Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

It might be. Grammatically correct options: as soon as it is completed, we will move all the data in the archival data base together with it being removed from the operational one or by the time it is completed, we would have moved all the data in the archival data base together with it being removed from the operational one The second sentence ...


1

If you're going for something that most people would recognize, I'd go with public wireless's suggestion of zealots. ... but if you're willing to accept slang, then you might consider fanboi. You can also use fanboy, which is typically considered to be less condescending.


2

I guess you're looking for a word which describes someone as inflexible, skeptic and refusing to change one's views or notion about something. It could be HERETIC, a person who differs from what is generally accepted. If someone sticks to outdated, stereotyped choices, it could be archaic. But more specifically I would suggest " Luddite ", which means ...


2

Since they consider it superior to any other without any substantial reason as to why, they may be elitists, or showing signs of elitism. 1: leadership or rule by an elite 2: the selectivity of the elite; especially : snobbery (elitism in choosing new members) - Mirriam-Webster Snobbery or being a snob would also fit. Anyone who thinks ...


1

They could be purists ... what is the purpose of the obscure language? ... Or they could be dinosaurs ... or they could be [insert name of obscure programming language here] snobs. Again, depends on the purpose and EFFECTIVENESS of the obscure language.


0

I say, "You are welcomed!" As in: You are welcomed to my time and effort—think nothing of it! abbreviated to "You are welcomed." Another example of the use of you are welcomed would be You are welcomed to anything in the pantry that suits your fancy versus, as is often said, "You are welcome to ...." Think parallels: You are invited to help ...


0

It depends on what you're trying to say. If you used to be associated with an organization, but have not been for a long time, it's It's been a long time since I associated with an organization. If you mean that you associated with an organization a long time ago, and are still associated now, you write: It's been a long time that I've been ...


0

If they actually predicted something beforehand, you could say that they "presciently" mentioned it. To be "prescient" is to see or predict the future.


2

Coding craft is a correct phrase; it means 'the craft of coding' as you said.Hire craft is correct as well; it means skill or ability to hire.It can of course be written hiring craft also.As you know hire can be a verb or a noun; see http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/hire: verb (used with object), hired, hiring. 1. to engage the services ...


0

Coding craft is the name of a company so they can name it what they would like and it does not matter (as long as they have copyrights).


0

I skimmed the general area of relevant pre- words in OED, but saw nothing suitable. I'd go for... As you anticipatively mentioned... (OED anticipatively: By way of anticipation.) In most contexts, doing something anticipatively would normally be understood to imply doing it deliberately (with conscious knowledge of a relationship between what you're ...


1

You might consider the word placeholder, specifically definition 2 as provided by Collins Dictionary.com: a section of text that is placed in a document, etc temporarily until the final text is inserted there at a later stage In the specific context of computing, another candidate might be variable: a named unit of storage that can be changed to ...


1

One common name for that is placeholder.


0

Ageing (Aging)- the process of becoming older and represents the build up of changes on the specific person source- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ageing Aged-Growing older and states specified length of time; of a specified age.


0

Please specify a multiple of $20.00 for the amount to withdraw. Please provide the time billed in increments of fifteen minutes. Of course, if you're talking about concrete items, you will sometimes see the term used for the packaging unit. How many cases of soda? How many sets of dinnerware? How many cords of wood? Try talking to some of the people ...


1

When speaking of my direct reports I use the term "staff". When speaking to my direct reports I use the term "team" or more specifically "team member". During annual reviews of direct reports I may reference my relationship to them as I'm their "supervisory support". Avoid the term "subordinate" as that can have a "less than" connotation.


2

You are exactly right, FumbleFingers, that "you're not the boss of me" is a childish (or childhood) equivalent of "you're not my boss." In fact, in southeast Texas, where I spent the first 16 years of my life, it was a standard riposte in Childspeak, covering much the same ground as "You're not my mother," but without the demeaning acknowledgment that your ...


