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11

So, there are plenty of words available to accomplish this aim, however you should use them in the proper situation. I mention some of them here (please note that some of these words have other meanings too, but I just focus on the related meaning here): Coach: Someone who trains a person or team in a sport. e.g.: A tennis coach. Lecturer: Someone who ...


11

The elided material. I would be tempted to say the elision, but I haven't found evidence that the noun is actually used in that way --maybe we could pioneer that usage.


10

an omission or to omit a part of the sentence use an ellipsis Ellipsis (plural ellipses; from the Ancient Greek: ἔλλειψις, élleipsis, "omission" or "falling short") is a series of dots that usually indicates an intentional omission of a word, sentence, or whole section from a text without altering its original meaning. From the Wiki for Ellipsis


5

Swan in Practical English Usage (p352) has a good entry on this question: After no, countable nouns are usually plural unless the sense makes a singular noun necessary. Compare: He's got no children. (More natural than He's got no child.) He's got no wife. (More normal than He's got no wives.) So, They have no children is indeed more ...


5

The first word to my mind is mentor: -- an experienced and trusted adviser.


5

Enabler, one who enables. Not commonly used in British English. It can also have negative connotations, meaning someone who allows an addict to keep up his addictive habit. (ref psychcentral.com, wikipedia.com )


4

It is called a negative utopia. The excerpt at the back of the novel 1984 uses the term negative utopia also. Below is a passage that explains negative utopia regarding to Orwell's and Huxley's novels and the distinction between dystopia and negative utopia: Here the distinction between a dystopia and a negative utopia is significant. George Orwell's ...


4

I think non-native speakers would probably be well advised not to use yonder in any contexts (though as a native speaker myself I'm okay with yonder=afar, over there and yon=those, that). From oxforddictionaries online: yonder ADVERB - ARCHAIC or DIALECT At some distance in the direction indicated; over there: DETERMINER - ARCHAIC or DIALECT ...


4

I think you can use the more neutral expression 'to rinse one's mouth'. Please step aside, I need to rinse my mouth! To rinse: To wash lightly with water. It may be common practice, but rinsing your mouth after brushing your teeth isn't a good idea. Source:http://www.thefreedictionary.com/Rinse


3

While I can find no authority to support these, the terms time-limited and time-restricted seem to logically (and semantically) apply. If you want a colloquial phrase, consider good through (or thru) and good until as adjectival phrases.


3

Connected or well-connected is actually a word that comes to mind and sounds right to me. Dictionary.com: Connected 5. having social or professional relationships, especially with influential or powerful persons. Well-connected 1. having influential or important relatives or friends


3

I think originator may convey the meaning: someone who creates new things Also a conceiver or a mastermind according to context.


3

If this person actually has their name and address as the "Ship To" address then they may be referred to as the addressee (the one to whom it is addressed). Alternatively, the package may be addressed to your customer in the care of some intermediary. From Wiktionary: Care of, usually abbreviated as c/o on envelopes, signifies an intermediary* who is ...


3

A recipient is what you call someone who receives something. It would fit the context.


3

Actually, as the following Ngram Chart for the years 1980 through 2008 indicates, "walk the talk" (the navy blue line) is considerably more common than "talks the talk and walks" (the lighter blue line), "talk the talk and walk" (the red line), "walks the walk and talks" (the green line), "walk the walk and talk" (the yellow line), and "talk the walk" (the ...


3

If you felt you were getting nothing out of the job, you could describe it as being uninspiring. If the work itself was so repetitive that it was making you bored of it maybe you could describe it as being tedious.


2

Your psyche is your subconscious being, or inner soul. Your psychology is your conscious emotions, fears, and personality. Your mental state is your analytic thoughts, beliefs, and willful visualizations. You would want to prepare psychologically for surgery to deal with your emotions and fear. You would want to prepare mentally for a backflip: to ...


2

You would use I for the subject of the sentence and not Me. The fact that the subject is plural is not relevant. The fact the the tense is past or past perfect or present perfect is not relevant. The inclusion of both is not relevant. If we take the first sentence and discard words two through five, we are left with: "Me have reviewed the fees." Clearly ...


2

The word "metered" is perfectly appropriate, valid, and well attested in this context (ever take a cab where the ride was metered?).


2

As @Dan Bron says, measurable seems to fit your criterion Able to be measured: objectives should be measurable and achievable [Oxford Dictionary Online] An alternative, albeit much less common, is mensurable capable of being measured : measurable [Merriam-Webster]


2

I would say that it is not a valid word. Collins English Dictionary says: Sorry, no results for “Modificator” in the Collins English Dictionary. Oxford English Dictionary says: No results found for “Modificator”. The suffix "-ator" is -ator used to form agent nouns, usually from verbs that have the ending -ate And "Modifate" is not a ...


2

Since you are specifically talking about shipping a product sold, another often-used term is consignee, an -ee derivation to the verb consign (same link, def. 1.1): Send (goods) by a public carrier. The consignee of a package is the person to whom it is addressed. Unlike recipient and addressee (which are both perfectly valid words for this, but also ...


2

As @mplungjan and @MarvMills point out, trigger is the accepted term. trigger verb something that causes something else to happen Merriam-Webster jQuery, the leading javascript framework, uses this nomenclature probably for its brevity. Native javascript (i.e. EMCAScript standard) calls it dispatchEvent (MDN documentation). If you need to describe ...


2

No need for "delusional passive-aggressive righteousness"; "self-righteous" or "sanctimonious" will do. M-W: self-righteous: having or characterized by a certainty, especially an unfounded one, that one is totally correct or morally superior. and sanctimonious: making a hypocritical show of righteousness, piety, etc. Note that as this sentiment ...


2

Menial Merriam Webster's second definition menial: used to describe boring or unpleasant work that does not require special skill and usually does not pay much money A job could be menial.


2

There must be a lot of it around. mundane [Google Dictionary]: adjective 1. lacking interest or excitement; dull. "his mundane, humdrum existence" synonyms: humdrum, dull, boring, tedious, monotonous, tiresome, wearisome, prosaic, unexciting, uninteresting, uneventful, unvarying, unvaried, unremarkable, repetitive, repetitious, ...


2

Given just those two option (there are others, such as 'I'm sorry that...) it depends on what you want to apologise for. To take two extremes, if it is something very specific, like arriving late for an appointment, you might say 'I'm sorry for being late', or 'Sorry I'm late'. It would be unusual to say 'Sorry about being late' If it is that you want to ...


2

The verb inform usually takes two complements, a direct object, and also a prepositional phrase or finite complement clause: I informed [Bob] [of the meeting] I informed [Bob] [that the meeting's happening on Friday]. In the Original Poster's example there is no direct object because the verb phrase uses a passive construction. The person taking the ...


2

The characters themselves are called ellipses (singular form ellipsis). As for the term for the type of the characters... "truncation symbols"?



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