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I don't know any way to work "sitting" in there, but the phrase "second fiddle" may provide a similar sound. "Second fiddle" is defined by Merriam-Webster as "one that plays a supporting or subservient role". The phrase comes from the world of music, in which the most accomplished and/or skillful musician for a particular instrument (violin, in this case) ...


0

Your question covers explosion as something experienced, for which one of these words might be suitable Aflame, transfixed, shaken, galvanised, petrified, overcome. galvanising (adj) vocabulary.com affected by emotion as if by electricity; thrilling ...and dramatic displays of emotion, for which these would be more suitable Outburst, tantrum, ...


1

Wellsprings of emotion can gush, erupt, or just about any word that would describe the action of a pent-up liquid escaping/flowing from its source. (Google books & Standard/net)


0

Acolyte may work, given the context.


0

As someone with an above average command of English, I tend to prefer"problematics" in lieu of "the problematic." The first refers to all those questions pertaining to the theme. The second asserts that the question at hand "is problematic."


1

I use "very kind of you to say so". That accepts the compliment and turns it round so as to compliment the speaker. Warm glows of appreciation all round!


0

Words like 'Accidence', 'declension' or 'conjugation' may be used for derivtional words. Of the three words suggested, the first two may be used for noun derivatives and the last for verb derivatives. The modulation of a word can well be described by the term, 'inflexion' as well.


0

A simple 'Thanks' seems appropriate, but also on the edge of curtness. You could instead reply with 'duly appreciated' or a more specific thank you like: Thanks for your support, I really appreciate it!


0

People who meet for the purpose of working on something together could be called collaborators. Scheduling can be difficult. These people would like to be collaborators, but they aren't yet -- so let's call them would-be collaborators. Note, I made that up -- I can't think of a pre-existing word or phrase. Here are a couple more: meeting ...


5

Literally, gap-toothed - having a large space between two teeth It's not endearing, and you probably wouldn't use it to describe a child in positive terms. It's often used as part of a description of a decrepit person. A child's usually just "losing his/her teeth" unless you want a vivid depiction of a "gap-toothed smile."


0

I think you are looking for something like "rebus". It was a type of visual pun. It used to strictly be with icons but it can be done through text. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rebus


1

"Artfully" is more about skill and adeptness than "art". So, an "artfully plated" dish would look appetizing and attractive, while an "artistically plated" dish of spaghetti might resemble a painting by Jackson Pollock.


0

Channel Islander gives an excellent answer that identifies shades of meaning. I can only add 6. I'm disappointed you can't join us. (You could have made a bit more effort)


3

There is no difference in meaning between your examples, to which you could add: I'm sorry you won't be able to join us. The difference between each of them is in degree, and as you correctly guessed, you would choose from among them based on whether you wanted to minimize or enhance the person's sense of guilt at missing the meeting. Largely a matter ...


0

It often happens that there is a Germanic word (to seem, German scheinen) and the Latin/French word (to appear. Latin appare:re, French apparaître). Both words mean the same, "to seem" is the common word, "to appear" a variant, a bit more elevated in style.


1

If you want to emphasize the "which would be better spared the world" aspect of the director's work, you can gain an alliterative edge by calling it superfluous cinema, where superfluous means simply "not needed: unnecessary," according to Merriam-Webster's Eleventh Collegiate Dictionary (2003). If, on the other hand, you want to focus on the extreme ...


1

Anthropomorphism in general is acceptable: see Einstein's use and others. However, anthropomorphism is sometimes used when it would be more accurate to speak of human activity, as in this case. The sentence would be both more accurate and more grammatically correct if rewritten as: Participants in this program engage in research and study cutting edge ...


0

Program in your sentence above is referring to a set of classes or courses that define a curriculum or just the curriculum itself. By definition, a list of classes cannot engage.


1

If you are asking how to say that correctly: I received the phone, I liked it and everything met my expectations.


