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1

I believe you have the answer right there in your question. You're being employed as a distraction. EDIT: I am aware that distraction tends to have negative connotations. That said, given that this person appears to only want you to be around at work to help him pass the time faster at work, and not in his social life, the entire situation appears ...


0

An object of entertainment? Plaything, perhaps? The OP's guess of 'muse' is close, though wrong: maybe, 'an amusement.'


1

If you were to relate the SE Rep system to a more traditional concept, like filling a cup with water, the cup can only contain X amount, and the rest is 'wastage' or 'overflow'. 'overflow' has the potential to be recovered, but 'wastage' is more final, like the loss from the cap. But 'wastage' implies carelessness, or negligence. This brings it more in ...


3

Notional loss? By not buying a lottery ticket, one could "lose" a million dollars. As opposed to a real loss of a dollar or two by buying one. This answer and the OP's example may not seem to match. That is because in the example, the loss is real, and so the example doesn't quite serve the purpose of the question.


1

"Isolate" is sometimes used (especially in science) to refer to the isolated group. So, in your example you might say: We wanted to compare two isolated groups. The first isolate we put in the blue room, the second isolate in the green room. Here "isolate" refers individually to each of the groups. See Wiktionary: isolate Noun isolate (plural ...


0

Blunder - (v) to act or speak clumsily. It has the added benefit of also meaning "a stupid or careless mistake". However a person who is oblivious to the harm their "truths" inflict is tactless. Then only problem with the word "tactless" is that it tends to apply more to the speaker than the statement (and is seen as judgmental against the speaker).


-2

Transploration? Yeah that sounds good. :o)


-1

Fuggetaboudit! LOL that's a folksy way of saying it


0

According to the Longman English Dictionary Online, both are fine: New experience: to show someone something or tell them about it for the first time introduce somebody to something/introduce something to somebodyExample: Malcolm introduced me to the joys of wine-tasting.


0

How about this: Never mind my question.


1

The expression at wit's end means exactly not knowing what else to do. at the end of one's ideas or mental resources; perplexed (dictionary.com)


1

Majority is overused, anyway. Best to restrict it to matters of voting. Usually, the word most works just fine. Instead of majoritatively, use mostly.


0

In simple terms, the context is indicating that language and reality are directly related, further supported by the context that follows the source text that implies heavily that if language is understood, so is reality. The fact that this question is being asked is meta to the document. The fact that the question is being answered without referencing well ...


1

Grouse is a noun (bird) and a verb ( complain). As an adjective (excellent) is used mainly in NZ and Australia and it is not commonly used as an adverb. I suggest you use 'grumpy' or a synonym of it. Grouse: (intransitive verb) (from MW) complain, grumble She's been grousing to her boss about the working conditions. Fans have groused that the ...


1

Yes, see: Wiktionary: Majoritively By means of a majority. (proscribed) Consisting of more than half (50%); predominantly. However, it certainly isn't a common word, and honestly, I don't see that it fits well in the example you gave. You might instead choose "usually", "frequently", "commonly" or "most often" instead.


0

The usual word for setting a variable is explicitly. precisely and clearly expressed or readily observable; leaving nothing to implication [WordNet via OneLook] The default value is implied (left to implication), where it is not directly expressed.


0

I hope things are going well for you. No troubles for you and yours.


0

I think there is more than one possible reason why someone may discount their national heritage. ermanen gives one possible answer: cultural cringe, a basic dislike of one's native culture. Another reason may be cosmopolitanism. Someone with this world view is more interested in commonalities than differences between people, seeing humanity as one big world ...


0

Sounds to me like she's at the 'reverse polarization' stage of her march toward adaptation in/to a new/changing culture and that she has simply not yet resolved her 'cultural disengagement' issues, but please give her time.


-4

philistine - a person who is hostile or indifferent to culture and the arts


-1

The term synthesis is defined as the process of combining objects or ideas into a complex whole (Compare analysis) A synthesist is one who engages in that process.


2

While the term self-hating, standing alone, is ususally applied to a person who dislikes themselves (see, e.g., Collins) when combined with an ethnic reference, it is sometimes used to indicate a rejection of the group by an individual who generally would be considered a part of that group. For example, the slang and pejorative term self-hating curry is ...


2

This behavior can be the result of cultural cringe or cultural alienation. Cultural cringe, in cultural studies and social anthropology, is an internalized inferiority complex that causes people in a country to dismiss their own culture as inferior to the cultures of other countries. It can also be manifested in individuals in the form of cultural ...


0

I've used 'cultural bastard' to describe a person that is of a culture by blood but doesn't identify with them. "accident of birth" is used here - Why is it that every India-origin person to win a Nobel after independence in the sciences is not an Indian citizen any more? Hargobind Khurana won the prize for medicine in 1968, Subrahmanyan ...


2

Whilst it is not a word one would expect to see in the tabloid news media, it is in regular use in intelligent circles in Britain. It is quoted in the OED, whose most recent example is from an article in the New Statesman of 1968. That probably epitomises the sort of publication to whose readership it would be an everyday expression.


