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35

I hear the word superficial often used in this context. Someone might be superficial, or only engage in superficial conversation.


23

A person who projects a sincere friendly attitude without a sense of deep commitment is cordial: adjective 1 Warm and friendly: the atmosphere was cordial and relaxed ODO The connotations of cordial were historically heart-felt: late 14c., "of the heart," from Middle French cordial, from Medieval Latin cordialis "of or for the heart," ...


22

The cheapening of psychiatric terms is not restricted to OCD, look at what has happened to "psychopath". (Where I used to live, it has come to be identical with "ex-husband".) As HotLicks says, we can go to its root with "obsessive", or if exercised on language (if the cap fits, wear it) we have "pedantic". In general, "niggly" and "picky". Area51's "fussy" ...


18

Gladiators gladiate. Yes, it is a word and it is mentioned as a back-formation from gladiator in Wiktionary. It is a noun-to-verb derivation, originally from the Latin noun gladiator ("swordsman"), from gladius ("sword"). (However, it is also used in botany and means "sword-shaped"). Gladiation is also in Wiktionary and defined as a combat between ...


10

Such a person is affable. Neither M-W nor OED explicitly defines this quality as shallow or superficial, but usage tends that way in my experience—similarly with bonhomie and hail-fellow-well-met.


8

Fussy could serve the purpose. too concerned or worried about details or standards, especially unimportant ones [Oxford]


6

I suppose you could use anal, for someone who has an obsessive attention to detail but I'd say that's stronger than just being fussy. Source: The Free Dictionary


6

Such a person is smarmy. Merriam-Webster has behaving in a way that seems polite, kind, or pleasing but is not genuine or believable


6

Combat seems good: noun [MASS NOUN] 1 Fighting between armed forces: verb 1.1 archaic Engage in a fight with; oppose in battle: The combat of gladiators in the colosseum satisfied the blood lust of Romans. From Gibbon's The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire This severe reformer shews no more indulgence to a ...


5

Just remote: (both BrE and AmE) A remote control device. Clicker but mainly in AmE: A remote control, as for a television or DVD player. (AHD) The Free Dictionary Here is a list of slang words for the remote control: What do you call your remote control remote control? Linguists have studied hundreds of newly ...


5

The term dysphemism is appropriate: noun A derogatory or unpleasant term used instead of a pleasant or neutral one. The opposite of euphemism. ODO, emphasis mine Brands are designed to generate pleasant feelings in the marketplace, but these monikers are proffered to defame the brand with a sense of contempt, as the specific meanings of the ...


5

Perhaps recherché: unusual and not understood by most people (Merriam- Webster). This word has a spectrum of meaning, from "exquisite/choice", through "affected", to "pretentious/overblown". Would you be happy with such ambivalence? I think, from your quote, you might...?


4

I love the word "pernickety" (which is an alternative form of "persnickety"): per(s)nickety overparticular; fussy Source: Dictionary.com Mr. Pernickety from the Mr. Men series


4

"It's all just small talk" Sounds to me like this person is simply sociable. Willing to talk and engage in activities with other people; friendly: Or gregarious, if you're looking for something fancier. (Of a person) fond of company; sociable: [Oxford]


4

Neither. You arrive at your work. arrive (v) - Reach a place at the end of a journey or a stage in a journey: we arrived at his house and knocked at the door


4

Obscure I think the meaning is (a) well-known, and (b) has a wide application, so I will skip the definitions. It is specifically applicable, given your description. The New American Dictionary states: Obscure often expresses dissatisfaction at one's inability to identify something. Two points: genre itself is specific (or specialised1), and ...


3

I'd call such a person a gladhand. verb (used with object) to greet warmly. to greet in an insincerely effusive manner. verb (used without object) to greet others with enthusiasm, especially feigned enthusiasm: The candidate spent weeks glad-handing around the state. According to the dictionary it's a verb, but in the wild I've only seen it used as a ...


3

What about "compete" or "perform"?


2

I would tend to describe the action of such a person as schmoozing. From Merriam-Webster: to talk with someone in a friendly way often in order to get some advantage for yourself I would think of someone who is only being friendly to another in a shallow way (usually for self-centered reasons) as schmoozing. If you want to completely avoid any ...


2

The phrase "fair weather friend" has this meaning—someone who is only friendly during good times but, when the storms come, is nowhere to be found. Edit: If you don't want to imply that this person will not be around when you really need them, then a less derogatory phrase like "friendly acquaintance" may be appropriate. (Edit inspired by the comment ...


2

X years on simply means that we are talking about something that happens five year after an earlier mentioned time. X years in means that we are X years into something that takes a certain (usually long) time to finish. On is probably more commonly used, but in the case of projects, programs and other such undertakings, in is used: The game started all ...


2

Totally random guess, but what about "nor their stated aim is to return the president to power"?


2

We also say "to steal a glance".


2

I think furtive/furtively works here. behaving in a way that shows that you want to keep something secret and do not want to be noticed He looked at her furtively He cast a furtive glance towards her. It doesn't have the negative connotations of spying or stalking.


2

The symptoms associated with the trivial use of "OCD" tend to match the definition of obsessive-compulsive personality disorder (OCPD). Rephrasing the DSM-5 definition of OCPD gives several words for describing aspects of OCPD. Legalistic; preoccupied with rules so as to lose the point of an activity. Perfectionist; letting the perfect be the enemy of the ...


2

My wife says, "Are you Monk?" though that might fade from public consciousness since the show finished. I think the TV show has made such affectations more readily shown in front of others, and seen as endearing rather than "strange".


2

The most specific term I can think of that encompasses both is official, but it may not be narrow enough for your purpose. official noun: official; plural noun: officials a person holding public office or having official duties, especially as a representative of an organization or government department.ODO


2

Stolen has within it's meaning that: The thing wasn't yours to take. The object (or being) was (usually) taken in stealth. With "taken" the same meaning is forced: You can steal a cookie, (that you weren't supposed to take, when nobody is looking) but, if you take a cookie - it may have been offered to you from a plate, in front of a group of people.


2

"Check it" is either slang, as in attention grabbing, or it's an imperative command such as "The tire seems to be low on air..." "Check it." "Check it up" it not something I've ever heard or read, but it sounds similar to "check it out" in the attention directing sense. "Check it out" could be used instead of "Look at that!" or it could be used in the ...


2

The best single-word summary that comes to mind of what gladiators do would be slaughter 2. the savage killing of a person TFD Online



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