Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

Passive-Aggressive is a good way to describe the behavior, if not the people themselves. You are communicating information. They willfully disregard this and take control of the conversation by focusing on how you say things. More, they won't respond until you use the words they want you to use. This is textbook passive-aggressive behavior.


0

Nitpicking: "minute and usually unjustified criticism"(m-w.com) pretty much describes your colleagues. Thanks, I learned something, I would say it's better just to humor them and let it go one ear and out the other because life is just too short. Don't take it personally.


3

A late answer, and it's a bit radical, but perhaps these people are genuinely trying to help you! Perhaps they seem themselves as friends, mentors, experts or educators. Sometimes the use of the wrong word is not only confusing for listeners but also a signal that you don't fully understand what you are talking about. Those who deeply understand a domain ...


0

A lot of men like pancakes, but you can only feed them so many pancakes before they get tired of eating pancakes every day. Even if you spice it up by putting whipped cream or fruit on the pancakes, eventually the men will still grow to like pancakes less and less as they indulge in them repeatedly. Replace pancakes with foot fetish videos... or just about ...


16

Your question really poses 2 questions: one where coworkers try to correct you, and one where they pretend not to understand you. The currently chosen answer seems to handle the first question with @Nicole's pedant. However for the second I would submit: Obtuse Annoyingly insensitive or slow to understand: 'he wondered if the doctor was being deliberately ...


10

Maybe "pretentious, punctilious, pompous, ostentatious, supercilious, hairsplitting, nit-picking...". My advice, keep it civil. Avoid placing the word "ass" after any of the preceding. Take the high road.


28

You could call a person who does that a pedant: Pedant (noun) a person who annoys other people by correcting small errors and giving too much attention to minor details; one who unduly emphasizes minutiae in the presentation or use of knowledge (Merriam-Webster)


2

Obstinate person, or maybe 'Obstinate besserwisser' (or 'Obstinate wiseass') seems like a possible description to me. Obstinate adjective 1. firmly or stubbornly adhering to one's purpose, opinion, etc.; not yielding to argument, persuasion, or entreaty. 2. characterized by inflexible persistence or an unyielding attitude; inflexibly persisted in ...


-1

Maybe British English, not American. American would be "I'm around (or available) this week. I work in Romania." Maybe British people say "about", but it will probably sound stuffy to most American ears.


-1

It's a joke. You can only do two per person. If it were a toe fetish, perhaps you could do up to ten per person.


0

so many X often means "a limited number of X". A lot men like feet. But you can only do so many of them. means that you cannot probably do all men that like feet. There's a limit. Here do means have sex with. Update: Considering the comments, however, it now seems far more plausible to me that she's talking about foot fetish movies, rather than men. ...


1

As for the second part: no, you cannot apply for a project in Berlin. This programme apparently wants people to move somewhere other than where they studied. As for the first part, I have no way of knowing what counts as "research career", nor what "full-time equivalent" means in Germany (full-time student equivalent or full-time job equivalent?) I would ...


2

This seems like a research grant offer. As for the first part of your question. The answer is yes. Most research grants and fellowships are given to PhD students alone and the fact that it states the first four years and not having a doctoral yet implies that is also the case here. As for your second part, Most third-party organizations offering research ...


1

Though it is common reference. Another word for your job is your post. This word has many meanings, most of which are related to jobs and mail. A post is position in a company, like manager or clerk. It could be where you’re stationed in the military, like a base in Afghanistan. You can post an ad on a bulletin board or an announcement on a ...


1

midrib (petiole) of leaflet The whole leaf is called coconut fond. stalk (petiole) of frond = Midrib. then leaflet of a frond. midrib (petiole) of leaflet https://www.flickr.com/photos/joegoauk73/16202081480/ the above / below pic is a broom entirely made of midribs


1

Empirical is often referential and is not necessarily done by the author. For example, 'Test power during shift can increase by a factor of 3 [1].'. This is empirical data, but the work is done in another paper cited in [1]. On the other hand, experimental data usually follows a description of the experiment itself.


1

I'm not sure, but I think if he says the parameters were set experimentally, that means he did separate experiments to determine their values. But if they were set empirically, that could mean that he merely adopted convenient values for them, so as to make calculations come out right. (But I'm not a physicist or engineer.)


0

A more general idiom of subservience is under the thumb (or under one's thumb) under control : in a state of subservience: her father did not have her that much under his thumb — Hamilton Basso Merriam-Webster Mr. Jagger has commented on both being the thumber and the thumbee The way she talks when she's spoken to Down to me, the change has ...


1

Submissive/browbeaten- TFD mentions... inclined or willing to submit to orders or wishes of others or showing such inclination.


0

Along the same line...wife-ridden: Unduly influenced by a wife; ruled or tyrannized over by a wife; henpecked.


1

They can, though sumptuous is often used in the sense of '(more than) satisfactory' meal and luxurious is used in the sense of meal being expensive. Update to give ref/eg Sumptuous: Of a size or splendor suggesting great expense; lavish: "He likes big meals, so I cook sumptuous ones" (Src: FreeDictionary) Luxurious: Providing great pleasure or comfort, ...


0

From an engineering perspective, one does not pursue a requirement. The team implements the requirement. Or, the design satisfies the requirement. One pursues a goal or objective (or a dream). Also, are you stating a future state in you are in the process of achieving the "optimally utilize..."? Or do you have a solution that you want to sell? Just the ...


1

My favorite term for this is a wordsmith, someone who demonstrates facility with words.


