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0

Actually, with a space as two words it is a useful phrase for wavering: irresolute oscillating.


1

I think you mean inspect (to introspect, like you said, can only mean to examine the thoughts in your own head — to "look into" yourself): Definition & Example (via dictionary.com): to look carefully at or over; view closely and critically: to inspect every part of the motor.


1

input would be one of the correct terms since it simply means anything that the user puts into the search bar, such as a phrase, term, query, and all other things the user would be searching for.


1

I'd say the two are not exactly the same. Judiciary labour means labour pertaining to the established judiciary, whereas juridicial labour is simply labour relating to the process or administration of law. It depends entirely on what you're trying to say.


0

I tend to side with you that "expecting" does not connote excitement, at least not in any widespread dialects (although when used to refer to a pregnancy, it probably does go hand in hand with excitement). But I do see that the Free Dictionary defines expect as "to look forward to the probable occurrence or appearance of" (here). Your student likely ...


1

Google given the following definitions of 'expect': regard (something) as likely to happen. "we expect the best" "a 10 percent rise was expected" regard (someone) as likely to do or be something. "they were not expecting him to continue" "I expect she'll be late" believe that (someone or something) will arrive soon. ...


5

Unless she specifically tells you to call her by her first name or suggests some title either verbally or in emails (or you hear it from somewhere), I'd play it safe and address her as Ms. [last name]. Note that it's best to use Ms. because Mrs. denotes that she is married (which would be an assumption on your part - or even if you know she's married, she ...


2

seeker from bing: NOUN 1.a person who is attempting to find or obtain something: "a tenacious seeker of the truth" ·


0

Inquisitive given to inquiry, research, or asking questions; eager for knowledge; intellectually curious: "an inquisitive mind" unduly or inappropriately curious; prying


2

Possibly you want investigator. one who observes or studies by close examination and systematic inquiry 'investigators who discovered new evidence that the universe was much older than had been previously estimated' Synonyms experimenter, researcher Related Words monitor, observer; empiric, empiricist, fact finder; field-worker; examiner, inspector ...


1

In the immortal words of Tracy Jordan "Superman does good, you're doing well" More seriously, Grammar Girl says either is okay, and "I'm good" is much more common in casual conversation. Personally, I had enough teachers in my schooling tell me not to say "I'm good" that I usually respond "I'm fine", "can't complain", "not bad", "great!", or something of ...


2

I'd suggest, "the first of a pair of talks," would be much less cumbersome, and easily readable. Series does have the implication that there are a few, i.e. 3 or more.


0

Yes, it is condescending. Largesse means: liberal giving (as of money) to or as if to an inferior [Merriam-Webster] Certainly you wouldn't want to insinuate that the clients are inferior. Instead, consider: Show clients your gratitude/appreciation with a gift of equal proportion.


0

Largesse, like noblesse oblige, suggests that the donor is extending not from charity but from an exaggerated sense of his own superiority. If you don't mean it that way, find another word.


0

It depends on the audience you are writing this to. But, you could say something like: It is customary and appropriate to provide gifts or favor of equal proportion to one's guests, as a display of reciprocity, respect, or mutual affection. Largess does have an air of superiority and condescension about it, and I would avoid it.


0

Sincerely, [name] or –[name] Using an en dash before the name. (It may supposed to be an em dash, but w\e IMO, just as long as it isn't a hyphen or a plan old dash.) Personally, I omit the space to denote attribution, to avoid confusing it with any other use. Another option is to omit the sign-off entirely or phrase it into a TL;DR: I hope to ...


0

Fond regards, Warm regards, or All the best Closer relative: With warmest affection, With much love, or Much love to you, Dad,


0


3

To me 'wobble' does have a bit of a negative connotation, as a wobble is typically something to be avoided, although in some cases, it could also be somewhat endearing. It's a bit like 'toddle' in that respect. On a side note, given the actual name of the ~ character, I'm going to go the less literal and slightly punnier route, and suggest the actual name ...


2

I believe the common term for this would be a disclaimer: a statement that is meant to prevent an incorrect understanding of something (such as a book, a movie, or an advertisement) source: m-w.com The person who is speaking is making a claim about someone or something, but specifically "dis-claims" that their statement applies to an entire group: ...


0

Ripple might be a good subsitute. Another interesting way to describe it could be "Sine" as the tilde closely approximates a Sine wave


1

"Vision" and "eyesight" would both be correct, and both could work for this context. However, like jme said in their answer, "vision" can have other meanings that don't strictly have to do with eyesight. As long as the sentence/paragraph you're using it in makes the context clear, you could still totally use it. "I have good eyesight, so I don't ...


3

In the context you are referring to of innate physiological ability, your third option is the most clear: I have good eyesight. Let's look at the other two options. I have good vision. In this case, "vision" could have an abstract meaning. A person playing a sport is sometimes said to have good "vision", as in ability to "see" (understand) the ...


5

I think you should go with something more neutral. It is clear from the other responses that "Wobble" can be seen as positive or negative. So I think you should try moving towards something like: Squiggle noun noun: squiggle; plural noun: squiggles 1. a short line that curls and loops in an irregular way. "some prescriptions are a series of ...


