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8

Here or is being used metalinguistically (it is not used to indicate that either of the two propositions [drinking wine or increasing risk] are true), but rather to contrast two ways of phrasing. The doctor is instead suggesting that you could describe the action that you are contemplating two different ways. It could be paraphrased as: Would you ...


6

Aghast: "filled with horror or shock: when the news came out they were aghast." (New Oxford American Dictionary) This is quite a strong word, but I think it fits the bill nicely. Dumbfounded: "greatly astonish or amaze: they were dumbfounded at his popularity." (New Oxford American Dictionary) Although it doesn't necessarily suggest a negative outcome, I ...


5

London town is a colloquial expression to refer to modern London in a way that evokes traditional sentiments, to a time where it wasn't as populated. Nicknames of Places: Origins and Meanings of the Alternate and Secondary Names, Sobriquets, Titles, Epithets and Slogans for 4600 Places Worldwide "London Town London, England. A form of the British ...


5

In the spirit of keeping the writing simple, you can go with: Analysis of algorithms Comparison of algorithms Under the 'Analysis' section, you can examine each algorithm in the required amount of detail. Once you have explained all the algorithms, use the 'Comparison' section to point out similarities and differences between them. You can ...


5

I think that what you are talking about is a personality trait known as being able to laugh at yourself and not taking yourself too seriously This quote of course can also describe someone's sense of humor and can mean a lot of things. For one, it could mean that you are so optimistic about your friends enjoying an embarrassing story about you ...


4

Generally speaking, "underlying" means it's there, causing an effect on other variables, but you may not be able see it directly, while "latent" usually means that it is present in an inactive form and may become active at some point. However, in the domain of statistical analysis it seems like the two words may be closer in meaning: Latent variable - "....


4

I'm nearly 100% certain she misspoke. The other two answers given here (by jlovegren and V0ight) do not make sense to me in this context; these interpretations do not seem to fit the intention. Moreover, the "or" is clearly not inclusive, because she follows it with "I take a decision each time I have a glass." The intention is clearly along the lines of, "...


3

Merriam-Webster's New International Dictionary, Second Edition (M.W.N.I.D 2) with a copyright date of 1953 does have such a sense of the word, but it marks it as obsolete. (Obs.) Since; considering that; inasmuch as. B. While on the other hand. However, what I think they meant is that it means whereas, which Oxford Dictionaries Online marks as ...


3

I agree with appalled. I think that it’s the best word for the context you’ve given. Here’s an interesting diagram for you! It displays several versions of emotions. Maybe you will find it useful. Edit: Under the category 'surprise,' the wheel lists startled, confused, amazed, excited, shocked, dismayed, disillusioned, perplexed, astonished, awe, eager,...


3

Historically, in British English, a bootblack. But Chambers (iPhone edition), which I quote below, also has shoeblack, which I have never encountered myself. boot'black noun 1. A person whose job is to clean and polish shoes 2. A shoeblack The 1993 paper edition of Chambers does not include shoeshiner (the iPhone edition lists it without definition)...


2

Rugged Individual I have no attribution for this in writing; but, it was the term my father used for those whom he admired for their steadfastness, and refusal to simply go along with the tide. In every instance, the one referred-to had made a substantial contribution to humanity by contribution or by setting an example. To me, it has come to mean a high ...


2

You might call this person unique: being the only one of its kind; unlike anything else. "the situation was unique in modern politics" synonyms: distinctive, distinct, individual, special, idiosyncratic; single, sole, lone, unrepeated, unrepeatable, solitary, exclusive, rare, uncommon, unusual, sui generis; informal: one-off, one-of-a-...


2

Let's attempt to look at this another way. Instead of focusing on the "encouraged" part of the statement, let's look at all parts. "encouraged with--encouraged by": As you can see, the 'by' variant is the outright winner, but this doesn't tell the whole story. Now let's examine the latter part of Ryan's sentence, and you'll see that "with" is more ...


2

Shocked would be appropriate. It generally has negative connotations — as opposed to surprised, which has positive connotations.


2

The Cambridge English Dictionary defines far-sighted as having good judgment about what will be needed in the future and making wise decisions based on this: Buying those shares was a very far-sighted move – they must be worth ten times their original value now. They label this a “UK” definition, but I disagree.  I’m a US person, and I believe ...


2

This is a case of an "exclusive or" being used rhetorically to provide an illusion of choice to better help whomever is speaking the phrase to decide what will benefit her concerning the future of her health. The two choices aren't being presented in the context of consequence, but in the context of psychology, i.e. which of these states of mind will most ...


1

The biggest difference is that when you ridicule someone, that person may be able to strike back: Demonstrate that your accusations are wrong, malicious, etc. When a person is humiliated, that's it. That person is humiliated. (Similar to "attacked" vs. "injured". A person who is attacked may be able to beat up their attacker. A person who is injured is ...


1

For programming I would change it to "expected" (future) and "predicted" and "unexpected" (past).


1

Both versions are possible. thesarus.com states in as a word that can replace among in the meaning of being in the middle of two points. In the example above, patients aged 50 can be described as being between two points. http://www.thesaurus.com/browse/among


1

Bootblack is the most popular term for this occupation. Google Ngrams


1

Your health condition entitles you to the seat upgrade. M-W: entitled -ˈtīt-liŋ, -əl-iŋ\ transitive verb 1 : to give a title to : designate 2 : to furnish with proper grounds for seeking or claiming something


1

Every dictionary I'm looking at here says "spake" is simply an (archaic) past tense of "speak." Variations happen. They used to happen more than now, especially in spelling.


1

It is not commonly used, but it actually refers to the time to expiry: Tenor: Tenor in finance can have multiple usages, but it most commonly refers to the amount of time left for the repayment of a loan or until a financial contract expires. It is most commonly used for nonstandardized contracts, such as foreign exchange and interest rate swaps,...


1

How about goddess, implying a person approaching perfection and probably widely desirable? If that seems too presumptuous, then something less grand such as princess might work. Yes, princess is sometimes used in a derogatory fashion, esp. in AmEng, but we could go on with enchantress, or, largely lacking gender, a romantic.


1

To answer your "gist" question, Which is the correct preposition, "by" or "with"? Why? both are "correct". Your question would best be, instead, which is the most effective preposition? Why? Because the question pertains to spoken English (Ryan's, during the media interview), repeated in quotes and paraphrases in written English (in published ...


1

Forget everything you have read until now in the answers, and, forget google and Ingram. He said /with/ instead of /by/, most likely due to one of the principal features of spoken language versus written language. There are many lists re these features on the internet, most of them do not cover using one word instead of another when the speaker is actually ...


1

First the obvious: "Encouraged by" is the standard and markedly more common expression, and news outlets that standardized the expression probably did so accidentally, because "encouraged with" is comparatively uncommon. I would next note that "by" is active, while "with" is passive. "I am disgusted by the candidates" because they are actively disgusting ...


1

"encouraged" can be either an adjective or a past participle of the verb "encourage" used in a passive construction. One way to tell the difference is to notice whether "encouraged" is modified by "very", since "very" modifies adjectives but not verbs (nor participles of verbs, because those are still verbs). So "Ryan was encouraged" could either be a ...



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