New answers tagged

-2

Bachelor is definitely a title... "He is a bachelor of commerce, a fellow of the Institute of Chartered Accountants in Australia and has been awarded honorary doctorates by Macquarie University and the University of Sydney." http://research.acer.edu.au/aer/14/ "A bachelor is an unmarried man. It is also the title of anyone of any gender or marital status ...


0

'It/they' are totally okay. However, 'she' is also recommended considering organization/agencies, just as human beings, countries and vehicles, are also productive, hold lives of employees and give forth career growth opportunities etc. Use it! 'He' is not appropriate though - even countries are hardly ever referred to as 'he' unless in French vocabulary


0

"Direction" is better than "vector".


1

I agree with @David. The use of vector in here would render the setence a tad bit weird.. I'd go with "trajectory" as well. It sounds technical but maybe that is what he was aiming for; otherwise, the author would have chosen a simpler, more commonplace word.


3

Definitely not “vector”. Mathematical and not in common use. Sounds weird. “Trajectory” is a bit technical but seems fine in the context. If you prefer plain English you could always use “direction”.


0

I came to this conclusion after reading http://grammarist.com/usage/lay-lie/ 'Lay needs an object—something being laid—while lie cannot have an object. For example, you might lay a book on the table, lay a sweater on the bed, or lay a child in her crib. When you feel tired at the end of the day, you may lie down. But you can’t lie a book anywhere, and you ...


1

I just learned from my Canadian born supervisor that 'supposed to' implies an expectation that someone will do something, or that something is expected to happen. The students were supposed to keep quiet during the lecture. In contrast, if you say assume, then it would be more like a possibility: It was assumed the students were quiet during the ...


1

I use "uniquify", meaning "to prune a collection so that all instances are unique", in my job as a software engineer. It's not the most attractive word but it fits perfectly, and most people would instantly guess what it means on first hearing. In fact, this appears to be "a thing" already: http://www.yourdictionary.com/uniquify (third-person singular ...


0

Distinct, is it the word you are after?


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"Cleaning?" Your question seems a little unclear, perhaps if you gave the context?


-1

I would say "a contender" - a person or group competing with others to achieve something. Contender — M-W a person who tries to win something in a contest; especially : a person who has a good chance of winning "There are several contestants, but only two real contenders." "This latest defeat means that she's no longer a contender for the ...


0

That person can be said to be "audacious". extremely bold or daring; recklessly brave; fearless: an audacious explorer, an audacious fighter, an audacious enterprizer, an audacious leader.


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I think it's an acceptable use although I've never heard it before. The online OED gives one meaning of "mutually" as "In a mutual relation; so as to reciprocate the same or an equivalent action, feeling, or effect; reciprocally." It gives citations back to the 16th century including from 1847 "We mutually embraced."


2

I would say a champion. A champion loves being challenged because that's the way he gets to prove he is still a champion. Also try adventurous, bold or daredevil.


-1

are is the plural form of the verb, so when you talk about "Spelling and grammar" (i.e. two things), are is the correct word to use.


0

You can say that you reproduce the table in your new paper. Reproduce verb 1. Produce a copy of: his works are reproduced on postcards and posters - ODO


0

Since you mentioned two word answers, I suggest combining what you think are the best two already given, such as: "Resource Tools", "Reference Tools", or "Reference Assets" as best suites your need.


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I would suggest "wisdom to be gained from". Even in our automated society of high technology, there is still wisdom to gained from farming by hand. A bit less wordy editorial suggestion: Even in our high-tech, automated society, there is wisdom to gained from farming by hand. Following the same logic, I would suggest: Even in this age of almost magical ...


0

You note in your keywords that you are looking for a single word replacement. I see, though, that you are open to at least 2 words if it will do the job. I believe "Resources & References" is what you are looking for. The less wordy "Reference Materials" might work fine. Rather than link to a dry grammatical reference, I am happy to use this ...


0

Direct and in-depth discussion with the providers followed, this was done concurrently with X with Y providing a parallel analysis, inspired by our respective perspectives. P is for Prolix. An in-depth discussion with the providers followed, X and Y offering their analysis of our perspectives. The participle phrase implies that "this was done ...


1

It can be called "Industrial Espionage" You can find more on wikipedia: https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Industrial_espionage


2

Choosing between "them" and "those" would depend on the context. If we were discussing a number of different books I would use "those" because as a deictic pronoun it refers to particular items, separating them from any others under discussion that I might have read. On the other hand, if the comment about Harry Potter books was not in the context of other ...


-1

Generally, letters are subset of alphabet since alphabet = all letters. But, you are right. In passowrd context, passwords consist of upper and lower case letters, digits and special characters, like in a minimum of 1 lower case letter [a-z] and a minimum of 1 upper case letter [A-Z] and a minimum of 1 numeric character [0-9] and a minimum of 1 special ...


1

If you are describing the specification for a password it is important to be as specific as possible. Otherwise you cause user frustration. If the scenario is that the user typed 6 characters and 8 are required then a message similar to "The password must be at least 8 characters" is appropriate. You use "characters" rather than "letters" because ...


0

Technically, a password only consisting of "letters" is considered weak. For that reason, "characters" is better. Being specific is useful when the specific category required is useful. E.g. I went to the shop to buy face powder, but got toothpaste instead. vs. I went to the shop to buy cosmetics but got toothpaste instead. The second, by not ...


0

Both are grammatical and natural. Those puts an emphasis on the books ("those as opposed to any others"), which them does not, and leaves it on the speaker ("My status with regard to them is that I haven't yet read them"). Edit: thinking about it, it's the "I am yet to" that sounds a bit unnatural to me. Perfectly grammatical, but rather literary. I would ...


