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59

Depending on context, all three could be acceptable, with woman probably being the most neutral. However, in all three cases, you seem to want to put emphasis on the fact she was a woman... if you met to talk about business, you could use a job-title. You could refer to her (depending on the nature of your business relation and her job description) as a ...


32

Pedantic is the first word that comes to mind. According to Oxford Dictionaries, pedantic is someone who is: Excessively concerned with minor details or rules, overscrupulous. Some synonyms beginning with a "P" : perfectionist, punctilious, precisionist.


18

The words like that will try to follow the current word-form rules in similar words. (to trap - trapping). The word "grep" is already in some dictionaries and it follows this theory: verb (greps, grepping, grepped) [with object]: Search for (a string of characters) using grep.


16

Many competent writers will challenge the assertion that "the perpendicular pronoun" (I) really needs to be avoided. Others seem to believe that only third person is acceptable, or that no person should ever be mentioned unless specifically talking about people. My own take is that this is all a matter of style, and whatever you pick -- as long as it ...


14

persnickety: giving a lot of attention to details that are minor or not important


14

Competence precludes finding oneself needing to mean "I" but having to say "this writer" - or, variously: the author your correspondent this ink-stained wretch (please, no!) TBH, the form hardly matters - silk purses and sow's ears, etc.


14

Phrases like "the Holy Grail of Physics", are snowclones of the form "Z is the X of Y". They work because X's properties are well-understood and can be used to immediately relate Z and Y. So if someone says Artificial Intelligence is the Holy Grail of Computer Science Then everyone knows what that means: AI is something that is rumoured to exist (or ...


12

You could try painkiller, in an extended sense; but I prefer anodyne.


12

In science, it is quite common to use "we" instead of "I" even if there is only one author.


11

I like this question, because I have often felt the same way. The reason is that there is no word for a female that is quite like the word "guy". "Gal" is often paired with "guy" but "gal" is like a cowgirl or a country girl and is extremely informal, bordering on demeaning. On the other hand, you can use "guy" to refer to any male, any age, any position, ...


11

I think that you can use splinter regardless of the material. In Merriam-Webster's Unabridged Dictionary online (subscription required), the example sentence for splinter in the meaning you intend references metal. splin·ter noun \ˈsplintə(r)\ plural -s 1 a (1) : a thin often jagged or needlelike piece split or rent off lengthwise : sliver, chip, ...


11

I was taught in elementary school that if a syllable ends with a vowel, the vowel is normally long, while if it ends with a consonant, the vowel is short. Also that if there is a vowel followed by one consonant in the middle of a word, the consonant is part of the next syllable, while if a vowel is followed by two consonants (that do not work together to ...


10

Cold weapon (also known as white arm) seems to be an appropriate word. It refers to weapons that do not use any sort of explosive force in their function. It comprises blunt (knuckles, maces), edged (swords, knives) and ranged (bows, crossbows) weaponry. Here is the relevant excerpt from Wikipedia: A cold weapon (or white arm) is a weapon that does not ...


9

Escapism comes close. an activity or form of entertainment that allows people to forget about the real problems of life Source: http://www.merriam-webster.com/ From Wikipedia: Many activities that are normal parts of a healthy existence (e.g., eating, sleeping, exercise, sexual activity) can also become avenues of escapism when taken to ...


9

It's called a splinter in the case of wood. "I've got a splinter in my bum from sliding down the bannister". Splints are something else. That's because wood can break apart (splinter) into sharp bits. In the case of metal, I'd call it a metal cutting, a chip, a shaving, a sliver, or a piece of swarf. In the case of glass, I'd call it a sliver or a shard. ...


9

Having mulled this over in my head for a bit, I finally came—through the help of @starplusplus’ comment—to a distinction which I think holds up quite nicely in the vast majority of cases. There will always be odd ones out that are just completely idiomatic and do not hold up to logical scrutiny (many, in fact—this is language we’re dealing with), but the ...


9

In my experience as an American: We do use the word delicious fairly often. It is not at all unusual or strange. Its use compared to the more general words "good" and "great" is dependent on context. For example, if my friend asked me "how's the food?" and I enjoyed the food, I'd more likely use "it's good!" or "it's great!" and reserve "it's delicious!" ...


8

"Knives, knuckles, a piece of metal, etc." can be considered melee weapons, although my impression is that the term is used more commonly in gaming (where it stands in opposition to ranged weapons) than in discussions of real weaponry. In any case, there are lots of other kinds of weapons that are neither firearms nor melee weapons, such as bows and arrows, ...


8

This isn't a very technical answer, but googling "grepping" returns 354,000 results. Googling "greping" only returns 47,300 results and suggests that you meant "grepping" instead. It seems that "grepping" is the correct usage.


7

I think that the "p" word you might want is punctilious. Punctilious (comparative more punctilious, superlative most punctilious) Strictly attentive to detail; meticulous or fastidious, particularly to codes or conventions. With a punctilious slap of the gloves, the duel was now inevitable. Precise or scrupulous; finicky or nitpicky. ...


7

According to dictionary.reference.com, interlinear is: situated or inserted between lines, as of the lines of print in a book: a Latin text with interlinear translation.


7

I would call that cerebral humor. Dennis Miller is fairly cerebral. Merriam Webster (above link) even uses that as an example usage of the word. He's a very cerebral comedian.


6

My suggestion would be (for your friend) to just drop the word in such contexts. It's a tic. In most cases, I think you & your friend will find that (a) it is not intensifying anything anyway and (b) no intensification is needed. IOW, just say I am so hungry now!


6

I have no idea what this has to do with English, but those are called microfiche readers in our language.


6

I'd recommend "empty" or "hollow", but you may prefer "kitschy": kitsch noun 1.art, objects, or design considered to be in poor taste because of excessive garishness >or sentimentality, but sometimes appreciated in an ironic or knowing way. "the lava lamp is an example of sixties kitsch" adjective 2.considered to be in poor taste but ...


6

Mawkish: excessively and objectionably sentimental. falsely sentimental, esp in a weak or maudlin way. Though the audiences are tired of mawkish plays and movies, writers and producers are never tired of them. There are always audiences who in their innocence shed tears at the excess of sentiment they express. The mawkish dialogues in the ...


6

Consider highbrow humor. Oxford Online defines highbrow as Scholarly or rarefied in taste


5

Precisian, OED sense 2: A person who is rigidly precise or punctilious in the observance of rules or forms; a purist, a stickler, a pedant. Precise, OED sense 3.a: Strict in the observance of rule, usage, etc.; formal, correct; scrupulous, particular; (occas.) overly formal, fastidious. Also: (of a practice or rule) strictly observed.


5

Consider pettifogging, present participle of pettifog, which per wiktionary is to quibble and nitpick over trivial details. A pettifogger is “Someone who quibbles over trivia, and raises petty, annoying objections”.


5

The words are similar, but usually not inter-changeable. Thin is an adjective that describes an object's characteristic width or depth: "This pencil is thin; that pencil is not." "This type of pasta is thin; the other is not." "The mattress is thin and lumpy." "We use thin-film technology in the production of solar cells." Narrow is an adjective that ...



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