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'Mistake' as a verb can be both transitve and intransitive; or to say it other way round, it is the context that makes the verb either. The problem lies elsewhere. 'If' introduces a condition as a subordinate clause which will be fulfilled in the principal clause ; and the sentence-If I don't mistake......-fails to find that consummation in the principal ...


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One term that might suit your description is soliloquy, which Merriam-Webster's Eleventh Collegiate Dictionary (2003) defines as 1 : the act of talking to oneself 2 : a dramatic monologue that represents a series of unspoken reflections A soliloquy can be spoken or unspoken and can be reflective or polemical. A silent version of a soliloquy is ...


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Neoplasia and infiltration are definitely not synonyms. Consider the VINDICATES mnemonic for differential diagnosis: Vascular, Infectious, Neoplastic, Degenerative, Idiopathic, Congenital, Autoimmune, Traumatic, Endocrine, PSychiatric Neoplasia refers specifically to tumors. From Merriam-Webster: neo·pla·sia \ˌnē-ə-ˈplā-zh(ē-)ə\ noun 1 :the formation ...


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The verb bug fits well with your emotional reaction: 2 informal Annoy or bother (someone): ODO Imagine how you feel if a swarm of gnats gathers around your head, and starts crawling in your ears, eyes, nose and mouth. The bugs are bugging you in much the same way that man is bugging you with his irritating distractions while you are trying to watch ...


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Sadism ? But, even if "in order to upset people around him" is the motivation, calling it "sadism" might be a bit much. "Sadist: Loosely and popularly, an abnormal delight in cruelty." (Webster's New Collegiate Dictionary). (I know I need a better dictionary but I am a simple physicist who recently got hooked on this site.) A word than connotes malice is ...


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It should be phrase neither do they. If you reorder the phrase, you get they do... which is the proper form of grammar.


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It will be 'deliver'. Mindie has... strategies to maintain...and [to] deliver...service. The to before deliver is absent, but the verb remains an infinitive.


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To my ear, either is fine depending on your meaning: 'Mindie has also cultivated strategies to maintain customer and distributor relationships and deliver extraordinary customer service' conveys that Mindie's strategies both maintain relationships and deliver customer service. 'Mindie has also cultivated strategies to maintain customer and distributor ...


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It is correct that “If I do not mistake, she would be his fiancée” is ungrammatical. Mistake as a verb is always transitive in normal use in current English; that is, you cannot just mistake—you have you mistake something. In fact, in the vast majority of cases where you use the verb in regular speech, you are talking about mistaking something/someone for ...


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'Instead' is properly placed. It gives such a sense as can be had from this sentence: "She drank cofee but I took tea instead." But, truly speaking, 'instead' is used more in the place of something mentioned earlier as___I was going to go shopping but I went dancing instead. This is why Dan,for his squeamishness, is not ready to use it at all. If, by any ...


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Authorities at Oxford and Webster do not control or shape the English Language, they only define it. In reality, the collective mind of every English speaker shapes the language. And because some words have gained popularity in some groups and not others, the language has spread out into many dialects. If you've ever read Mark Twain, you might have found his ...


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We might call this person reserved: formal or self-restrained in manner and relationship; avoiding familiarity or intimacy with others: a quiet, reserved man.


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If you're willing to use an eponym, consider referring to the person as "a Sisyphus." Here is the entry for Sisyphus in Merriam-Webster's Eleventh Collegiate Dictionary (2003): Sisyphus (14c) : a legendary king of Corinth condemned eternally to repeat the cycle of rolling a heavy rock up a hill in Hades only to have it roll down again as it nears the top ...


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You could try "nonperformer": (noun) a person who does not succeed.


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There's chortle, a portmanteau word defined as "laugh in a breathy, gleeful way" (Google) and coined by Lewis Carroll (probably as a mixture of "chuckle" and "snort").


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What about "an underachiever"? Someone who always fails to reach their full potential. Often used in reference to students and athletes. Definitions: "one that fails to attain a predicted level of achievement or does not do as well as expected" MW "a student who does not perform as well as expected or as well as the IQ indicates" TFD "a ...


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How about "underachiever"? underachieve verb, intrans to be less successful than expected, especially academically; to fail to fulfil one's potential. underachievement noun. underachiever noun. [Chambers 21st Century Dictionary] If you're referring to someone who never attains their desires or goals then you might describe them as "a ...


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If you're looking for someone that does not care about attaining goals, you might be looking for apathetic: having little or no interest or concern --Merriam-Webster Similarly, they might be unmotivated: not having interest in or enthusiasm for something, especially work or study --Google They might also be referred to as lackadaisical: ...


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You could have some fun with recent popular history. His genitals suffered the same fate as John Bobbitt's.


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He lost his manhood would be most likely understood to mean that his genitals were irreparably damaged of removed. He was emasculated: meaning castrated, or having the testicles removed.


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You could say that they removed his gonads. Primary reproductive organs: the ovaries and testes. thefreedictionary.com


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There is a word for this : castration (Surgery) to remove the testes of; emasculate : The veterinarian castrated the two bulls. You can talk about "his castration" without being worried about being impolite. Nevertheless, this will remain a very sensitive subject.


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Though often used interchangeably, there are subtle differences in meaning between "over" and "during." You might also consider using "throughout." Something that happened at a specific time will generally be described with "during." E.g.: "During the last decade, scientists discovered life on Mars." Both "during" and "over" can be used for something ...


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The expression would be buy by weight in case of weight, and generally buy something by something in general.


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I would say he is preoccupied (by thoughts of her). He has a preoccupation (with her). Or, she is his preoccupation. http://i.word.com/idictionary/preoccupied http://i.word.com/idictionary/preoccupation "Obsessed/obsession" are used similarly, but they sound a bit stronger than what you described.


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For a noun form of provocative, the English language has incorporated the French word: Provocateur Noun, French a person who provokes trouble, causes dissension, or the like; agitator. See also agent provocateur.


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Look up each of these words at somewhere like http://dictionary.reference.com/. Schedule is probably the best fit a series of things to be done or of events to occur at or during a particular time or period but itinerary is fine too a detailed plan for a journey, especially a list of places to visit; plan of travel The others are not so good.


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"Make it" is synonomous with "succeed" is some contexts.


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vicariously means experiencing through others. vicarious: felt or enjoyed through imagined participation in the experience of others: a vicarious thrill.


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Personally I would put a table in the intro that lists the variations with a name for each. Either a simple logical progression (group 1, group 2) or something more descriptive if you prefer - then go ahead and use those definitions throughout.


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A few thoughts about this: 1) Personally, I think it is worth making scientific writing as plain and accurate as possible. If "confounded" indeed describes the relationship between A and B, then that is the term you should use. 2) I don't think "confounded" has a negative connotation at all* - at least in the epidemiology literature. It merely specifies a ...


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Can "Simultaneous equations" be tried??----a suggestion only from one novice at that!!


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You would say "I am an engaging leader."


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Yes. Engager is in the full OED (Oxford English dictionary) and has been since 1891. One who enters into an engagement or agreement; †a surety, guarantor. a. One who engages in an enterprise or occupation. b. One who engages the service of another; an employer. One of those who signed or approved of the ‘Engagement’ of 1647.


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In brainstorming fashion: I am good at interacting with others. I am good at repartee. I am a good conversationalist. I am good at motivating people. I am good at galvanizing people. I am good at spurring people to get involved. I am good at actuating people.


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In reference to "complaint", they are virtually identical in meaning. Usage preference is a matter of chronology and which-side-of-the-pond: "File a complaint" is more common in American English since about 1950; before that, "lodge a complaint was more common. Google NGram American English corpus "Lodge a complaint" has been more common in British ...


2

"One would hope that by the end of the contract you will have found another apartment"


-1

Dogs can have a single coat, typically called hair or a double coat (an under coat and a top coat), typically called fur. Hair is shaved, Fur is sheared.


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This is probably due to difficulty with prepositions, for which it is harder to learn by rules than by experience! The preposition "by" is used in "X by X" where "X" is a noun to adverbially specify that the main verb is performed to each "X" in the context one at a time. Some examples are: one by one (one at a time) line by line (one line at a ...


-1

Buy is for a consumer, and purchase is for a customer. or Buy is for final use, and purchase is for reuse. The purchase of raw materials goes toward buying for ultimate consumption.


0

Following the principle of not using a certain word if a more precise one is available, I would use seem here, which is the more subjective of the two choices. In your example, the "general case" most likely is not an object that can be seen. If it were, then appear would be the better option, because this verb more precisely indicates the act of perceiving ...


3

When referring to temperature for an oven, you use at. For example, when making baked potatoes ...at 400 degrees F ...at too high a temperature And usually you will "bake" or "roast" in an oven rather than "cook", though that's not a hard rule. Bake those potatoes at 400 degrees Fahrenheit for 45 minutes


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My wife is a Dog Groomer. There are two ways of tidying a dog's coat. These are the terms used by the Kennel Club in Britain. The 'Breed Standard' for a pedigree show dog will define how the coat of a particular breed of dog should be prepared. Clipping is the term used when using either manual or electric clippers. Even when taking the coat to a very ...


1

The word should be class. Even though it is followed by 'are', class is not what makes the sentence plural. Because the subject has two parts, 'Inventor' and 'Inventor’s Society class', the sentence is plural and requires 'are'; since the author is talking about both.


3

Anachronism is a word which describes chronological inconsistency. Anachronism "An anachronism (from the Greek ἀνά ana, "against" and χρόνος khronos, "time"), is a chronological inconsistency in some arrangement, especially a juxtaposition of person(s), events, objects, or customs from different periods of time."


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There seems to be a significant diversity in dog grooming terminology. Several popular online resources refer to dogs being shaved rather than shorn, clipped or stripped, as in The LP Grooming Guide, published by the Loose Pooch Kennel Club: Cocker Cut ... The face is shaved and some pet parents like to leave the head furry,while others prefer it to be ...


1

It's only 'gendered' since you are specifically making it so. Have you considered simply removing the 'gender' nouns rather than replace them? "Hey everyone, who's working on the .." "Which one of you broke the build"? "We should ask someone down in IT"


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The difference between to shear and to shave, which lexicographers may or may not clearly describe, lies in the type of cutting implement, which affects the nature of the cut. One shears with scissors or clippers (or a mechanical device that employs multiple small blades in a scissoring action), whereas one shaves with a single bevel-sharpened blade pressed ...


1

"She fed him lamb" is the best way to say that she gave him a meal of lamb. The phrase "She fed him on lamb" implies a steady diet of lamb that she's feeding him. The phrase "She fed him with lamb" doesn't sound as correct as just leaving out the preposition entirely. How did her dog get so big? She fed him on lamb (habitually). What did she feed ...


4

image generated by relikemindia.com The word that comes to my mind is turnkey: Turnkey refers to something that is ready for immediate use, generally used in the sale or supply of goods or services. The word is a reference to the fact that the customer, upon receiving the product, just needs to turn the ignition key to make it operational. ...



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