Tag Info

New answers tagged

2

I would use evocative. evocative (adjective) bringing strong images or feelings to mind. For example: evocative discussion or evocative lyrics


2

My best suggestion would be generative : having the power or function of generating, originating, producing, or reproducing. Other words that come to mind are provocative (especially if controversial), engaging (giving rise to debate or argument), emotive or affective (if arousing feelings), seminal (if referring to highly influential ideas in the past).


0

Word for describing ideas/questions that [truly] stimulate thought Fascinating is the word I would choose: ADJECTIVE Extremely interesting: from the VERB fascinate [WITH OBJECT] 1.0 Attract the strong attention and interest of (someone): 1.1 archaic (Especially of a snake) deprive (prey) of the ability to resist or escape by ...


0

If the amount that the targets have been exceeded by is extremely minor, to the point of being unimportant, I would go with simply "all targets have been met," which continues to be true even if some targets have actually been exceeded. If any of the targets had been exceeded by a significant amount, you would go with "met or exceeded," (but this is not ...


4

I understand why "barely" might have slightly negative connotations, but I don't feel "narrowly" does. In any case, words for "by a little" include: slightly (adv.): to a small degree; not considerably. marginally (adv.): to only a limited extent; slightly. Definitions by Google dictionary.


0

He beggered himself buying that Porsche. Academic Law dictionary: Beggared — Beggar Beg gar, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Beggared}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Beggaring}.] 1. To reduce to beggary; to impoverish; as, he had beggared himself. Milton. [1913 Webster] 2. To cause to seem very poor and inadequate. [1913 Webster] It beggared all …


0

Giving up all your property - perhaps for religious reasons - is called 'repudiating' your property, although that doesn't cover the 'buying something else with the money' part of the meaning that you're looking for. repudiate, verb trans. a. To cast off, disown (a person or thing previously claimed as one's own or associated with oneself). ...


1

Apathetic I believe this is the word you are looking for. ap·a·thet·ic ˌapəˈTHedik/ adjective adjective: apathetic showing or feeling no interest, enthusiasm, or concern. "apathetic slackers who don't vote" synonyms: uninterested, indifferent, unconcerned, unmoved, uninvolved, disinterested, unemotional, emotionless, dispassionate, lukewarm, ...


2

I have not seen the word boorish used in any of these answers, which is the term that seems to me to fit the individual concerned.


0

"out-of-sequence events" is as concise a substitute as I can come up with. If you want to be crude and sarcastic, you could say "because we did it bass-ackwards" (which is, if you didn't know, a euphemism for "ass-backwards"). But this refers to the out-of-sequence-ness of the whole series of events, not to any one event.


2

Dear SuperUser, If I understand your question correctly, by the terms “socially and publically” you are describing an individual who is not only selfish and thoughtless (or, uncaring) when alone (that is, privately) but also a person who is willing to display those same inappropriate attitudes toward others socially and enact those behaviors publically. ...


-2

Fortnightly is the word you are looking for.


1

Entitled is the word I would use. That seems to cover both the boorish action and the public display display of disregard. It's perhaps not exact because you specify "doesn't care" where this means more "willfully feels above concern". One might be not able to care (antisocial) or be not interested (selfish), but entitled gets toward viewing "the public" as ...


2

As you want to emphasize rudeness and discourtesy in public and social environments, I would go for uncivil. It can be used of persons as well as of actions and behaviors. 3. Not civil or courteous, impolite; rough, rude, lacking in manners [OED] The disrespectful actions that you listed are considered as uncivil behaviors or they can be an example of ...


1

apathetic could be an apt word. I think the word should be 'unemotional'. 'Inconsiderate', 'selfish' adds unnecessary additions to the meaning of what should just mean 'does not care'.


2

Disregard can be used in certain phrases to imply being careless and indifferent to other people's feelings or social norms. to pay no attention to; treat as unworthy of regard or notice (MW) examples: Alice's disregard for other people's feelings have forced her to live through life as a loner. I'm worried that Bob's total disregard for ...


