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33

You can utilize the word "subset" for this usage. Squares are a "subset" of Rectangles. Meaning, they are within the "set" of Rectangles, but not all rectangles are squares. Taken from Google Define: sub·set ˈsəbˌset noun noun: subset; plural noun: subsets; noun: sub-set; plural noun: sub-sets DEFINTION a part of a larger group of related things. ...


16

I use the phrase slip of the pen. From Wiktionary: (idiomatic) A mistake in handwriting. Formally, there's always lapsus calami. From Oxford Dictionaries: formal A slip of the pen. Informally, you could get away with Janus Bahs Jacquet's suggestions or the like, apparently patterned after typo: I tend to call them writos or pennos, but I ...


15

The bug was reintroduced by a subsequent change, resulting in a regression.


13

Square is a hyponym of rectangle, which is a hypernym of square. See wikipedia articles for those terms.


10

UNFIXED. And that is not the same as regression error. If you try to fix something, deploy it, and it turns out not to be fixed, then it was never fixed! period. Regression error is when the fix attempt BROKE SOMETHING ELSE THAT PREVIOUSLY WORKED, hence that "something" has regressed.


10

analytical: skilled in or using analysis especially in thinking or reasoning deliberate: characterized by or resulting from careful and thorough consideration characterized by awareness of the consequences judicious: having, exercising, or characterized by sound judgment A few more options: rational, prudent, sensible.


10

A square is a special type, or a specialisation of rectangle. A rectangle is a more general type, a generalisation of a square. They are in a hierarchical relationship. They are in a specialisation relationship.


8

Actor is the right term, even though we more often associate it with the theater. It's all a matter of context. For example, google offers as a secondary definition the following: a participant in an action or process. employers are key actors within industrial relations


8

I would suggest meticulous. Meticulous suggests that someone is gathering information to ensure that all details and options are covered. This can be a result of acting methodically or otherwise.


6

We always just called them yearbooks. But these were the same ones we could purchase at the end of every school year, so not sure if that's different from something particular to graduation.


6

The relationship between a square and a rectangle is "type of". A square is a type of rectangle, but a rectangle is not a type of square. I'm not aware of a single word that means "type of". In engineering and programming circles, this relationship is also described as "is a". Another similar relationship in this context is are "has a". A ...


5

A mandelbug (named after Benoît Mandelbrot's fractal) is a bug whose causes are so complex that it defies repair, or makes its behavior appear chaotic or even non-deterministic. Reference: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Heisenbug


5

I'm going to give the actual answer to the question: (1) When you've thought you fixed a bug, but you had not fixed it: in answer to your question, there is no single, common word for this. As others have suggested you would simply say it is unfixed, reopened, or "not yet fixed". (2) it would seem you were trying to remember the word "regression". (i) ...


5

Lapsus is a common formalism for inadvertent error, and you could use lapsus calami specifically for writing, though it is far less common than lapsus linguae for speaking. (Wikipedia suggests lapsus clavis for keyboard errors, but that may be a step too far). Or you could just use the English 'slip of the pen/tongue/fingers'.


5

"Why" in this case is not being used as a question word, but as an interjection, such as: "Oh! It tastes just like chicken!" "Why, it tastes just like chicken!" It's a old usage, dating back centuries, and it is not obsolete. It usually indicates a degree of mild surprise in the speaker in response to a remark or a question. I recall a scene in an ...


4

Rigorous - "scrupulously accurate, manifesting rigor, done carefully and with a lot of attention to detail" - Usage:"He is rigorous in his control of expenditure". Painstaking - "expending, showing, or involving diligent care and effort" Usage: "she was always painstaking about her work." Exhaustive- "comprehensive in scope; thorough: an exhaustive ...


4

I'd use circumspect. adj. watchful and discreet; cautious; prudent: circumspect behavior. [R H K Webster's]


4

There are different ways to think about this: You can consider the set of all squares and the set of all rectangles and how they overlap with one another. In mathematical jargon we would say Squares are a proper subset of rectangles. or Rectangles are a proper superset of squares. In normal, non-technical English, Squares are a subset of rectangles. will ...


4

If you want to coin a word, you just do it. For instance, I've just coined the word litgenitor, and I'm defining it as someone who wants to coin a new word. I intended it for you, but it looks like it's me as well. I stated with lit as in literal, adding gen as in genesis, and tor as in actor. But I fully expect the word to go pffft in no time flat. You ...


3

The key term is "real estate," not just "estate," and this is important since "real estate" has the connotation of an expensive resource whose purchase should be carefully considered, whereas "estate" describes a single property or an inheritance. Note also that screen real estate is definitely a physical thing (an area on the screen) so dscribing it as ...


3

For non-technical users, don't get into any details. Just say that the media could not be played (or displayed, for static media such as photos).


3

Typically the term "East Asian" refers to people of places such as China and Japan, and "South Asian" means people of India and the surrounding countries.


3

Two areas where grammar tends to have less importance than others are in naming enterprises, and in marketing products. And as the name of an enterprise, there is nothing wrong with "WE ON". There is a bit wrong with this in your tag sentence, however, as in the form you propose the tag sentence, it lacks a verb, and is therefore not a sentence, (Although ...


3

"We on" -- with the verb dropped -- is not standard English. And for me, the dialects which use that kind of formulation are not the ones I'd pick to impress your market. If that's what you're trying to communicate, On Task (or OnTask, perhaps) would be a better name. Though it may already be in use.


2

In some occupations, “individuals who cautiously plan for the future all the time” are those who are alive or uninjured or on time, etc. They may also be termed smart or sensible, but some may think them fussy (“Anxious or particular about petty details”). More specific terms, perhaps pejorative, include calculating, cunning, scheming (“Tending to ...


2

You might use "Executive" (the person who executes the action), or simply "Individual" to get across the notion that a person caused this action. "Person" works as well. "Doer" is a possibility, but is rare enough in everyday usage that it might make your code harder to read. With the additional context, the registered users are all "Registrants" or ...


2

Perhaps self-questioning, self-examination, self-analysis or introspection are somewhere near the target?


2

I'm not aware of a word that means exactly what you're looking for. Contrasting focuses on the differences between options A and B, and is often used when one is preferable to the other and you're trying to highlight why. But it's not always so - you can contrast 'night' and 'day' without implying one is better than the other.


2

A square is special case of rectangles. As Mike said, subset is correct. In my opinion, by saying special case the uniqueness of squares amongst rectangles can be emphasised.


2

They share a "specialization" relationship if you want to use a software term.



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