0

I would call him a "word-lover". Of course there are terms such as logophile (one who appreciates and enjoys words) but they are not common enough and their meaning wouldn't be recognized in oridinary conversation. In the higher register, however, "logophile" would be more appropriate. logophile (noun) "One who appreciates and enjoys words." From the ...


2

In American politics, 'pivot' has lately turned into a buzzword that essentially means 'change of policy focus or direction'. In your query sentence, "the U.S. pivot towards Asia" means "the U.S.'s increased focus on issues relating to Asia".


0

To be about - to be near by So, 'Can I speak to Dan ? Well, he's about here somewhere'. Whereabouts - precisely where. So, 'Whereabouts do you come from?', and 'His whereabouts remain secret'


0

OK, I think understand the problem you’re having. You are trying to adroitly handle 1) the impacts of 2) multiple oil spills 3) on bird populations 4) across multiple species. Rather than trying to force an ill-fitting suggestion into your bracket field as the sentence stands, I would like to suggest a very slight restructuring of the sentence itself, ...


2

I don't honestly think you'll do much better than many populations, though you may want to say "...of seabirds". You may want to concentrate on the verb. These populations could be decimated (even though I prefer the historic usage to the modern), heavily/adversely affected, harmed, etc. The end result could be something like "In the past oil spills have ...


0

I guess you could use on of the following expressions in the plural form GROUP B--These terms are not group names for a particular type of bird, but have been commonly used for many different types: Colony Company Flock Parliament Party (source: http://baltimorebirdclub.org/gnlist.html) Hence: ...


1

Perhaps subpopulation (n), a population that is part of a larger population. (vocabulary.com) M-W dictionary : an identifiable fraction or subdivision of a population.


2

To run the wickets is apparently a term from the game of croquet, and not as one might expect cricket. It means to complete the game in one turn. The following is a piece of an article in Country Roads magazine: Cochran said [ . . . ] “If you’re really good at it, you can run the wickets in a single turn just like you run the table in pool.” ...


0

An alternative to "criticality" might be "necessity", as in "The Necessity of Art" and "The Necessity of Errors".


1

criticality 1. The state of being critical (Wiktionary)


0

Believe it or not, criticality is actually a word! Crucial works too.


0

Pertinence means importance in a specific situation. While it doesn't convey the need for urgency, it weeds out the unnecessary.


2

There are hundreds of written language systems with unique characters. Each writing system has a unique name for its set of characters, which is often (but not always) the name of the language itself. Not all of the writing systems have alphabets. For example: Chinese has logographic characters representing morphemes. Japanese has logophonetic ...


0

One term for an underlying, primordial belief is ur-belief. You can get a sense of how people use it from the following excerpts. From Barbara Ardinger, Pagan Everyday: Finding the Extraordinary in Our Oridnary Lives (2008): But everyone has heard of the man in the moon. He first appeared in a Saxon folk tale with his wife, the woman in the sun. To our ...


16

The Equatorial Guinean currency, the ekwele, has plural bipkwele.


18

I'm not sure whether pronouns count: "I" versus "We". There are also some prefixes: e.g. "byte" versus "kilobyte"; and "ester" versus "polyester"; and possibly "pole" versus "dipole".


25

The only one I could find is cow/kine. However, kine is mentioned as an archaic plural of cow in most dictionaries including OED but Wikipedia and Wiktionary mentions as regional or dialectal also. Wordsmith does not count it as archaic and includes a contemporary usage: Kine is one of the very few words in English (other examples: I/we, me/us) that ...


0

You might be thinking of the person's existential state — a term that covers pretty much anything you might want it to.


1

Perhaps, mise en scene (noun): environment; locality thesaurus.com Your request is a heavy burden for a single word to carry and the greater the load the more general and abstract the term will have to be.


3

The problem with catch-all words is that they tend to be bland. Situation and circumstance are good bland catch-all words: NOUN 1 A set of circumstances in which one finds oneself; a state of affairs: Condition(s) is another relatively bland word that can catch all three elements of feeling, activity, and company: NOUN 2 The ...


1

The shortest word in AmE is "sup" - a contraction of "what's up". If you approach someone and say "sup", it is recognized as a greeting. If you ask "Sup?", you are in effect asking, "How are you?", "What's new?", Where are you and who are you with?", "How are they (one's testicles) hanging" - and various other questions. I'm sure an authority such as ...


0

If you're looking for a word that describes a person and their context on the continuum of their life, then phase is good. It also implies conditions that change over time. "At one phase of his life, John felt unhappy with his job and friends." Also chapter and stage work well here. Of course, you could just go for the obvious life "John's life was ...


0

There is mien though this doesn't really cover who they're with: A person’s appearance or manner, especially as an indication of their character or mood: he has a cautious, academic mien Perhaps bearing, or demeanour or aspect? Difficult to capture everything in one word.


0

Probably context may fit your description: the set of circumstances or facts that surround a particular event, situation, etc.


1

It was lingual fun. The trend developed in the middle of the 15th century and one of the first such lists occurs in The Bokys of Haukyng and Huntyng; and also of coot-armuris better known as Boke of Seynt Albans or The Book of St. Albans printed 1486. That it also contains such entries as "a doctrine of doctors", "a disworship of Scots" and "a gaggle of ...


0

Perhaps the question could be considered disingenuous. One of the meanings is Pretending to be unaware or unsophisticated; faux-naïf. American Heritage Note that the term is often used to indicate intentionally deceptive, rather than innocently misleading.


2

"Counter-intuitive" contains "in", though it refers more naturally to the answer than the question.



Top 50 recent answers are included