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harrumph /həˈrʌmf/ verb; gerund or present participle: harrumphing clear the throat noisily grumpily express dissatisfaction or disapproval. "skeptics tend to harrumph at case histories like this" He harrumphed and said, ‘I am deeply obliged’. (from Google)


9

Master: the man in authority, such as the head of a household, the employer of servants, or the owner of slaves oR animals. Concubine: a woman who cohabits with a man to whom she is not married, esp. one regarded as socially or sexually subservient; mistress. From The Designation of the Individual: Expressive Usage in Biblical ...


7

The friends went on a walk with a spring in their step. spring in one's step (idiomatic) enthusiasm, energy or a positive outlook or cheerful attitude.


5

There's parasite: : a person or thing that takes something from someone or something else and does not do anything to earn it or deserve it source: http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/parasite Along the same lines are freeloader, sponge, and mooch: freeload: to get or ask for things (such as food, money, or a place to live) from people ...


5

I would suggest leech: a person who clings to another for personal gain, especially without giving anything in return, and usually with the implication or effect of exhausting the other's resources; parasite.


4

According to n-gram it's been around for about a century, and getting more popular all the time.


4

Blend, if you are looking for a slightly looser fit: 1.2 Put or combine (abstract things) together: ODO As a practicing psychiatrist, is it possible for me to blend my feminist ideology with my chosen career?


4

I have heard plenty of grousing from a) mental health professionals, b) sufferers from clinical depression and c) the nearest and dearest of the latter, about the "cheapening" of this word to mean, as you say, "sad". Having the blues, the megrims, being melancholy, down in the mouth or whatever is part of the human condition: clinical depression is a ...


3

Though perhaps awkward in some contexts, timestamp does fit your desired meaning. The date and time at which an event occurs or occurred, usually indicated in human-readable form, especially when used in a log to track events.


3

long itself works perfectly fine as an adverb For a long time: his long-awaited Grand Prix debut long-uncultivated alpine meadows, though it sounds a bit unusual, should do it.


3

I've always called the bits at the bottom "tear strips". As, apparently, do others. The whole page is just a flyer, bulletin or ad(vertisement).


3

Saunter does not indicate confidence but does indicate lack of anger/frustration/hurry. (M-W)


3

I would use swagger. However, I also think stride is a good one, as FumbleFingers say. Strut may also work. You can also say walking with aplomb


3

"Aggregated" is the past tense construction of the verb "to aggregate". In contrast, "aggregate" is an adjective ("aggregated is not an adjective). The company aggregated sales figures to check expectations. (verb) The aggregate sales of the company exceeded expectations. (adjective) For your phrase: The aggregate consumption of oil consumed ...


3

We can say an imperious look.


3

"chagrin" comes to mind. distress of mind caused by humiliation, disappointment, or failure. MW "To my chagrin, the party ended just as I arrived." "She had gained five pounds over the winter, much to her chagrin." "He decided to get a tattoo, to the chagrin of his parents."


3

There are several quotes that describe a man keeping a mistress, as her protector. Did a mistress wait for her protector to come to her, or did ... "Unmasking the Duke's Mistress" By Margaret McPhee A mistress should never be foolish enough to fall in love with her protector, nor trust him ... "For Desire Alone" (Mistress Matchmaker #2) by Jess ...


3

It is often a long time from wiktionary : In psychotherapy and psychiatry, a state of mind producing serious, long-term lowering of enjoyment of life or inability to visualize a happy future. I used to suffer from depression, but now I'm mostly content with my life. In psychotherapy and psychiatry, a period of unhappiness or low morale which lasts ...


3

In an appropriate (though sometimes necessarily extremely contrived) context, most nouns can replace most other nouns. There are a number of natural contexts in which number can replace hotel room without causing any confusion, and some speakers will actually do this: As far as I know, the president will be staying in number 1. - No, he won't. Since ...


2

I don't have a word, just an expression. When a person ceases to look up to you, I would call that as "being taken off the pedestal." The idea is that you used to be regarded like a monument (or a statue) to that person---something to admire---but no longer.


2

It is established in common dialect (Scottish - proper English) that a user is someone who uses another person to serve themselves heedlessly. Simply using the word user might be straightforward enough! A word which springs to mind for me, due to my locale, is a skag - also someone who uses another person. Opportunist/parasite/freeloader. Interestingly ...


2

A parasite: One who habitually takes advantage of the generosity of others without making any useful return. (AHD) or a sponger: a person who lives off other people by continually taking advantage of their generosity; parasite or scrounger The Free Dictionary


2

I don't think there is an established collective noun for this fictional creature. Unicorns have somewhat an established collective noun because unicorn is a well-known legendary/fictional animal. Blessing can fall under terms of venery and these terms are more prevalent when we are more familiar with the animal and if they are used more frequently in ...


2

Lies at the basis is very widely used (Google Books search gives 1,420,00 results) so I wouldn't call it clumsy. Although this doesn't prove or disprove the nuances in meaning between the examples.


2

As JeffSahol pointed out in a comment, I think the principal confusion here is the difference between base and basis. base - the bottom or lowest part of something : the part on which something rests or is supported (M-W) basis - something (such as an idea or set of ideas) from which another thing develops or can develop (M-W) Base generally ...


2

Fuse, if you really want to communicate them being melted together into one unit: verb 1 [WITH OBJECT] Join or blend to form a single entity: ODO etymonline.com 1680s, "to melt, make liquid by heat" (transitive), back-formation from fusion. Intransitive sense, "to become liquid," attested from 1800. Figurative sense of "blend ...


2

I think showing good judgement is exactly what you're describing in "telling good people from bad people", so I would use discernment as the quality. If you're looking for a more scientific bent, you could use discriminating, which can still be used to mean "exhibiting good selection abilities" even though its alternate meaning of "showing bias" is ...


2

Well the word definitely exists. I think its origin would be technical, eg. it is heavily used in software engineering. I'm not sure it's made the leap into common usage for "something or someone that validates ...". That said, I'm sure you would be understood. As a double-check: what's your thesis about? Would the word normally be used in that context?


2

Or coalesce in a different construction: verb 1.0 [NO OBJECT] Come together to form one mass or whole: 1.1 [WITH OBJECT] Combine (elements) in a mass or whole: Is it possible for my feminist ideology and my psychiatric practice to coalesce in real life?


2

This tends to follow a convention of whether the position is definite or indefinite. Ted's an important person; he's a CEO at ABC. The CEO of ABC made an important statement today. We also see "at" when highlighting a position within a subdivision of an organization. He's the President of Human Resources at ABC.



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