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0

If you guarantee you have to pay if he doesn't fulfill his responsibility. If you vouch it's just a casual guarantee.


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It is alright to use both of these which mean the same thing: any kind of application any kind of applications Although the first is more common. Google search results isn't a good indicator but anyway: "any kind of pet" (226000 results) "any kind of pets" (103000 results) "any kinds of pets" (102000 results) "any kinds of pet" ...


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When I was a child, I had an educational wildlife atlas with illustrations of animals in their habitats/biomes. There were different habitats like rainforest, coast, desert, arctic, jungle, ocean, savannah etc. I did some research and couldn't find the exact book; but I found a similar book called Wildlife Atlas, a Complete Guide to Animals and Their ...


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After a few days of not thinking about this at all, I realized the word interim fits the criteria. Although it's not terribly good from a stylistic perspective.


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This is covered in this good dictionary Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary Remember: Seek is not usually followed by a preposition. NOT: I went to the beach seeking for peace and fresh air.


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How about a Mealophile, or a Morselist? What about Gastronomical (or just Gastro?)


1

As far as meaning goes, 'depth of the trench' and 'trench depth' are equivalent. Also for 'pulverize' vs 'pulverizing', though as the reader won't likely be reading the instructions at the time he is pulverizing, using the simple present tense is better.


-1

Flammable burns readily in oxygen or the atmosphere. Combustible will burn if lit. Inflammable has to be set on fire.


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advance noun an instance of notable progress in the development of knowledge, technology, or skill Synonyms advancement, breakthrough, enhancement, improvement, refinement The Internet, planes, cars and mobile phones are advances that shaped the 20/21st century. engineering achievement Greatest Engineering Achievements of the 20th ...


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Nouns related to "any" are correctly singular, when there is the possibility that only one thing might be involved. "Any person can do this" "He looked for any kind of evidence" "Any solution is better than none" "This works for any kind of drawing" Using "all" requires plurals: "All people can do this" "This works for all kinds of drawing" The ...


0

First, "any kind of" can definitely indicate a multitude of kinds:-) If you really want to be different, I'd go for: Results can be applied to any variety of drawing or texturing applications "Any kinds of" is not considered terribly elegant. Now, you can use it, but ... read again previous sentence. BTW, at Google Books: "any kind of applications" ...


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Is there a more correct term than technologies for grouping items that require knowledge of techniques (technology) to be created? No, in English they're called technologies. Any recent dictionary should make this clear (even if it also shows the original meaning). eg. the free dictionary: n. pl. tech·nol·o·gies a. The application of ...


1

Paper dictionaries will use the accepted "dictionary" form of the word, whether it is the singular form of a noun or the bare infinitive of a verb. The dictionary will typically show the transformations these words undergo, much as you noticed with the online dictionaries. You may see the gerund form of a verb if that form has a meaning distinct from the ...


1

"Motoring" is for quite some time past this kindergarten stage of words that you're talking about :-) Also, use the proper Merriam-Webster:-) motoring noun plural -s : the act or recreation of riding in or driving an automobile Origin of MOTORING from gerund of 3motor Merriam-Webster Unabridged Dictionary "Motoring" is a ...


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a [patronizing, etc] frown, scowl, glower, lower, gloom Water from the best fount:-) A Dictionary of Discriminated Synonyms with Antonyms and Analogous and Contrasted Words Merriam-Webster, Inc - 1984 Frown, scowl, glower, lower, gloom are comparable when they mean to put on a dark or malignant countenance or aspect. [read the entire ...


2

'For' is implied by 'seeking' and therefore redundant. In 'searching an answer,' 'for' is not implied and should be added. One of those English mysteries, I guess.


2

It's not too welcome, IMO. At Google Books, one can test the waters injecting relevant extra words in the search, say "dissertation," which limits the search environment to publications containing "dissertation": "provide the best guess" "dissertation" About 0 results "provide the best estimate" "dissertation" About 9 results


0

CMOS (The Chicago Manual of Style) recommends to go for decision to the best dictionaries in such cases, and for AmE it's this one for me: stand–alone adjective : self-contained; especially : operating or capable of operating independently of a computer system or network a stand–alone word processor Merriam-Webster Unabridged Dictionary


1

In the UK, it is often referred to as a "Paddington stare". This refers to the character Paddington Bear who found fame in the books of Michael Bond, which have been adapted for TV and movie. “Paddington had a very persistent stare when he cared to use it. It was a very powerful stare. One which his Aunt Lucy had taught him and which he kept for ...


1

An old saying for a demanding look is, to look at someone with "daggers in your eyes." If you are being patronizing, you would give someone a "withering look". (To cause them to "shrivel up")(US)


1

Sometimes when a grumpy old man gets annoyed, he makes noises like clearing his throat. Does grumbling or grunting define that action? Grumble: definitely not. That consists of complaining words, it is not a sound. Grunt: close, but that isn't it. Grunt doesn't include throat-clearing, and it is an inhalation. Is there a more appropriate ...


0

The word I was looking for is snaperly: When a bully goes from beating up kids when no one is looking, to acting like a nice friendly child when the teacher is looking, she is acting snaperly When I am cruising on Facebook at work, and I quickly do a Alt+Tab to switch back to my work screen because I notice my boss just stepped out of his office, I am ...


