New answers tagged

1

I'd suggest, wait station (area) The wait station is the area that holds supplies for your servers. The Everything Guide to Starting and Running a Restaurant sidestation (area) might also fit the bill. Bussers are typically expected to stock the sidestation and restock it as needed throughout the meal EATiQuette busser: US a person who ...


2

I think they are generally referred to as service spaces: Service spaces are those used for galleys, pantries containing cooking appliances, lockers and store-rooms, workshops other than those forming part of the machinery spaces, and similar spaces and trunks to such spaces. (www.iadclexicon.org)


0

You cannot replace Pharmaceutical with medicine as according to merriam -webster dictionary Pharmaceutical means - of or relating to the production and sale of drugs and medicine and http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/pharmaceutical meaning of medicine is a substance that is used in treating disease or relieving pain and that is usually in the form ...


0

You effect a change. Here the word effect precedes an impacting result. You caused change. A change affects you. The word affect precedes a subject that was impacted. A change changed you. Both affect and effect are about impact. The subtle difference is that one is for the impact itself. The other is about the thing impacted. Lets mix them up: If ...


3

That would mean that you wish you knew what caused the stock. The word you're looking for is affect, you wish you knew what caused variance, or vicissitudes in the stock market, am I right? Affect (verb): "have an effect on; make a difference to." Effect (verb): "cause (something) to happen; bring about." "I am greatly distraught inasmuch as I can't ...


0

I understand in how far as synonymous to to what extent, as its structure is exactly the same as that of Dutch in hoeverre and German inwieweit (both, literally, 'in how far', meaning 'to what extent'). That's what I make out of it being a native Polish speaker who is familiar with those other two languages. No idea if it's idiomatic in any native variety ...


0

The general term for systems that run apps is “[computing] device.” The “computing” is often silent if you are already speaking in the context of computing, but if you need to introduce that context, you can say “computing device.” Some devices are also phones, and some are not. Some of your readers might install the app you are talking about onto an iPad ...


1

I don't think my and our are necessarily the same. If I say Our family eats turkey New Year's Eve, I mean that my family including me but if I say My family eats turkey New Year's Eve I may be referring to the rest of my family but not me. Our implies a potentially closer affinity between the speaker or writer and the group.


1

The question of "mobile" vs "cell" is one thing, but given the example sentence I think this question is maybe really trying to ask what we call the computers we use that are smaller than laptops and are primarily touch-screen devices. In my experience there isn't a good word to describe these. Partly because they are relatively new and the terminology ...


0

Nothing! ... you need to install the app. Smartphone will sounded dated when the marketing around those devices changes, and doesn't account for smart televisions like apple TV, smart watches, and things like Amazon's Echo. There is little confusion to the user that the app won't install on a laptop, if the app isn't appropriate in that context. ...


-3

Kindly look at the definition of a mobile phone at AHD as below: [https://ahdictionary.com/word/search.html?q=MOBILE&submit.x=32&submit.y=23] Mo·bile (mō-bēl, mōbēl′) Share: A city of southwest Alabama at the mouth of the Mobile River, about 61 km (38 mi) long, on the north shore of Mobile Bay, an arm of the Gulf of Mexico. Founded c. 1710, the ...


1

It depends on what you intend by scenario. If you mean settings, then configuration is appropriate. If you mean performance, then use run. Your sample sentence is There will be 3 ___ of the scenario. The main issue with run is that it doesn't unambiguously indicate that each would have a different configuration. It simply says that "the" scenario ...


0

This is the poster which Tom, Alex, and I made for last Monday's lesson. Note that "polite" style is to place yourself last in a list such as is used above.


0

This is the poster Tom, Alex and I made for last Monday's lesson. This is our poster. Tom, Alex and I made it for last Monday's lesson. This is our (Tom, Alex, and myself) poster which we made for last Monday's lesson. While the example sentence might fill out a sentence diagram without errors, it sounds stilted to my ear. If the question is simply ...


0

The correct construction would be, "This is my, Tom's, and Alex's poster, which we made for last Monday's lesson." However, there are more effective ways to write it. This poster, which we made for last Monday's lesson, is Tom's, Alex's and mine. This poster was made for last Monday's lesson by Tom, Alex, and me. Tom, Alex and I made this ...


