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0

In North America, there's also the work-up, meaning a diagnostic investigation.


0

My choice would be adult fiction or fiction for adults.


0

Perhaps tenacious was the word you were looking for?


0

Perhaps something like "polyview" or "polyperspective"? Poly meaning multiple, and then slapping any synonym for angle/viewpoint/dimension you like.


2

Word starting with T tem·er·ar·i·ous [tem-uh-rair-ee-uhs] adjective reckless; rash. Alternatives saucy adjective ˈsȯ-sē, ˈsa- 2 a : impertinently bold and impudent b : amusingly forward and flippant Usage: "Not today my good man, I'm feeling saucy." Saucy in your example would be a saucy word choice.


0

"Moment" is a good word for a point in time. And it accepts adjectivals gracefully: beginning moment critical moment Moment of creation Moment of genesis


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"So the Mormon belief is {less exclusionary / more {mainstream / inclusive}}".


0

I don't think there's a particular term for a monarchy in this situation because there's no difference as to who is ruling. It's just a question of what title is granted to the spouse of the monarch. In the United Kingdom and its predecessors (at least England), the title granted to the husband of a reigning Queen has never been King. King William III was ...


0

View strikes me as being the usual term. Other possibilities are view(ing) mode, display mode or window, depending on the exact context.


0

This usage is correct and would mean: If he wants, Mr. X should make claims on the work quality by writing them in the certificate.


0

In response to your comment about a word starting with t, how about this? I feel like trailblazing today That implies going where you have not been before.


0

Eccentric - unconventional and slightly strange Deviant - differing from a norm or from the accepted standards of a society Wayward - given to or marked by willful, often perverse deviation from what is desired, expected, or required in order to gratify one's own impulses or inclinations or swayed or prompted by caprice; unpredictable Capricious - given ...


3

Monarchy comes from the Greek for 'one ruler'. So all monarchies have either a king or a queen in power; though the ruler's spouse may be called 'queen' or 'prince consort', the title does not grant equality. If it did, the system would no longer be a monarchy: possibly, as mentioned above, a diarchy. (Note for historical pedants: though Philip of Spain ...


0

The term "perspective" comes to mind.


0

Although there may not be common word that says exactly that, you can at least go with a correct conjugation. I would go with experimentational conjugated from experimentation. Example Confrontation versus confrontational Other examples: Argumentation versus argumentative. Incantation versus incantational Orientation versus orientational (source ...


0

No, "discrete" is not an appropriate description. "Discrete" means: discrete — consisting of or characterized by distinct or individual parts With regards to data, discrete data means data that takes a very specific form: discrete data — Data that can only take certain values. For example: the number of students in a class (you can't ...


0

hole in the wall maybe - or drinking hole according to: http://www.dict.cc/deutsch-englisch/Spelunke.html The German word for this is Spelunke by the way.


0

What about "There's got to be a better way"? Is that grammatically correct?


0

It doesn't work as a single word but you could use "tempted" in combination with another verb. "I am feeling tempted to experiment today, and will go another way"


0

The distinction in meaning still technically exists but colloquial usage doesn't really care and just picks one. You can still find plenty of guides online detailing which is more appropriate but more modern articles are beginning to include paragraphs such as the following from Grammar Girl: The good news is that in ambiguous cases it doesn't matter ...


2

"Boyo" is a non-standard word that simply means "boy": boyo — Irish: boy, lad As the dictionary entry notes, it is "Irish" and the most common place to hear "boyo" is from Irish mob stereotypes in film or television. As for your examples: How's it going boy-o? That particular stare has the boy-o in it. (I think it makes more sense) ...


0

I’m pretty sure English lacks a single word that connotes both “dirty” and “old-fashioned.” “Saloon” is the word for the bars of the American frontier, as commonly seen in westerns. A saloon can be fancy and upscale, or cheap and dirty. “Dive” is a word (one among many, but the one I feel is most ...


9

While most monarchs have been male, many female monarchs also have reigned in history; the term queen regnant refers to a ruling monarch, while a queen consort refers to the wife of a reigning king. Most states only have a single person acting as monarch at any given time, although two monarchs have ruled simultaneously in some countries, a situation ...


0

"I'm feeling "enterprising" today?" enterprising: ready to embark on new ventures; full of boldness a d initiative. Also, consider "intrepid." intrepid: fearless; daring; bold.


1

I'm feeling frisky today, and hear the wayward call of the wild in my restless soul. The path not taken beckons me with a Siren's song.


2

The term "hole in the wall" also comes to mind. I think this is regional though, and different places have different terms for this. I've been told that in Puerto Rico they call it a "bad dead bar", which I kinda like...


0

Which one is correct there is not equipment available on the area for tomorrow. there is not equipment available in the area for tomorrow.


0

Another possibility is "I'm feeling contrary today" Opposite in nature, direction, or meaning


11

I would use adventurous. It is commonly used in this situation.


