Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

to and towards are the very different terms. see- Towards- is used for a particular direction for instance- 1/ you go towards your school. ( not sure whether or you arrived at school) To- using to is a bit different term than towards, it shows surety that you've made it to school or you will make it to school. so technically you may not use them ...


0

To and toward(s) cannot be used interchangeably as explained in the following extract: The preposition to is another common preposition of place. It is normally used with a verb showing movement and shows the result of the movement-- the place or person that the movement was toward or in the direction of. The preposition toward has a ...


0

The OED uses the words "abruptly," "eruptively," "impulsively," and "burst out" to define "blurt" for verbal expression. So the word by itself contains enough of a propulsive sense so that "out" is redundant. However, the word "out" is appended often enough the combination is almost a set phrase. The google, for instance, finds 775K uses of "blurt" and ...


2

It is an advervial use of out that adds emphasis to some actions: Out: without inhibition; boldly: speak out. aloud or loudly: cry out The Free Dictionary


1

— Do you think you can come? — Yes, unless I were to have a visitor. This means it's unlikely I'll have a visitor. But if you think your listener might not be completely clear about that, you could say Yes, unless I were to have a visitor, which isn't very likely; OR Yes, except in the unlikely event I were to have a visitor. Here's a clearer one ...


0

I agree with you that the phrase seems redundant but technically, it is grammatically correct. A large group of crowds A large group of [plural-noun] A large group of marbles A large group of buildings A large group of trees A large group of sheep As you can see, any plural noun is acceptable instead of crowds. Since crowds is ...


0

Self-sacrificing if the person doesn't overdo it. Otherwise, kitchen martyr or doormat.


-1

I'm not sure whether this has happened in the intervening years, but there is now at least one dictionary listing {AHDEL} for this sense of 'verse' (admittedly marked 'slang': verse 3 tr.v. versed, versing, verses Slang To play against (an opponent) in a competition. [Probably back-formation from versus taken as verses in such phrases as ...


-3

A verse is a group of words put together creatively and rhythmically such as in a poem or a song. To use it as a challenge is grammatically incorrect. When you say you want to verse someone it sounds as though you want to teach that person how write a poem correctly.


4

To nod may also refer to an unconscious movement: To nod: (intr) to let the head fall forward through drowsiness; be almost asleep: the old lady sat nodding by the fire. (Collins)


0

One - Ogden Nash, master of letters as he was, was being clever & deliberately rhyming insouciance with nuisance (nouciance). Two - I've personally battled with split differentials re insouciance and nonchalance myself in a couple of my books (this name is one of my many pseudonyms) and I found that using nonchalance best described ambivalence in ...


0

You'd better to use such style : Booked : __ times.


0

affective – "relating to moods, feelings, and attitudes"


1

Confirmed for a rather inflexible answer; justified implying a slightly less definite conclusion; appropriate suggesting they were not unfounded; reinforced, bolstered, supported, strengthened implying they were added to; correct if you want to appear more reactionary. Cobmbinations of words may fit better - sadly true, not unfounded, not without cause etc ...


0

How about improbably? It has the correct meaning, and moreover it's an adverb, so it can fit in your sentence (modifying have).


0

Dictionary discussions of 'assumption' and 'presumption' I found several treatments of these two words in different reference works. Although some of the discussions are clearer than others, they all generally agree that a presumption is more grounded in observed probability than an assumption is. The most concise discussion appears in Bryan Garner, ...


0

I would reword the response. — Do you think you can come? — Most likely yes, unless I have a visitor.


-1

the root of the words is 'sume' which is to take or use. The pre and as are the prefix to that root. per means 'before and as is ad which it 'towards' Thus the two word are time dependent. One has history and one has future. presumption is guess based on knowledge whereas assumption is to pull it out of you hindquarters.


0

It's difficult to think of single word answers that fit into the sentence given. You could try "possibly" or "perhaps".


4

The usual idiomatic form is to say something like: I shall be available, except in the unlikely event I have a visitor.


0

Your question is a very broad question in the sense that it does not specify the targeted type of individual you are addressing. For example, if it was a type of professional, you could follow up with: "How is work?" Or "How is your work going?" If they are a mother or elderly person, you could ask them how their family is doing. The more you know of an ...


0

No, that is not correct. The following are correct: I will go there before 7 p.m. I will go there within an hour.


0

not very likely Not one word, but that sounds more likely than unlikely.


6

Wouldn't "unlikely" do? i.e. "It's unlikely!"


1

As mentioned in one of the comments, "altruistic" seems to be the word you're looking for. altruism (noun) "feelings and behavior that show a desire to help other people and a lack of selfishness" e.g. "I ​doubt whether her ​motives for ​donating the ​money are altruistic - she's ​probably ​looking for ​publicity." MW Depending on ...


0

I think you could use complaisant, charitable, altruistic, humane, accommodating, and maybe liberal or compassionate. Those would be pretty good.