3

The "person who gives you information" is called an expository character. Expository adjective Intended to explain or describe something - ODO Here's an example of the phrase in use (bold added; italics in original): Finally, according to Rowling, next to Albus Dumbledore, Hermione is the perfect expository character; because of her ...


0

Docent according to dictionary.com is a person who is a knowledgeable guide, especially one who conducts visitors through a museum and delivers a commentary on the exhibitions


0

Reading the comments under the question, I found OP's intended usage example: "the --- of the system is lack of support for NoSQL databases." In that case, I've something like this to suggest: Drawback — ODO A feature that renders something less acceptable; a disadvantage or problem "The main drawback of a global fitting strategy is the time ...


4

It depends. If you are talking about the whole person in this context, then "who". If the sentiment is, for example, "You're a monster!", then I would go with "I am what you made me."


1

Instead of "making an earth connection", try Earth as a verb. — ODO British Connect (an electrical device) with the ground "the front metal panels must be soundly earthed" "When plugged in, the pump is earthed and I have a little more piece of mind!" "They are not able to be earthed, filtered, or shielded electrically." Ground as a ...


1

When I used to help out in an Italian family-run restaurant in London, the coffees ordered by American tourists were either called acqua sporca ("dirty water") or acqua nera ("black water") by the waiters. Nowadays, long black coffees served in Italian restaurants might be called American coffee, or a long black. As for cappuccinos, if too much water (or ...


1

As a speaker of American English, I would use the word weak to refer to the kind of coffee you describe. I might also call it watery or watered-down, but, while they mean the same thing, they're less common than weak in these circumstances.


1

Carried out is indeed a good one. To me, any of these would fit well in this case: Carried out Conducted Performed (executed?) (handled?)


-1

Cappuccino is diluted. Cappuccino is poor and weak. we can use both sentences.


2

Given that Homo Sapien essentially translates to "Wise like us" I think that a new sentience would be labeled as Sapien Superius and as such the ideal term for the unreasonable fear there of would be Sapiophobia, a fear of the wise. That is what I think it ought to be. As it so happens there is Prosophobia, an irrational fear of progress.


0

As a general term technophobia: abnormal fear of or anxiety about the effects of advanced technology. more specifically, Automatonophobia : the fear anything that falsely represents a sentient being which could mean robots or object using artificial intelligence.


1

Technophobia — M-W noun fear or dislike of advanced technology or complex devices and especially computers Robotophobia — Robots and Androids Robophobia is an anxiety disorder in which the sufferer has an irrational fear of robots, drones, robot-like mechanics or artificial intelligence. It frequently results in a panic attack and ...


3

Consider how when someone gets goosed, if you call that a goosing, then if it happened several times, those would be several goosings not several *geesing. By analogy, the answer to your question then must be cactusings for more than one cactusing instance of somebody getting cactused. As Peter Shor rightly points out in comments, the plural of footing is ...


0

A phrase that may serve your purpose is "intrinsic need". Intrinsic is an adjective meaning "belonging naturally; essential." To use one of your examples, "Even in our automated society of high technology, there is still an "intrensic need" to farm by hand."


0

Non-assigned has 77k Google hits Nonassigned has just under 8k Un-assigned has a bit over 36k hits and unassigned has 5.9 million and a dictionary definition not allocated or set aside for a specific purpose and, as a bonus, not assigned has 5.9 million hits as well ... so I think you can conclude an answer from that as to the most common usage. ...


0

I believe the term in old New York was Jehu. Referring to a person who drives furiously or dangerously.


1

I will try one more time, and propose this time deficiency. This is not a fancy word, or idiom, but since the OP clarified in this comment, a sentence of interest is the following: The deficiency of the system is lack of support for NoSQL databases. From MW, deficiency means a lack of something that is needed : the state of not having enough of ...


0

Either one is correct grammatically. Which one is correct logically depends on whether the two parties have the same role or two (or more) different (or the same) roles. That might sound confusing, but what I mean is this: List the role(s) of Party One. List the role(s) of Party Two. Is there just one role listed under both? In other words, both have ...


0

I don't particularly believe either are wrong. However, one does say "Software engineering firm" which gives the noun in its action, which is probably more valid and applies to the noun "intern" as well. Saying "Software engineer firm" will basically be a colloquial way of saying a firm full of software engineers. This may not apply to "Software engineer ...


0

Check out this - I watched a beautiful movie last day. All the actors acted well. ( means actors of that movie) Is equivalent to I watched a beautiful movie last day. All actors in the movie acted well . If he just says "All actors acted well" , it's grammatically misleading. As if he is speaking about all actors in the Earth !! And it's actually ...


0

I think you can go into more detail when describing the fun experienced by describing how fun it is. For example, engaging can be used to describe that its not only fun, but maintaining your interest. When I write, phrases like having a blast can also flavor the text beyond "it was fun" and evoke certain impressions in readers. I have also personally come ...


1

Use synonyms like: Joy. Merry. Mirth. Having a good time. Having an enjoyable time, or even "enjoying yourself".


1

You could use Host or Hostess for its feminine counterpart. someone who invites people to a meal or party, or to stay in their home. However, as pointed out in the comments, it will not be suited in all contexts.


0

My answer is inspired by thinking from an AI or chess engine perspective. A chess engine or AI appears only as smart as its programming and is in that sense limited by its programming or design or perhaps even the hardware it is running on. It may then appear smart enough to play good chess overall, but still fail to recognize certain patterns, because ...



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