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26

I think you are looking for cadence - Cadence   noun the way a person's voice changes by gently rising and falling while he or she is speaking If you are referring to a particularly low sound, then perhaps murmur is a better fit - Murmur   noun a low indistinct but often continuous sound


7

A player who doesn't buckle under pressure, could be said to deliver the goods. And I would also describe such a player as being ruthless and consistent. However, a slang term which fits the Op's request is clutch: to perform under pressure In the last few seconds of a close game, only a player with clutch can lead the team to victory. (Derived from the ...


5

A few points to bear in mind: This is not writing; this is a native English speaker speaking English. Aloud. This is a professional comedian performing comedy. Into a microphone. This is a person being paid hundreds of thousands of dollars to say this. On national TV. So "correct" is hardly the issue. In fact, maybe being "correct" isn't such a great ...


4

If you're asking for the term describing the characteristic of speech that allow you to discern its context without an understanding of the language itself, I would suggest: Intonation In linguistics, intonation is the variation of spoken pitch that is not used to distinguish words; instead it is used for a range of functions such as indicating the ...


3

I think Elliot's "cadence" is part of the sports announcer's formula, though these other definitions of "cadence" seem more fitting for what the OP describes as "pitter, patter": Balanced, rhythmic flow, as of poetry or oratory. The measure or beat of movement, as in dancing or marching. Additionally, the characteristic "staccato" speech ...


3

In my experience, the noun seniority almost always refers to length of service, but the adjective senior may not. Senior is often used to characterize people according to their position in the hierarchy ("...according to a senior advisor to the president"), and is a formal part of some job titles indicating a superior position ("Senior Software Developer"). ...


3

Ridibund From Wiktionary Inclined to and easily brought to laughter; happy. This word is rarely used so I recommend that you stick with more natural phrases like quick to laughter.


3

You might say they would laugh to see a pudding crawl:- Someone who would laugh to see a pudding crawl is easily amused and will laugh at anything. (See also here.)


3

A frequent term is just "the 50 states." Using the number 50 is more common than spelling out fifty and by explicitly noting 50 it is unlikely anyone thinks you are including the non-states which would be objects 51 and 52. You could also refer to "the States" but this is a little more ambiguous as "the States" is often used as a nickname for "the United ...


3

I think the most common term in America for this is saloon. In westerns the cowboys would be drinking at the saloon. Surely its floors weren't better than sawdust. However I do remember a phrase from my youth in the south - a honky-tonk. My grandma actually ran a honky-tonk. Pizza place by day and bar/concert place at night. Half of the flooring was ...


2

AS of: Used to indicate the time or date from which something starts: As of January 1, a free market will be created. I’m on unemployment as of today Source:oxforddictionaries online Your second sentence is wrong.


2

I am not big on jack of all trades used in a "company" sense. Not many people would say, let us get our jack of all trades to help you out. I have heard one specific title given to this type of person at restaurants, construction jobs, and big company. The term is floater. One who wanders; a drifter. 3. An employee who is reassigned from job to ...


2

The OP included odd-job man and he is perfectly correct. It was the first expression that came to my mind as well. MW, curiously, also spells it as odd-jobman a man skilled in various odd jobs and other small tasks Another related term is odd-jobber. Origin: 1855–60


2

Consider rise to the occasion rise to the challenge step up thrive in a crisis thrive on adversity If the player or team were doing poorly and then rallied, you could say come back from the dead


2

nailing jelly to a tree like nailing jelly to a tree adj. Used to describe a task thought to be impossible, esp. one in which the difficulty arises from poor specification or inherent slipperiness in the problem domain. Also used in variant “to a wall” In AmE, jello or Jell-O is used instead of jelly. In BrE, jelly is used instead of jello. ...


2

One punches in / clocks in and punches out / clocks out using a time card inserted into a time clock, clocking-in machine or time recorder. The resulting data might be recorded in/on a timesheet or log. Today, one might record similar information in a computer-based system by logging in and logging out.


2

Writing skills or written communication skills. There is also verbal skills. verbal: relating to or consisting of words ▪ The job requires someone with strong verbal skills. [=someone who is good at writing and speaking]


2

Abderian: Given to laughter; inclined to foolish or incessant merriment. Based on Abdera Cachinnating is to "to laugh aloud, laugh immoderately"


2

More for less definitely sounds like a better bargain. Less for more sounds like the old joke "a bargain at half the price." I would say the reason has to do with which of these two phrases sounds more natural: Three for a dollar. A dollar for three. To my ear, the first does. I expect the goods to come first and the price to come second.


1

The first thing that came to mind was the prefix pseudo-. From Macmillan: pseudo- (prefix) not real, but pretending to be real: used with many nouns and adjectives pseudoscientific So, you could call them pseudo-scholars, or even pseudoexperts. One author wrote: Pseudo-experts don't understand, and so they tend to look at what the experts are ...


1

Like herding cats, which got a segment on Mythbusters and was found to be significantly more difficult than the proverbial like catching a greased pig. (That episode also tested the similar like trying to put ten pounds of manure in a five pound bag. They do not test herding rats with a blowdryer. I should also note there was a great cat-herding ...


1

How about "pressure hitter" and "pressure performer?" Nick Folk, Jets kicker, says he knows he has what it takes to be a pressure performer in postseason.l Comsider also the phrases "work wonders (or outperform oneself) when pressure is full on" and "be at one's best when pressure is at its highest."


1

Speaking from a restaurant manager's point-of-view, I would use service to depict different ways of serving a meal. For example, the traditional fine dining experience of being served one course at a time was called Russian Service, and contrasted with French Service, which involved all the dishes being served at once. Family Service is used to describe the ...


1

In catering and the restaurant industry, these are referred to as types of "meal service." "meal service" In a broader cultural context, they are referred to as types of "meal structure." "meal structure"


1

For formally communicating a person's role in the company, I would consider referring to him or her as a generalist. Contrast this to a specialist, whose job is defined very narrowly. Our generalist, Samantha, is responsible for performing a wide variety of tasks to ensure we're shipping the best product possible. Definitions: Merriam-Webster, Oxford. ...


1

A Renaissance person is someone who works at many careers during his/her lifetime, possibly at the same time. The "Renaissance" part is because a lot of people (usually men) were like this during that period, such as Leonardo da Vinci, who was an artist, scientist, inventor, engineer, architect, and a whole bunch of other things. I suppose that, as it was a ...


1

Consider the idiom chief cook and bottle washer a person who does a wide variety of routine, sometimes menial, tasks: He's not just sales manager, he's the chief cook and bottlewasher in this firm.


1

Depending on context, consider "gofer,' "handyman," and "versatile/all-around worker." gofer (or gopher): a person whose job is to do various small and usually boring jobs for other people. handyman: a man employed to do various tasks (Collins English Dictionary -- Complete and unabridged, Ed. 2003). versatile: (of a worker, etc.) able to turn ...


1

"Cocksure" seems a good candidate to cover both "smug" and "know-it-all". It means both "marked by overconfidence or presumptuousness (cocky)" and, more to your needs, "feeling perfect assurance sometimes on inadequate grounds". Otherwise, there is "stubborn": "unreasonably or perversely unyielding" or "bold": "very ...


1

Consider terminability the quality or state of being terminable* *terminable: able to be ended, capable of being terminated finitude might fit also The quality or condition of being finite.



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