0

It is not possible to disillusion ourselves just as it is not possible to administer CPR to ourselves. But we can become disillusioned, i.e. have our illusions taken away.


2

Yes. I was brought up knowing the word, not coming from a Jewish background at all. I don't think this is uncommon. From Wikipedia: Judge Alex Kozinski and Eugene Volokh in an article entitled Lawsuit Shmawsuit, note the rise in use of Yiddish words in legal opinion. They note that chutzpah has been used 231 times in American legal opinions, 220 of ...


0

I think it's common to use who when the clause is being used to identify the person, and that when it's used descriptively. E.g. The girl who had plenty of money was arrested. implies that there were several girls who might have been arrested, but only the one with plenty of money actually was. You would use the above sentence to answer the quesetion ...


1

A mathematician's complicated way of saying language gives a picture of reality using words. Some specialists are unable to translate their specialist terms into normal language. But the use of the term isomorphism sounds enormously scientific and raises a banality on the level of high science. And the speaker knows that most readers have no idea of what ...


0

From en.wiktionary, sense 2 of isomorphism is “A one-to-one correspondence”. The three specializations within that entry (to the word's uses in “group algebra”, computer science, and category theory) are essentially equivalent. For example, in algebra, a bijective relation – an isomorphism – is both injective, or one-to-one, ie each domain element maps to ...


-1

I am not an English major but these answers seem wrong to me. I came here to see if "so as not to" was considered appropriate in any case. The comma makes it sound like the writer is trying to say that the killer was not suicidal and wasn't carrying the knife to intentionally cut himself. This is not what the author means. He means to say that the thief was ...


0

Who vs that is kind of a grey area. The general rule is who should be used when referring to a person, that where referring to an object. In practice, though, that has been used as a relative pronoun when referring to an individual for a long, long time.


1

Wikipedia has an entry called "Universal History", to quote (emphasis mine): "Universal history is the representation of general facts both of entire nations and of individuals. Its uses are manifold. It teaches human nature and the experience of all centuries. Universal history is commonly divided into three parts, viz. ancient, medieval, and ...


1

"The other day, I was in my car, waiting for a traffic light behind a pedestrian crossing. A friend of mine crossed the street right in front of me. For some reason, I didn't call out to him. Also, from macmillandictionary.com: call out: PHRASAL VERB [INTRANSITIVE/TRANSITIVE] to shout something, especially when you are trying to get ...


1

The other day, I was in my car, waiting for a traffic light behind a pedestrian crossing. A friend of mine crossed the street right in front of me. For some reason, I didn't honk (at him). There isn't a general single word that you can use for this sense. You already mentioned the most common usage: get someone's attention. Here is the Google Ngram ...


3

'Puzzled', 'undecided', 'confused', etc.


1

Although they are Greek words, sympatheroi (plural), sympathera (feminine singular) and sympatheros (masculine singular) could work well. The words mean "my child's parent(s)-in-law", literally "co-parent(s)". They are used in the first person (Hello, Sympathera!) as well as the third person. Sympatheroi has a niche use in the Uniform Parish Regulations ...


0

No, it is not. The word is 'deceive' ourselves.


1

You are disgusted at the other fellow's bad taste, and you might be contemptuous of him, but you are not in any way insulted or injured.


2

There's skirt-chaser, defined at freedictionary.com as a man who is aggressive in making amorous advances to women. Some examples: "Robinson was supposed to have been one of the most incorrigible skirt-chasers of his time." (oxforddictionaries.com) "Troy vows to relinquish the life of a skirt-chaser if only he can get Angel in his arms." ...


1

'Proxy' comes to mind. A strange thing to have to say. LOL


1

You can use sea to refer to most large bodies of water on earth. a : a great body of salt water that covers much of the earth; broadly : the waters of the earth as distinguished from the land and air b : a body of salt water of second rank more or less landlocked <the Mediterranean sea> c : ocean d : an inland body of water —used ...


2

'Large body of water' is the best way to express it in English. There is no specific word such as you are asking about that means 'large body of water' (which is vague in any event: how large is 'large'?). We have oceans, seas, gulfs, lakes, ponds, estuaries, rivers, etc.


4

You might consider waterbody but it is a less common word and it is often spelled as water body. It covers small bodies of water too but it depends on the context also. A body of water or waterbody is any significant accumulation of water, generally on a planet's surface. The term body of water most often refers to large accumulations of water, such as ...


1

Why not empathy The ability to understand and share the feelings of another. [Oxford Dictionaries Online] There is a difference between sharing the feelings of another and taking on the role of spokesperson. If you want to convey the latter role, you may be a champion of their interests A person who fights or argues for a cause or on behalf of ...


0

"Rips" and "tears" are two different types of failure of a garment or other sewn object. A "rip" is a failure of a seam in an item, that is a place where two pieces of fabric are joined; a "tear" is a failure of a single piece of the garment other than the failure of a seam. Further the degree with which the two types of failure can be repaired varies. A ...


1

I suggest Second-hand offended Here is a good article: Second-hand Offended Is Offensive Do you think I'm being politically incorrect to use the name "American Indian?" Well, 92% of them preferred American Indian over Native American, or any other name concocted by the "second-hand offended."



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