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0

I'm going to suggest inextricable as an adjective. It is used with situation or fate also which fits well to the idea. It is also used in technical contexts. Unavoidable; inescapable: bound together by an inextricable fate. Source: http://www.thefreedictionary.com As a noun, I can suggest impasse. It is often used in bargaining and discussions ...


0

What you would want is to mitigate the consequences of your behaviour, meaning make (something bad) less severe, serious, or painful (Oxford dictionary). But, to make it one word, the situation is unmitigable (found in a few dictionaries, usage examples).


0

FUBAR is a neologism created from the informal military acronym for f@#$ed up beyond all repair, referring to a situation where there is no solution that will provide positive results. There are bowlderized versions for sensitive ears, such as fouled up beyond all repair/recognition. And there is the TARFU variant, meaning totally and royally f@#$ed up. ...


-1

Maybe a checkmate situation accurately defines what you want to say. If you wish to be particularly vulgar, you could use the colloquial term 'clusterfuck'


0

Simply stick "-ing" to a noun to verb it: tool -> tooling shed -> shedding The reason for the extra "d" in "shedding" is that the "shed" part of "sheding" sounds different.


2

Can I suggest "united", so the whole phrase would be "eternally united"?


1

Both phrases point to the same sentiment of being fairly certain that the speaker has not been introduced. The register is different however, the first implying a snobbishness absent from the second (note that it is not necessarily more formal, only more pretentious, e.g. something one might expect to hear from a James Bond villain).


4

In science, it is quite common to use "we" instead of "I" even if there is only one author.


1

What do you think of this one? It's quite short and clear, without having to use a word/phrase to explain it. This website is using that pricing system, and I think it's understandable enough. (: Maybe just to make it even clearer, change the title of the second column to "Price/Item" or "Price per Item".


1

You might use any of this: Case History - a record of a person's background, medical history, etc, esp one used for determining medical treatment Anamnesis- a patient's account of their medical history Heteroanamnesis- The medical history or case history of a patient is information gained by a physician by asking specific questions, either ...


2

Medical history and patient profile are employed when folks are being stuffy; but on the clinic floor everybody in the hospitals I've worked at and offices I've visited just called it the patient's chart. ADDED, with respect to your further qualifications: On the one hand, I don't think any responsible medical practitioner would regard any aspect of the ...


12

Many competent writers will challenge the assertion that "the perpendicular pronoun" (I) really needs to be avoided. Others seem to believe that only third person is acceptable, or that no person should ever be mentioned unless specifically talking about people. My own take is that this is all a matter of style, and whatever you pick -- as long as it ...


1

The adjective unfulfilled might be used to describe this kind of person. of persons; marked by failure to realize full potentialities; "unfulfilled and uneasy men" Source: http://www.thefreedictionary.com/unfulfilled It is related to not realizing rather than effortlessness, but you might not realize your potential if you do not show any effort. ...


1

Replacement of terms doesn't always have to be the answer. For example, you could omit "as" and rearrange the sentence as follows: "Opening the door slowly, John looked over his shoulder." If you want it left in its original order, you can replace "as he" with "and," as seen below: "John looked over his shoulder and opened the door slowly."


2

The most common idiom for something heavy is not a single word. You will hear it commonly when people are trying to lift heavy things: This weighs a ton! It's really more of a hyperbole than an idiom, but it is what's said.


1

I think that a known expression to refer to something very heavy is: As heavy as lead Ngram shows that its is usage has been decreasing in last decades but it is still used. Lead is known for its high level of specific gravity, which I think is the reason why it is used to refer to something very heavy.


2

Pass away - I agree that this is a more formally used phrase Kick the bucket - This one is used quite commonly as a colloquial dysphemism (making it sound harsher than it is - avoid this at a funeral it may offend someone. Meet one's end sounds more philosophical to me, sort of like implying one's death was part of their destiny. Depart this life seems ...


1

John looked over his shoulder and slowly opened the door. And is simplest of all when combining things, even actions.


1

This writer is correct. For example: Exercise has many benefits. Proponents of exercise find there is a large variety of exercise options to fit different lifestyles. Barack Obama goes running in the morning. Jane Doe attends a weekly dancing class. I myself do press ups and stomach crunches in between writing stints through out the day. The writer ...


9

Competence precludes finding oneself needing to mean "I" but having to say "this writer" - or, variously: the author your correspondent this ink-stained wretch (please, no!) TBH, the form hardly matters - silk purses and sow's ears, etc.


1

You could get away with 'mare if you are facing a syllable constraint, at the risk of sounding forced.


2

We call that "quantity pricing". So the price if you buy 100 is the Quantity 100 Price.


1

Analgesic is another synonym for anodyne, painkiller, derived from the Greek ἄλγος (àlgos), "pain." Literally taken, algos means physical pain, although the word has been metaphorically used as "trouble, sorrow" since as far back as Hesiod. It is still used in modern Greek with both meanings.