1

I don't think either needless or redundant convey that the film is awful. I would say worthless is a better word. But I suggest razzie-worthy cinema is a more interesting way to say it. The Golden Raspberry Awards, often shortened to the Razzies, is an award ceremony in recognition of the worst in film. (wikipedia)


-1

"Redundant" can mean unneeded in the sense that's it's duplicative. No matter how good the resulting film, it would be redundant to remake Casablanca. "Needless," on the other hand carries a pejorative sense and has the echo of the common phrase "needless waste."


-2

Neither of those addresses the issue of quality. He might have made a superlative film but one that breaks no new ground, which would make it redundant and needless, but not awful.


0

This is interesting... (purely based on personal experience) When you scribble something, your brain does not need to be engaged on a conscious level - you may be checking to see if the pen works, or signing your name on 'autopilot'. "Scribble down" means, (IMO) the words that you are scribbling were "up" somewhere - maybe in your mind's eye, or, in the air ...


2

The difference is one of intention. To scribble is to write quickly, often not very neatly. To scribble down is to write quickly, often not very neatly, with the intention of being able to refer to the information later. He scribbled on an envelope while on hold with customer service. He scribbled down the flight number and gate. The same difference ...


1

It's going to be hard to do it in one word. I suggest blatant truism


1

The phrase take safe doesn't exist in English. A common idiom is play it safe.


0

No, in this sense "safe" is an adjective as in "the safe choice." You need a noun to serve as the direct object of "take." The nominal form of "safe" is "safety," but "take safety" isn't idiomatic. Two suggestions to keep the parallelism and the cadence: Should young people think big and take risk rather than think small and seek safety? Should ...


0

Heterological means: (grammar) Of an adjective, not describing itself. Quora has some examples. Long is a heterological word because it is not a long word. Monosyllabic is another heterological word. Douglas Hofstadter, in his book Gödel, Escher, Bach: An Eternal Golden Braid, has some fun with non-self-describing adjectives. There is a ...


0

This is a dangerous enterprise, and I'm going to ask you to give it up. Suppose that we came up with such names. Let's call a word "eunymic" (well-named) if it's an apt description of its meaning, like "fire-engine red." Let's call a word "caconymic" (badly named) if it's not, like "plastic glass." Now, let's decide which describes "caconymic" itself. ...


0

The American English idiom is "I went for a run," to say "I went running (this morning or some other time)." If I google "I went on a run," the vast majority of results actually say, "I went for a run," suggesting that that is the default idiom in American English. "I went on a run," on the other hand, could suggest that you participated in an event -- a ...


2

Any of your suggestions would work. Under something else try states, provides, maintains (with a hint of uncertainty), lays down, etc.


-1

I would not use mandate to describe something you want to do. A contract is usually written, so it doesn't technically say anything. Dictate usually means one of the preceding options. Stipulate is technically the act of making the agreement, so it'd be more accurate to say something like "Didn't we stipulate that I have x right." if you use that word. The ...


2

If you analyse it down to the minutest details, there is a difference in meaning. When you go somewhere and the purpose of your leaving is to partake in some activity, you can (with certain activities) choose to emphasise two aspects of your leaving: The activity that you intend to partake in The purpose or intention that you have when you leave When ...


1

I agree with your feeling, although the meaning of the phrase is clear. I don't like the phrase because Covey is using a noun as an adjective and I don't see that there is any stylistic need to do so. Does he dislike "gravitational" or does he not know it? In the first case he fails to communicate any sense of why he dislikes it. In the second he just ...


1

The trusty Ngram viewer does find a few uses of "gravity pull," particularly in older books and particularly with regard to coal mining, but also including this 1923 mechanics textbook: The gravity pull of the earth on a 1-pound body ... is extensively used as a unit of force and it is called a "pound." More recent matches are mainly false drops or ...


