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20

My wife is a Dog Groomer. There are two ways of tidying a dog's coat. These are the terms used by the Kennel Club in Britain. The 'Breed Standard' for a pedigree show dog will define how the coat of a particular breed of dog should be prepared. Clipping is the term used when using either manual or electric clippers. Even when taking the coat to a very ...


11

There seems to be a significant diversity in dog grooming terminology. Several popular online resources refer to dogs being shaved rather than shorn, clipped or stripped, as in The LP Grooming Guide, published by the Loose Pooch Kennel Club: Cocker Cut ... The face is shaved and some pet parents like to leave the head furry,while others prefer it to be ...


7

The difference between to shear and to shave, which lexicographers may or may not clearly describe, lies in the type of cutting implement, which affects the nature of the cut. One shears with scissors or clippers (or a mechanical device that employs multiple small blades in a scissoring action), whereas one shaves with a single bevel-sharpened blade pressed ...


5

The verb bug fits well with your emotional reaction: 2 informal Annoy or bother (someone): ODO Imagine how you feel if a swarm of gnats gathers around your head, and starts crawling in your ears, eyes, nose and mouth. The bugs are bugging you in much the same way that man is bugging you with his irritating distractions while you are trying to watch ...


4

How about "underachiever"? underachieve verb, intrans to be less successful than expected, especially academically; to fail to fulfil one's potential. underachievement noun. underachiever noun. [Chambers 21st Century Dictionary] If you're referring to someone who never attains their desires or goals then you might describe them as "a ...


4

image generated by relikemindia.com The word that comes to my mind is turnkey: Turnkey refers to something that is ready for immediate use, generally used in the sale or supply of goods or services. The word is a reference to the fact that the customer, upon receiving the product, just needs to turn the ignition key to make it operational. ...


4

The meme I Have No Idea What I'm Doing may fit in your case. I posted this because it came to my mind but abstraction from Tushar answer must be what you are looking for.


4

Incontrovertible maybe?, like it can't be proven wrong.


4

You're looking for "axiom", a statement that is regarded as being established, accepted, or self-evidently true. axiom (noun) A self-evident or universally recognized truth; a maxim "It is an economic axiom as old as the hills that goods and services can be paid for only with goods and services" (Albert Jay Nock). TFD axiomatic (adj) relating to or ...


3

When referring to temperature for an oven, you use at. For example, when making baked potatoes ...at 400 degrees F ...at too high a temperature And usually you will "bake" or "roast" in an oven rather than "cook", though that's not a hard rule. Bake those potatoes at 400 degrees Fahrenheit for 45 minutes


3

Anachronism is a word which describes chronological inconsistency. Anachronism "An anachronism (from the Greek ἀνά ana, "against" and χρόνος khronos, "time"), is a chronological inconsistency in some arrangement, especially a juxtaposition of person(s), events, objects, or customs from different periods of time."


3

Indubitable may work for you. A statement that is indisputable, and beyond any doubt.


2

The technical word for hiding details of workings is abstraction In computer science, abstraction is a technique for managing complexity of computer systems. It works by establishing a level of complexity on which a person interacts with the system, suppressing the more complex details below the current level. (Wikipedia) A user interface (UI) allows ...


2

"One would hope that by the end of the contract you will have found another apartment"


2

Though often used interchangeably, there are subtle differences in meaning between "over" and "during." You might also consider using "throughout." Something that happened at a specific time will generally be described with "during." E.g.: "During the last decade, scientists discovered life on Mars." Both "during" and "over" can be used for something ...


2

If you're willing to use an eponym, consider referring to the person as "a Sisyphus." Here is the entry for Sisyphus in Merriam-Webster's Eleventh Collegiate Dictionary (2003): Sisyphus (14c) : a legendary king of Corinth condemned eternally to repeat the cycle of rolling a heavy rock up a hill in Hades only to have it roll down again as it nears the top ...


1

I don't believe that there is a single term for this but I might be wrong. I'd suggest something like 'delicate foliage', maybe with further circumscription. The tree's inner delicate foliage, protected from harms of any sort by the shrouding outer leaves


1

One term that might suit your description is soliloquy, which Merriam-Webster's Eleventh Collegiate Dictionary (2003) defines as 1 : the act of talking to oneself 2 : a dramatic monologue that represents a series of unspoken reflections A soliloquy can be spoken or unspoken and can be reflective or polemical. A silent version of a soliloquy is ...


1

To my ear, either is fine depending on your meaning: 'Mindie has also cultivated strategies to maintain customer and distributor relationships and deliver extraordinary customer service' conveys that Mindie's strategies both maintain relationships and deliver customer service. 'Mindie has also cultivated strategies to maintain customer and distributor ...


1

There's chortle, a portmanteau word defined as "laugh in a breathy, gleeful way" (Google) and coined by Lewis Carroll (probably as a mixture of "chuckle" and "snort").


1

You could try "nonperformer": (noun) a person who does not succeed.


1

What about "an underachiever"? Someone who always fails to reach their full potential. Often used in reference to students and athletes. Definitions: "one that fails to attain a predicted level of achievement or does not do as well as expected" MW "a student who does not perform as well as expected or as well as the IQ indicates" TFD "a ...


1

Yes. Engager is in the full OED (Oxford English dictionary) and has been since 1891. One who enters into an engagement or agreement; †a surety, guarantor. a. One who engages in an enterprise or occupation. b. One who engages the service of another; an employer. One of those who signed or approved of the ‘Engagement’ of 1647.


1

In reference to "complaint", they are virtually identical in meaning. Usage preference is a matter of chronology and which-side-of-the-pond: "File a complaint" is more common in American English since about 1950; before that, "lodge a complaint was more common. Google NGram American English corpus "Lodge a complaint" has been more common in British ...


1

This is probably due to difficulty with prepositions, for which it is harder to learn by rules than by experience! The preposition "by" is used in "X by X" where "X" is a noun to adverbially specify that the main verb is performed to each "X" in the context one at a time. Some examples are: one by one (one at a time) line by line (one line at a ...


1

The word that immediately comes to mind would be : Script Kiddie. And although the word is traditionally associated with using softwares written by others to attack a computer/network of computers; It can be, however, used to describe the person you mentioned in a much broader sense, that is not just tools like nmap but other genres as well. ...


1

The word should be class. Even though it is followed by 'are', class is not what makes the sentence plural. Because the subject has two parts, 'Inventor' and 'Inventor’s Society class', the sentence is plural and requires 'are'; since the author is talking about both.


1

It's only 'gendered' since you are specifically making it so. Have you considered simply removing the 'gender' nouns rather than replace them? "Hey everyone, who's working on the .." "Which one of you broke the build"? "We should ask someone down in IT"


1

How about folks? Folks (informal) People in general. y'all (very informal) you (used to refer to more than one person). For example: "Listen up y'all!" Everyone/everybody every person. For example: "Hello everyone", "Hello everybody!" People For example: "Good morning people!"


1

"She fed him lamb" is the best way to say that she gave him a meal of lamb. The phrase "She fed him on lamb" implies a steady diet of lamb that she's feeding him. The phrase "She fed him with lamb" doesn't sound as correct as just leaving out the preposition entirely. How did her dog get so big? She fed him on lamb (habitually). What did she feed ...



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