Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

I believe we say this man is shrugging his hands, even if he does not move his shoulders when he does it...


0

pass someone by You passed (me) by ~ you left me out of something. Happen without being noticed or fully experienced by someone: sometimes I feel that life is passing me by pass by someone You passed by me ~ you went past me. something to go past. A car slowly passed by the front of the house. (macmillandictionary.com)


0

Looking at your examples, and resolutely ignoring the red herring of disregarding social norms, I would suggest "objective". This is a poor but common translation of the word that rings the bell at the top of the fairground whatsit, the German sachlich.


0

Felicitation comes from the verb felicitate, which means "congratulate," and has a Latin root, felicitas, "happiness," from felix, "happy or fortunate." (vocabulary.com) Felicitation (You'll almost always see the noun felicitation in its plural form, felicitations) The act of felicitating; a wishing of joy or happiness; congratulation Usage ...


1

John and Jenny could be called mavericks. From thefreedictionary.com... Maverick - a person who shows independence of thought and action, especially by refusing to adhere to the policies of a group to which he or she belongs.


1

Aloof would work. From Dictionary.com: At a distance, especially in feeling or interest; apart: They always stood aloof from their classmates. Reserved or reticent; indifferent; disinterested: Because of his shyness, he had the reputation of being aloof. For your second sentence, the noun form would be aloofness.


1

Each statement is correct but has different meaning or connotation. Passed by me means they simply moved past you. Passed me by can mean that you were ignored or disregarded.


0

Recall seems to work fine, if not a bit clinical. Revoke not only sounds formal, but also has a harsher connotation, surrounding permission (which may be an interesting design implementation). Why not simply unsend?


0

I would not use instead at all. The content is clear without it. If you really want to draw attention to the second version ('more complex scenario') you could start it as a new paragraph.


0

The word used in this context is most likely 'vice'. It's pretty well-attested too when talking about bad habits. The Cambridge Online even gives an example sentence that is similar to the first example you've given. vice noun (FAULT) C2 [C or U] a moral fault or weakness in someone's character: Greed, pride, envy, and lust are considered to be ...


2

If by tools you mean commercial products (like your MS Office example), consider: Brand loyalty Investopedia, Wikipedia Brand loyalty is a result of consumer behavior and is affected by a person's preferences. Loyal customers will consistently purchase products from their preferred brands, regardless of convenience or price. For instance, He keeps ...


0

How about "augmentative". I like the play it has, both in sound and in meaning, with "argumentative."


2

Filtration is the process of separating solid/particles from fluids. I would then go with filtering, though filter alone may do as well.


2

I would use "between" here. The subject moved between camera locations A and B. I somehow get the feeling you're potentially talking about something security related (e.g. police report for a company burglary). I would definitely add in a later sentence that the two camera locations are separated, and that the subject's whereabouts between those two ...


0

Yes, you can use melancholically if you want in that place, without changes to the sentence structure. As the sentence is right now I would not use melancholic, as that is the wrong form, but with editing it could be a useable alternative. If you really want to use melancholic, then I would suggest the following, although without context it is hard. ...


0

Perfectionist, to me, has the connotation that the person's desire for perfection is focused on their own work, perhaps even that it is limited to their own work. You wouldn't call someone a perfectionist because they could see room for improvement in their country's economy and their family's social dynamics and the state of the movie industry and their ...


0

I don't know why you're knocking perfectionist. A perfectionist is always looking for thing to be perfect. The way to make things perfect is to improve them. I'd say that thinking "there is always a scope for improvement" is the same as looking for perfection. Anyway, if you're looking for an alternative (with negative connotations), such a man could be ...


0

Meliorism - the belief that the world can be made better by human effort. An intermediate outlook between optimism and pessimism. Optimism - a tendency to look on the more favorable side or to expect the most favorable outcome of events or conditions. Dictionary.com


0

Could someone maybe help me out if I'm wrong about this? If not, what is the term for this type of phonic 'phenomena'? Haha Personally, I would use the first option, only because it sounds like there is an over-use of plural words. (Remarkable number s of user s vs. A remarkable number of users) See how the first sentence sounded like there are too many ...


0

With regard to "wood" and "wooden", part of the choice depends on whether the "woodiness" of the object is fundamental or incidental. The door is perhaps the best example: I might say "Go down the hallway and then go through the wood door on your left" when giving instructions. The door is wood, but I'm just describing it, the same way I might say "green ...


1

A contractor is a kind of vendor. Vendor is a relatively general term, referring to a company that sells any kind of product or service. ODO: A person or company offering something for sale, especially a trader in the street Contractor refers to a vendor that enters into a contract with the customer. ODO: A person or firm that undertakes a ...


0

Both of these sentences are correct as supply and provide mean the same in this context. Both sentences are saying that the buyer is responsible for all materials etc. Both will work


1

Hmm. You could try the word consonant-- implying the motives or actions of the two characters are consistent and even harmonious. From dictionary.com: in agreement; agreeable; in accord; consistent (usually followed by to or with ): behavior consonant with his character. corresponding in sound, as words. harmonious, as sounds. Otherwise, ...


