Hot answers tagged

3

"Solidarity" springs to mind. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solidarity See also the Zulu word "Ubuntu" which has several meanings, one of which is "the bond of sharing". It has a free operating system named after it. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ubuntu_(philosophy)


3

It's because when searching "nails," your results include "gel nails," "acrylic nails," "nail polish," "nail art," "fake nails." Whereas "fingernails," especially as one word, imply natural, bare, undecorated nails.


2

This construction (or verb-chain, or verb-group—we don't have a consistent name for it) is a modal passive. Only on the first verb in the group is finite—having a specific past or non-past reference.; subsequent verbs must be non-finite forms. A modal verb is always first, and always finite: can The verb immediately following a modal ...


2

The phrase is used in Season 5, Episode 8 of "The Simpsons," in reference to a cheese doodle being used as fishing bait ("Godspeed, little doodle"). If your male friend likes the Simpsons or is of a certain age, it might be an allusion to this, and therefore a term of endearment.


2

"Wise" itself is a great word for this, but it's not as specific as what you're looking for. Perhaps a synonym like "prudent" would do the trick, though. "Receptive" is a word for someone who is "willing to listen to or accept ideas, suggestions, etc." (Merriam Webster) Example usage: She is receptive to criticism. He is a receptive listener who benefits ...


2

Using the same kind of term, a present-day Luddite would eschew scientific and technological advances and milestones.


2

I felt I needed to broaden my horizons. broaden/widen somebody's horizons to increase the range of things that someone knows about, has experienced, or is able to do This trip to the Far East has certainly broadened our family's horizons. Cambridge Idioms Dictionary, 2nd ed.


1

I just checked my (old) Oxford English Dictionary. Medicament is attested from 1541, medicine in the sense of "any substance or preparation..." from 1225, and medication for a substance only from 1796, and then only for botanical use. I guess we'd need a more recent edition to look into its use for humans.


1

In addition to the answer above: stretch myself, learn something new, explore different options, expand myself. I don't know which if any of those would be good for your application, though. Thing is, I'm certain the person reading your application won't believe that's why you did it (to stretch outside your comfort zone). You tried a different career ...


1

I would propose the common vernacular "Slacker". One who "slacks" takes a non-committal and uninvolved procrastination, or denial of responsibility to the level that it is perceived as a personality flaw. Not to be confused with "Lazy", a "Slacker" is able to improve, but prefers the conscious choice of 'Slack'. Additionally, 'Slack' sometimes requires ...


1

Consider the Belgium motto "l'union fait la force" whose translations are: "there is strength in unity", or, "together we are stronger".


1

If you mean "don't know about science" you could say they are (scientifically) ignorant or illiterate. If you mean they refuse to believe in science then they are "antiscientific".


1

"Separate" or "distinct" paired with almost anything in the second list (including "perspectives") might work.


1

Idealists might work... or even fanatics, although that might be too strong without some modifier. This would be in the sense of those whose ideas outweigh their common sense. Reformers or activists might work for "someone who wants to do good", but that that good is not effective doesn't come through unless modified by something else. Something like "...


1

Only look at the pronunciation of the next word The choice of a or an is always based on the pronunciation of the word immediately following the article. The grammatical structure of the phrase is irrelevant. The spelling of the word is also irrelevant, except insofar as it relates to the pronunciation. Since there are a lot of cases where English spelling ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible