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0

I think prescient or prognosticator might work. Edit: Maybe accidental or inadvertant prognosticator would be more accurate.


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You may also consider rephrasing whatever you are trying to convey in order to avoid the word entirely. For example: Ms. X's final act as president of ABC organization was to...


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I'd call that person bad luck "You're bad luck, you are." You're my Henry Allbones - G. B. Hope "Maybe you're bad luck." Hero - E. V. Crowe "You're bad luck. I bet you're bad luck to yourself." "He is, kid," Blocker said. Yesterday Will Make You Cry - Chester B. Himes


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I don't recall coming across the word myself before, but starting from... inaugural 1 - happening as part of an official ceremony or celebration when someone (such as a newly elected official) begins an important job. - happening as part of an inauguration. - happening as the first one in a series of similar events ...I figured I was bound to ...


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Leave both out completely. It makes no sense to wear a helmet only at certain times while riding a bike. Remove the wordiness, write it like: One should wear a helmet while riding a bike. or, more emphatically, Always wear a helmet while riding a bike.


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I think they might have been called inventions a device, contrivance, or process originated after study and experiment. Merriam Webster Here's an example from THE SCOTS MAGAZINE OR GENERAL REPOSITORY OF LITERATURE, HISTORY, AND POLITICS from 1799: AS many people entertain inaccurate ideas concerning that moſt important and intereſting invention the ...


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Raison d'être is frequently used to describe the reason a thing or a persons is relevant. French, meaning "reason for existance".


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Probably the term mechanisation conveyed the idea of technology development at that time: mechanisation or mechanisation (BE) is the process of doing work with machinery. The Industrial Revolution started mainly with textile machinery, such as the spinning jenny (1764) and water frame (1768). Demand for metal parts used in textile machinery led ...


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Technical was a word in the mid 1700s, btw. Source: A dictionary of the English Language by Samuel Johnson.


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I would call them the "salvage crew".


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I like ultimate, but that's a less common usage of that word these days. You could go with "concluding" or "closing" as well.


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Perhaps the term device. It appears in a patent signed by Jefferson Letter of Patent for a Grain Separating Device, Signed by Thomas Jefferson and James Madison. Dec. 21, 1803. DS, 3 Pp. (1 Folio Pc.).


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The person can be called a Cassandra (as noun a Cassandra) A prophet of disaster, especially one who is disregarded. This is based on the character Cassandra from Greek mythology A daughter of the Trojan king Priam, who was given the gift of prophecy by Apollo. When she cheated him, however, he turned this into a curse by causing her prophecies, ...


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"told him to his face" is a common idiom. "caught sight" is a common idiom. "take it out on" is a common idiom. To check is to limit. One who controls can speed up as well as slow down, and canchange direction. No material difference between chance and possibility. An occasion is when an event occurs, and it can last all day. The moment is a very short ...


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The best option is "at all times". Not a great sentence. One should wear an approved safety helmet whenever cycling.


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'either" has a lot of uses you should study in a grammar or in a dictionary such as OALD. "either" has two basic meanings: In "on either side of the road were trees" the meaning is: on each of the two sides there were trees. The second meaning is "one of two". In "You can have either A or B" it means "you can have only one thing, A or B, but not both. You ...


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You can say anything you like. Whether your listeners have the same understanding of what you are saying as you have, or immediately apprehend it, is something else altogether. The normal collocation is neither . . . nor for these sorts of things. Not either has a very strange sound. There are times when one uses nor following a negative that is ...


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Writing You're not pretty nor funny would also be acceptable. Saying neither/nor is the logically equivalent of saying "You are not pretty and not funny". Saying "You are not pretty or funny" can be parsed to mean "Either you are not pretty or else you are funny."


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I think in certain professions, using Latin terms is common and I have seen "sine qua non" used by educated people without any objection from others.


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Neither should be used with nor, and either with or. "You aren't either pretty nor funny" is simply incorrect. "You aren't either pretty or funny" is arguably acceptable but "You are neither pretty nor funny" is much more elegant.


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"To enjoin" sounds less imperative than "to injunct". I am not a native speaker but I can feel the difference between these two verbs because of their latin roots. In French, we face the same issue: "enjoindre" exists as a verb, and "injonction" is supposed to be the noun. However, as a Swiss lawyer, I could validly argue that the two words have a ...


1

I'm not totally sure I grasp what you're asking, but are any of these phrases along the right lines? Basically, you've written a letter, and want to ask someone to give you their opinion on it? I wrote her a letter. What are your thoughts on it? Would you like to read the letter I wrote for her? Can you give me your thoughts on the letter I wrote for her? ...


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See this: Word for the opposite of "hypochondria" This post refers to "egodystonic" which is along the lines of believing what you want to believe, including the status of your health.


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Denial, denying certain conditions as a kind of possible "psychological self defense mechanism" Anosognosia, Wikipedia defines this word as "deficit of self-awareness". Though it seems like this is actually related to injuries inside your brain and has nothing to do with just "psychological" reasons. Both words seem to be kind of related. As Wikipedia ...


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"Why" in this case is not being used as a question word, but as an interjection, such as: "Oh! It tastes just like chicken!" "Why, it tastes just like chicken!" It's a old usage, dating back centuries, and it is not obsolete. It usually indicates a degree of mild surprise in the speaker in response to a remark or a question. I recall a scene in an ...


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At the beginning of a sentence or clause in this case, why expresses incredulity or a knowing retort. It functions in that regard almost like but or and yet. It has a rhetorical flavor to it, a marker for an internal dialogue that the speaker is having with himself. In German I suspect it might be closer to dennoch in meaning. If RegDwight weighs in here he ...