3

Hyphenated suffixes are usually an idiosyncratic choice that mainly serves stylistic purposes; as far as grammar is concerned, hyphens are normally reserved for words where the suffix is a proper noun or itself a large word (three or more syllables), although there is no consensus and there are exceptions to the rule.[1] For me there is no need to put quote ...


11

I was taught in elementary school that if a syllable ends with a vowel, the vowel is normally long, while if it ends with a consonant, the vowel is short. Also that if there is a vowel followed by one consonant in the middle of a word, the consonant is part of the next syllable, while if a vowel is followed by two consonants (that do not work together to ...


2

Arguments in other answers for doubling the p are compelling, but also note that Wiktionary (linked to but not quoted in another answer) specifically shows such spelling of grep's present participle, among other forms: grep (third-person singular simple present greps, present participle grepping, simple past and past participle grepped) making it clear ...


16

The words like that will try to follow the current word-form rules in similar words. (to trap - trapping). The word "grep" is already in some dictionaries and it follows this theory: verb (greps, grepping, grepped) [with object]: Search for (a string of characters) using grep.


2

Since grep (pronounciation) rhymes with step, I would follow the pattern with stepping and write grepping. (Writing it as greping makes me want to move short e (/ɡɹɛp/) in the first syllable to a long e, /ɡɹip/, rhyming with weeping. Your mileage may vary.) Similarly, while awking seems straightforward, I'd favor sedding over seding.


7

This isn't a very technical answer, but googling "grepping" returns 354,000 results. Googling "greping" only returns 47,300 results and suggests that you meant "grepping" instead. It seems that "grepping" is the correct usage.


3

The adverb makes 'he opened the door slowly' non-punctive. It is not clear whether 'looked' is describing a punctive act or a durative one. If the former (the apparent tautology is idiomatic): John opened the door slowly, taking a swift glance over his shoulder as he did so. / John took a swift glance over his shoulder as he slowly opened the ...


5

Let us say one piece costs $10. So 10 pieces would cost $100. Say, if someone buys 100 or more pieces, you provide a 10% discount. In this case, 100 pieces would cost $900, 110 pieces would cost $990, and so the unit price would be $9. Now, let's summarize the usage: If you want to refer to the total cost for all 100 pieces sold as a single unit, use: ...


1

Opening the door slowly, John looked over his shoulder.


1

Most linking conjunctions you could use here will sound a little clunky. I'm guessing what you're aiming to show is the simultaneity of the two actions. A participle clause would achieve this effect without the need for an extra conjunction. You could turn either clause into a participle clause, so either of the following would do: Looking over his ...


0

Possible alternative constructions: "John looked over his shoulder, at the same time slowly opening the door." "While slowly opening the door, John looked over his shoulder." "John looked over his shoulder, slowly opening the door as he did so." "John looked over his shoulder, slowly opening the door in the meantime." "John looked ...


-1

Hand-to-hand weapons? (but that does not include projectile weapons..)


-2

''While'' is a better replacement as both of the words explains doing something simultaneously.


1

I think what we are missing here is that we have refused to realize both words. An is indefinite while the is definite. But using it with a child simply means we both know HE or SHE is the only child. If you say an only child, you have generalise the term to mean that you are an only child AMONG many other similar issue in other families. It just means ...


0

If you are giving it a "positive" connotation, instead of negative, perhaps these can get close: modest, humble, unpretentious, unassuming


2

One of the most-used terms for such a person is underachiever, which wiktionary defines as “One who underachieves by performing less well than expected”. But slacker, in its sense of “A person lacking a sense of direction in life; an underachiever” may often apply too, given the “never gives the effort to show [potential]” stipulation in the question.


0

The word I would use is "relativized" to refer to diminished relative importance.


1

"On hold", "Set aside", and "Later" might also be good headings if you're looking for something less formal. All along the same lines as @Chris Sunami's popular "Postponed".


3

Consider sappy. According to American Heritage, it means both (Slang) Excessively sentimental; mawkish. (Slang) Silly or foolish.


0

There is a proverb in the Old Testament book of Proverbs which talks about the kind of person you describe: "He who goes about as a talebearer reveals secrets, But he who is trustworthy conceals a matter" (Proverbs 11:13 NAS, my emphasis). A synonym for a "talebearer" is a "gossip." A gossip is someone who cannot keep a confidence (or secret). In ...


0

If this word you seek is about someone who is talking about you to reveal secrets or information for the purpose of causing trouble, then I would consider the word snitch. According to Merriam-Webster, "a snitch is a person who tells someone in authority about something wrong that someone has done." The implication for snitch is that the act of snitching ...


1

As this is related to programming workflow, a computer term would probably be in order. From Wikipedia: In computing, preemption is the act of temporarily interrupting a task being carried out by a computer system, without requiring its cooperation, and with the intention of resuming the task at a later time. Such a change is known as a context ...


1

"Downgraded Priorities" can describe the now lesser-important tasks and projects.


4

Postponed Tasks Postpone: 1. to put off to a later time; defer: 2. to place after in order of importance or estimation; subordinate (dictionary.com)


1

Superseded? In the context of "The superseded"



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