New answers tagged

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Examples of use: 1. I'm going home for the weekend 2. I stay there from Monday to Friday and go home for the weekends 3. Cycling is my favorite weekend activity 4. I often go cycling at weekends 5. I will be available for the weekends of 1st/2nd and 8th/9th.


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You may be able to apply self-evident here. Not needing to be demonstrated or explained; obvious: self-evident truths Reference: http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/english/self-evident


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There is nothing wrong with "no-brainer question". A compound noun is a noun that is composed of two or more nouns. When there are two nouns like "no-brainer question", the first noun functions as a noun modifier. Another broadly used idiom is "rocket science" which means: an activity requiring considerable intelligence and ability (esp in the ...


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Simply because it is grammatically wrong. There isn't = There is NOT There is no = There is NO So the mistake here is thinking that "isn't " means= "is no" There is no rule that says.... There is'nt a rule that says.... There is not a rule that says....


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Children and/or animals who "perform" for attention are often described as "a (little) ham." http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/ham


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“Stakeholder” would work for all the example organizations on your list except perhaps “individuals.” Stakeholder A person, group or organization that has interest or concern in an organization. Stakeholders can affect or be affected by the organization's actions, objectives and policies. Some examples of key stakeholders are creditors, ...


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There are the terms symbiosis or symbiotic and mutualistic that refer to a mutually beneficial relationships.


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Focusing on what one is left with after the initial disappointment, your description is almost the exact definition of regret: Regret (n): a feeling of sadness, repentance, or disappointment over something that has happened or been done (especially a loss or missed opportunity). Although, this may not meet your needs, since regret is often used in ...


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tastefully is an adjective and in the second sense modifies the understanding of how the house has been decorated. Meanwhile, the first could be taken to mean that the walls have, you know, flavor.


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I just checked my (old) Oxford English Dictionary. Medicament is attested from 1541, medicine in the sense of "any substance or preparation..." from 1225, and medication for a substance only from 1796, and then only for botanical use. I guess we'd need a more recent edition to look into its use for humans.


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Medicine is the older word (from Latin via Middle English). I believe medication is AmE, and therefore non-existent in the 15th century. See oxforddictionaries.com Of course, they didn't speak English in the Ottoman Empire. If you are translating for a contemporary AmE audience, I'd use medication. As always AmE improves on the language, as medicine, ...


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In medieval times, which lasted until the 15th century, there wasn't really a concept of medicine like we have today, or rather there were many competing concepts, from Christianity, the ancient Greeks, pagans etc. So, I don't think there's a simple answer to this. Have a read of this wikipedia page: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/...


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Only look at the pronunciation of the next word The choice of a or an is always based on the pronunciation of the word immediately following the article. The grammatical structure of the phrase is irrelevant. The spelling of the word is also irrelevant, except insofar as it relates to the pronunciation. Since there are a lot of cases where English spelling ...


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"Wise" itself is a great word for this, but it's not as specific as what you're looking for. Perhaps a synonym like "prudent" would do the trick, though. "Receptive" is a word for someone who is "willing to listen to or accept ideas, suggestions, etc." (Merriam Webster) Example usage: She is receptive to criticism. He is a receptive listener who benefits ...


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In addition to the answer above: stretch myself, learn something new, explore different options, expand myself. I don't know which if any of those would be good for your application, though. Thing is, I'm certain the person reading your application won't believe that's why you did it (to stretch outside your comfort zone). You tried a different career ...


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I would propose the common vernacular "Slacker". One who "slacks" takes a non-committal and uninvolved procrastination, or denial of responsibility to the level that it is perceived as a personality flaw. Not to be confused with "Lazy", a "Slacker" is able to improve, but prefers the conscious choice of 'Slack'. Additionally, 'Slack' sometimes requires ...


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I felt I needed to broaden my horizons. broaden/widen somebody's horizons to increase the range of things that someone knows about, has experienced, or is able to do This trip to the Far East has certainly broadened our family's horizons. Cambridge Idioms Dictionary, 2nd ed.


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Both terms could fit in the sentence, the difference is mainly a question of register: The words deny, reject, refuse and decline are often confused. Of these, the words reject, refuse and decline have very similar meanings. Interestingly, the word accept can be the opposite of all of them. To refuse to do something is to say that you won’t do ...


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Consider the Belgium motto "l'union fait la force" whose translations are: "there is strength in unity", or, "together we are stronger".


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"Solidarity" springs to mind. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solidarity See also the Zulu word "Ubuntu" which has several meanings, one of which is "the bond of sharing". It has a free operating system named after it. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ubuntu_(philosophy)


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Well, a google search of the phrase "argue views" came up with only 1,920 hits, most of them being news articles, so I don't believe it is ungrammatical to use views as the object of argue, it does seem a bit uncommon though. And, to verify that conclusion, I typed "Can they argue views that are not their own?" "They argue the view that is not correct." ...


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Denialist: A person who does not acknowledge the truth of a concept or proposition that is supported by the majority of scientific or historical evidence.


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Using the same kind of term, a present-day Luddite would eschew scientific and technological advances and milestones.


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If you mean "don't know about science" you could say they are (scientifically) ignorant or illiterate. If you mean they refuse to believe in science then they are "antiscientific".


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It's because when searching "nails," your results include "gel nails," "acrylic nails," "nail polish," "nail art," "fake nails." Whereas "fingernails," especially as one word, imply natural, bare, undecorated nails.


