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I think the term you are looking for is anvil: A heavy block of iron or steel with a smooth, flat top on which metals are shaped by hammering.: Anvil pictures


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I'll offer a couple of suggestions that would work well in the context you gave (all definitions chosen for the appropriate context from dictionary.com): mesh to match, coordinate, or interlock: The two versions of the story don't mesh. integrate to bring together or incorporate (parts) into a whole. to make up, combine, or complete to ...


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The following sentence is a professional request: Please use delimiters with large numbers. A delimiter is a sequence of one or more characters used to specify the boundary between separate, independent regions in plain text or other data streams. Delimiters are particularly helpful in mathematical notation: For ease of reading, numbers with ...


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Commonly "thousands separator" is the name of the comma in this format; that doesn't translate nicely to an adjective, so perhaps you could rephrase your statement slightly to tell them to use "numbers with thousands separators" (rather than the clumsy "thousands separated numbers").


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Same meaning. Noah Webster is telling you "exhortation" is more common.


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"Records", beside having a close reference to vinyl records, as the comment suggests, evokes the products that the company sells to customers. "Recordings" evokes the act of preserving performances on some media for future reproduction. Thus, the semantic difference is between references to the product vs. the activity. This is akin to putting "beer" vs ...


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It is quite difficult to find a perfect equivalent of Amae, however I would like to add some information that will help you understand what the key conception of Amae is. In the first place, you need to distinguish Amae proposed by Doi from Amae in usual use. He used the word in the title of his book The Structure of 'Amae.' (The English title: The Anatomy ...


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Assimilate - To become or allow something to become a part of a country or community rather than remaining in separate groups. Eg. New arrivals find it hard to assimilate.


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I've always thought the word for this was needy (or neediness). needy 2. Wanting or needing affection, attention, or reassurance, especially to an excessive degree. Note that the verb form (甘える, amaeru) means to behave like a spoiled child.


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Translating cultural phrases always intrigues me. I wonder if there is a systematic approach. So we are looking for a term that would describe a desire to be loved dependence or submission a pleasurable or "sweet" experience some degree of caprice or playfulness all but without negative connotation From ermanen's observation, many English words that ...


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Jibe: to be in harmony or accord; agree. Or any of these synonyms: http://www.thesaurus.com/browse/jibe


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If there are multiple rounds in which the weaker competitors are gradually eliminated, this process can be called playoffs, with the final round, sometimes called a championship round, determining the ultimate winner. Usually these championships use such terms as quarter-finals, semi-finals, finals for the last few rounds. Others may use more colorful ...


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I've never heard of amae before, but from the context that ermanen provides above, it sounds as though any English translation of the word would have to be tailored to the specific context in which the word arises. One aspect of term appears to be a sense of protectedness that might be be well represented by the word coziness. Merriam-Webster's Eleventh ...


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Another term with few negative connotations that stretches to satisfy the categories of familial, romantic, and workplace would be Adulatory, or someone exhibiting Adulation, which is a good term for children looking to please parents, or someone looking to please a romantic interest they see as more than a peer. And Adulation is the best one-word "feeling ...


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Yearning/longing for attention/love and basking in it seems to me a good description.


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To expect indulgence would come fairly close. A banal example: I ask my independent adult son to stop and buy a loaf of fresh bread before coming over to dinner. Due to our close rapport, I don't see this as being an unreasonable request even though I am perfectly capable of going down to the shops and buying the bread myself. It is because I am confident ...


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A 'tournament' is a competition in which competitors are placed into 1-on-1 rounds, and compete to get into higher divisions. The end result will be a 1-on-1 with the two teams that got the furthest. A 'championship' is a competition in which teams can win and lose without too much concern, and the team that wins is the one that has won the most games. In ...


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Just my opinion, but the word bummer seems a bit too informal for this context, and it might make it hard for some users to take your ratings seriously. I think disappointing might be a better word, the opposite of which could be stellar: Stellar As expected Disappointing


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My question is, what would you call a person who does NOT see ghosts. Ghost-blind? For those who don't see them, the discussion is a form of gullible thrill-seeking, or an intellectual question (or an opportunity to feel superior to the "gullible.") For those who DO see them, it's more a question of what is their true nature, why do they appear, or what ...


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When we use "obstruct" we think of an obstruction, usually something physical, doing the obstructing. To hinder on the other hand is a verb less bound to the idea of some object. His weariness hindered his stride, the boulders obstructed his path, his clothing hampered his movements... his situation was alarming. We would have to know the nature of the ...


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Because both of them allow multiple meanings, sometimes I would avoid either of them, and I'd use their more limited-meaning/specialized synonyms: say block up, retard, check, impede, make slow, impair, damage See those synonyms indicated in their very definitions e.g.: hin·der verb transitive 1 obsolete : to do harm to : impair, damage ...


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This is difficult to answer because you do not give us the complete sentence. "Alarms occur when ... which obstruct the operation of the machine." As written, the sentence seems to imply that the "alarms" affect the operation of the machine. This is because we have no knowledge of what the "..." represents. Also the verb - obstruct - and not - obstructs - ...


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The term obstruct gives us the idea that the flow of an action is blocked so then in terms of a technical manual, it would seem a better fit for the context. A technical manual describes how a particular thing works, therefore that idea of action is reinforced by the obstruction of the regular actions of a piece of machinery.


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All the following definitions may help chose the correct terminology: Sensor: A device for sensing and measuring light, pressure, or temperature, and sending information back to a computer. A device that responds to a physical stimulus and converts the stimulus into a signal conveyed to another device. For example, a sensor in a printer detects ...


