New answers tagged

-1

"That" doesn't pass the consistency test for possessives of pronouns. You'd have to invent a new word, 'thats' for sentences like "John is the person thats bike was stolen." It's really clumsy.


0

I believe there is some qualitative difference. Very is an intensifier, so very different will be indicating that the difference is large in some (arguably) "measurable" terms: an intensive difference. Adverb much means "to a great extent", so an extensive difference, which may be understood as the quantity of features or traits that differ rather than how ...


0

The difference is about what was expected. No1 shows you saw someone having problems, did nothing then felt guilty later. No one is expecting any help to be given The 2nd indicates that you had previously offered or been told to help but not done so. Either the person or a third-party is expecting you to help.


1

There are two forms of different. Different from / Common with Different than / Common than. American usage of different tends to delude itself into believing that all cases could be lumped into the 2nd form - though fortunately, immigration of professionals from places like India and Europe have mitigated that delusion, such that it has become more ...


0

Juncinator, for a non-native English speaker your "feel" for the language seems pretty good to me. I believe that the first of the three meanings Helmar offers above does fit well in the negative. I would agree with Helmar on "very" for the positive and (only opinion as I don't know of any rule here) I am comfortable with "much" for the negative - i.e. he ...


2

Short version: Use very different You want to use an adverb in front of different. While much can be an adverb, it has a very different meaning then. None of those three matches what your sentence wants to express. to a great degree or extent by a long time very nearly - Much (2) adverb Very on the other hand is the fitting adverb you ...


0

Tufy was our Chihuahua. He'd been in the family ever since I was born. I think something strange in the above sentence. Usually, past perfect is used to refer to the event that happens before the event in 'past simple' form. He had been in the family before I was born. (after that, he might not be with us) He was in our family when I was born. (both ...


1

Sounds to me like being conscientious. Conscientiousness?


0

I just came across: self-determination dictionary.com determination by oneself or itself, without outside influence. This doesn't seem like exactly what I was thinking of and neither does Bobby's answer, so I'm going to leave the question open for now to see if the answer I was thinking of shows up and I recognize it, but I wanted to leave this ...


1

agency dictionary.com the state of being in action or of exerting power; operation http://thelawdictionary.org/discretionary-power/ personal autonomy https://www.law.cornell.edu/wex/personal_autonomy The right of privacy has evolved to protect the freedom of individuals to choose whether or not to perform certain acts or subject ...


1

Writing “the Association ‘ABC’" is incorrect. Here are a few factors to consider: 1) If "association" is being used as a generic term and is not part of the official name, (i) it should not be capitalized and (ii) it should follow the actual title instead of preceding it. You would therefore say "the ABC association” and not “the Association ‘ABC’”. 2) ...


0

I'd go for 'unprojected', 'unanticipated' or 'unforeseen'. Although 'unexpected' may be best. NB: 'Parties short longevity' means parties that have a financial short-position in (or short-exposure to) longevity. They are effectively betting on longevity decreasing (perhaps for sub-populations), but were then wrong-footed when, for example, HIV/AIDS-medicine ...


0

Unforecasted can be used to suggest that there has been a failure in the matter of forecasting. The increase in life expectancy should have been forecast, but wasn't. Unexpected works, but it has less suggestion of a failure and more suggestion of anomaly. So it depends on what you want. It's another topic, but there are problems with Parties short ...


1

Association has got two meanings - the 1st being: "a group of people organized for a joint purpose". (For example,"The National Association of Probation Officers".) And the 2nd being: "a connection or cooperative link between people or organizations". (For example, "He developed a close association with the university".) Now, I hope you would ...


2

Common dictionaries are not very precise on which sort of nonliving subject can conclude depending on the meaning given, but the OED gives more detail: II. To close any transaction; to end. a.To bring to a close or end; to wind up, finish, close. (Said of a person, or of a final act, etc.) absol. To make an end of an action, e.g. speech or ...


0

It could be either. "Unforecasted" implies that there has been some forecasting of increases in life expectancy, and the actual increase in life expectancy doesn't match the forecasts. If there haven't been any forecasts of this type, then we shouldn't say "unforecasted". "unexpected" is more simple and doesn't need any further explanation in this ...