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Such a disappointment would deserve a word like bringdown, bummer or bitter pill (to swallow). bringdown a disappointment or disillusionment; letdown: It was quite a bringdown to find myself running last in the mayoral race. bummer A disappointing or unpleasant situation or experience: the team’s relegation is a real bummer bitter pill ...


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"Separate" or "distinct" paired with almost anything in the second list (including "perspectives") might work.


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The "used" of "it can be used" is not a past tense form, despite it being called a "past participle". Instead, it is a passive verb form, which is usually the same as the past form. The term "past participle" is a confusing and unwise piece of terminology, but it's traditional, and we're stuck with it. Sorry. It ought to be called a "passive participle".


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This construction (or verb-chain, or verb-group—we don't have a consistent name for it) is a modal passive. Only on the first verb in the group is finite—having a specific past or non-past reference.; subsequent verbs must be non-finite forms. A modal verb is always first, and always finite: can The verb immediately following a modal ...


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You say that "Resources" adequately describes the desired concept to consumers of the "Resources". Perhaps if you call these things "Consumer Resources", consumers will understand this to mean the same thing as "Resources", but makers will understand this term to mean "something that I would regard as a Resource if I were a consumer."


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I have heard the word "artifacts" used in this context, but that might wind up confusing both groups. The usage I'm talking about comes from software development, and generally refers to the tangible by-products of the software development life cycle, as discussed at the Programmers Stack Exchange site under the question title "What does 'artifact' mean?"


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bold [bohld] adjective, bolder, boldest. not hesitating or fearful in the face of actual or possible danger or rebuff; courageous and daring: a bold hero. not hesitating to break the rules of propriety; forward; impudent: He apologized for being so bold as to speak to the emperor. necessitating courage and daring; challenging: a bold adventure. beyond ...


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Often, a good antonym for compound is irreducible: Not able to be reduced or simplified (Oxford Dictionaries) Another word you might consider is simple, although it does have other meanings that might make it too vague for your purposes: Composed of a single element; not compound. (Oxford Dictionaries)


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The phrase is used in Season 5, Episode 8 of "The Simpsons," in reference to a cheese doodle being used as fishing bait ("Godspeed, little doodle"). If your male friend likes the Simpsons or is of a certain age, it might be an allusion to this, and therefore a term of endearment.


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Idealists might work... or even fanatics, although that might be too strong without some modifier. This would be in the sense of those whose ideas outweigh their common sense. Reformers or activists might work for "someone who wants to do good", but that that good is not effective doesn't come through unless modified by something else. Something like "...


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Yes, it is possible and common. The meaning is as one may expect, to connect/relate some(usually two) concepts, ideas, etc. Take a look at these examples: If we attempt to bridge two concepts that are very far apart, more energy will be consumed (and lost) to achieve it. ...and by Doctors Without Borders It may be possible to bridge two ideas which ...


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Purely based on what sounds natural to me as a native speaker, I would say you are responsible for someone or something, and you have a responsibility to someone or something. In other words the difference is responsible versus responsibility. But there is also a slight difference in semantics I think.


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"Responsibility for" would precede a noun or a noun phrase. Example: A parent has a responsibility for their child. A student has a responsibility for doing their homework. Here it means that the object is under the care or supervision or purview of the subject. "Responsibility to" would precede a verb. Example: A parent has a responsibility to teach ...


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With a focusing modifier like "only", the only practical rule in writing is to place it sensibly so as not to cause confusion. "Only" usually precedes its focus, and it can often be placed adjacent to it, as in "We found only one error", in which case "only" is modifying the NP "one error". But if the focus is contained within a verb phrase, as it is in that ...


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SMS language — Wikipedia SMS language or textese (also known as txt-speak, txtese, chatspeak, txt, txtspk, txtk, txto, texting language, txt lingo, SMSish, txtslang, txt talk) is a term for the abbreviations and slang commonly used with mobile phone text messaging, but sometimes used with other Internet-based communication such as email and instant ...


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The question is about forcing someone to do something. The words dictator and dictate come to my mind. But I am not sure if those imply putting your force on someone else against his will.


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I am left thinking of "taking one's medicine." If this isn't the context you're looking for can you provide an example or more specifics?


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Staying within your religious context, this practice is known as Mortification of the flesh is an act by which a individual or group seeks to mortify, or put to death, their sinful nature, as a part of the process of sanctification. In Christianity, common forms of mortification that are practiced to this day include fasting, abstinence, as well as ...


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It's the same with a little difference on each. What's going on? something "running" that continues to happening right now What's happening? as Event and occurrence.


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To be "in the now" means to be "completely focussed on what is happening to you now, not thinking about the past or future or anything which isn't immediately around you." That is, it's a way of describing someone's attentional state. It is alternatively referred to as "living in the moment", or the state of "mindfulness". It is often linked to Buddhism, ...


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Since "doormat" is taken, I'll submit "obsequious". It means being obedient or servile to an excessive degree MW


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Would "per sprint" work? Or "each sprint"? These 5 tasks must be completed each sprint. This event happens 5 times per sprint.


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First: Its tail slipped from beneath its skirt. I've always heard "slip beneath" as a synonym for "hide," as in an animal slipping beneath a rock. Now, some other options: peep out poke out sneak out slide out You could also reword the sentence to the effect of something like "Its skirt shifted to reveal a tail." And of course, there's the option to ...


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After several interesting conversation in the post's comments, I got creative and found names for my use case which make most sense for me. While I understand that given the nature of the question it looks almost like at this point this is more of a personal preference than a black and white answer, I will share my thought process. Based on my use case, ...



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