0

In physics and astronomy, people would probably say gravity's pull, or as you suggested, gravitational pull, not gravity pull. However, it looks from your quote as thought this author is not talking about gravity in the physical sense, but is trying to borrow a concept from one field and used it in another field -- to sound sophisticated, perhaps? To lend ...


0

I believe that using gravity to modify pull works as a noun adjunct.


0

You want to say: that the criticism was not harsh, not intended to malign sb Since you are in a pickle with the management, it seems that what was intended and what was perceived are two different things. To clarify your intention, well-intended is a great choice (offered by Robert). What went wrong was a misunderstanding which you can't blame on the ...


0

Unkind or unsupportive. I'll add a few thoughts about the awkward situation you find yourself in. If you didn't mean to start a fight, then it might be good to try to help the offended party calm down and start looking at things more rationally. -- But without being defensive, aggressive, or conciliatory. It can help to begin by validating the person's ...


6

Whether you should use initialisms at all is a matter of how strictly formal your formal paper is supposed to be. But even supposing that certain initialisms are acceptable, it is worth noting that some style guides assess the acceptability of U.S. as a noun and of U.S. as an adjective differently. Here is the advice of The Chicago Manual of Style, ...


0

If the subject of your criticism was merely another’s work product, then you could (possibly) claim that your critique was an objective and fair appraisal, intended constructively and certainly not meant to be slanderous or defamatory. If, however, your criticism also included reference to the author of the work product, then you might add that it was ...


2

I suggest using specifically to qualify your criticism. Given that the administration/management will have heard the professor's side of the story, you may get some credit for admitting it was criticism: I specifically criticized ______, intending only to point out _________, not to in any way demean [your professor]. It's hard to build a case for you ...


2

The New Jersey Estate Law says a divorced spouse is considered predeceased to that of the testor. Therefore it is clear that predeceased can be used in conjunction with an event. In this case, a divorce was the event that regarded the spouse predeceased to that of the testor's death even though the spouse lived on past the testor's death. Alive ...


4

"Not harsh" is a subjective quality. So I would try to frame "harshness of criticism" as a quality that is defined by a third party, rather than a quality that is defined by you (Party A) or them (Party B). I tried to give [Party A] an appropriately delicate, well-intentioned critique. You could then expound on that: This critique was not ad ...


0

It is not correct to use "the." We use "a" in this case because we are talking about a common customer. There is no specific customer implied. Even if you were already talking about customers in your material, there is not a specific customer who has booked you. Also, your sentence reads like the title of something, which I feel should use "a." For ...


0

You're confusing the term "phrasal verb" with some other concept. A phrasal verb is typically a verb that is combined with a specific preposition (or a particle) that creates a specific meaning. Your example of "made a..." doesn't create a new definition or meaning. I could very well say "made a cake" or "made the decision" and it has the same meaning, to ...


1

eoisabi.org gives the following reasons [reformatted]: • Delexical structures are very common in current English. Although the total number of delexical verbs is small, they include some of the very commonest words in the language (give / have / take / make / do / hold / keep / set ...) Delexical structures contribute to the impression of fluency ...


0

The underlying reason your teacher is right (not necessarily correct) is that the teacher is teaching you idiomatic American English. Native speakers use and are familiar with the "I feel stressed" phrasing; "I feel stressful", while technically correct according to your dictionary definitions, is not idiomatic, and native American English speakers are ...


1

Stressful means "causing stress". You can check any dictionary. Environment, circumstances, work can be stressful, that is they are causing stress for somebody. So if you say "I feel stressful," it would mean "I feel that I am causing stress (for somebody)." The word stressful is just not used in this way. Correct expression is "I feel stressed."


0

stressed - adjective - feeling very worried or anxious. stressful - adjective - full of or causing stress. Therefore, stressed has to do with how you feel, and stressful has to do with what you are full of. I am stressful would likely be more correct than I feel stressful, much like one would say The tank is full of gas.



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