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16

Perhaps you can use shrewd or astute. Wary may be also a good fit.


7

In the US, we call a person who is quick to "see through" others, "street-smart". While the expression can be used in other ways, it is often a way to describe someone who is not easily deceived.


6

Wouldn't "unlikely" do? i.e. "It's unlikely!"


5

"Penalty" http://www.thesaurus.com/browse/bonus?s=t Interesting concept, "Penalty Avoidance Question".


4

No, they are not directly synonymous. Protract comes from the Latin "to draw out, to pull" (the same root as for tractor). Hence it suggests that the activity has been artificially stretched, i.e. lengthened but not overall enlarged. One may wish to prolong a pleasurable experience, but not protract it.


4

I would expect that a savvy person would not be gullible and would be difficult to fool.


4

Canny. 1. having or showing shrewdness and good judgment, especially in money or business matters "canny shoppers came early for a bargain" synonyms: shrewd, astute, smart, sharp, sharp-witted, ... more


4

I think you really wanted to add an "a" and "in the". Like, I applied for a green card in the visa lottery. The green card is what you hope to receive, the visa lottery is how the green cards are allocated among applicants.


4

The usual idiomatic form is to say something like: I shall be available, except in the unlikely event I have a visitor.


4

To nod may also refer to an unconscious movement: To nod: (intr) to let the head fall forward through drowsiness; be almost asleep: the old lady sat nodding by the fire. (Collins)


3

In common use, one might call someone who's very on-guard against being tricked suspicious. This sense of the word is defined by Merriam-Webster as "having or showing a feeling that something is wrong or that someone is behaving wrongly : feeling or showing suspicion". Note that this word can be applied both to the person who suspects something and to the ...


3

Noteworthy Worthy of notice or attention; notable; remarkable: A noteworthy addition to our collection of rare books.


3

There are plenty of synonyms for good that you could use, but fine probably isn't strong enough. In some contexts, it could be understood as meaning less than average. You'll see on the Cambridge Dictionary's website that fine can mean bad in many contexts. If you don't want to use good, then satisfactory might work well, as it has a clear meaning and will ...


3

astute : keenly perceptive or discerning; sagacious. 1 or perspicacious : Having or showing penetrating mental discernment; clear-sighted.2 acutely perceptive or discerning3 1 Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved. ...


2

I'd probably write the sentence as either 3 or 4: More students are emerging with A grades in A level exams - perhaps as a result of sheer hard work and competition. or More students are emerging with A grades in A level exams as a result of, perhaps, sheer hard work and competition.


2

The situation described in the OP is called Pay-Per-Use Software (SaaS). And using purchase is common in the field. Take the following sentence as an example: Pay Per Use software licensing agreements for HDC Series system cameras offer users greater flexibility and significant cost savings. The software licensing agreements enable Sony customers to ...


2

One word is engage [with object] Arrange to employ or hire (someone): he was engaged as a trainee copywriter [with infinitive] Pledge or enter into a contract to do something: he engaged to pay them £10,000 against a bond [ODO] You engaged Max to design your logo. Or possibly contract [with object and infinitive] Impose an obligation ...


2

How about enlist? Maybe this sounds better than assign?


2

"Fine" is understood to mean exceptional quality when used in common phrases such as "fine art" or "fine furniture". It loses its "punch" outside of these expressions, however. When composing a slogan, alliteration is often used for mnemonic purposes - also, temporally speaking, you might want to put "process" before "result". I'd suggest: "Simple Methods, ...


2

What about a skeptic? noun skep·tic \ˈskep-tik\ : a person who questions or doubts something (such as a claim or statement) : a person who often questions or doubts things Skeptics are usually hard to fool or deceive, as they tend to be doubtful until evidence or something shows otherwise.


2

Those are all ok, although I think I like your first choice best: Queueing twice for a cup of coffee is once too many. One time sounds a bit funny to use instead of once, although there are places where it can work.


2

I'd use classic to mean 'typical' with symptoms Ngram shows a much less common use of classical symptoms of depression vs classic symptoms of depression . See below the definitions: Classical: has a few narrow definitions, including (1) of or relating to the ancient Greeks or Romans, (2) of or relating to a peak stage of a ...


2

You don't apply for a lottery. You're trying to combine "apply for" and "take part in". What you want to say is "I applied for a green card by participating in the green card lottery." That is a bit wordy, so you might say "I participated in the green card lottery." You could also say "I submitted my application and took part in the green card lottery."


2

According to the OED, use "microwaved" to describe something Irradiated with microwave radiation; spec. cooked or heated in a microwave oven. "micro waved" has no reference under either "micro" or "waved".


1

wise - the definition given by Collins includes shrewd, suggested above.


1

If OP feels that significant is "too strong" for the context, it can easily be "tempered" by... Developers spend a not insignificant amount of time writing this type of code. There are a claimed 94 written instances of the above usage in Google Books above, compared to over 2000 for a significant amount of time. If a speaker avoids a far more common ...


1

The way that people interpret fine depends on context and dialect. In BrE, fine is often used to mean something of high quality, but in AmE it often means meeting expectations, but nothing more. In a slogan fine results, simple methods, I understand the results to be OK, but not really that good, they are nothing special. That may not be the message you ...


1

It is newly ready. However, I support the proposals to replace ready. (Although I realize this may be beyond your control.)


1

In this context, perhaps you can use restored or recovered. So you may have the states: not ready - ready - error - recovered.


1

I think reset fits well here. to move (something) back to an original place or position 'After performing the evasion maneuver he reset into his fighting stance.'



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