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Obstruct is a synonym of hinder: As verbs the difference between obstruct and hinder is that obstruct is to block or fill (a passage) with obstacles or an obstacle see synonyms at block while hinder is to make difficult to accomplish; to frustrate, act as obstacle. Ngram (hinder/obstruct the operation). The examples shown don't refer only to ...


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Yes, "of" is normally required. I can imagine those two words being adjacent only in an appositive: Philosophy and the City: Classic to Contemporary Writings- Page 6 Sharon M. Meagher We now leap forward in our story to the time of the decline of another great ancient city, Rome.


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I would personally avoid the use of "no more" especially in written language. It is more "common speech" than good English. I would replace "no more" with "any more" and apply the negative to the verb. So the first sentence becomes: I don't love you any more. The second sentence is a bit awkward as you have written it but it could be phrased: I won't ...


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From the four possible answers you have give us, I would select Move all switches into their default positions. I might suggest an additional possible answer that I like better than what you have displayed here ... "into" is fine but "to" sounds better to me. Set all switches into (to) their default positions.


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I think you need brevity here for the field name itself, maybe locations. I suppose there will be a form to fill out. In the html input box, you can display a helpful message, and that can be a little bit longer. Also, on the page that explains how the system works, you can define locations more thoroughly. If you feel locations is too short, you could ...


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Here's one for you that ensued in a big argument. I have four older brothers. I referred to my next eldest, the third eldest as my youngest brother. I was told that I was dead wrong because he was not younger than me. But I am not wrong. It dosn't matter how you cut it he is still my youngest brother. I never said he was my younger brother, only the youngest ...


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"Humanism" is a term generally used to describe a philosophy that rejects religious superstitions and the presence of an afterlife. If you look it up using this term, you will find many historical references.


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I'd say the term that best fits what you're looking for is strong atheist. The general categories are as follows (the definitions change a bit but these are my interpretations): Strong atheist ("no god exists") (Weak) atheist ("there's no evidence for a god") Agnostic ("I'm not sure whether there's evidence for a god") Deist ("there's evidence for some ...


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As far as I can there is no single word for such a denial. For example, had such existed, I am sure that the knowledgeable, well-researched article on the Afterlife at the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy would have used it, or such a term would be used in the Catholic Encyclopedia, but I can find none. There are more general positions (atheism, ...


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You can refer to the amount of time Joe has invested into his research. "Joe has done many hours of research . . ." If the reader will be aware of the amount of time above which it can now be considered "a lot," then you can be more specific. "Joe has done hundreds of hours of research." If Joe were eleven years old and was doing a book report, the reader ...


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It might be a mouthful but voluminous goes well with research: adjective 2 (Of writing) very lengthy and detailed: ODO


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Comprehensive: adjective 1.0 Including or dealing with all or nearly all elements or aspects of something: 1.1 Of large content or scope; wide-ranging: ODO Joe has done comprehensive research on the subject. Comprehensive implies more completeness than extensive does.


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Extensive: adjective 1.0 Covering or affecting a large area: 1.1 Large in amount or scale: ODO Joe has done extensive research on the subject.


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A paper air plane whizzed past my ears. The boys aimed the paper air planes at their aunt and flung them. He is an expert in propelling paper air planes.


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a few more ideas. Some of these are incomplete without saying something about where it's going. hurl, jettison, give a push, propel, aim, lob, pitch, send, set in motion, initiate flight, chuck, fling, release.


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You could say someone has a catchy smile, like this cheerleader: catchy smile I shot some Cheerleaders for a fashion Catalog.....she is such a beauty, isn't she? Or, this baby I've been begging for a genuine smile from Daniel. Today my daughter Christine sent me some photos in an email. Now that's a genuine smile and it's catchy because ...


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Opticon's OptiWiki has this to say about Print Contrast Signal: The Print Contrast Signal, PCS, is a measurement of the ratio of reflections between the bars and spaces of a symbol, commonly expressed in percent. PCS is calculated as PCS = [(RL - RD)/RL] × 100% Where: RL = Reflections of the light elements RD = Reflections of ...


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His smile was like barbecue sauce- it wound up on everyone's face.


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There doesn't seem to be a word that ignores how you are going to play the music together, so which word you use depends on how you will play. If you're going to be emphasizing improvisation, you could call it a "jam". If you're going to be reading music together, you could call it a "reading session". If you're going to take turns playing something with ...


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"Butchered" has several figurative meanings, not all consistent with each other: If you totally "flubbed" a speech, for example, you "butchered" it. If an editor totally rewrites your literary effort (in a way you do not like), he "butchered" it. If you were being interviewed on a TV show and the host kept asking questions intended to make you look stupid ...


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Looking for a word with a more positive connotation than “infectious” Their smile was, irresistible adjective: too attractive and tempting to be resisted. "he found the delicious-looking cakes irresistible" synonyms: enticing, tempting, alluring, inviting, seductive; Google irresistible it was, captivating adjective: captivating capable of ...


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"Contagious smile" and "infectious smiles" are very strong collocations which have a positive connotation. I don't think we really have much choice but to use these expressions when describing an amazing smile that makes others smile, too.


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Infectious and contagious are very commonly used for this purpose, and no one really seems to object. If it really bothers you, you could say: "He has a winning smile" - which means his smile 'wins people over', or, makes them feel happy too. (US)


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You can use it similar to this, though usually one would say "He got himself all rared up." This is still common usage in the American South/Southwest, though it would be considered more odd in other parts of the country, so consider using it if the character you're writing for is either older or Southern, and consider other terms if they aren't. "Psyched ...


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The transitive is the normal application: Rosamunda's Revenge - Page 34 Emma Craig - 1997 "No, no, dear," Tacita said, vexing her. where Tacita irritates/vexes the other woman. Now, the intransitive branch also exists: vex intransitive verb : to suffer distress (as of mind) : become irritated : fret, worry ...



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