0

Scraping. "The sound of the chair scraping against the floor". My interpretation of the second half your sentence leads me to belive that you mean "silenced", as in "fell silent". "The sound of the chair scraping against the floor can be heard clearly as the room silenced with my sudden action." Perhaps "fell silent" might be more appropriate in that sense? ...


1

The word you’re looking for is probably scrape (sense 2.1 and 2.2.): The sound of the chair scraping against the floor could be heard clearly as the room suddenly went silent at my sudden action. (Note that “as the room silence with my sudden action” does not make any sense. ‘Sudden action’ in itself sounds quite odd in this context, but I don’t know ...


0

"betrayal" can mean deception. But I think the common word is "deception". As "betrayal" normally means giving away a secret, I think, the word is losing out to "deception". With "betrayal of expectations" the author wants to say that your expectations don't come true.


0

The wind is invisible, yet tangible. It's invisible because it doesn't absorb light that we can see with our eyes. But it's also tangible because we can perceive it by the sense of touch, e.g. a morning breeze on one's cheeks. tangible: capable of being touched; discernible by the touch; material or substantial.


0

Different from that of many other countries. that is correct, those is plural and could work here since you are referring to a number of countries. The comparison you are making is the book industry in Japan vs the rest of the world.


5

Consider "dump," "roadhouse", and 'juke (house/joint)." roadhouse: a tavern located on a road outside of a town or city. juke house: Southern US: a cheap roadhouse.


1

"so as to" and "in order to" are equivalent. "In order to" is more common: "in order to" shows a desired situation (achieving your goal) and an action that is done to get to that state (study) - "I study in order to achieve my goal" Generally, this can be shorted to "to": "I study to achieve my goal". (However note that "to" has many other uses.)


1

Speaking as an Englishman, and (supposed) fluent English speaker I would use the first syntax in normal conversation - the second seems to be too formal for everyday use. However, the decision is yours, as you are correct in that they have the same meaning.


0

Static electricity is invisible, odourless and noiseless but can be felt, both indirectly (it can make the hairs on your body rise) and directly (it gives you an electric shock when a sufficient potential difference exists between you and an adjacent object). By the way, your question is self-contradictory: if you can feel something, it is not ...


0

There's really nothing unusual about a thing that can be perceived by touch and by no other sensory experience. Objects can be perceived variously by one or more, or none, of the sensory feelings. There are colorless, odorless and tasteless things that can still be 'felt' through other means. Certain gases are highly corrosive and can cause an ...


0

You are saying that something is tangible, i.e. capable of being touched or felt; having real substance; capable of being clearly grasped by the mind; substantial rather than imaginary; having a physical existence; corporeal. BUT: you cannot hear it (it is inaudible), see it (it is invisible), taste it (it is completely tasteless), or smell it (it is ...


0

'Small' doesn't make sense here because the adjective referring to the length of time (duration) of a nap. Small is more of a descriptor for the overall size of something rather than length in particular (such as the saying, "it's a small world"). 'Short' is better because it is an adjectives used to describe length (of time or of objects). You might say ...


0

Wrongest (as others here have suggested) is good; worst is also possible. In fact, though it is slightly less specific about the nature of the problem, worst is actually the more idiomatic superlative in some situations. In my opinion, wrongest is usually best reserved for failures that involve a moral dimension. Compare the following: "That's the ...


1

Landmark is an option. After a difficult childhood, the encounter with Rev. Charles was a landmark in his life. Inflection point is also a viable option that isn't overused. My personal favorite is juncture. After a difficult childhood, the encounter with Rev. Charles was a juncture in his life.


1

The most common term used in Arizona would be "dive" bar. Some have sawdust or peanut shells on the ground, others do not. In general a dive bar tends to be low key, less pricey, and dark. You can use the slang version, as "dive" to be a noun or you can simply refer to it as a "dive" (adjective) "bar" (noun). Another relevant term related to dive bar is a ...


2

Groggery is a low-class tavern (not necessarily dirty) but an informal, albeit archaic term: groggery /grog"euh ree/, n., pl. groggeries. a slightly disreputable barroom.


1

Greasy spoon a term which according to Wikipedia has also been adopted in the US. It was originally used to describe those cheap, nasty-looking cafès that were often present on high streets in working class areas or dotted along motorways, frequented mainly by tramps, and lorry/truck drivers. These cafès usually served traditional English breakfast and ...


0

Among the many good suggestions so far, you might also consider transforming moment.


13

The usual term for no-frills bars or pubs in America is dive bar. Many people simply call such a bar a dive. They are not all shabby or run-down, but many are.


8

I think the most common term in America for this is saloon. In westerns the cowboys would be drinking at the saloon. Surely its floors weren't better than sawdust. Old Fashion Saloon: Modern Saloon: However I do remember a phrase from my youth in the south - a honky-tonk. My grandma actually ran a honky-tonk. Pizza place by day and bar/concert ...


-1

...was the one moment to change his life.



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