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15

You are quite correct that simply describing someone simply as bald is ambiguous: it could mean that they can no longer grow hair, or that they have cut off all their hair. To disambiguate: Gone bald describes someone who has lost the ability to grow hair. (Closely related, balding or going bald describes someone who is in the process of losing their ...


4

A reputable medical website http://webmd.com describes the condition alopecia as the medical term for baldness. Notwithstanding a variety of treatments, cosmetics and quackery, the condition is more or less permanent. Hairless, on the other hand, could be the result of a mechanical, not a bioogical process, and can usually be remedied by time and ...


4

Artefact is British, while Americans use artifact. So, depending on where you live, choose accordingly. I found this information here.


3

That would mean that you wish you knew what caused the stock. The word you're looking for is affect, you wish you knew what caused variance, or vicissitudes in the stock market, am I right? Affect (verb): "have an effect on; make a difference to." Effect (verb): "cause (something) to happen; bring about." "I am greatly distraught inasmuch as I can't ...


3

Use “current” and “previous.” The most-recent numbers you have are the current numbers. The ones before that are the previous numbers. If you have to go further back than that, use dates: January 15th numbers, January 1st numbers. If you were talking about episodes of a TV show, the one you watched last night is the current episode. The one you watched ...


3

If a person hints it is always intentional and delivering the hint is usually their primary goal. If a person implies something what they say suggests an interpretation but doesn't state it explicitly. Implications are usually not the primary goal and can also be unintentional. Typically in American English you would hear "are you implying that I'm fat?" ...


3

Enigmatologist is the word for the person you describe. The term was coined by Will Shortz, the former editor of Games magazine, which I read voraciously as a child. He's currently the editor of the New York Times crossword puzzle. Mr. Shortz is apparently the only person in the history of the world to have a degree in Enigmatology (the University of ...


2

[Basically a copy of my answer at “In” vs. “among”:] True, in is more appropriate in nonmedical writing but among is the standard term for a medical study with multiple subjects. Episiotomy and the risk of severe perineal injury among Korean women This would also apply to an overview of studies with multiple subjects, if that is what you happen to ...


2

I would prefer "...now is working as intended." or "...now is working as designed." The potential problem with as expected is that someone might expect it to fail. EDIT: To address your comment, I think that "as intended" and "as designed" are interchangeable in this context. However, you might use both words just to avoid the repetition of designed. ...


2

Honestly, I think that "hairless" is also too ambiguous. It could mean that it never had hair to begin with. I'd go with "gone bald." If you just say "bald" it could be temporary, but "gone bald" has a strong implication that it's more or less permanent.


1

"Hairless" is also ambiguous because it does not refer specifically to head hair. It could refer to a chest that appears hairless, and that would be a more common usage. A more obscure word meaning the same as hairless is glabrous. glabrous gla·brous (glā'brəs) adj. Having no hairs or projections, especially on body parts that normally have hair; ...


1

It depends on what you intend by scenario. If you mean settings, then configuration is appropriate. If you mean performance, then use run. Your sample sentence is There will be 3 ___ of the scenario. The main issue with run is that it doesn't unambiguously indicate that each would have a different configuration. It simply says that "the" scenario ...


1

The question of "mobile" vs "cell" is one thing, but given the example sentence I think this question is maybe really trying to ask what we call the computers we use that are smaller than laptops and are primarily touch-screen devices. In my experience there isn't a good word to describe these. Partly because they are relatively new and the terminology ...


1

I don't think my and our are necessarily the same. If I say Our family eats turkey New Year's Eve, I mean that my family including me but if I say My family eats turkey New Year's Eve I may be referring to the rest of my family but not me. Our implies a potentially closer affinity between the speaker or writer and the group.


1

As a Brit I can see the confusion. A lot depends on intonation when uttering the sentence. It is partly archaic and you would not use the expression often in colloquial circumstances - but it is a polite form, if you intonate correctly. If you were to "announce" using the phrase, offering the air of being emphatic you could well sound pompous as if you ...


1

We use AT when we speak about sports, activities: excel at football. And we use IN when we speak about academic subjects: excel in maths.


1

We may use the simplistic term : •WORKING KNOWLEDGE — the adjective can be made WORKABLE if need be. But I would love to use - BASICS - in all these situations.


1

Household An added reinforcement to this suggestion is that fact that it is a legally recognized description of "people living together in a single domestic arrangement (whether family or not)" and as such is commonly used in tax codes and similar documents.


1

Nth and N-1th for the relevant terms of the sequence. nth in Cambride dictionary  used to ​describe the most ​recent in a ​long ​series of things, when you do not ​know how many there are: I ​glanced at my ​watch for the nth ​time that ​morning.


1

This is a very interesting question. Matter and antimatter when combined create energy, but they are not the only ways of creating energy so not sure if that answers your question?


1

It's not exactly English, nor is it an English concept, but the Chinese duality of yin and yang might be the nearest to what you need. Yin Yang according to the Chinese lies beneath all reality and is the root of much of their sciences.



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