1

Short Answer: In US law, you win/lose a case but you win/lose at trial, not win/lose a trial. tl;dr: In US law, a case is used to describe a particular lawsuit, either criminal or civil (non-criminal). A case can be resolved at various stages. The parties can settle, dismiss the case or proceed to a formal determination. That determination may be reached ...


2

The generic version of your question is Beginning a sentence with a present participle or gerund. Sure you can. Texting while driving is an extremely dangerous habit. Texting his friends while driving, he would be drinking latte at the same time. Painting houses is her favourite past time. Buying a house without a broker, she would save quite a sum ...


2

Case and trial have related meanings with reference to a legal context. Case is a more general term that refers to a legal action that can be taken against someone, while trial refers specifically to the legal proceeding regarding a case. Case Law: An action or a suit or just grounds for an action. The facts or evidence offered in support of ...


-2

Several phrases in the English language are grammatically correct yet sound odd. I do not know if 'You are not the boss of me' is one of them; I do know that I, for one, would never dream of saying or writing it. Rather than obscure theme music, however, I attribute the encroaching ubiquity of this garish construction to its popularity in lowbrow social ...


3

Traits of the kind that you mention can be classed as demographic characteristics or demographic features. According to the definitions supplied by Oxforddictionaries.com, demography has two denotations: 1 The study of statistics such as births, deaths, income, or the incidence of disease, which illustrate the changing structure of human populations. ...


0

Discriminant is one word that I can think of. Though it has a mathematical meaning, there is also a meaning in the sense of language. http://www.yourdictionary.com/discriminant - which cites 'The definition of a discriminant is some distinguishing characteristic or feature that allows someone or something to be separated from others.'


1

If I were you, I would say, "My competence will benefit your company". The sentence you asked sounds a bit strange to me. I usually hear people say "A benefits B", such as "The policy benefits thousands of people", or "B benefits from A", as "Thousands of people benefit from the policy". Hope my answer is helpful :)


0

Ignoring, as you said, the use of and with numbers, and sticking with and as a logical connective, the sentence is presumably to be considered as X AND Y (is|are) Z, where you are to choose is or are. The answer is is, because the truth value Z is singular - it is true or false (or something else in, say, a 3-valued logic). But at that level this is not an ...


1

Individual employer is the common definition for a a person employing their own staff: Support for individual employers : There are many benefits to employing your own staff to provide care and support in your own home but we also know that being an employer can be daunting and confusing. Skills for Care has a range of resources to help make this ...


2

I work with police reports in teaching technical writing skills, and from reading a number of those, the distinction I commonly see (dealing with the same body) is... The police officer finds the dead body/body at the crime scene. The pathologist autopsies the cadaver. The corpse is what gets buried. In crime reporting, no presumptions are ...


6

They are two different terms with different, though related, etymology. Flammable is the more recent and also the more common of the two: (Etymonline) inflammable early 15c., in medicine, "liable to inflammation," from Middle French inflammable and directly from Medieval Latin inflammabilis, from Latin inflammare (see inflame). As "able to be set ...


1

A simple google search of “stoked about” yields about four times more hits than either “stoked on” or “stoked to.” This matches my expectation, because I don’t recall ever hearing someone use “stoked on” or “stoked to.”


1

Most NDAs I've signed have referred to "sensitive information" (which agrees with one of Dan Bron's suggestions) I would just say "Non disclosure agreements are required when a party wishes to prevent the other from disclosing sensitive information"


1

Go for something that's reasonably self-explanatory, like "weekend-weekend" or, if space is limited, an appropriate abbreviation. If you have to abbreviate it, make sure you have a tooltip that expands the abbreviation.


-1

If this is going into a CV, I'd say it's better to describe how you'll be able to benefit the company, or increase its value. The job is part of the company, so you can't actually benefit the job, it's the company.


0

I vote "indexes" Since it's a toss-up, I plan to use "indexes" from now on. Chris Ballance argues in a comment above that "indices" is easily distinguished from the verb, as in "he indexes things", but I think that would be clear from context. Meanwhile, "indexes" is a normal-looking plural and "indices" is a weird exception to learn. Languages tend to ...


0

'Hearing' implies that the sound reaches my ears and my brain at some level acknowledges it. (I was in a bar and I heard two people talking). 'Listening' implies focusing on the sound, or the words. (I listened to two people talking about the game). So being listened to means that someone has paid attention to what you've said. Having said all that, when ...


-1

The more I think about this, the less happy I am with a simplistic answer. Many verbs are used in the middle voice: We weighed the parcel. The parcel weighed 3 kg. And the ing-form may in some cases be used correspondingly: A parcel weighing 3kg was sent to the station. Here, the verb age isn't used in the middle voice with the sense of 'be ...


0

Rather than adding value to the job, I would say that you add value to the company by excelling at the job.


0

Resources is a general class of entities. Media is a subset resources. A resource could be humans, CPUs, skills, file systems, databases, storage media, audio media, video media, etc. Therefore, if you wish to describe all classes of resources, but also wish to specifically emphasis media resources, you would say "media and resources". However, if you only ...


0

If you have been involved in the information technology in significant ways, you would realise the word view is an overloaded word. An information view can be a schema view. It can be an MVC / MVP view. It can be a WSDL. It can be an API. Perhaps, like others, you meant a portal. However, most of the time in information design and development, an ...


0

I agree brevity is the key to good writing. I don't understand why they are going to see Billy. Is Billy integral to the decision making process? I am a big fan of self editing.


0

I would say, that if you wish to name the section while considering 'the downloadable PDFs, Press Releases, Annual Reports, Latest News and Newsletters' to be references/resources in the form of media (i.e. They each act as a medium to convey information), then 'Media Resources' is appropriate. [As Joe Blow said in the comments, I've seen 'Media Resources' ...


0

Brevity is the key to good writing. "As to" can often be omitted or replaced with "if." The sentence is too wordy and can be made more succinct in a couple ways. "John suggests they go see Billy while they make the decision as to decide whether or not they should to agree to the operation." Or even, "John suggests they visit Billy while they decide if ...


0

Enhance verb:; 3rd person present: enhances; past tense: enhanced; past participle: enhanced; gerund or present participle: enhancing intensify, increase, or further improve the quality, value, or extent of. "his skill-set does nothing but enhance his qualifications to lead this mission" synonyms: increase, add to, intensify, heighten, magnify, ...


0

I saw an ad banner that said: "Learn more on swimming with manatees." Say all you like that it doesn't matter which you use, but I feel strongly that "more about" would be preferable. As written, that ad makes the writer of it sound like, well, a "more-on."


4

If the information is condensed and summarised, then a common word for this is dashboard. It might apply even if the information is not summarized. "An easy to read, often single page, real-time user interface, showing a graphical presentation of the current status (snapshot) and historical trends of an organization’s key performance indicators (KPIs) - ...


1

An argument normally involves two opposing positions. If the argument is about factual matters, it's likely one or both positions can be either strengthened or weakened by evidence (as to which facts are true or false). Thus, the US should not have invaded Iraq can be supported by facts (Iraq had nothing to do with 9/11, Iraquis are worse off now than under ...


0

The difference is similar to that of can and may. Saying to someone "Sorry, I could not get to that" is like saying "I can't get to it because I am physically or mentally unable to." If you "Did not get to that" it means you most likely can, just were busy in the mean time with no time to do said task. "I'm sorry, I did not get to that. I'll do it right ...


-1

Comments by Josh61 notwithstanding, to get to X normally implies to reach a target [location, situation, condition]. This implication is even stronger in negated constructions, where to not get to X strongly implies there was a failed attempt to reach X. Consider... 1: I did not get to the party last night 2: I did not make it to the party last night ...


1

"Later" is definitely more formal than "Later on" According to me the "on" is just a filler to make the sentence smoother. For Example- Many times we use "in order to", even though "to" is sufficient.



Top 50 recent answers are included