1

You've described two distinct concepts, so there's not really one applicable word. 'Not socially and publically care about other people' is a sentiment one feels themselves, whereas the examples you provided are all antisocial acts that one does. Not caring socially/publically about other people doesn't mean you do anything about it: you might just be ...


-1

http://www.thefreedictionary.com anxious: Uneasy and apprehensive about an uncertain event or matter; worried. Attended with, showing, or causing anxiety: spent an anxious night waiting for the test results. Usage Problem Eagerly or earnestly desirous.


-1

"That" and "which" are never interchangeable! The word "that" is used when the phrase that it starts can not be omitted from a sentence that contains it. The word "which," which can be very useful, starts a phrase that can be omitted from a sentence without changing its meaning, and is almost always preceded by a comma. Neither of your examples are ...


2

"Be able to recognize..." seems to be what is meant by these statements, but it really depends on how this list is introduced. For example, the list is fine as written if it's introduced by something like the following: At the end of this course, students will be able to: [list] But there, the "be able to" has been moved out to the intro. In this ...


1

I would use executor 2.0 A person who produces something or puts something into effect: This follows after the dominant usage: the person assigned to execute the final will of a person who has died. If the connotation of death makes executor objectionable, then agent (2), operative, operator (2) or assignee (2) might work.


2

I would generally describe any facet of a workflow that performs an action an 'actor', be it a person, or some automated part of the process. ac·tor ˈaktər noun a participant in an action or process. "employers are key actors within industrial relations" You might say 'current actor' or something similar if you are trying to convey the fact that this is ...


0

The OED carries only two senses of the word anachronism (see below), which involve the ascribing of something to a wrong time-period, such as when the clock strikes in Shakespeare's Julius Caesar. They didn't have striking clocks in ancient Rome, whilst they had them in Shakespeare's day. I feel sure that the instance you quote is a malapropism. I would ...


-2

This is the defining characteristic of Shakespeare's Othello (and his wife is also innocent and unsuspecting). If you said "an Othello type", in an appropriate context, it could convey what you need.


-2

Perhaps " arm twisting " is what you are looking for.


4

This is a man who fears (not feels)and he is a paranoid (TFD) person who suffers from paranoia, the unreasonable fear or irrational belief that other people are plotting to harm him or her.


-1

The pan was broken means there was intention of breaking pan . In " the pan got broken " there was not intention of breaking the pan.


19

"Insecure" is a pretty accurate word. Being insecure about your relationship can mean you are constantly worried and suspicious that your partner is attracted or involved with someone else. Bear in mind that insecurity has a wider application and can go beyond a mistrusting feeling in a relationship(see below). Another accurate example would be "Jealous". ...


4

Protective might be a good word: 1.1 Having or showing a strong wish to protect someone or something: From the Verb form protect: Keep safe from harm or injury: If you wish to stress the fact that his primary mistrust is toward men, who might use her unsuspecting naivete to harm her, this would be a good choice as the etymology implies ...


0

Switch plates or cover plates for light switches seem to be the most common definitions: Many people overlook the opportunity to add a decorative flair to any room by switching out old light switch covers. This is a simple trick that turns a utilitarian necessity into a chance to easily inject stylish accents into your home. The selection of switch ...


0

The common usage to refer to the switching device and its surrounding plate is light switch (at least in the US). Note that switches can be used to control other devices, such as outlets (receptacles) or furnaces, etc. In those cases, it is more properly simply called a switch. The cover or surrounding trim by itself (without the switch) is caller a cover ...


-1

That is (in the US) a "3-gang Decora-style switch with brushed stainless cover" :-) It could be running ceiling fans or lights or an electrical window shade, so it isn't necessarily a "light switch" though it could very well be. See this well known supplier's website for examples. P.S. "rocker switch" is generic and would therefore be better than "light ...


