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The verb bug fits well with your emotional reaction: 2 informal Annoy or bother (someone): ODO Imagine how you feel if a swarm of gnats gathers around your head, and starts crawling in your ears, eyes, nose and mouth. The bugs are bugging you in much the same way that man is bugging you with his irritating distractions while you are trying to watch ...


4

This is a sentence which uses extraposition from noun phrase movement. Often when a noun phrase (NP) has a long relative clause, or other modifier, that modifier gets moved out of the noun phrase and appears at the end of the sentence. This is particularly likely when the verb phrase is very short like this. Here is another example: We fired three people ...


3

The general rule is that we would use "The X brothers" or "The X sisters". And indeed, we might indeed use that form if we were talking about the two Grimms other than as named authors: "The Grimm brothers were both professors at the University of Göttingen". It's not unheard of to use the form "The Brothers X" if we have cause to use it as a name, ...


2

A day is unit of time: noun 1 A period of twenty-four hours as a unit of time, reckoned from one midnight to the next, corresponding to a rotation of the earth on its axis. ODO We often speak of time metaphorically in terms of spacial movement as in: the time has come take each day as it comes the day is coming The expression the day ...


1

Do you know what the good things are [to do around here]?" Do you know what the good things to do around here are?" The Original Poster's second example (#2 above) might be considered to be the canonical version of the sentence. This is the version where all the phrases are in their normal positions. The embedded interrogative clause in the ...


1

To me as a diner, my interpretation would come down to whether I associate the adjective more strongly with a particular cuisine (e.g. Thai fish cakes) or raw produce (New Zealand lamb). I know Thailand as a region that has a distinct cookery style, though I don't associate it with particular ingredients. The inverse is true for New Zealand. The exception ...


1

In the catering business, they sometimes use "a la " or, better, "à la" (with the accent) It comes from French, and literrally means "in the style/manner of". It's short, well known and it's part of the English and American thesaurus http://www.collinsdictionary.com/dictionary/english/a-la?showCookiePolicy=true If you put Chicken a la ...


1

Assuming @webbcode is correct, the following sentence would read: At last the day came when everyone except the Kelveys had seen the doll's house. This means: Now everyone except the Kelveys had seen the doll's house. The reason "At last, the day came when..." is used is for dramatic impact. It creates a sense of importance to the event, whereas ...


1

Something to consider .. The Brothers Grimm refers to the "unit", the "act", the "legal (so to speak) entity", the "artistic entity". You are referring to the "group" as one entity. It's like saying "The Beatles". Conversely, referring to the Grimm brothers is like saying "John, Paul, Ringo and George" or "all the people in that room" or "everyone here ...



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