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6

I am assuming the question was something along the lines of "What colour do you like?" The answer "I like the colour blue" means that the colour you like, in general, is blue. The answer "I like the blue colour" implies that there was a given choice of certain colors and you chose the one which is blue (as if you where choosing from colour swatches). ...


4

In the sentence The player appears to have not connected. connected is the focus of negation, and thus not can appear directly before it, as here. However, not can also appear directly before the beginning of any constituent containing its focus. Connected is in the Verb Phrase have connected, so not can go before that, too The player appears to not ...


4

I would use: The player appears not to have connected or The player does not appear to have connected


3

The usage of "which were a size too small" is correct in this sentence- Mr Boxell had deliberately sold the man a pair of shoes which were a size too small, knowing he would return them next day! "A" here indicates one size small. If you take a look at this lifestyle blog, there is a similar usage of "a size too small"- Ever go to the store ...


3

Although grammatically (I think) it's correct, personally I might change it. The more repetitive this action becomes, the less sincere it is. But you could very well say, "The smaller an object gets, the denser the object gets", though again it would sound better as "...the denser it becomes."


2

Neither is a conjunction, implying that there are two or more negative statements in play. I would reword your example as Despite the fact he was nearing his thirties and got stressed a lot at work, he still had a full head of hair. No thinning at all. Nor did he have wrinkles, and his face was still long and thin—not the least sign of weight gain. ...


2

Both variations you give are grammatical, but their meanings are slightly different. In both cases, you have a complex verbal form, a perfect passive, which consists of three verbal forms: A finite auxiliary have (here in the third singular present, has), marking the perfect; A past participle of the auxiliary be, marking the passive in conjunction with – ...


2

Your intuitions are correct. They do mean different things. The particular difference is predictable from the relative positions of the negative don't and the universal temporal quantifier always in the propositions. There are two possible positions. The negative can include the quantifier in its scope Job interviews don't always go well, in logical ...


2

You are correct. The I don't always meme, which has many fine examples, does indeed affirm this. The technical reason, if you want one, comes intuitively if we consider the order of operations, given by the positioning of the words within the clause they form. Taking your sentences as you gave them, then: Job interviews don't always go well. In this ...


2

You're right, this is an older usage. It looks like the object was fronted or "topicalized" to the front of the infinitive. This no longer works in English but I guess it used to! Similar rules exist is German and other Germanic languages.


2

Nothing seems wrong with word order in 'Which were a size too small.' Substitute the word "one" for "a" to get implied meaning. The second choice which could be written as "which were too small" is less specific. How many sizes too small?


2

He is saying that the shoes were one size too small (e.g. were a size 10 instead of the size 11 that the customer required). Your other example could also be used, but would have to be whose size was too small, but the wording in the original sentence is more correct.


2

For a general explanation, perhaps the fact that Indian-English is not a 'native' variant of English, in the same way that American and Australian variants of English are descended from British settlers centuries ago. In fact the majority of Indians who speak English consider it to be a second language, rather than a bilingual mother tongue. As such, many of ...


1

The word quite describes the degree of intensity to which the adjective modifies the noun. If I say that something is quite big, then it should be understood to mean that the thing is bigger than many things but not as big as it could be. It might be less common to discuss varying degrees of purple, but I don't think I would call it ungrammatical to do so. I ...


1

The latter seems very wrong to me. Putting the word "not" after "should have" may possibly be correct form in other languages, but seems to me to be incorrect in American English. Also, I'm no English professor; but I would question the use of a comma in that sentence.


1

The fact that it is a 'joint-stock' company is a matter of its legal status and not equivalent to the other words which describe its type of business. I am also unclear whether 'investment' is another arm of the company's business, or whether it is an investment company in the areas mentioned. It seems to me you should say 'Joint-stock company investing in ...


1

Neither of them are grammatically correct. Neither is used when you have two or more 'options' to choose from. In this case you would say: Nor did he have wrinkles You could also say: He did not have wrinkles, either


1

I saw John intoxicated [/drunk as a lord] [/happy once]. and I found John sleeping [like a log]. are 'object-orientated depictive constructions' ( Asada ). As these necessarily involve complex predicates, the adjectives (participial or otherwise) must follow the noun they modify (here, the object). Attributive adjectives can of course be used, ...


1

In line with the commenters above, I find your sentence grammatical but a little awkward (for the same reason you do). I'd suggest either of these two variants, both of which place the verb 'are' somewhat closer to the subject of the sentence: I wonder what the plans are for the next steps regarding the topic we discussed yesterday. I wonder what ...


1

Yes, it is correct as written. It is a stylistic choice used to draw attention to some portion of the sentence. This is the rhetorical device called anastrophe, itself a type of hyperbaton. Anastrophe is defined by the OED as: Inversion, or unusual arrangement, of the words or clauses of a sentence. Poetic Use As mentioned here, Coleridge uses ...



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