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If the container, plastic, glass, or barrel, comes with a tap or spigot, it can be called: a drink or beverage dispenser. Different sized jugs can contain between 1.5 and 3 gallons. Barrel beverage dispensers needn't be wooden nor have to be filled with alcohol. 5-gallon water dispensers are plastic jugs that specifically contain bottled water Rain ...


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No, it is not a common collocation. The preferred verb of the two, for taking deadline as object, is very clearly (according to Ngram) meet. Your interlocutor is probably confusing the journalistic imperative to meet one’s deadlines with the theatrical/cinematic imperative to hit one’s marks.


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The definitions behind the individual terms differ and it's easier, at a semantic level, to understand how 'meet' aligns with the sentiment of the phrase. 'Hit the deadline' is a more colloquial phrase and less formal. There is also the implied sentiment of enthusiasm or willingness to complete the task.


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You might be thinking of vicarious; in particular: "felt or enjoyed through imagined participation in the experience of others". (M-W)


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The verb, refurbish. When you refurbish something, you generally keep the structure the same but improve its looks and possibly its functionality. (as by renovating, re-equipping, or restoring etc.) The word refurbish is also often used to describe secondhand technology that has been rebuilt to restore function by replacing a component that has ...


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I have heard many people use the word "repurposed" as well. I'm not sure if there needs to be a hyphen after 're'.


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"Upcycled" is a currently popular term for reusing the old, especially in reference to making something worn, faded, or otherwise undesirable valuable (such as taking a ratty leather coat and cutting out the good parts and sewing it into a bunch of iPhone cases. to process (used goods or waste material) so as to produce something that is often better ...


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I would call them " xx liter bottles". Even jug and pitcher are lesser known than bottles. Everyone know what a bottle is. Go ask a three year old which word they know best. That will be the best one. The best word or the most accurate should only be the one that most people agree on not what dictionary says is accurate (well unless everyone else around ...


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These are called jugs of water. See foe example the 3 and 5 gallon jugs here: http://tulpehockenwater.com/products.asp


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They are bottles, exactly as Chasly points out. You can so trivially find 100,000 usages on the internet, it is not worth making a link here. Note that your best bet is probably to refer to them as: "water delivery bottles" or perhaps better "water cooler bottles" That would be the most absolutely clear way to refer to them. Consider propane/cng ...


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A railroad man would distinguish "routes" as "lines". RR lines can use the same track to get from Destination A to Destination B as well as from Destination A to Destination C.


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"Calm down" "My mood is none of your business" A temporary state of mind or feeling Mood denotes both transience and neutrality, as required.


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An expression such as this requires context. It is probable that the relationship has already been described in the story and this is a brief way of referring back to it.


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A "media splash" is noticeable coverage in news media -- newspapers, TV, radio, online outlets, etc. Here's a headline from The New York Times: Beyond Publish or Perish, Academic Papers Look to Make a Splash. It's about academic economists who want their papers reported on for a general readership instead of having them restricted to an audience of fellow ...


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If you are referring to these, Link to picture These are called 'gallons' in our local shops. Haven't heard of any other name elsewhere till date (though they might exist). https://www.google.co.in/search?q=water+gallon will also give you these. Note: Gallon also refers to these: Link to picture


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In the trade they call them bottles. Maybe flagon or pitcher.


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I think you are looking for a carboy or a demijohn. They are usually made of glass but they can be plastic also. For commercial use, they usually contain distilled water and they can be used in households. A carboy or demijohn is a rigid container with a typical capacity of 20 to 60 L (5 to 15 gallons). Carboys are primarily used for transporting ...


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First, a word in clarification: "bottles" would be the term I would naturally use for these containers. However, after using that same word - not once, but three times - the OP asks for another term. That is the nature of this OP. So, as a second-choice, rather than tankard (its Middle English origins notwithstanding), perhaps a suitable term would be cask? ...


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You might describe this person as having a cloying personality: cloy: disgust or sicken (someone) with an excess of sweetness, richness, or sentiment.


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kiss-up (plural kiss-ups) (colloquial) One who flatters a supervisor, or superior, in order to get special attention Joe got that promotion because he was a kiss-up, not because he knew the job. Wiktionary


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Am assuming,facility here means 'building'. Often , a building constructed for special purposes (gym ,hospital ,school )is called a facility. :) Correct me If I am sounding wrong or stupid :P


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Small/large refer to size. One number is not smaller than another unless you are talking about font size. 2 is less than 1. You would use "lesser" in cases where "greater" would be appropriate in the reverse. 5 is greater than 4, so 4 is lesser than 5. But it would also be appropriate to say 4 is less than 5. Regarding debt, a debt of $2 is greater than a ...


