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0

Perhaps "understanding" is the word you seek. If the group has not settled on a solution, they have probably agreed on some parts of the solution and agreed that they that need to continue discussions on other parts before they can reach an agreement. Although they have not agreed on the solution, they have come to an understanding. A more general term is ...


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Generally, it means the person is always rude and disrespectful. I think someone who has an attitude problem should be treated as an outcast unless the person has bipolar disorder. That, I can understand.


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Essentially, the meaning is the same. I would say that your second option is clearer and more concise.


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I am henceforth Some people do not understand the meaning of henceforth Could u please explain x O neg blood rights Universal donor no other blood because it would kill us x


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"with our preliminary consensus" or "from what we had agreed on thus far" would work. I suspect that unless notes were taken at the meeting by an agreed-upon scribe, and circulated after, there might really be no preliminary consensus, as each participant might "take away" a differing sense as to what the group had agreed on thus far. However, If such ...


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Laughter is a highly complex behavior. One term for what you describe might be nervous laughter (if you actually laughed instead of just felt the urge to laugh). But that term is used in various ways, so as far as I know, the best way to describe it is similar to what you did in the question.


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In work-related "conversations" the buzz phrase for conclusions is "take-away".


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In your example, the noun itself is perfect: The masterpiece in the work lies in its...


0

You could use mastery, even though people's primary association is of a person's mastery of something. Mastery can still be used for the quality of the thing. Alternatively, you could try virtuosity, which at least covers the "great technical skill" part of masterpieceness and functions as a synonym of "mastery." And two other words that connote ...


3

The phrase "a stone's throw" is not related to the unit of weight the stone. The phrase has a biblical original and predates the weight unit. The phrase means 'the distance you can throw a stone', and so is deliberately intended to be vague, since people throw stones for different distances, and stones weigh different amounts. It's usually taken to mean ...


4

There is no technical definition of a 'stone's throw'. It's a vague idiom. OED says: The distance that a stone can be thrown by the hand; vaguely used for a short or moderate distance. http://www.oed.com/view/Entry/190832 It's the distance that a person could throw a stone - make of that what you will. The size and weight of the stone and the ...


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For the label, I think Timing mode would work. For one setting, I suggest elapsed time. In computing, the term is wall-clock time. For the other setting, I suggest operation time. (In aviation, the term for the time that the engine is running is called Hobbs time. I doubt that your users would be familiar with that reference, though.)


1

Consider Time mode or Timing mode in place of the Operation label, with real-time or active or work time as possible values, with or without various hyphens or spaces. Thus, the always-timing and when-working cases could be denoted via some of the options shown below. Note, some other terms (elapsed, wall, etc.) have been used historically and may be ...


-1

Titter to laugh nervously, often at something that you feel you should not be laughing at.


1

Mode "always" might be called "real time mode". Mode "machine is working" might be called "discontinuous mode". The label could be "Clock Mode" or "Countdown Mode".


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The psychological term is "inappropriate affect". Not to make you nervous... but, it can be an indicator of pathology.


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I'd describe that as a fit of hysterical laughter : Hysterical: uncontrollably emotional. irrational from fear, emotion, or an emotional shock. ( from dictionary.reference.com)


3

Nervous-laughter should be a appropriate word. And in a novel I read a word painful-dimples, It sounds compatible too. But painful-dimples kind of word is not heard or seen usually.


1

Gotta disagree w/ the "not on the East Coast" disagreement. Older expressions seem to live longer in the New England States and "lousy with" is still quite common - meaning "infested". (And everybody there knows that it originated with a head-full of lice.) Ex: "Mrs. Vanderbilt was lousy with jewels." It is probably less common to hear it used in the more ...


0

If ever you were to use "incredulous", that would be the perfect time. The problem is that most people do not know the word, so you might have to explain. Since you're admittedly "pretentious", that might not bother you. Similar cautions apply to "obviate", and "comprise" which some people have heard, and some use, but almost nobody (in America, anyway) ...


14

The AmE expression knock on wood and the BrE version touch wood ( which predates the American one) are two common 'superstitious' sayings: knock on wood is used by people who rap their knuckles on a piece of wood hoping to stave off bad luck. In the UK, the phrase 'touch wood' is used - often jokingly by tapping one's head. The phrases are ...


0

And please break up and/or rephrase that sentence. It is too long and complex; plus, it begins with an "if" which is never resolved. The simplest fix is to add "; it" before "would". To make your sentence more organized and digestible, I would be inclined to set off your list of doubtful thoughts as parenthetical, either with actual parentheses or with ...


22

In the UK the expression is "touch wood". We are kinder to natural resources.


0

Might I offer -> Forgotten Upon reading the details, it seems to suit your question. http://www.thefreedictionary.com/forgotten


0

'Insignificant' would, I think, best suit your requirements. Not a polar opposite, such as 'fixation', for example.


5

Use contentment. The sense of content as a synonym for contentment is rarely in use, except as a component of set phrases like [my] heart's content. The American Heritage Dictionary defines content (n.) as something contained, as in a receptacle. individual items in a publication or document; material that constitutes a document. a. substance ...


0

You say, "I would like to make the titles as natural as possible". In that case, leave them as you had them originally. You will not do yourself any favors by trying to shorten the expression through just the use of pre-/post- in place of before/after. It is in any case presumably the receiving that pre- and post- would apply to, not the customers or the ...