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allusion comes to mind: an expression designed to call something to mind without mentioning it explicitly; an indirect or passing reference. So does paraphrase: A rewording of something written or spoken by someone else. This also brings to mind how often the suffix esque can be used to accomplish the same. For example, see the Shermanesque ...


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It's a paraphrase: NOUN A rewording of something written or spoken by someone else. EXAMPLE SENTENCES In his early years as a teacher he wrote explanatory paraphrases of many of Aristotle's works, setting a pattern of exegesis which continued to be followed throughout the Middle Ages. He cannot get around that by saying he wrote a ...


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To add to what others have said here (the messages being (a) there is no English Academy deciding what words are legitimate and (b) anyone can make up any word anytime), it might help to realize that English-language dictionaries are typically (almost universally, I think) based on actual usage. IOW, if a word is in the dictionary then it is used or ...


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As has been said, there is no Institute of Words and Meanings (maybe there should be!). A word or phrase that is invented is said to be "coined", and if it gains popularity, people will often reference the coining of the word or phrase along with it's coiner, the person who invented it. Frequently the coining is galvanized in history through its use in a ...


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If you want to coin a word, you just do it. For instance, I've just coined the word litgenitor, and I'm defining it as someone who wants to coin a new word. I intended it for you, but it looks like it's me as well. I stated with lit as in literal, adding gen as in genesis, and tor as in actor. But I fully expect the word to go pffft in no time flat. You ...


2

Is there any rules and regulations for naming a new word? There are no rules about how to create a new word, just as there are no rules about how to create a new idea. That's how human imagination works! Whether your new word will be successful or not outside of your own usage, of course, is a different story. Just like any other new invention or idea, ...


1

(It's not grammatically meaningful.) WeOn or We On is a terrific company name - great work! For any English speaker, phrases like "right on" or "you're on!" or "we're on it" immediately come to mind. (You can google all these.) On top of that it has a cool, badass, japanese-or-chinese-or-korean vibe. There was once a famous ad agency, "Omon" (eg), it ...


3

"We on" -- with the verb dropped -- is not standard English. And for me, the dialects which use that kind of formulation are not the ones I'd pick to impress your market. If that's what you're trying to communicate, On Task (or OnTask, perhaps) would be a better name. Though it may already be in use.


3

Two areas where grammar tends to have less importance than others are in naming enterprises, and in marketing products. And as the name of an enterprise, there is nothing wrong with "WE ON". There is a bit wrong with this in your tag sentence, however, as in the form you propose the tag sentence, it lacks a verb, and is therefore not a sentence, (Although ...


0

If one were to meet with a man from Seoul, a man from Tokyo, a man from Beijing, and a man from Saigon, it shouldn't be hard to figure out which is which. They are as different as the Irish do from Italians and Swedes. Why not refer to them by their nationality, or better yet, their ethnicity. The man from Saigon looks different than the Hmong, many of ...


1

Having recently had a girlfriend of Korean descent, I was informed that 'Oriental' is not actually considered pejorative, but rather simply antiquated. She said that 'Asian' is perfectly acceptable, it's what they use amongst each other when specific country is not known or needed. Of course, trying to stay PC in referencing ethnicity is a moving target, ...


3

Typically the term "East Asian" refers to people of places such as China and Japan, and "South Asian" means people of India and the surrounding countries.


1

In your example sentence, "every day" would be correct. Used as a compound word, everyday means commonplace: Purse snatchings are an everyday occurrence in that neighborhood.


0

No, you don't ordinarily have to specify that you're talking about time. If someone talks about yeast going a long way, it's understood that "a little leaven leaveneth the whole lump." If you're talking about your tires going a long way, it's understood that the tread lasts many miles. If your chewing gum goes a long way, it's understood that it loses its ...


0

If you are attempting to state it in a way that sounds natural, ie the way a native English speaker would say it, you'd say either leaves your mouth fresher for longer or even briefer, leaves your mouth fresher longer In fact, the for long in your comment example is more often used in the negative: your mouth will be fresh, but not for long ...


1

In the Web development world, these are known as "missing assets". Not sure if that's too technical for your audience.


0

The entity offering assistance is the server (or the servant). The entity receiving assistance is the client. Governments assist client states, computer servers assist client computers, professionals assist clients. Even librarians have started switching their terminology from patrons to clients.


1

An obvious truth is one which is instantly recognized, but one which may not hold up on careful examination. A patent truth is incontrovertible, but it may not be instantly recognized. In many cases. of course, something will be both obvious and patent. In that case, a political candidate would use patent when trying to emphasize the validity of his own ...


1

The general term for this, not specific to media files, is broken link. But I agree completely with @Mr. Shiny's answer. Don't talk implementation to users; just tell them that this is not available now.


1

Seems more like a stackoverflow question here, but Mr. Shiny and New 安宇 is right, for non-technical audience you should just say something like "Unable to display the content at this time, please click on this link for more details", and put the details for more techy people in a separate page linked from the main one.


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For non-technical users, don't get into any details. Just say that the media could not be played (or displayed, for static media such as photos).


1

In context of the statement, it appears that you wish to express gratitude for their presence. (evident from : aren't near) "John and Mary for their (reassuring) presence even when you aren't near." A look at these examples: ■I want you to come here to see me. ■I am already here so let me see if they have to stuff I need. ■I called my friend to tell her ...


0

I'm a big fan of "data-rust." Even though I've only ever heard it colloquially in tech-nerd circles, I suspect it's easily enough adopted.



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