1

The character on the key is the tilde character, and is part of a Spanish character, ñ. In Spanish, the ñ character is pronounced just like an "n" followed by a consonant "y" as in "señor" (mister/sir) or "mañana" (tomorrow). Though if you're afraid your audience might not know that the word "tilde" refers to that symbol, I might suggest: Squiggle noun ...


2

To help provide a modern contextual background in support of the name Wobble, I want to highlight that the word wobble has actually received a significant positive connotation in certain cultural subsets. Most famously in the past decade (and underground for a decade and change before that) a genre of music has been evolving that actually centers around ...


4

Depending on the type of product Wobble can have a meaning of either funny or unsturdy/off balance. If you have a table or a chair that wobbles, people see that negatively. If you have a ball or other toy that wobbles, it makes it more fun. Since you are making a tool, wobble might not be appropriate to use as a product name in this case. Two good words ...


23

This may be somewhat opinion based, but I don't think that wobble is negative-sounding in and of itself. I think it is fun and silly, in a good way - and it seems to strike the right tone for a web tool, as these often do have silly names (such as 'Pyjamas' or 'Mustache'). Positive meanings of wobble are found in the wobbling of a jelly, or a musical wobble ...


0

A suitable synonym besides proactive might be preemptive


1

At least one senior Nazi in mid-C20th Germany, Otto Rasch, had two PhDs and, according to the Wiki ref below: "was known as "Dr. Dr. Rasch", in accordance with German academic tradition." https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Otto_Rasch When I was a post-doc in Sweden in the 1970s we had an elderly fellow at Kvantkemiska Institutet with five PhDs (really!), but I ...


2

No, there's no special title for such a situation. Someone with a double doctorate still just has the title "Doctor," in prefix form generally abbreviated to "Dr.": "Dr. So-and-So." (By the way, having two PhDs is not a standard stage in most academic careers, and it's not necessarily more prestigious than having a single PhD. See the answers to this ...


3

Many definitions of vanish define it as "to disappear, especially quickly or suddenly" (see, for example, here). While it is true that "vanish" can be used to mean gradually disappear, this is not the primary sense. It is a secondary sense, according to many dictionaries. If you expect the adverb to mirror the semantics of "vanish", "suddenly" is probably ...


2

The term "cast", meaning actors, is reserved for the theatre and is not used for characters in a book. In a quick search I was unable to find a collective noun for book characters, so the best option is probably to say "The characters in the book were … (richly drawn / absurd / poorly developed / etc)".


0

Perhaps bon vivant is what you're looking for? a person who likes going to parties and other social occasions and who enjoys good food, wine, etc.


0

Nope.  ex1: She could be thereby covertly influenced to buy the item of clothing or jewelry. ex2: The mucosal immune memory of the mother is thereby transmitted to her offspring Look at the link below for more ex: http://fraze.it/n_search.jsp?q=thereby


3

Although normally used to describe being awake when one should normally be asleep, the word wakefulness (the noun form of wakeful, defined below) can work here. Wakeful adjective 1.1 (Of a period of time) passed with little or no sleep - ODO You can say that someone got 10 hours of wakefulness. Here's one instance from a web search (emphasis mine): ...


0

Although I can’t find it listed anywhere as such, as I interpret Elaine Chaika’s multiple use of “co-conversationalist” in Linguistics, Pragmatics and Psychotherapy: A Guide for Therapists, it seems that she’s using it as a synonym of "interlocutor." (from ‘Google Books’) Cf: the use of “[her] co-conversationalist and interlocutor” in The Legacy of Dell ...


0

Possibly a little dated, but "a man about town" could be used.


2

my millenial daughter uses the term FOMO. It's a person who suffers from a severe Fear Of Missing Out.


1

How about "over-attender" or "social-lot?" (socialot?)


5

The way I've heard such people described is as "social butterflys"


1

Glitterati popped into my head, although it might just apply to the smartly dressed attendees.


0

yep it's a real word. Check out those examples: http://fraze.it/n_search.jsp?q=hugest


0

"I'm hoping you can assist me with..." "I'm hoping you can help me with..." "I have [some issue] you may be able to help/assist me with..." Depending on the exact nature of the question, you may want to avoid being too polite and go with a more blunt/urgent approach: "I require your assistance with..." (sounds a little more formal than "I need help")


17

gadabout A habitual pleasure-seeker. I think this is a great, fun word that doesn't get enough play.


6

Man About Town A man who frequently attends fashionable social functions, as in Fred is quite the man about town these days. This expression, first recorded in 1734, uses town in the sense of “a sophisticated place” as opposed to rural settings. The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary


7

Eventgoer (or event-goer) One who attends an event. This should work just like partygoer: a person who attends a party or who attends parties frequently "chauffeured transportation was provided for those partygoers who had overindulged themselves at the bar" The -goer suffix means: a ​person who goes to the ​stated ​type of ​place ...


11

You may be looking for party animal (informal) someone who ​enjoys ​parties and ​party ​activities very much and goes to as many as ​possible: Sarah's a ​real ​party ​animal - she ​likes to ​dance all ​night. — Cambridge


0

NO INTIMATE IS NOT SHORT FOR IMPLY,and infer is short for inferred.Debate word,lawyer lingo.my time on this site is short so forgive me if I got it wrong.



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