1

Conclude has two meaning - simply to "end", and also to arrive at a decision. https://www.google.co.uk/webhp?sourceid=chrome-instant&ion=1&espv=2&ie=UTF-8#q=conclude Your interpretation is being coloured by the second meaning, I think. Personally, I think that "finished" is a better choice of word, being simpler and more to the point. For ...


2

Ngram to the rescue... Noob in/at/on does not register in Ngram but if you calque it on newbie, it seems that newbie in wins, followed closely by at and on ex-aequo. It seems that Noob is mostly used as a standalone noun as in "I'm a noob". If you take in-at-on out of the equation this word get lot of hits. but as standalone newbie is still ...


-1

Quadrangle is a geometric shape that has four angles. And logically, if any shape has four angles, then it will have four sides. Then it comes a quadrilateral. I guess, you can use them interchangeably. However, quadrangle is a word often used for an open space where people gather, say on a school or university campus.


2

Though luck, according to Ngram the two have nearly similar use. (See below.) But as quadrangle is also used as synonym for Square, court, courtyard, plaza, enclosure, precinct, piazza...therefore a portion of its usage is for something else than what you're asking for. Whereas quadrilateral is exclusively used for the geometric figure, so the answer to ...


1

To prevent something means to stop it from happening. To avoid something means to make sure that it doesn't affect you. Thus we can avoid the rain, but not prevent it, for example. However, one strategy for avoiding something is to prevent it. Thus we could say that we avoided a crisis by preventing it from happening in the first place. In the case of ...


0

A prognosticator is the word you are looking for I believe. To predict according to present indications or signs; foretell. Reference


0

Shrewd Pragmatic if we are talking about plans and effects on physical things Considerate if we are talking about anticipating other people's feelings and emotions and influencing them for the better with kindness Canny implies knowledge of cause and effect Astute implies observant Sensible Judicious Practical connotes knowledge of effects on physical ...


2

Done for means "done on [someone's] behalf". If someone was trying to commit suicide, but the police did it for him, it isn't clear how grateful his survivors would be. But since the "for" means the subject is doing what the object wants done, yes, most of the time, the object will experience it as a positive. Off topic, but in British English, "done for" ...


1

Positive "do to" You do something to me, something that simply mystifies me. Tell me, why should it be you have the power to hypnotize me? (Cole Porter)


2

Positive do to: "Hot diggity, dog ziggity, boom What you do to me, When you're holding me tight." -Hot Diggity (Dog Ziggity Boom) [1956]


-2

'Offer' means to show our willingness to give something. In the context of job offer, the employer offers a job. Make an offer, or extend an offer is redundant. For example we may say, 'We offer you ...(such and such thing) The communication is 'offer of employment' or 'offer of a job'. (Dictionary of Human Resources Management. (https://yamanfc.files....


0

GENERAL GUIDELINES ON "BY" VS "WITH" - Quoted from Collins Cobuild Dictionary OBSERVATION - ENCOURAGED BY a living being or any object. ENCOURAGED WITH any object. MEANING - Both ENCOURAGED BY and ENCOURAGED WITH mean the same thing. STATISTIC OF USAGE ACROSS THE GLOBE - 1. American English - ENCOURAGED BY = 1786 ENCOURAGED WITH = 27 TOTAL = ...


5

In the spirit of keeping the writing simple, you can go with: Analysis of algorithms Comparison of algorithms Under the 'Analysis' section, you can examine each algorithm in the required amount of detail. Once you have explained all the algorithms, use the 'Comparison' section to point out similarities and differences between them. You can ...


1

I would go for: self-mockery (or self-mocking according to the Oxford dictionnary)


0

Your answer becomes clear if we analyse each sentence: I had wanted to buy a TV This sentence tells us that in the past you had a desire to buy a television, and the implication is that you didn't go out and buy it. I had had the idea of buying a TV This sentence tells us that you only had the idea of buying one, you don't necessarily want to go ...


5

I think that what you are talking about is a personality trait known as being able to laugh at yourself and not taking yourself too seriously This quote of course can also describe someone's sense of humor and can mean a lot of things. For one, it could mean that you are so optimistic about your friends enjoying an embarrassing story about you ...


