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50

You could use summit as suggested by John D, or you could use "crest" http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/crest Whether you use summit or crest could be influenced by whether you are climbing a mountain or walking up a hill. It is more usual to talk about the summit of a mountain, and the crest of a hill (compare the previous reference with ...


30

The transitive verb "summit" refers to reaching the top of a hill or mountain.


18

just for some archaic fun, 'culminate' technically means reaching the top of a hill (from the latin culmen)


12

"Fucking someone's brain out" does not, in any remote sense, come even close to meaning "stealing someone's heart". While I don't speak Persian, based on what you've provided here, I would say that "stealing someone's heart" would be the closest English idiom. For example, it might be used in a conversation between two (female) friends: Friend 1: ...


12

This is by first time here (so be gentle) ... respectfully, 'summit' and 'summited,' are the terms I've heard most frequently employed by actual mountain climbers. Also I've heard the intransitive verb 'peaked' used on a few occassions, though far less frequently. Rightfully or not, the term 'crest' carries connotations of wave-like fluidity and effortless ...


7

Books, like ships, are 'launched'. OED has: book launch n. 1964 Guardian 25 Aug. 4 (headline) Book-launch at the Sycamore. 2000 J. Pemberton Forever & Ever Amen 4 If someone's stupid enough to publish the damn thing then there's..book launches, readings and other such nonsense. Knowing my luck, I say, it'll become a bestseller. ...


7

misaq, if you're talking about 'dating' then the word 'fuck' is not likely to be at all appropriate. Despite the wideness and proliferation of its use in many sections of society, the word fuck remains (and has been for centuries) one of the most taboo words in English. Until relatively recently it rarely appeared in print; even today, there are a number ...


7

mountains get conquered. hills get 'climbed'.


6

Here are two more suggestions: (see OED) to scale: to climb to the top of something very high and steep and (see OED) to peak: to reach the highest point or value Google brings up quite a few examples for "to peak a mountain".


5

I think there isn't a single word that exactly covers this meaning but blight comes close. It is actually a plant disease or the symptoms of that disease caused by pathogenic organisms (insects and fungus usually). But if you say blighted, you imply that crop is destroyed by blight. Blighted crops are crops blighted by pests, that is, crops damaged by ...


4

John D's suggestion of 'summit' is not incorrect, however I would avoid its use when talking about a hill or mountain as you might end up repeating the word (to summit the summit). Instead, I'd recommend the use of the transitive verb surmount with much the same meaning.


3

Two often used expressions are We are not aware of any method... All existing methods seem to be based which leave room for error on your side but convey the message. The expression To (the best of) our knowledge mentioned in other answers is also fine.


3

To the best of our knowledge... I think this one is "scientific" enough. It has been used by my advisor (whose language choice I trust) and it hints that you did your best to study the subject.


3

Your idea is a synthesis of two previous ideas. That sounds much like your intended meaning.


3

Unique is usually used for being different in a good way.


3

Consider infestation. Oxford Online defines infest as (Of insects or animals) be present (in a place or site) in large numbers, typically so as to cause damage or disease: the house is infested with cockroaches


3

First choice is "Book Launch". To launch something is to propel it or get it going, usually from a standing position. You can launch a rocket, a career, a product or even a watermelon. Either way, you're getting it off the ground. To inaugurate means to start something, to give it a kick off. A new book was launched by me. The ...


2

You asked for more than one suggestion, so here are some that spring to mind that have a less negative feeling than 'weird'. I am not sure if you are using it to describe a person, but they could also fit other things From Oxford Quirky: Having or characterized by peculiar or unexpected traits or aspects Things are often described as quirky when they ...


2

For Case 1, I would say "chatting in real time". You might also say something like "replying right away". For Case 2, we can corrupt the common English phrase "playing phone tag". Phone tag is when two parties are trying to get a hold of one another via telephone, but only get each others' answer machines, leading to a back-and-forth cycle of "Hi, this is ...


2

There's a word that has been borrowed from Japanese to describe continuous process improvement in manufacturing, "kaizen". I'm posting this as an answer based on the suggestion in the comments, and the fact that it is in several of the English dictionaries that I checked. a business philosophy or system that is based on making positive changes on a ...


2

While they both get the point across reasonably well, the second option "Shamefully" flows off the tongue a little easier. Since it is a play on "proudly presents," adding just one syllable to change the phrase to "Shamefully Presents" makes the connection easier to make.


2

The two words are very different in who's involved how with what. Ashamed is an emotion; it refers to some individual's experience of personal shame. Shameful is a moral judgement, not an emotion; it refers to an individual's belief that someone else ought to experience personal shame. Consequently, when used adverbially, without human subjects ...


2

Like the bureaucratic, Date of Birth, birthdate includes the year. Baryshnikoff (Jan 27, 1948) and Mozart (Jan 27, 1756) share a birthday but not a birthdate. I have met many people who were born on the same day of the year as me, but only one who also was born the same year. I did refer to her as having the same birthdate as me. (American English)


2

Use contentment. The sense of content as a synonym for contentment is no longer in use, except as a component of set phrases like [my] heart's content.


1

The two sentences mean the same thing, and both are grammatical. I agree with you that the first sounds less natural, but according to Google Ngram it's actually much more common.


1

You could use plague in this instance. Either way it may be most clear if you add of [bug type] to whichever word you choose.


1

Personally I don't associate the adjective weird with negative feeling. If you are afraid that people may mistake a description you have written for a derogatory remark, try to be more descriptive in your writing. Don't just use an adjective to describe a person or thing (e.g. "He is weird"). Here is an example: if you are describing a person who thinks ...


1

In technical terminology, this kind of mechanism is called access control and the system is called access control system. It is usually used in computer security and telecommunication. You can also consider access approval to exclude authentication. In computer security, general access control includes authorization, authentication, access approval, and ...


1

A similar event occurred in the French village of Oradour sur Glane on June 10, 1944, and during the prosecution of the perpetrators, their crime was referred to as a “massacre,” an “atrocity,” and a “crime against humanity.” The perpetrators referred to it as “collective punishment.”


1

If you're trying to talk to a friend during a loud concert, you might say "I had to shout over the music". If your friend is speaking, and you interrupt him to make a point, increasing the volume of your voice so that you are heard (by him or by others in the conversation) despite the fact that your friend is still talking, you would be talking over him.



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