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0

It depends on your audience, but I’ve always liked the phrase nom de guerre.


-1

I like @dwjohnston's suggested jaded. Given that the suffix -ette often means "small, young" (c.f. French cadette = younger sister, BrE ladette = loutish young woman), I propose the neologism... jadette - [prematurely] jaded young person Since it's not yet in the dictionary, I don't know whether it's pronounced with a long or a short 'a'.


2

An official collection of laws is a "code", as in "Revised Code of Washington" (RCW), "United States Code" (USC), or "International Residential Code" (IRC). One meaning of "library" is a collection of books.


7

Consider corpus. a complete or comprehensive collection, as of laws or writings of a specified type: the corpus of civil law Source: Webster's New World College Dictionary Copyright © 2010 For example, Wikipedia lists below corpora: Hippocratic Corpus, the lectures and writings of Hippocrates Corpus Inscriptionum Etruscarum, an index of ...


1

I would suggest perhaps a cynic, or a cynical 12 year old. cynic - noun. a person who believes that people are motivated purely by self-interest rather than acting for honourable or unselfish reasons. While the term cynic in itself doesn't capture 'young person who acts like a jaded old person', in context both mentioning that they're young and that ...


5

Perhaps you're thinking of codex (obsolete) a code, or body of laws [Collins] As noted, its not much in use today. There are also several compendia of law in specific fields called restatements (law) Any of several treatises published by the American Law Institute in which a group of legal scholars within a field of law set forth the principles of ...


4

Canon carries a strong connotation of officialdom (hence, canonical). Noun canon (plural canons) A group of literary works that are generally accepted as representing a field. "the durable canon of American short fiction" — William Styron from Wiktionary


3

"Born middle-aged" is a phrase I have heard applied to such people (including myself, actually). There are plenty of matches on Google for that phrase. The OED says that "middle-aged" can be used for "resembling a person in middle age", so you can interpret the phrase in that sense.


2

A pretty general word can be "digest". But I don't know if it can apply to your case (it does not seem (to me) very "official-sounding"): we should see the context. Google reports one definition: "a compilation or summary of material or information." Other similar words might be: body, compendium.


0

Through some thesaurus surfing I think I found it: Lexicon I know this only refers to language, and is not a collection of books, but it does seem to be the word that was on the tip of my tongue. Hopefully someone can submit an answer that carries the same power and has a much closer definition to the one in my question.


-3

I would call him an oxymoron. In the very nature of the word that is what you have here.


-2

curmudgeon - a crusty, ill-tempered, and usually old man


4

Sclerotic--an inability to adapt. 'That boy Tim is a sclerotic kid--age 13 going on 65.


-4


0

In British English, I would call such a person an old fogey.


4

I'm going to suggest nostalgist. It seems like there is no word that covers both being young and nostalgic, but nostalgist conveys the idea in the context. You can use nostalgic as an adjective also, as in a nostalgic person. Nostalgist is the noun version of nostalgic but urbandictionary mentions that it is used among young people and includes regional ...


9

A young person who demonstrates wisdom and maturity beyond their years is often called an old soul. It comes from the belief that some reincarnated souls retain a measure of the wisdom and character developed in previous incarnations. These days, even those who don't share in the actual belief find use for the phrase in normal conversation. I'd be perfectly ...


3

"Born too late" is a moderately common phrase, as popularized by Edwin Arlington Robinson's poem "Miniver Cheevy": ... Miniver loved the days of old     When swords were bright and steeds were prancing; The vision of a warrior bold     Would set him dancing. [...] Miniver Cheevy, born too late, ...


1

I think old-fashioned can well describe the characteristics you are describing: favouring or adopting the dress, manners, fashions, etc, of a former time Scot and Northern English: old for one's age: an old-fashioned child. Source: Collins English Dictionary


2

I personally use "Alias" to reference an online user's name. It's similar to nickname, but the context is clearer that it's a false name.


4

He sounds like a fuddy-duddy one that is old-fashioned, unimaginative, or conservative [Merriam-Webster] The term is not limited to children, but is often applied to someone who seems old beyond their years. You also might consider fogey an extremely fussy, old-fashioned, or conservative person (esp in the phrase old fogey) [Collins] In this ...


6

My son was like this when younger, and his Scoutmaster remarked once that he appeared to be working on his Running-for-the-Senate merit badge.


5

I have often seen "alias" used in this way in describing what someone is called on an Internet community.


1

Why not, "alter ego"? It may be rather high-toned but in my opinion it matches the use of a nickname, especially used on the internet where the anonymity is valued. I'm interested in opinions that oppose mine though :) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alter_ego


4

The lad you speak of has an anachronistic perspective. Anachronistic may seem to be a stretch here, but when you think about it, an anachronistic perspective (attitude, outlook, way of looking at things) is a perspective that is somehow out of order chronologically. Very often we think of anachronistic thinking as a backward-looking thing from the ...