3

"Aggregated" is the past tense construction of the verb "to aggregate". In contrast, "aggregate" is an adjective ("aggregated is not an adjective). The company aggregated sales figures to check expectations. (verb) The aggregate sales of the company exceeded expectations. (adjective) For your phrase: The aggregate consumption of oil consumed ...


0

I am a cozy, cuddly person. When I am in certain warehouse or industrial spaces, if they are not filled with the expected "sound and vision" of artistic, or warm, usually organic touches of an eatery, I can get depressed fast. It's almost a feeling of agoraphobia: cold, sterile, empty, disconnected, detached, remote—like there is not enough love, ...


1

Since I don't have the rep to comment, and nobody has made it their main answer, let me chime in with Stride. It has more meaning than just long steps. The usage that immediately comes to mind is: in stride 1 without interference with regular activities 2 without emotional reaction also: Stride 1b the most effective natural pace : maximum competence ...


1

Conflicting requirements. One requirement says the car should be strong (hence heavy), the other says it should be fuel efficient (hence light). They are in conflict. Also "competing requirements" may be used. An interesting follow up question would be, what is a word to describe something that "solves the dilemma" of conflicting requirements? For ...


1

ACTIONS VS EXISTENCE Clothes is used when something is done to them,going to be done to them, or being done to them. clothing is used when describing the features of them.For example: The wind picked up the clothes wile it was drying on the line. That piece of clothing is rather dark The piece of clothing was laying on the ground In other words, ...


0

To do something "confidently, coldly and calmly" is to do so with conviction. conviction [kuh n-vik-shuh n] noun -Dictionary.com a fixed or firm belief The spec ops team deployed themselves about the battlefield with conviction.


1

Preclusive is a word, albeit not one that you are likely to encounter often. It is just the adjective version of preclude.


1

To me, to walk "purposefully" connotes a vision of someone looking straight ahead, in control and with a purpose.


-3

How about boring, no seriously - someone could bore through a crowd indicating not anger or haste just determination.


-1

Facile: done or achieved in a way that is too easy. This is a subtle usage of the word. Facile is a derogative way of saying something is easy, even if it has not yet been achieved.


3

I would use swagger. However, I also think stride is a good one, as FumbleFingers say. Strut may also work. You can also say walking with aplomb


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Reactivity can describe this behaviour in psychology. Reactivity is a phenomenon that occurs when individuals alter their performance or behavior due to the awareness that they are being observed. Reactivity is not limited to changes in behaviour in relation to being merely observed; it can also refer to situations where individuals alter their ...


3

Saunter does not indicate confidence but does indicate lack of anger/frustration/hurry. (M-W)


-2

"Bearing". E.g. "Sailor, stand straight and maintain your bearing at all times!".


1

Hello, Everyone might be a good start. "Pals" and "Fellows" don't ring quite right in a business environment.


0

I think Journeyman directly reflects the level of accomplishment you are referring to. Using the term accomplished may suit you - it implies experience and proficiency, but not necessarily mastery. As might use of certified or proven.


1

A pal is a buddy or friend, or worse, a sarcastic way to indicate your annoyance with someone. It's possible that some of your client employees and partners haven't met. And you don't want to give this large group the impression that you are annoyed with anyone. Probably best to go with your alternative, "To All".


-1

I like "brown-noser". Its slang but hits the nail right on the head...


2

word that describes ... type of phony "goody-two-shoes" type behavior Merriam-Webster defines the adjective UNCTUOUS as used to describe someone who speaks and behaves in a way that is meant to seem friendly and polite but that is unpleasant because it is obviously not sincere unctuous. The poster child of an unctuous personality in “classic” ...


-1

How about conformist ? a person who conforms to accepted behaviour or established practices.


0

How about sycophant a person who acts obsequiously toward someone important in order to gain advantage.


-1

genuinely of the period Jade - Page 47 Roger Keverne - 2012 For the sake of readers, Ming reign names and dates are presented below, but this is not to suggest that the appearance of one of these names on a carving is a guarantee that it is genuinely of the period. 2Hongwu (Hung-wu), AD 1368–1398 ...


-1

I think you are looking for: Contemporaneous: adj. Originating, existing, or happening during the same period of time: the contemporaneous reigns of two monarchs. (AHD)


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One possibility: wheezed his annoyance transitive verb : to utter with a sound of wheezing [breathe with difficulty with a usually audible sibilant or whistling sound ] In Darkness Waiting John Shirley - 2013 The old man wheezed his amusement. He shifted to accommodate his bags. “You think you workfor yourself, huh?


42

harrumph /həˈrʌmf/ verb; gerund or present participle: harrumphing clear the throat noisily grumpily express dissatisfaction or disapproval. "skeptics tend to harrumph at case histories like this" He harrumphed and said, ‘I am deeply obliged’. (from Google)


0

In the US we say: 'You kowtow to the boss' or, you are kowtowing. It means showing deference - whether or not you are sincere. (Borrowed from the Chinese expression for kneeling and touching one's head to the ground, to a revered person.)



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