-1

facetious treating serious issues with deliberately inappropriate humour; flippant.


2

You may be referring to prefiguration, which is a typology primarily used in theology? Source: Wiki Otherwise, foreshadowing is probably the closest match.


0

both the fable and parable has equal elements such as the setting, symbolism and gives a moral message but the only thing is that a fable uses animals and the parables include humans. but it is to note that fables are mostly read by children and the animal characters could live in them so that the message is easily grasped.


2

If you say that someone "sleeps outdoors," the most common inference would be that they are homeless - or perhaps they can't abide the air-conditioning. It usually brings to mind a picture of someone in a setting where there are indoor places to sleep. (A city, or a residential neighborhood.) If you say "sleeps in the outdoors, one assumes that there is a ...


2

"Square" can be any of the open areas between buildings. It may have no specific function and should be considered a generic term. A "market square" is therefore just one type of square. In essence, it is a square designated for use as a market (though its use could certainly extend beyond that). A "market" could be set up anywhere. For instance, there ...


0

Your definitions above are correct, so your choice really depends on what you're trying to convey. I think market square works best here because it's the most descriptive, indicating that it's an open public space normally used for commerce. A square by itself also works fine here, but is a little less descriptive, especially since a town might have multiple ...


1

Folklore is also a discipline of study, in which the word folklore refers to informal and traditional cultural practices within a particular group, including things people say, do, and make. Even though this thread is old, folklore is misrepresented a lot, so I wanted to put that out there.


0

The only way to say this was once a very simple one: I haven't any money. You can still say this today, but it sounds very formal because it is so old-fashioned. The reason this has fallen out of use is that for a long time now, English has required do support when negating any verb other than those on a short list that doesn't even include do itself ...


4

What about "compete" or "perform"?


-1

I haven't got any money. I don't have any money. Both are grammatically correct. People in some countries use the first one and some people use the second one. So it's better to know both ways in order to speak to everyone. But some native speakers will say "I haven't any money" which is informal English, so if someone says it like that you have ...


0

Assuming the goal was to kill the other contestants ("In the earliest munera, death was considered the proper outcome of combat." - Wikipedia), the term deathmatch, common in video gaming, seems to fit: Normally the goal of a deathmatch [or Free-For-All] game is to kill ... as many other players as possible until a certain condition or limit is reached - ...


0

This ngram suggests that eyes lighted up lost ground to eyes lit up in the early 1900s Also worth noting that Oxford no longer lists lighted as the past simple form of light. It just lists lit I would say that lighted up sounds a bit archaic today and you should go with lit up.


1

The difference isn't so much in meaning as in nuance and it is very slight. In the first sentence there is a sense of time elapsing. If it had been written as On the journey home and back at his house in Scy Chazelles Schuman gave the plan his undivided attention. there is still the meaning that while on the journey Schuman was giving the plan ...


1

First off, photo = photograph = picture produced by photography and therefore, they're interchangeable, although photo is the short form and more commonly used in the spoken language. Next, the verb in such a context is to lie, which means to rest, to remain in the horizontal position. lying in would be more appropriate here. You're right, the preposition ...


0

There are many textbooks which have vocabulary exercises. Some of them are English Vocabulary in Use with offers a few textbooks of different stages of knowledge or Advanced Laguage Practice where you have both grammar and vocabulary exercises.


0

arena combat (a noun phrase, not a single word, sorry)


1

Probably the single word you are looking for, which may be "more fit" than ignore, is: disregard transitive verb: (M-W) to pay no attention to, treat as unworthy of notice (or regard) (D) leave out of consideration; ignore: (TFD) to show no evidence of attention concerning (something): Please disregard what I said before. He disregarded his father's ...


0

In addition to all the good answers: pretentious highbrow


0

1)perhaps the course of habit is when a person makes a conscious decision to do something and that action is then repeated until it is exercised without thought or remorse... 2)un-conscientiously doing something that is not an automatic until it has first been done out of willfulness. the force of habit is that urge that pulls a person in after the person ...


0

You might say not given due consideration. Longman's dictionary suggests the following sample usage: After due consideration, I have decided to tender my resignation. In many contexts "due consideration" would be a formal version of "take seriously"


0

Following Catija's advice, I nominate "not being addressed". It is the perfect register for this kind of writing, i.e., social-workerese, aka hot air.


1

I'd argue that you see "not take seriously" in enough important news sources to think it's not completely informal. If you want something different, how about: not heeded Heed: to pay careful attention to somebody’s advice or warning


4

Obscure I think the meaning is (a) well-known, and (b) has a wide application, so I will skip the definitions. It is specifically applicable, given your description. The New American Dictionary states: Obscure often expresses dissatisfaction at one's inability to identify something. Two points: genre itself is specific (or specialised1), and ...


2

Fight verb 1. take part in a violent struggle involving the exchange of physical blows or the use of weapons.


1

As well as Margana's excellent answer, you could try arcane, recondite or esoteric.



Top 50 recent answers are included