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For the special case when such compliments are part of an ulterior motive: A kiss-ass, alternately ass-kisser, is a person who excessively praises a superior with the (perhaps only perceived) intention of gaining favor for personal advancement. This pejorative term would likely be used by such a person's colleagues, who are disgruntled by the unseemly ...


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Axiomatic From the ODO: Self-evident or unquestionable: 'it is axiomatic that dividends have to be financed'


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Your edit sounds a little like a tu quoque, a Latin phrase that is sometimes used in English. It literally means "you, too." If someone accuses you of something that you're actually guilty of, and your only defense is to point out that the accuser is guilty of the same thing, that's a tu quoque. It's considered a logical fallacy if you think someone ...


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Gospel accepted or promoted as infallible truth or as a guiding principle or doctrine


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I'm fond of “unctuous” : unctuous Excessively flattering or ingratiating; oily: he seemed anxious to please but not in an unctuous way from the ODO


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A small addition as you've been answered in the main: In the context of a computer program or game, it is common to refer to newly born entities as being 'spawned', which has the added bonus of being synonymous with your original question.


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Apologies to Leonardo, but I would suggest a Mona Lisa smile or a coy smile. Although the actor's lips are thicker, the expressions conveyed through the lips are identical.


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His lips broke into a teasing smile, with one corner hinting upwards.


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It doesn't make any sense to me. I have never encountered eyesight in a figurative sense: it always refers to somebody's real physical faculty of seeing.


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sycophant -- a person who praises powerful people in order to get their approval


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The psychological term for this is 'projection'. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Psychological_projection


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I see the adjective tag, but for me "a single word for someone" calls for a noun (otherwise you have adjective + "person"). So, my suggestions are: adulator That many in the eighteenth century actively resisted what seemed to them classical cultural imperialism, something supported by contemporaries they considered spineless adulators and imitators, may ...


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There's chortle, a portmanteau word defined as "laugh in a breathy, gleeful way" (Google) and coined by Lewis Carroll (probably as a mixture of "chuckle" and "snort").


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As touched upon in a previous answer, obsequious fits the bill somewhat. Full of or exhibiting servile compliance; fawning. thefreedictionary.com


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Toady. noun 1. a person who behaves obsequiously to someone important. (Google) For example: The governor surrounded herself with toadies who ensured a constant stream of sunshine flowed up the gubernatorial anus.


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effusive uttered with unrestrained enthusiasm Profuse; overflowing: effusive praise. (TFD)


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How about Impute? From Mirriam Webster Verb im·pute \im-ˈpyüt\ to lay the responsibility or blame for often falsely or unjustly Was also thinking about inculpate, but impute seems a better fit.


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Pompous: full of high-sounding phrases; bombastic: a pompous proclamation. ostentatiously lofty or high-flown: a pompous speech. The Free Dictionary


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Fawning From the ODO: adjective Displaying exaggerated flattery or affection; obsequious: Example: 'fawning interviews with Hollywood celebs'


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Gushing adjective (Of speech or writing) effusive or exaggeratedly enthusiastic: gushing praise See the ODO.


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sub·ter·fuge /ˈsəbtərˌfyo͞oj/ noun noun: subterfuge; plural noun: subterfuges deceit used in order to achieve one's goal.


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I would say he is preoccupied (by thoughts of her). He has a preoccupation (with her). Or, she is his preoccupation. http://i.word.com/idictionary/preoccupied http://i.word.com/idictionary/preoccupation "Obsessed/obsession" are used similarly, but they sound a bit stronger than what you described.


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I would use the word demagogue or demagogy for this act as politicians are mentioned. I am also in favor of Red herring.


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Such a person could be described as an armchair expert or armchair pundit. From the OED: [as modifier] Lacking or not involving practical or direct experience of a particular subject or activity: an armchair traveller Example sentences: The result is a unique perspective applauded by armchair naturalists in which the stars of the film are also the ...


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Wiktionary has blameshift verb (biblical) To blame another for one's own wrong-doing. Blameshifting ... pointing the finger at another when trying to save one's skin. Dictionary.com only gives the noun: blameshifting noun the act of transferring responsibility for an error or problem to another; also written blame shifting


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Scapegoating? From Wikipedia: Scapegoating (from the verb "to scapegoat") is the practice of singling out any party for unmerited negative treatment or blame as a scapegoat. Scapegoating may be conducted by individuals against individuals (e.g. "he did it, not me!"), individuals against groups (e.g., "I couldn't see anything because of all the tall ...



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