2

[Basically a copy of my answer at “In” vs. “among”:] True, in is more appropriate in nonmedical writing but among is the standard term for a medical study with multiple subjects. Episiotomy and the risk of severe perineal injury among Korean women This would also apply to an overview of studies with multiple subjects, if that is what you happen to ...


0

If "family" means the people who are fostering but not the fostered children then "fosterers" would be an option but perhaps a bit cold. If "family" includes both the fosterers and the fostered children then "household" mentioned above sounds right to me.


1

Household An added reinforcement to this suggestion is that fact that it is a legally recognized description of "people living together in a single domestic arrangement (whether family or not)" and as such is commonly used in tax codes and similar documents.


0

I would like either The functionality is now as expected. or The web site is now woking as expected. but not The functionality is now working as expected.


2

I would prefer "...now is working as intended." or "...now is working as designed." The potential problem with as expected is that someone might expect it to fail. EDIT: To address your comment, I think that "as intended" and "as designed" are interchangeable in this context. However, you might use both words just to avoid the repetition of designed. ...


4

Artefact is British, while Americans use artifact. So, depending on where you live, choose accordingly. I found this information here.


0

I believe the correct word would be international. There are plenty of examples where the inter- prefix (meaning "between" or "among) is used to describe similar interactions. The national suffix conveys that this interaction is on a country basis. International: involving two or more countries : occurring between countries - Merriam-webster dictionary ...


0

I think "price renewal date" would be used


0

In terms of making statements less formal, you really have to take it case by case, but the Old-English word would be less formal in many cases (e.g., Holy Ghost versus Holy Spirit). In the case of kingly/royal/regal, the word royal has become far more common than kingly, so switching from the former to the latter would not make the sentence sound less ...


0

Legitimate book keeping? It's clear, concise and rather straightforward. However, another possibility (although very informal) is to refer to the book keeping process as being on the up and up. I read on a popular blog, 'The Grammarist' that this idiom's exact origins are mysterious, dating back to the 19th century, likely American and it appears to come ...


1

We may use the simplistic term : •WORKING KNOWLEDGE — the adjective can be made WORKABLE if need be.


1

Perpetrator and transgressor are both agent nominalizations -- 'one who VP' -- of transitive verbs. They're both from Latin (polysyllabic, and -or instead or -er agentive suffix), and therefore falute highly, which means they're used in legal, political, and other dramatic contexts. The transitive verbs they're formed from (perpetrate, transgress) have ...


2

Here are the definitions: Perpetrate Carry out or commit (a harmful, illegal, or immoral action) - ODO Transgress 1 Go beyond the limits of (what is morally, socially, or legally acceptable) - ODO Perpetrate refers primarily to the action while transgress refers primarily to the state of unlawfulness. The difference is similar to that ...


0

Transgress means to cross (a ‘line’); perpetrate means to complete an action (most commonly a crime). As any dictionary with etymology will show. Note that there is nothing inhærently criminal to perpetration: 1849 J. K. Paulding Puritan & Daughter II. viii. 102, I would respectfully recommend that you perpetrate, as it were, a good deed.


1

Transgress is milder. Perpetrate is much stronger. Transgressors break a rule, perpetrators break the law. A transgression might be is someone shows up at your formal dinner in jeans and a T-shirt instead of a tuxedo. If you then stab that person for it, you have perpetrated a crime. They broke a social rule, you broke the law.


0

Your first use of contacts is wrong. Contact has many meanings. contact does not have a plural in your context, it would be The more contact the cloth has with the dirty surface, the more spoiled it gets. When speaking of contacts in plural the word refers either to electrical contacts or to people with whom you have a connection. Also, the info cards ...


0

Consider palestra, a public place in ancient Greece for teaching, training and practice in wrestling and other athletics. The "Palestra" is the home gymnasium of the University of Pennsylvania (or just "Penn"). Built in 1927, this is the arena aptly nicknamed the Cathedral of Basketball.


0

Consider Agora. According to the Wikipedia: The Agora (/ˈæɡərə/; Ancient Greek: Ἀγορά Agorá) was a central spot in ancient Greek city-states. The literal meaning of the word is "gathering place" or "assembly". The agora was the center of athletic, artistic, spiritual and political life of the city 1. The Ancient Agora of Athens was the best-known ...


0

Sociodynamic is perhaps the word that you are looking for. To invent a phrase, one might consider first writing an authoritative dissertation or thesis such that the origin of thought and intent are clearly demonstrated. Else recite your new word with enough vigour and conviction, that it become entrenched in your colloquial dialect.