2

If you play for 3 months, stop, and then pick up lessons again 3 years later. you take it up - To begin again; resume: E.g. Let's take up where we left off. (TFD) Alternatively, You start/initiate/learn playing again. initiate (TFD) As a verb, initiate means to start. Also, I started playing Violin and I officially started playing Violin can carry ...


1

START verb (past tense: started; past participle: started) come into being; begin or be reckoned from a particular point in time or space. cause (an event or process) to happen. To say that you started to play violin when you were 12 years old does not imply that you have been playing the violin continuously since that point in time, it ...


0

Is it possible that the title was shortened, and the phrase should be understood as "Degree of Proximity (of blood)" Or it could be that "of blood" was dropped in order to show that "non-blood" -- and maybe non-traditional -- relations are to be included. In that case, you might coin something like degree of familial proximity.


1

Could you use 'Family relationship'? Free Dictionary Definition: Noun 1. family relationship - (anthropology) relatedness or connection by blood or marriage or adoption


0

Even though the question mentions "gracht," I believe Jon C is not asking for a translation of that word, but rather one word that is a synonym for all kinds of structures that allow land-based travel. I nominate, road, way, or possibly path. I prefer "way" but my reasoning might be odd. In religions and philosophies that have roots in Hinduism--Buddhism, ...


0

The two are perfectly compatible. adj Capable of existing or performing in harmonious, agreeable, or congenial combination with another or others: compatible family relationships. The noun is compatibility, so you can say They have compatibility, but using the adjective as above is a simpler and stronger style. Your template sentence ...


1

Goods purchased like this are called wholesale goods and the act of puchasing these goods is known as buying wholesale. From Wikipedia: Wholesaling, jobbing, or distributing is the sale of goods or merchandise to retailers; to industrial, commercial, institutional, or other professional business users; or to other wholesalers and related subordinated ...


0

Epiphany. ( relates to 'Eureka') Reference: Wikipedia An epiphany (from the ancient Greek ἐπιφάνεια, epiphaneia, "manifestation, striking appearance") is an experience of sudden and striking realization. Generally the term is used to describe scientific breakthrough, religious or philosophical discoveries, but it can apply in any situation in which an ...


0

Complementary: serving to fill out or complete Reference : Merriam Webster online dictionary


1

Preorder- noun An order for an item that has not yet been made commercially available. Reference :http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/us/definition/american_english/preorder


1

Buying a commodity a long time before it will be needed in order to guarantee the availability of supply, or to insulate oneself against future price rises, is known as hedging. Commodities bought in this way are the subject of a so-called futures contract. For instance, many airlines hedge their jet fuel purchases in order to minimize the possibility of ...


1

OP seeks a word which captures the essence of a few extraordinary (i.e., non-mundane) experiences which, while fleeting and brief, are yet of enduring import and influence. Although words like epiphany, climax, and eureka are often applied to such emotionally-charged experiences, because the OP is dissatisfied with those words, it would seem that their ...


1

Websters: Way a thoroughfare for travel or transportation from place to place That meaning seems to be falling somewhat into unuse. In 1913 Websters was far more definitive about what all is covered: That by, upon, or along, which one passes or processes; opportunity or room to pass; place of passing; passage; road, street, track, or path of ...


0

The Wikipedia entry for "gracht", Gracht is lengthy and says "The word is almost untranslatable; for that reason the following terms kanaal, vaart, gracht and singel will be discussed here first," and also, "There is no direct equivalent for "gracht" in the English language, therefore it is best left untranslated." So I'm guessing there is no good answer to ...


0

I'm going to officially propose "rush". Third definition in the third definition of Websters Online: a surging of emotion (It's also apparently the name of some sort of musical combo.)


4

When the only maps of directions were paper, they were called roadmaps. Any route, highway, lane, avenue, etc.. from dirt to eight-lane, can be called a "road". (US)



Top 50 recent answers are included