1

Dan Bron's comment is apropos, although this is a common problem when attaching a prefix to a phrase where the key word is not the first word, and often the users will be able to make sense from context. However, a reasonabe compromise would be to use Before Customer Inquiry After Customer Inquiry


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I have to disagree. "Lousy" is not used very often in the US. At least not on the east coast. We typically use "crappy" or "sucks" instead. For example - That movie was crappy or that movie sucked! Every once in a while, someone might say they feel lousy when they are sick but for the most part, people say they feel like crap. "Lousy" was popular in the ...


0

Confounding - adjectival form of: con·found verb \kən-ˈfau̇nd, kän-\ : to surprise and confuse (someone or something) : to prove (someone or something) wrong - merriam-webster.com


1

I think you said it yourself in your question. It is an intimidating experience. to make timid or fearful (source) to overawe or cow, as through the force of personality or by superior display of wealth, talent, etc. (source) Another option might be daunting. to lessen the courage of; dishearten (source)


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You can consider dubious. causing doubt, uncertainty, or suspicion : likely to be bad or wrong Below is an example that exactly fits to your situation: Someone with not half his years, not a tithe of his experience, and none of his expertise in the subject, will challenge him. Often the challenger will be someone who has an ax to grind, or someone ...


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Forbidding 1 : such as to make approach or passage difficult or impossible -- merriam-webster In such a situation, one might pause, take a deep breath, gather resources, and plunge in or forge on. So you would have An experience that induces self-doubt is a forbidding experience.


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I have encountered a few people who use the word "vouchering". However, the word wasn't meant to share the same meaning as time booking. I believe they used it entirely for another meaning; from what I could understand on what they were trying to imply.


2

Like the bureaucratic, Date of Birth, birthdate includes the year. Baryshnikoff (Jan 27, 1948) and Mozart (Jan 27, 1756) share a birthday but not a birthdate. I have met many people who were born on the same day of the year as me, but only one who also was born the same year. I did refer to her as having the same birthdate as me. (American English)


1

It seems like healing should be the "opposite" of inflammation. However, as you have probably read, the process of inflammation is technically a part of the process of healing (even though inflammation is often the cause of a patient's pain and other problems). In medical circles, experts speak of the abatement or resolution of inflammation. Dorland's ...


0

I'd change "by fortune" to "by chance" and "like those who reach these positions by legacy" to "like those who inherit these positions"


0

A battle sounds aggressive rather than humorous. How about duel, match-up, or showdown. The late, great Howard Cosell used to come up with rhyming (or assonant) descriptions like "The Rumble in the Jungle" and "The Thrilla in Manila" -- they are actually funnier because they are a bit labored. Where is your match to be held?


2

The two words are very different in who's involved how with what. Ashamed is an emotion; it refers to some individual's experience of personal shame. Shameful is a moral judgement, not an emotion; it refers to an individual's belief that someone else ought to experience personal shame. Consequently, when used adverbially, without human subjects ...


2

While they both get the point across reasonably well, the second option "Shamefully" flows off the tongue a little easier. Since it is a play on "proudly presents," adding just one syllable to change the phrase to "Shamefully Presents" makes the connection easier to make.


1

Shamefully. Usage of the word this way as an adverb to mean "with shame" is listed as rare in my dictionary (OED), although I have certainly heard it before. Ashamedly is noted as much rarer still-- with only one example from 1600. If there's a comedic element, using Ashamedly might play that up. But from your second paragraph I don't get the sense that ...


-1

If a condition has ceased to manifest symptoms, it can be said to be quiescent Being quiet, still, or at rest; inactive. The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary


-1

It seems particularly difficult to establish 'rules' here as the examples above show. We could probably say, however (correct me if I am wrong) that if prerequisite is intended as an adjective, then the adjectival form is most commonly followed by 'to': e.g., The satisfactory completion of French I is prerequisite to enrolment in French II.


1

A high point on a hill or mountain that is not the principal summit can be described as a top - for example in the list of Scottish hills known as the Munros. The feature on the right of the picture would seem to fit that description. The more distant feature on the left looks like a ridge. Its highest point might also count as a top, or might be considered ...


6

Here are two more suggestions: (see OED) to scale: to climb to the top of something very high and steep and (see OED) to peak: to reach the highest point or value Google brings up quite a few examples for "to peak a mountain".


0

1) My advisor has been very helpful, from helping me decide which classes to take to guiding me toward the resources available to me Merriam-Webster defines the verb guide as transitive verb 2 a : to direct, supervise, or influence usually to a particular end e.g. Her example helped to guide me toward a career in medicine. Usage ...


12

This is by first time here (so be gentle) ... respectfully, 'summit' and 'summited,' are the terms I've heard most frequently employed by actual mountain climbers. Also I've heard the intransitive verb 'peaked' used on a few occassions, though far less frequently. Rightfully or not, the term 'crest' carries connotations of wave-like fluidity and effortless ...


7

mountains get conquered. hills get 'climbed'.


18

just for some archaic fun, 'culminate' technically means reaching the top of a hill (from the latin culmen)


0

The possible candidates I have identified (partly with the help of OneLook.com) are conspiracies, fallacies/pathetic fallacies, fancies, fantasies, idiosyncrasies, illiteracies, inconsistencies, lunacies and redundancies; and some of those are pretty marginal possibilities at that. If none of them ring a bell, then I think your memory is at fault.



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