0

A word has one or more meanings aka definitions. These are the explanations of the various senses a word can have when it is used. When a word is actually put to use in a statement or predication, it has a sense. A word's sense refers to its meaning-in-context, its meaning-as-used. A word's sense refers to which of its definitions applies in context. In ...


0

They provide well structured courses. I believe your full comment might be, "I am interested in enrolling because they provide well structured courses."


2

I think most of the answers here (which I have upvoted) cover it. Sense has a connotation that meaning does not. Sense: a feeling that something is the case. synonyms: feeling, awareness, sensation, consciousness, recognition The person is dealing with distance as an emotion, not a number of miles, and sense carries the connotation of feelings, ...


1

Furthermore, as is often the subtle case with languages, it is difficult for a foreign speaker to "feel" the slightly humorous/awkwardness of "on account of" versus the straightforward "because of" which more clearly designates causality and frankly, as such, sounds more professional in a formal context. I was trying to think of (or manufacture) --an example ...


1

I'll answer your two questions in turn: Yes, if you write both articles that could be interpreted as meaning the total appearances in both articles combined - better to say each article. Rather than how often it appears in one article more than another, you could say the difference in number of appearances between the two articles. Taken together, with a ...


0

An interesting question, that has inspired much thought in my quater. To my mind and ear; Sense refers to that which we intuit, implying a deeper context, one other than that of physical distance; The closeness of friendship, or other, relates to the intimacy of human contact. Where as meaning; when we consider the etymological root; refers to the physical ...


0

"we were too distant (and not only in the geographical meaning) ..." I think the usage of 'meaning' in the OP is right, although the sentence is flawed. The geographical meaning (i.e. definition) of distance is the distance between two points. It expresses itself in terms of metres, kilometres, feet, yards and miles. Geographically-speaking 'distance' can ...


0

In English, when speakers want to point out a specific meaning of a word when using it more than one way, they say: in the x sense of the word. So: We were too distant (and not only in the geographical sense of the word) ..." In a dictionary, a word can have several meanings, but the idiomatic expression is: sense of the word.


-2

As long as something exists as a concept, it exists hypothetically. The problem with your question is that, in order to define something as an extant object, you need to specify what it is, as an object. Or else you won't know whether it's actually an object or not, thus whether it's extant or not. In other words, veridical existence presupposes ...


1

Since the context is machine learning, there is a well known discipline that goes by its abbreviation, tf-idf. tf–idf, short for term frequency–inverse document frequency, is a numerical statistic that is intended to reflect how important a word is to a document in a collection or corpus. Wikipedia Perhaps one could borrow these terms: term term ...


4

Stripping away inessentials, and reversing the claim (use 'non-geographical' or 'metaphorical' if this is a concern): We were too distant (in the geographical meaning). is infelicitous and unidiomatic. 'Meaning' refers almost inescapably to the word 'distant' here, and 'with' rather than 'in' is required. We were too distant (in the geographical ...


4

Sense is better because it is not meaning that is meant here, as blunt as this sounds. I would not object to "... (and not only by its geographical meaning)", I would regard it as a deliberate style decision, as sort of contrast to more common "... (and not only in the geographical sense)". Observe the change "the" to "its". "Its" is focusing on distant ...


8

Throwing caution to the wind, and speaking to a British exam question in an American voice, I'll suggest that perhaps sense, which I agree would have been a more felicitous choice, invites the reader to a connotative understanding, whereas meaning calls up a more objective decoding of the word. Sense, after all denotes perception in a variety of modes: ...


1

You could say We examine [or count] the common incidence of the use of the animal's name between the articles as well as the differential incidence. Collins defines incidence as degree, extent, or frequency of occurrence; amount a high incidence of death from pneumonia


1

Does "how often it occurs in both articles" really mean that it occurs individually in article A and in article B? Or can this wording be confused with in total, like summing up the occurances in both articles? It can be interpreted either way, though I'd favour the sum. Is there a better way to express ''how often it occurs more in one article than ...


1

"For each animal, we count how often it occurs in both articles and how often it occurs more in one article than in the other." "How often it occurs in both articles" is asking for a sum (i. e., 8 times). "How often it occurs more in one article than in the other" is ambiguous. As an less ambiguous alternative, how about, For each animal, we count ...



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