Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

37

It is called a jam session. It is sometimes shortened as jam. (jam is used as a verb as well.) An informal gathering of musicians to play improvised or unrehearsed music. [TFD]


18

Snowball: verb [NO OBJECT] Increase rapidly in size, intensity, or importance: "the campaign was snowballing" ODO


15

Possibly "doleful" would be appropriate, doleful adjective: expressing sorrow; mournful. "a doleful look" synonyms: mournful, woeful, sorrowful, sad, unhappy, depressed, gloomy, morose, melancholy, miserable, forlorn, wretched, woebegone, despondent, dejected, disconsolate, downcast, crestfallen, downhearted. See, Google doleful Or perhaps, ...


13

Pithy statements that give advice, e.g. "Fake it till you make it" (not a particularly good one, however...) are called aphorisms: A tersely phrased statement of a truth or opinion; an adage. They are also known as adages, maxims, axioms, etc. Common aphorisms are easy to recognize, and they aren't necessarily idioms: Actions speak louder ...


11

Chagrined: verb (be chagrined) Feel distressed or humiliated: ODO From 100 Words for Facial Expressions, by Mark Nichol, on dailywritingtips.com: Chagrined: humiliated or disappointed From A Bit of Blue Ribbon, by Sarah Beaumont Kennedy, in Outing, Volume 27, 1896, page 5: The girl with the parasol nodded, the marvelous ...


8

Burgeon: verb [NO OBJECT] (often as adjective burgeoning) 1 Begin to grow or increase rapidly; flourish: ODO The etymology of burgeon suggest new life: early 14c., "grow, sprout, blossom," from Anglo-French burjuner, Old French borjoner "to bud, sprout," from borjon "a bud, shoot, pimple" (Modern French bourgeon), of uncertain ...


8

You might consider psychs himself up The Free Dictionary defines it as: Inf. to get someone excited or mentally prepared for something. I psyched myself up to sing in front of all those people. The coach psyched up the team for the game. and psych somebody up - to make someone enthusiastic about something they will do [...] Tim was psyching ...


7

David. David was a young shepherd with a sling and 5 smooth stones who pitted himself against a gigantic Philistine who was fully armed for battle. Yet he brought the giant down with one stone (saving the others for the giant's brothers.) But we've known O'Brien is a fighter since back in the day, when he was the David to Jay Leno's Goliath. [Boston ...


6

There seem to be lots of words in English for accepted wisdom expressed pithily in the form of a particular situation: adage, proverb, aphorism, saw, saying, etc. Of these, 'adage' seems to express most prominently the advisory part which the questioner wants. The OED defn is: "A traditional maxim; a proverb or short statement expressing a general truth". I ...


5

This course of action, works. You could also say "convention" when referring to the societal trend of depositing the elderly in institutions.


5

Palpable: 1.1 (Especially of a feeling or atmosphere) so intense as to be almost touched or felt: ODO From etymonline.com: late 14c., "that can be touched," from Late Latin palpabilis "that may be touched or felt," from Latin palpare "touch gently, stroke" (see feel (v.)). Figurative sense of "easily perceived, evident" also is ...


5

In its primary sense, to exonerate someone means to prove their innocence. If you prove your own innocence, you exonerate yourself. However, the verb is sometimes used as the antonym of convict: Someone accused of a crime is either convicted or exonerated. Of course a person cannot exonerate themselves in this sense any more than they can convict ...


4

I think "fall" would work but adding "in disappointment" would make it clearer: His face fell in disappointment. The link also has some other options for both disappointment (FC122) and embarrassment (FC121, right above).


4

From Wiktionary: The idea : is propagated ... 2.(transitive) To cause to spread to extend; to impel or continue forward in space; as, to propagate sound or light. 3.(transitive) To spread from person to person; to extend the knowledge of; to originate and spread; to carry from place to place; to disseminate 5.(transitive) To generate; to ...


4

The word you could be looking for might be idol, or possibly role model. idol: a person or thing that is greatly admired, loved, or revered. role model: a person looked to by others as an example to be imitated. Oxford Dictionary


3

Memetic. (Not much better than viral, but it means essentially the same thing.)


3

obsolete Obsolete refers to outdated computer hardware, software, technology, services or practices that are no longer used, even if they are in working condition. A technology often becomes obsolete when replaced by a newer or better technology. (techopedia)


3

There is no word for such a facial expression, except, perhaps, a grimace. The feeling is dismay or consternation.


3

In Do you know where he lives?, the interrogative part is do you know ?. I do not think where he lives is interrogative. Where is simply acting as a relative pronoun, not an interrogative one, as in That is the house where he lives. As regards I can't imagine how he did it there is no interrogation at all. It is not even a question, simply a statement of ...


3

You can consider rodomontade. A vainglorious brag or boast; an extravagantly boastful, arrogant, or bombastic speech or piece of writing [OED] An example from OED: 1862    Thackeray Adventures of Philip I. viii. 144    Phil used to bore me after dinner with endless rodomontades about his passion and his charmer; but my wife ...


3

Well, rare chiefly dialectal variant of rear rear verb transitive verb 2 c \ˈrir\ (audio pronunciation) dialectal, chiefly England : to stir up to action : arouse Merriam-Webster Unabridged Dictionary thus in principle one could say "rare myself up" to mean "arouse myself [to enthusiasm, etc]" Problem is: it's not there, ...


3

His smile was like barbecue sauce- it wound up on everyone's face.


3

Extensive: adjective 1.0 Covering or affecting a large area: 1.1 Large in amount or scale: ODO Joe has done extensive research on the subject.


3

Comprehensive: adjective 1.0 Including or dealing with all or nearly all elements or aspects of something: 1.1 Of large content or scope; wide-ranging: ODO Joe has done comprehensive research on the subject. Comprehensive implies more completeness than extensive does.


2

Here's one for you that ensued in a big argument. I have four older brothers. I referred to my next eldest, the third eldest as my youngest brother. I was told that I was dead wrong because he was not younger than me. But I am not wrong. It dosn't matter how you cut it he is still my youngest brother. I never said he was my younger brother, only the youngest ...


2

The answers to this question are very interesting... They all assume that the disappointed party is in a position to display genuine emotion. I have found that the normal response in this situation, if there are others present, is the (often pathetic) forced smile. (Think of the expressions of the losing nominees, when the Oscar winner is announced.)


2

There is nothing negative about the term viral when the context is music, communication or the Internet. When a YouTube video goes "viral" it just means it has attracted a huge number of visits in a very brief period of time. Nobody turns their noses up at a viral piece of information; on the contrary, when a video or advertisement is said to be viral that ...


2

Thrive, Flourish, Bloom come to mind. All of them refer to something developing swiftly/vigorously and in a healthy manner.


2

Based on the excerpts you chose to include in the OP, I would surmise that you intend to convey a positive, rather than a negative, view of retirement homes. If so, you may want to minimize use of the term “practice,” which carries connotations of habitual and repetitive, or automatic and unthinking action. Rather, whenever appropriate, you may want to ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible