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There are numerous examples of adjectives which are sometimes or always placed after the noun they modify (postnominal or postpositive usage). Wikipedia has a useful article, which includes: A postpositive adjective is an attributive adjective that is placed after the noun or pronoun that it modifies. This contrasts with prepositive adjectives, which ...


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Pragmatically, 'husband' is normally used as an inalienable noun. (A table in a paper on "Alienable vs. inalienable possessive constructions" by Martin Haspelmath suggests that 'husband' appears as possessed 74% of the time in numbers based on the British National Corpus, more than any other kinship term listed except 'grandmother'.) Inalienability is not ...


3

To me, this isn't about being grammatically correct, but about using a style that expresses politeness. And, as I expected, she agrees with me:-) Grammar Girl's Quick and Dirty Tips for Better Writing - Page 146 Mignon Fogarty - 2008 It is a matter of politeness, not grammar, that leads people to put themselves last in a list. In the same ...


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I smell French word order in "inspector general", cf the company Société Général. But you can do either in English. Some phrases are stuck in the one, though, there has never been a general witchfinder.


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Yes. You can start or finish a sentence with 'for' as long as you have a context for it somewhere in the sentence, because 'for' is a conjunction as well as a preposition. A Preposition is a word governing, and usually but not always preceding, a noun or pronoun, and expressing a relation to another word or element in the clause. E.g.: Was this the answer ...


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The first is far preferable to the second, in my view. However I would still make some minor amendments to that in the interests of concision and clarity. This would be my suggested wording: I wish to express my sincere gratitude to those people without whom it would not be possible to complete the work. In no particular order they are:... Finally, I am ...


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Too many commas — old-fashioned. Try: We prove first two preliminary properties and then the whole theorem. First[,] we prove two preliminary properties and then the whole theorem. You don't need comma before "and," as these are not independent clauses (they have the same subject, "we"). e.g., CRM Proceedings & Lecture Notes - Volumes 14-15 - ...


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As a Brit speaker, I would prefer your word order too, but this is euphony not grammar. I can't entirely explain why the second is better on my ears. Probably because "whips" is a shorter word than "chains" despite being equally monosyllabic, as the vowel is shorter than the diphthong. Classicists will surely talk about dactyls or something.


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The former is definitely more common; the latter sounds rather dated, and interpretations may vary depending on the different connotations that it could provoke. The second option is often found in its contracted form, though: Why can't I open the door?. Have a look at this question on cannot versus can't and the wh-movement it references. Note that the ...


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I would put it this way: WARNING: Extended satirical material on this program may strike some viewers as vulgar, offensive, prurient, or (worst of all) serious. It's satire. Please adjust your expectations and interpretations accordingly.


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Both are correct exactly the way you used them. LDOCE and ODO give examples for experience in and experience with, where experience is of course used as a noun. Furthermore, Google Books shows extensive usage of both phrases:26,700,000 and 12,000,000 respectively.


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They are both correct, but might convey a slightly different meaning, depending on the context. We painted (everything) even the floor. It suggests that you were painting the house already, but you weren't sure whether the floor was part of the deal. You did it anyway, just in case. We worked so hard. We even painted the floor. It also suggests ...


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I got to know about dative case after receiving some really helpful comments. And I found a very helpful document about dative shifting. Explanation which exactly meets with my question; 3a John sent the parcel to Mary 3b John sent Mary the parcel 4a John sent the parcel to the States 4b * John sent the States the parcel In both 3 and ...


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Personally, both feel a little awkward and potentially ambiguous. I would suggest: Of the following symbol types, which will give the right answer? or Of the following types of symbols, which will give the right answer?


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First the first :-) should be formulated as: Which of the following types of symbols will give the right answer? Visions of Culture: An Introduction to Anthropological ... - Page 401 Jerry D. Moore - 2000 Thus we are brought to an important point, namely, that we are distinguishing not only types of symbols, but types of symbolic functions. ...


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First of all, this must be corrected (thanks, tchrist): who are considering to be employed --> who are considering employment Now, to your choices: none of the two is the best. The way to do it: Go to Google Books (not vanilla Google); select and test your critical cores. The best (and the most natural) is at the top here: "difficult to get even an" ...



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