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6

Consider endorser. Oxford Dictionaries Online defines endorse as Declare one’s public approval or support of: the report was endorsed by the college


4

It depends. If you are talking about the whole person in this context, then "who". If the sentiment is, for example, "You're a monster!", then I would go with "I am what you made me."


3

The "person who gives you information" is called an expository character. Expository adjective Intended to explain or describe something - ODO Here's an example of the phrase in use (bold added; italics in original): Finally, according to Rowling, next to Albus Dumbledore, Hermione is the perfect expository character; because of her ...


3

Consider how when someone gets goosed, if you call that a goosing, then if it happened several times, those would be several goosings not several *geesing. By analogy, the answer to your question then must be cactusings for more than one cactusing instance of somebody getting cactused. As Peter Shor rightly points out in comments, the plural of footing is ...


2

Given that Homo Sapien essentially translates to "Wise like us" I think that a new sentience would be labeled as Sapien Superius and as such the ideal term for the unreasonable fear there of would be Sapiophobia, a fear of the wise. That is what I think it ought to be. As it so happens there is Prosophobia, an irrational fear of progress.


2

Choosing between "them" and "those" would depend on the context. If we were discussing a number of different books I would use "those" because as a deictic pronoun it refers to particular items, separating them from any others under discussion that I might have read. On the other hand, if the comment about Harry Potter books was not in the context of other ...


2

When a pejorative term is desired: sellout Someone who does something that does not agree with that person's beliefs or values especially in order to make money


2

I would say a champion. A champion loves being challenged because that's the way he gets to prove he is still a champion. Also try adventurous, bold or daredevil.


1

I use "uniquify", meaning "to prune a collection so that all instances are unique", in my job as a software engineer. It's not the most attractive word but it fits perfectly, and most people would instantly guess what it means on first hearing. In fact, this appears to be "a thing" already: http://www.yourdictionary.com/uniquify (third-person singular ...


1

If you are describing the specification for a password it is important to be as specific as possible. Otherwise you cause user frustration. If the scenario is that the user typed 6 characters and 8 are required then a message similar to "The password must be at least 8 characters" is appropriate. You use "characters" rather than "letters" because ...


1

Instead of "making an earth connection", try Earth as a verb. — ODO British Connect (an electrical device) with the ground "the front metal panels must be soundly earthed" "When plugged in, the pump is earthed and I have a little more piece of mind!" "They are not able to be earthed, filtered, or shielded electrically." Ground as a ...


1

Carried out is indeed a good one. To me, any of these would fit well in this case: Carried out Conducted Performed (executed?) (handled?)


1

When I used to help out in an Italian family-run restaurant in London, the coffees ordered by American tourists were either called acqua sporca ("dirty water") or acqua nera ("black water") by the waiters. Nowadays, long black coffees served in Italian restaurants might be called American coffee, or a long black. As for cappuccinos, if too much water (or ...


1

As a speaker of American English, I would use the word weak to refer to the kind of coffee you describe. I might also call it watery or watered-down, but, while they mean the same thing, they're less common than weak in these circumstances.


1

Technophobia — M-W noun fear or dislike of advanced technology or complex devices and especially computers Robotophobia — Robots and Androids Robophobia is an anxiety disorder in which the sufferer has an irrational fear of robots, drones, robot-like mechanics or artificial intelligence. It frequently results in a panic attack and ...


1

Use synonyms like: Joy. Merry. Mirth. Having a good time. Having an enjoyable time, or even "enjoying yourself".


1

You could use Host or Hostess for its feminine counterpart. someone who invites people to a meal or party, or to stay in their home. However, as pointed out in the comments, it will not be suited in all contexts.


1

I will try one more time, and propose this time deficiency. This is not a fancy word, or idiom, but since the OP clarified in this comment, a sentence of interest is the following: The deficiency of the system is lack of support for NoSQL databases. From MW, deficiency means a lack of something that is needed : the state of not having enough of ...


1

It can be called "Industrial Espionage" You can find more on wikipedia: https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Industrial_espionage



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