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20

I would say such a person was brazen ˈbreɪz(ə)n adjective 1. bold and without shame. (Google) For the example given: He’s brazen; he asked me for another $100! or more effectively: He’s a brazen [expletive]; he asked me for another $100!


13

I would call this person audacious (adjective) or say that he/she has chutzpah (noun). The word "audacious" can be in a positive or negative fashion, so the speaker can use tone of voice to determine which one is meant. This sort of subtlety lends a certain intimacy to conversations. According to the Cambridge dictionary, audacious means: audacious ...


11

I would call this the "Bear-Sneaker Stratagem". "Stratagem" is defined by Merriam-Webster as "a trick or plan for deceiving an enemy or for achieving a goal". If you want a less military-sounding context, "strategy" might work as well. A similar term is "gambit", defined by Merriam-Webster as "something done or said in order to gain an advantage or to ...


7

You could use the word "protocol". Then you could say you implemented the "Bear-Sneaker Protocol". Similar words would be "program" or "procedure". Edit: Maneuver, like the Picard Maneuver.


6

There is no difference in meaning between your examples, to which you could add: I'm sorry you won't be able to join us. The difference between each of them is in degree, and as you correctly guessed, you would choose from among them based on whether you wanted to minimize or enhance the person's sense of guilt at missing the meeting. Largely a matter ...


5

Literally, gap-toothed - having a large space between two teeth It's not endearing, and you probably wouldn't use it to describe a child in positive terms. It's often used as part of a description of a decrepit person. A child's usually just "losing his/her teeth" unless you want a vivid depiction of a "gap-toothed smile."


5

Sounds like you're looking for ploy. a cunning plan or action designed to turn a situation to one's own advantage


4

You could say that they have brass neck A type of behaviour where someone is extremely confident about their own actions but does not understand that their behaviour is unacceptable to others. Cambridge Dictionary In your example: He's got a brass neck; he asked me for $100! Alternatively, you could use the synonymous term effrontery. ...


3

Such an explosion of emotion can sometimes be referred to as an outpouring of emotion. Merriam-Webster has: Outpouring(n): an act of expressing an emotion or feeling in a very powerful way


3

euphoria (noun): a feeling or state of intense excitement and happiness 'Even thinking about seeing it brings a feeling of euphoria so intense that I'm having to resist the urge to go and lie down.' Source: ODO Further information is available at: Wiki


3

The difference is one of intention. To scribble is to write quickly, often not very neatly. To scribble down is to write quickly, often not very neatly, with the intention of being able to refer to the information later. He scribbled on an envelope while on hold with customer service. He scribbled down the flight number and gate. The same difference ...


2

Any of your suggestions would work. Under something else try states, provides, maintains (with a hint of uncertainty), lays down, etc.


2

Wellsprings of emotion can gush, erupt, or just about any word that would describe the action of a pent-up liquid escaping/flowing from its source. (Google books & Standard/net)


2

What is opened by Scorpion? The concert. Scorpion opened the concert. "Scorpions opened for UFO" means that the "Scorpions" band went out on stage first, and primed the audience for the main attraction, "UFO".


2

Ordinal: of or relating to a thing's position in a series Source: Google "ordinal definition" I don't know what Google's source for definitions is.


2

You might try he's got a nerve to do that or got some nerve to do that. nerve (noun) the rudeness to do something that you know will upset other people. [+ to infinitive] She's late for work every day, but she still has the nerve to lecture me about punctuality. That man has some nerve! He's always blaming me for things that are his fault. ...


2

Perhaps the person is acting entitled. More commonly, for the pejorative sense, the noun form, entitlement is used The belief that one is inherently deserving of privileges or special treatment: no wonder your kids have a sense of entitlement [AS MODIFIER]: this entitlement mentality is completely out of control Oxford Dictionaries Online Also, ...


2

These days, the term full stack developer gets thrown around a lot, in an attempt by employers to suggest the programmer should not be siloed into one area of development. eg. In the development of web applications, developers are commonly expected to know multiple languages, such as Javascript, SQL, XML, Java or C#, in order to achieve basic functional ...


2

That person sounds ballsy : aggressively bold : gutsy, nervy Definitely slang and somewhat vulgar, it is definitely not to be used in formal writing or conversation with most people beyond your friends.


2

In the original joke, one friend sacrificed another to avoid confrontation. The way I read your story is that both you and your wife participated in the conflict until the bear, your daughter, left the conflict location. If you had left the room so that your wife had to deal with the bear, I would say that you had, at that point, enacted the ...


1

Your question covers explosion as something experienced, for which one of these words might be suitable Aflame, galvanised, galvanising (adj) vocabulary.com affected by emotion as if by electricity; thrilling ...and dramatic displays of emotion, for which these would be more suitable displayed paroxysms of mirth, rage, panic... paroxysm: ...


1

I suggest making it more direct. "Which CSS property changes the color of text?"


1

You should use "health check". The compound word "healthcheck" is not common. This compound word may sound more natural to you because there is a common compound word used in this setting with almost the same meaning: "checkup". To see why "health check" is better, try replacing those two words with two words that have similar grammatical and semantic ...


1

A row is basically a group of something arranged in a line. A row of houses. A row of seats. It rained for five days in a row. Hence, a good word to describe something relating to a row would be linear.


1

"Effusion" is defined by Merriam-Webster as "[an] unrestrained expression of words or feelings".


1

I use "very kind of you to say so". That accepts the compliment and turns it round so as to compliment the speaker. Warm glows of appreciation all round!


1

I agree with what your dictionary tells you. As demonstrative pronouns, this and that allude to objects according to proximity: this thing close to me, that thing over by you. So think of this and that when they refer to ideas as metaphors for physical things: the closer idea gets a this and the farther idea gets a that. Sam: This is what they tell me: Keep ...


1

"Artfully" is more about skill and adeptness than "art". So, an "artfully plated" dish would look appetizing and attractive, while an "artistically plated" dish of spaghetti might resemble a painting by Jackson Pollock.


1

Channel Islander gives an excellent answer that identifies shades of meaning. I can only add 6. I'm disappointed you can't join us. (You could have made a bit more effort)


1

Anthropomorphism in general is acceptable: see Einstein's use and others. However, anthropomorphism is sometimes used when it would be more accurate to speak of human activity, as in this case. The sentence would be both more accurate and more grammatically correct if rewritten as: Participants in this program engage in research and study cutting edge ...



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