0

Rather than using a few words or a phrase or two, as @WhatRoughBeast has suggested, I recommend that you present an argument, which would be a series of sentences that have a rhetorical relationship to each other. The best structure of your argument depends on the details of your argument and also the context in which you are writing (including the audience ...


0

"That which does not kill us makes us stronger." "Too soon old, too late smart." "There are some thing you just have to learn for yourself." "If only I could go back in time and slap some sense into my younger self."


2

You don't apply for a lottery. You're trying to combine "apply for" and "take part in". What you want to say is "I applied for a green card by participating in the green card lottery." That is a bit wordy, so you might say "I participated in the green card lottery." You could also say "I submitted my application and took part in the green card lottery."


0

I assume ppt means a Powerpoint presentation, and you're looking for a word that means things which you are asking someone to do for you. If this is correct, then I think you're looking for the word Requests which means things you ask of someone. "Asks" would not be normal usage. You may want to take some time to rephrase your question. It's a bit confusing ...


1

Microwave is a range of radio frequencies of electromagnetic propagation emitted in microwave ovens to cook food by radar to either cook rabbits prancing in the vicinity or to reach far distant objects to detect their presence in cellphone communication, which has the possibility of cooking your brain cells by placing the phone next to your ear, or your ...


2

According to the OED, use "microwaved" to describe something Irradiated with microwave radiation; spec. cooked or heated in a microwave oven. "micro waved" has no reference under either "micro" or "waved".


1

Yes, oxforddictionaries.com gives microwave as being: [to] cook (food) in a microwave oven: he microwaved some steak out of the freezer http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/english/microwave I would generally trust a dictionary over auto correct


4

I think you really wanted to add an "a" and "in the". Like, I applied for a green card in the visa lottery. The green card is what you hope to receive, the visa lottery is how the green cards are allocated among applicants.


-1

Both adjectives can mean intelligent. So you have the idea "intelligent" expressed with two adjectives which is very common in literary texts; "bright and sharp" has more weight than "intelligent".


0

nontrivial (that's mathematician-speak) substantial (might be a bit too strong?) considerable (again, might be too strong?) goodly decent (maybe a little too informal for your purposes?) respectable (only works if you're feeling admiring and not resentful about the time spent) fair


1

If you really want to convey the idea of this specific type of hair without using technical terms or slang, I think fine body hair is as good as you're going to get. It's not evocative, but searching for it will show it's widely used by people who are trying to describe exactly what you're talking about.


0

Hire is the most common way to say this in the U.S. (Engage could be used, but might make you sound a bit pompous.)


1

It is newly ready. However, I support the proposals to replace ready. (Although I realize this may be beyond your control.)


0

Maybe the word you're looking for is irony. While they waited for the waitress to bring their coffee, Cheryl suddenly realized it was in this very Starbucks where she and Andy had first met for coffee on that misty day in March six years earlier. How ironic, she thought.


1

If you want an alternative to productive, you could use efficient. Unfortunately, efficiency can have more than one meaning when talking about languages, as it can refer to how many resources the compiled programs need, or how fast they run, but context can make this clear.


0

Other possibilities: Quick-witted man, A man sharp as a tack, Man of keen/sharp/alert intellect/mind, Man with a vivacious spirit, Quick/swift thinking man.


0

If you want a noun, quick learner or, more old-fashioned, quick study. Usage: She's a quick study OR she's a quick learner.


0

Although not specific to being difficult to fool, the word sharp comes to mind. You won’t fool Charlie, he's a sharp one. From the Oxford dictionaries online definition of sharp - Having or showing speed of perception, comprehension, or response:


0

There are no exact synonyms expect where stipulated (say in the sciences). But treaty and pact are vague enough and overlap in meaning enough that they can easily be swapped in many contexts. Did I mention that dictionaries aren't perfect either. That is constraint of dictionary writing, one may have limits on the length of a definition and nuances one can ...


1

An easy way to maintain neutrality would be We now want to test how easy or hard it is to [...] (Note that easy comes before hard by convention, just as up comes before down.)


1

Agreements Treaties are also pacts, and sometimes vice versa. Both are agreements. Although both pacts and treaties are types of agreements, they are not separate, distinct types of agreement with no overlap. Rather than being different things, substantial overlap occurs between pact and treaty, so there can be no right answer to your question about ...


1

Following the link and looking at the text preceding the first sentence, it soon becomes clear that the article was written by a non-native speaker of English. I would say that it's an error and perhaps reflects some idiom in the writer's own language. I couldn't access the original text for the second quote for some reason. I would say that it may be a ...


2

I'd use classic to mean 'typical' with symptoms Ngram shows a much less common use of classical symptoms of depression vs classic symptoms of depression . See below the definitions: Classical: has a few narrow definitions, including (1) of or relating to the ancient Greeks or Romans, (2) of or relating to a peak stage of a ...



Top 50 recent answers are included