Hot answers tagged

29

You may be looking for socialite: someone who is well-known in fashionable society and is often seen at parties and other social events for wealthy people (Merriam-Webster)


23

This may be somewhat opinion based, but I don't think that wobble is negative-sounding in and of itself. I think it is fun and silly, in a good way - and it seems to strike the right tone for a web tool, as these often do have silly names (such as 'Pyjamas' or 'Mustache'). Positive meanings of wobble are found in the wobbling of a jelly, or a musical wobble ...


17

gadabout A habitual pleasure-seeker. I think this is a great, fun word that doesn't get enough play.


11

You may be looking for party animal (informal) someone who ​enjoys ​parties and ​party ​activities very much and goes to as many as ​possible: Sarah's a ​real ​party ​animal - she ​likes to ​dance all ​night. — Cambridge


7

Eventgoer (or event-goer) One who attends an event. This should work just like partygoer: a person who attends a party or who attends parties frequently "chauffeured transportation was provided for those partygoers who had overindulged themselves at the bar" The -goer suffix means: a ​person who goes to the ​stated ​type of ​place ...


6

Man About Town A man who frequently attends fashionable social functions, as in Fred is quite the man about town these days. This expression, first recorded in 1734, uses town in the sense of “a sophisticated place” as opposed to rural settings. The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary


5

The way I've heard such people described is as "social butterflys"


5

I think you should go with something more neutral. It is clear from the other responses that "Wobble" can be seen as positive or negative. So I think you should try moving towards something like: Squiggle noun noun: squiggle; plural noun: squiggles 1. a short line that curls and loops in an irregular way. "some prescriptions are a series of ...


5

Unless she specifically tells you to call her by her first name or suggests some title either verbally or in emails (or you hear it from somewhere), I'd play it safe and address her as Ms. [last name]. Note that it's best to use Ms. because Mrs. denotes that she is married (which would be an assumption on your part - or even if you know she's married, she ...


4

Depending on the type of product Wobble can have a meaning of either funny or unsturdy/off balance. If you have a table or a chair that wobbles, people see that negatively. If you have a ball or other toy that wobbles, it makes it more fun. Since you are making a tool, wobble might not be appropriate to use as a product name in this case. Two good words ...


4

Yes, huge sounds like an absolute adjective, but the following dictionary entry explicitly allows both comparative and superlative forms for huge: Huge adjective (huger, hugest) 1 Extremely large; enormous - ODO This Ngram comparing huge/hugest with large/largest appears to show that the relative usage of the respective superlative forms are ...


3

You might make use of the following idiom: Procrustean bed - "a scheme or pattern into which someone or something is arbitrarily forced" (Merriam-Webster) Procrustes was a figure from Greek legend who cut or stretched his guests to fit his bed. If you need it as a verb, you might use the construction: __ was made to fit the Proceustean bed of __.


3

Although normally used to describe being awake when one should normally be asleep, the word wakefulness (the noun form of wakeful, defined below) can work here. Wakeful adjective 1.1 (Of a period of time) passed with little or no sleep - ODO You can say that someone got 10 hours of wakefulness. Here's one instance from a web search (emphasis mine): ...


4

"Drinking the Kool-Aid" does not mean being on the inside so long you see only good things. It means demonstrating unquestioning obedience or loyalty to someone or something--it could mean seeing only the good things, but that's imprecise. The phrase derives from James Jones' followers at Jonestown, who committed suicide by drinking poisonous Kool-Aid at his ...


3

To me 'wobble' does have a bit of a negative connotation, as a wobble is typically something to be avoided, although in some cases, it could also be somewhat endearing. It's a bit like 'toddle' in that respect. On a side note, given the actual name of the ~ character, I'm going to go the less literal and slightly punnier route, and suggest the actual name ...


3

In the context you are referring to of innate physiological ability, your third option is the most clear: I have good eyesight. Let's look at the other two options. I have good vision. In this case, "vision" could have an abstract meaning. A person playing a sport is sometimes said to have good "vision", as in ability to "see" (understand) the ...


3

Many definitions of vanish define it as "to disappear, especially quickly or suddenly" (see, for example, here). While it is true that "vanish" can be used to mean gradually disappear, this is not the primary sense. It is a secondary sense, according to many dictionaries. If you expect the adverb to mirror the semantics of "vanish", "suddenly" is probably ...


2

No, there's no special title for such a situation. Someone with a double doctorate still just has the title "Doctor," in prefix form generally abbreviated to "Dr.": "Dr. So-and-So." (By the way, having two PhDs is not a standard stage in most academic careers, and it's not necessarily more prestigious than having a single PhD. See the answers to this ...


2

I believe the common term for this would be a disclaimer: a statement that is meant to prevent an incorrect understanding of something (such as a book, a movie, or an advertisement) source: m-w.com The person who is speaking is making a claim about someone or something, but specifically "dis-claims" that their statement applies to an entire group: ...


2

I'd suggest, "the first of a pair of talks," would be much less cumbersome, and easily readable. Series does have the implication that there are a few, i.e. 3 or more.


2

Possibly you want investigator. one who observes or studies by close examination and systematic inquiry 'investigators who discovered new evidence that the universe was much older than had been previously estimated' Synonyms experimenter, researcher Related Words monitor, observer; empiric, empiricist, fact finder; field-worker; examiner, inspector ...


2

seeker from bing: NOUN 1.a person who is attempting to find or obtain something: "a tenacious seeker of the truth" ·


2

The term "cast", meaning actors, is reserved for the theatre and is not used for characters in a book. In a quick search I was unable to find a collective noun for book characters, so the best option is probably to say "The characters in the book were … (richly drawn / absurd / poorly developed / etc)".


2

my millenial daughter uses the term FOMO. It's a person who suffers from a severe Fear Of Missing Out.


2

To help provide a modern contextual background in support of the name Wobble, I want to highlight that the word wobble has actually received a significant positive connotation in certain cultural subsets. Most famously in the past decade (and underground for a decade and change before that) a genre of music has been evolving that actually centers around ...


1

The character on the key is the tilde character, and is part of a Spanish character, ñ. In Spanish, the ñ character is pronounced just like an "n" followed by a consonant "y" as in "señor" (mister/sir) or "mañana" (tomorrow). Though if you're afraid your audience might not know that the word "tilde" refers to that symbol, I might suggest: Squiggle noun ...


1

How about "over-attender" or "social-lot?" (socialot?)


1

Glitterati popped into my head, although it might just apply to the smartly dressed attendees.


2

It's not a parallel construction to "drinking the kool-aid," but the opposite process is becoming jaded. jaded: feeling or showing a lack of interest and excitement caused by having done or experienced too much of something http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/jaded



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