1

To answer your "gist" question, Which is the correct preposition, "by" or "with"? Why? both are "correct". Your question would best be, instead, which is the most effective preposition? Why? Because the question pertains to spoken English (Ryan's, during the media interview), repeated in quotes and paraphrases in written English (in published ...


2

The Cambridge English Dictionary defines far-sighted as having good judgment about what will be needed in the future and making wise decisions based on this: Buying those shares was a very far-sighted move – they must be worth ten times their original value now. They label this a “UK” definition, but I disagree.  I’m a US person, and I believe ...


3

I agree with appalled. I think that it’s the best word for the context you’ve given. Here’s an interesting diagram for you! It displays several versions of emotions. Maybe you will find it useful. Edit: Under the category 'surprise,' the wheel lists startled, confused, amazed, excited, shocked, dismayed, disillusioned, perplexed, astonished, awe, eager,...


2

Shocked would be appropriate. It generally has negative connotations — as opposed to surprised, which has positive connotations.


4

I'm nearly 100% certain she misspoke. The other two answers given here (by jlovegren and V0ight) do not make sense to me in this context; these interpretations do not seem to fit the intention. Moreover, the "or" is clearly not inclusive, because she follows it with "I take a decision each time I have a glass." The intention is clearly along the lines of, "...


0

If Crowdsource is the appeal to a collective to share and consolidate expenses for a want or need to be satisfied by me, on consignment (delayed gratification), the reverse of this would be for me to wholly assume the expense to hire or contract an individual to satisfy me.


8

Here or is being used metalinguistically (it is not used to indicate that either of the two propositions [drinking wine or increasing risk] are true), but rather to contrast two ways of phrasing. The doctor is instead suggesting that you could describe the action that you are contemplating two different ways. It could be paraphrased as: Would you ...


2

This is a case of an "exclusive or" being used rhetorically to provide an illusion of choice to better help whomever is speaking the phrase to decide what will benefit her concerning the future of her health. The two choices aren't being presented in the context of consequence, but in the context of psychology, i.e. which of these states of mind will most ...


0

When you want an answer to a question, don't look randomly on the internet and expect enlightenment. Especially not for a question on language. This random extract tries to stuff way too many possibilities into one paragraph. One gets the impression that the author is compressing a complicated phenomenon and scanting on details, which is in fact correct. ...


1

The biggest difference is that when you ridicule someone, that person may be able to strike back: Demonstrate that your accusations are wrong, malicious, etc. When a person is humiliated, that's it. That person is humiliated. (Similar to "attacked" vs. "injured". A person who is attacked may be able to beat up their attacker. A person who is injured is ...


-1

Such a person would be called a prognosticator. Merriam-Webster one who predicts future events or developments


-2

How about an Harbinger, which is one who shows what is coming or will come. Also, a strategist, which is a person who is always planning things and the things that will result of other things. For that one I would say "a strategist of sorts". Not to mention an "harbinger of sorts".


-1

Clairvoyant might be the word you're looking for.


-1

Anxiety appears to me to be a Psychological Disorder. Nervousness, on the other hand, seems to me to be caused by being overstimulated by the environment surrounding you at the time. This could be mental caused by requirements of the task at hand. Emotional caused by, perhaps, the illness of a loved one. Physical caused by the need for endurance, such as ...


-1

I agree with Grzegorz J. Rybacki. This is meant to express the interrogative form of insofar. However, the term inhowfar does not exist, and neither does in how far (although maybe it should, but that's another matter). As the comments here show, it’s not clear what textbook it’s taken from nor which speaker it’s written by (whether German or Dutch). ...


0

Cofectioning: verb, archaic The act of making confections (separate from the medical term). Out of use in English by 16th century, but now is as good a time as any to bring it back. [Dictionary.com]


3

Merriam-Webster's New International Dictionary, Second Edition (M.W.N.I.D 2) with a copyright date of 1953 does have such a sense of the word, but it marks it as obsolete. (Obs.) Since; considering that; inasmuch as. B. While on the other hand. However, what I think they meant is that it means whereas, which Oxford Dictionaries Online marks as ...



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