective or adjective phrase. (E.g. members [dissatisfied with the board's decision].) This is part of today's standard English -- as to how this usage was used in the past, you'll probably want others to provide you that info. Here are some examples, w.r.t. today's standard ...


2

I believe that adjectives have never been postposed in English, the only exceptions being those noted in the comments: titles and legal terms adapted from the French (court martial, major general, heir apparent) and adjectives and participles with their own postposed complements and adjuncts. The mannerism is tolerable in some poetic registers, but ...


2

Sir is used very rarely in the United States. It usually implies that someone has been granted an honor in the British honors system (e.g. Sir Elton John or Sir Mick Jagger.) If it is used, definitely capitalize "S" and the person's name. You may address someone directly as "Sir" without using the name, as in "Hello, Sir, nice to meet you."


1

In countries where knighthoods are awarded, such as Britain and Australia the capitalization is significant. Sir, with a capital S, is only used for someone who has been granted a knighthood. A good guide is here The female equivalent being a Dame For people without knighthoods, you would use sir with a lower case s as a form of respect. In this case the ...


1

It would be "I have included Linda's and my suggestions in the file." The trick is to simplify. Separately you would write: "I have included my suggestions in the file." and "I have included Linda's suggestions in the file." Since the same rules apply in combination, either "my and Linda's", or "Linda's and my" are correct. "Both" is optional before ...


1

In English, quantity is expressed before the noun. Any other use in usual circumstances would be considered intentionally aberrant or just incorrect. In poetry or other writing which allows license, it could be done. For example, googling my sisters three will reveal a book title and lines from a poem (My older sister - of my sisters three); all others show ...


1

Yes, you can reverse the order of salutations, both at initial greeting ("Kitty, hello!") and at farewell. One famous instance of the latter is in the classic (1959) country western song "El Paso," by Marty Robbins, in which a cowboy shoots another cowboy over the love of "wicked Feleena," escapes, but then is mortally wounded by a band of vengeful cowboys ...


1

I believe this to be a case of inversion of an accepted alternate form. In other words: many times questions are formed by inversions of statements and this is an inversion. What color[ed] eyes did she have? Inverts (more or less): She had blue colored eyes. There is a tendency in spoken language to swallow the -ed at the end of a word. ...


1

There's a distinction between: tell me, [2ndary part of sentence follows] - emphasis is on tell me tell me how [main sentence goes on] - emphasis is on how Imho, the guy who corrected your original version would be right, had inserted a comma: Can anyone tell me, how can I solve this <- 2ndary is more stand-alone, and would sound bad in the form like ...


1

Your initial question was perfectly formed. The revised question, though understandable, is not English as she is spoke, at least, not in the UK. The revised question actually contains TWO questions: Can anyone + how can I? I get the sense this is a translation from a native language syntax into English.


1

This is a case of inversion that appears after certain negative or restrictive expressions and "only". Paraphrasing Swan: Rarely had the sunset been more gorgeous. Seldom could she see such a gorgeous sunset. Never had she seen a more gorgeous sunset. Hardly/*Scarcely* had she left the house when she saw the gorgeous sunset. No ...


1

to tell apart or to tell the difference between things means to distinguish and is an expression. "say apart" and "speak apart" do not work. "to tell", "to say" and "to speak", without the additional "apart" are indeed similar, though not necessarily interchangeable. Apart from the difference in how they take objects and which prepositions are used when ...


1

Arguably it is grammatical, but it is difficult to read because it tends to ramble. There are also a number of big words in close proximity. It needs splitting up and to be more punchy. I would say: Our group's "content analysis study", indicated one thing above all. TV advertising depicts children's behaviour in gender stereotypes. Indeed, that tends to ...


1

It's probably a matter of looking at the original equation. Because the 'for' could be interpreted differently by different folks. I would take "substituting A for B" to mean replacing B's with A's. It would be more clear if written as "substituting A's with B's." In the end, you're going to have two equations, one with A's and one with B's. So, whatever ...



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