8

As I native North American English speaker, I would colloquially refer to the person you described as old-school. Meriam-Webster defines that term as: old-school typical of an earlier style or form based on a way of doing things that was common in the past using or supporting traditional practices So for example: Joey is ...


5

Nickname is the appropriate word because it is a common synonym of screenname in computing. It is used outside the internet but it became a common word in this context. Nick (short of nickname), on the other hand, is mostly used in technical contexts.


2

It depends on whether you just want to keep warm food that is ready for eating, or whether a warm environment is required as part of the food preparation. For most of us at home, the oven on a low setting suffices for doing this. For those involved in the food industry, there are of course more specialised equipment. Josh61 has mentioned a food warmer. If ...


2

Another discussion is here http://forum.wordreference.com/showthread.php?t=2216027 'username' seems to be acknowledged as indicative without accompanying baggage. https://www.google.com/search?q=define+username


6

Pseudonym has meanings beyond the web, but is just as applicable to usage online as off. It's also generally more appropriate to both formal writing, and writing for non-technical audiences. It's a bit more widely understood than the alternatives, being several hundred years older and more established in the language. (Screen Name and Handle are, as already ...


5

You are probably referring to a food warmer: Heat lamps, hot boxes, steam tables, soup kettles and display warmers are just some types of food warmers that currently exist. Heat lamps, steam tables and soup kettles often leave food exposed in some way while they keep it warm. Hot boxes and display warmers fully enclose foods. ...


5

Since "fridge" is short for refrigerator, it's doubtful you can use "hot fridge" because that would kinda mean "hot cold". An enclosed container that heats or keeps food warm is an oven or a warming oven - as shown below:


46

There are various terms for this. Once upon a time, “screen name” would likely have been the most common. However, it seems to me that this convention has been driven by the most pervasive websites. So, with Facebook et al's move toward encouraging the use of real names, “screen name” seems much less common (phrases such as “nickname” appear to be used now ...


2

A moniker or handle would be an appropriate word for internet name.


7

I suggest 'Internet handle' (but having said that, Fathima's screen name is a well-established term, as a Google search will quickly show).


20

I guess screen-name is appropriate: Noun, Digital Technology: a unique sequence of characters that a person chooses to use for identification purposes when interacting with others online, as in computer games, instant messaging, or forums. Source:http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/screen+name


2

Take a look at this link for better understanding on usage of certain prepositions. The definition of "OF" as a preposition- Of Used for belonging to, relating to, or connected with: Examples of "of" as a preposition- The secret of this game is that you can’t ever win. The highlight of the show is at the end. The first page of the ...


3

According to Ngram the preposition of is more used, especially with the singular form of price, but both prepositions are acceptable. It appears that there is not much different between the two preposition used to indicate the price of something.


0

The direct grammatical feature to your question, is that in typical English usage an adverb (like highly) does not directly modify a gerund (participating). Further, construction you propose is not very direct, which I don't think is the best form for a CV. If it were me I'd use Team member developing X.


-2

I think your answers on how to use "these" and "those" are incorrect. I was taught to use a noun after both these and those. EX: these apples....those apples. these and those always need a noun after them, them and they do not. One needs to always answer these_______? Or, those ______? what what


0

I am not sure I get the question at all. Anyway, I will suggest a few words, and revise them when I have a better understanding of what you mean Intuition, hunch


-1

If your audience is mathematical (or scientific/technical) several examples spring to mind. This suggests it may be solvable in a half millennium or so: The Fermat Theorem in ABC is to identify XYZ. This suggests the problem solution is just getting under way: The Riemann Hypothesis in ABC is to identify XYZ. And these suggest that the problem ...


0

Your colleague could be a divergent thinker.  a thought process or method used to generate creative ideas by exploring many possible solutions. Read more here: http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Divergent_thinking


0

Capable of using both brains (right and left) where the left brain can process in sequence and the right brain can comprehend simultaneously. Leonardo DaVinci was a classic thinker capable of seeing and articulating in multiple dimensions.


0

All these words can be used more generally and applied to atypical situations, so in principle each word could be used for everything else. But normally the core meanings apply, at least to some extent. Where they don't, it may be for historical or strange technical reasons, or because the organisation wants to mislead the public. Therefore I will only ...


0

Though Assembly and Association tend to have overlapping meanings: A group of persons gathered together for a common reason, as for a legislative, religious, educational, or social purpose. an organization of people with a common purpose and having a formal structure. Assembly has also a more specific usage: a number of people gathered ...


0

'Hobson's Choice'--means one is given a choice but permitted only one choice. Named after Thomas Hobson (1544-1631) a livery stable owner in Cambridge England. To rotate his horses Hobson gave his customers the choice of taking the stall nearest the stable door or taking no stall at all. Hobson's choice is no choice.


-1

In health care reports, it is always "as evidenced by".


-1

I would say that, by however slim the margin, following the forms of the root language is preferable. But in no way would it be an error, in normal conversation, to modify it to suit the language in which it is being used. There might be rea



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