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35

Playing off WS2's comments, there's this excerpt from Cakes and Ale: or, the Skeleton in the Cupboard, a 1930 novel by W. Somerset Maugham: "Than Roy no one could show a more genuine cordiality to a fellow novelist whose name was on everybody’s lips, but no one could more genially turn a cold shoulder on him when idleness, failure or someone ...


14

Justin Greer has already given an excellent answer, but it’s worth looking at why some examples of this seem more marked/forced, while others (like W2’s comment on the question) seem rather more plausible. The most obvious way to get than at the start of a full declarative sentence is to use a “PP-fronting” construction, i.e. putting the prepositional ...


14

Bob's fat is so much more adorable than everybody else's, Mary said. -Than everybody else's? You can't be serious. 'I'm very serious. Even more adorable than a- a- a-', halted Mary. -'Than a what?' 'Than a blue whale on a trapeze.'


7

"Than" is a word that is normally difficult to start a grammatically correct sentence with. Also: Than a bear, the cub is smaller.


5

Than a more typical sentence structure is this example certainly stranger. However, it is not invalid. With other conjunctions and prepositions may we make the same construction. From this point forward shall my answer be deemed complete.


2

In the question as it stands, out of context, there is some merit to FumbleFingers' comment “it's not appropriate to use "respectively" to link the sequence of the two distances upstream to that of the two [unnamed] sources”. However, as you may observe in answers and comments at ELU question 34843, some sentences use respectively to indicate that things ...


2

It sounds from the comments as though you mean literally meat (for eating) made from a dead god (or someone posing as a god). If that's the case then "the flesh of the god" does make sense as a title. It is somewhat ambiguous, but it sounds as though the story itself resolves that ambiguity. So it's ambiguous in an interesting way. It's (IMO) a better ...


2

"The lecture however does cover a lot of information, still doesn't explain the main subject." You could say "The lecture, however, does cover a lot of information while still not explaining the main subject." if you're stuck on where however goes. You could say "However, the lecture DOES cover a lot of information while still not explaining the main ...


2

You are free to choose any order you like, so long as 'and I' comes last.


2

More than one usage of 'to' exists. Restricting analysis to to + infinitive, note the difference between Not to be charged the full price would be great. and To not be charged the full price, make sure you show your concessionary pass. The second example here uses the 'in order [not] to' sense. Possibly, positioning has evolved to show the ...


2

Hot she is is a very unusual construction. Exactly what the speaker meant to convey by using such odd syntax would depend completely on the context: there is no general answer.


1

Both formulations can be used. Tell me what your opinion on this matter is is a straightforward prompt which invites the other person to say what they think. In its written form, the variant wording requires some additional punctuation to clarify the fact that it is actually a question: Tell me: what is your opinion on this matter?


1

Each pair are semantically equivalent. The main differences are of emphasis and continuation and leading from one topic to another. In general, you would want to put which of the two you want to emphasise earlier in your sentence. Note however that toward the end of a paragraph, speech, section of a speech, etc. you can in fact emphasise something more by ...


1

The answer to the question hinges in the definition of the word "phrase". A phrase can be any conceptual expression of some kind of clause, whether grammatically correct or not: A small group of words standing together as a conceptual unit, typically forming a component of a clause: ‘to improve standards’ is the key phrase here is a phrase. So, a more ...



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