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52

"Robust" is sometimes used to convey the system behavior you describe, with the positive connotation. For example: Despite what user input comes its way, the program does not crash. It is very robust.


45

There is an idiomatic phrase that describes the situation He can't see the forest for the trees. Dictionary.com defines it as An expression used of someone who is too involved in the details of a problem to look at the situation as a whole: “The congressman became so involved in the wording of his bill that he couldn't see the forest for the ...


44

flexible, tolerant. But you may be better off using two words or a compound word. I'd use fault-tolerant. For example: Even though the user formatted the date incorrectly, it handled the mistake gracefully. It is fault-tolerant.


24

Argument from fallacy could work. (It's also called argumentum ad logicam or fallacy fallacy, among other things.) Logically Fallacious, a database of logical fallacies, describes it this way: Description: Concluding that the truth value of an argument is false based on the fact that the argument contains a fallacy. Logical form: Argument X is ...


21

Merriam-Webster's Eleventh Collegiate Dictionary (2003) has this entry for the noun truism: truism n (1708) an undoubted or self-evident truth; esp : one too obvious for mention —truistic adj. Truisms are neither controversial nor especially interesting to discuss at length, and they tend not to have meaningful negatives. Indeed, the word truism ...


17

This is a resilient system. This is a good word to talk about fault-tolerant system.


16

"Insecure" is a pretty accurate word. Being insecure about your relationship can mean you are constantly worried and suspicious that your partner is attracted or involved with someone else. Bear in mind that insecurity has a wider application and can go beyond a mistrusting feeling in a relationship(see below). Another accurate example would be "Jealous". ...


13

I can't believe that nobody has submitted... Idiot-proof or foolproof In modern English usage, the informal term idiot proof or foolproof describes designs which cannot be misused either inherently, or by use of defensive design principles. The implication is that the design is usable even by someone of low intelligence who would not use it ...


10

You could call them a pedant - "a person who annoys other people by correcting small errors and giving too much attention to minor details" from the Merriam Webster online dictionary.


10

You could say he has tunnel vision, in the metaphorical sense, or that this person is missing the point of your argument.


10

This is a robust system This software is more robust However, I think jiggunjer's suggestion of fault-tolerant is even better, notwithstanding your qualms about offending your customer. As he/she says, it's an industry term which your customer should be able to swallow without flinching. In my opinion, care is needed to ensure that being polite to ...


10

Are you referring to a 'fleeting' moment?


9

There's myopic (adj): lacking foresight or discernment; having a narrow view of something (M-W), but it feels like that's not quite it.


9

Specifically on the subject of input, Jon Postel said: TCP implementations should follow a general principle of robustness: be conservative in what you do, be liberal in what you accept from others. This principle is paraphrased and misquoted all over the place, with words like "lenient", "generous", "tolerant" in place of "liberal"[*]. All of ...


9

parasite src: ODO 2 derogatory A person who habitually relies on or exploits others and gives nothing in return: the capitalist is really a parasite on the workers etym: … '(person) eating at another's table' … syn: hanger-on, cadger, leech, passenger, drone informal bloodsucker, sponger, sponge, scrounger, freeloader British ...


9

Leech. While the biological leech is a parasite, the metaphorical meaning does not require actual damage to the host. It is characterized by attaching oneself to the accomplishments of a host and not doing significant efforts of one's own.


8

Well, they are being sarcastic. If you want to roll with the superiority they say you have, you can call them a pissant (bonus if you pronounce it in the more British-sounding stlye, as 'pissent' with one syllable) or peasant - but that isn't what they are doing to you. They are engaging in satire or mockery, and attempting to lampoon and caricature you. ...


7

There's actually a great term for this that's generally applied to legal or political issues, but it can be applied elsewhere that's called "pettifogging". It means to purposely draw attention to minor or petty details in order to distract from the larger matter at hand.


7

A word for someone who sarcastically exaggerates your superiority? The best moniker was suggested by what Brian offered: Mocker NOUN A person who mocks someone or something: from mock VERB [WITH OBJECT] 1.0 Tease or laugh at in a scornful or contemptuous manner: 1.1 Make (something) seem laughably unreal or impossible: ...


6

Is there a phrase, term, or something to describe the train of thought where a person "pokes holes" in a specific example and overlooks the greater picture...? Yes, and with precision. In the legal arena what you describe is termed a straw man argument. 2. Straw man: A 'straw man' is a common type of argument and is an informal fallacy based on the ...


5

Calling it an "old wives' tale" would work. From Merriam-Webster: old wives' tale (noun) a common belief about something that is not based on facts and that is usually false


5

In Analytic Philosophy there are statements that don't have useful or meaningful negatives. For example, consider the statement "Some tame tigers exist" Which is understandable and possibly useful. However, the negative "Some tame tigers don't exist. " doesn't seem to have a possible interpretation. Most interpretations of the later sentence are using ...


5

The word analogue lacks a negative connotation and appears to convey your intended meaning well. In your example sentences: "...released the Tintium line of microprocessors, an analogue of Intel's Pentium line." "...sought the services of Biocraft LLC, who custom designed and attached a prosthetic analogue of his original limb."


5

lenient is the word. 'fault tolerant' is a technical word, not really a word found in English parlance. For example, you can say 'English teacher is lenient', not 'English teacher is fault tolerant'. If a 'document' writing software does not check for, say grammar or spelling, it is not a fault tolerant software :D


5

Sponge and moocher come to mind. From http://www.thefreedictionary.com/moocher mooch (mo͞och) Informal v. mooched, mooch·ing, mooch·es v.tr. 1. To obtain or try to obtain by begging; cadge. See Synonyms at cadge. 2. To steal; filch. v.intr. 1. To get or try to get something free of charge; sponge: lived by mooching off friends. 2. To ...


4

You can consider nostrum. It is a medicine in conventional use but not proven to be effective, or an ineffective but favorite remedy, scheme, theory etc. to solve a problem. It comes from the Latin phrase nostrum remedium "our remedy". OED definitions: A quack remedy or patent medicine, esp. one prepared by the person recommending it. Also in ...


4

The word is make. I will make the milk. I will make the hot chocolate. I will make the tea. See, for example American Heritage Dictionary.


4

Also, parochial adj. . . . Narrowly restricted in scope or outlook; provincial: parochial attitudes. {AHDEL} Collins puts this sense first; it's probably the commonest. Hot Licks has graciously reminded me that suggestions in comments are snafflable, so I'll promote throw[ing] out the baby with the bathwater which does fit nicely for ...


4

One possibility is master. Among the several definitions, Collins lists a person who has complete control of a situation This obviously has heavy historical connotations, especially in cultures that have allowed slavery. A somewhat more archaic term is overlord One in a position of supremacy or domination over others. American Heritage



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