New answers tagged

3

Although you can indeed haave a yearning hope for something, yearning itself is a feeling of intense longing for something. So yearning for something doesn't intrinsically include hope, no. Edit: would probably be better if I explained why this is the case. I could, say, yearn for a reconciliation with my ex-girlfriend, even though I know for a fact ...


0

Consider palestra, a public place in ancient Greece for teaching, training and practice in wrestling and other athletics. The "Palestra" is the home gymnasium of the University of Pennsylvania (or just "Penn"). Built in 1927, this is the arena aptly nicknamed the Cathedral of Basketball.


0

Consider Agora. According to the Wikipedia: The Agora (/ˈæɡərə/; Ancient Greek: Ἀγορά Agorá) was a central spot in ancient Greek city-states. The literal meaning of the word is "gathering place" or "assembly". The agora was the center of athletic, artistic, spiritual and political life of the city 1. The Ancient Agora of Athens was the best-known ...


0

Sociodynamic is perhaps the word that you are looking for. To invent a phrase, one might consider first writing an authoritative dissertation or thesis such that the origin of thought and intent are clearly demonstrated. Else recite your new word with enough vigour and conviction, that it become entrenched in your colloquial dialect.


12

The Australian National Dictionary has an entry for "date" meaning anus and vagina. http://australiannationaldictionary.com.au/index.php The link does not work well. You have to fill in "date" in the search field. 1919 W.H. Downing Digger Dialects 18 Date, a word signifying contempt.] 1961 M. Calthorpe Dyehouse 214 “In your bloody date! What do ...


32

Date as a synonym of "anus" is Australian slang. The definitions I've found are a bit vague in terms of what specific anatomical feature it refers to (some say "anus," some say "buttocks"), but other people responding to this post have provided evidence that this vagueness may just be due to some dictionary-writers misunderstanding the meaning. (For example, ...


0

As sumelic pointed out with an answer that should have been chosen instead of mine, it's Australian slang usually meaning "buttocks" but can be used for other body parts in the same region. There's a page about it at http://www.australiatravelsearch.com.au/trc/slang.html


2

Terrible Twos Not used so much as a term for the person, but the development stage of that toddler. Charlie is in his terrible twos, and it's been so difficult! Dictionary.com defines as: "A stage of development in which toddler behavior is a particular challenge." Additionally, this term is widely used throughout parenting (Parents.com) and health ...


7

A brat. a : child; specifically : an ill-mannered annoying child a spoiled brat b : an ill-mannered immature person Merriam-Webster While there are many other terms for this idea, this one is commonly understood in American English.


0

Rescheduling any event so it's nearer to the present is often called bringing it forward, whereas the reverse is pushing it back. The deadline was brought forward by one week This idiom is defined in the Macmillan Dictionary, amongst other places: bring forward: to change the date or time of an event so that it happens earlier


0

I've heard the phrase "tightening up the schedule", used to signify that low-priority tasks would be cancelled to move the finish date up.


-1

I'd generally say the text is "scratched out", or maybe "crossed out" -- the latter especially if done fairly neatly, with only one or two lines. If really obliterated, especially with ink, the resulting artifact might be called a "blot", and the text might be said to be "blotted out".


3

To plug can be defined as: 9 a recommendation or other favourable mention of a product, show, etc, as on television, on radio, or in newspapers (Collins Dictionary Online) So this means that Branum encourages self promotion by recommending one's own projects. Show-plugging, film-plugging, book-plugging, church-plugging, recipe-plugging, and many more ...


1

How about a universalizer? Those who universalize typically make sweeping generalizations.


0

Generalizator --> someone who generalizes Terminator --> someone who terminates Generator --> someone who generates Short sighted or narrow minded would maybe come to mind. More the former than the latter.


0

What about generalisor to describe someone who generalises?


1

The obvious answer would be: Prejudiced: having an unreasonable dislike of or preference for somebody/something, especially based on their race, religion, sex, etc. Synonyms: narrow-minded, bigoted, intolerant Biased: having a tendency to show favour towards or against one group of people or one opinion for personal reasons; making ...


3

Consider: Spicy: flavoured with or fragrant with spice. Piquant: having a pleasantly sharp taste or appetizing flavour. Tangy: having a strong, piquant flavour or smell. Peppery: strongly flavoured with pepper or other hot spices Picante: (of food) spicy. (Oxford Dictionaries)


3

You are probably looking for spicy or hot: adjective (FOOD) ​containing ​strong ​flavours from ​spices. hot food contains strong spices that cause a burning feeling in your mouth, piccante. The sauce is very hot – be careful! (Cambridge Dictionary)


3

Consider, class (Education) chiefly US a group of students who graduated in a specified year: the class of '53. CED graduating class The body of students who graduate together this year. WordNet by Farlex


0

So one of the students is a "specialty- master". First is the hyphening rule to compound when introduced to new terms, then after it will qualify or disqualify common usage, but you just have to see if it gets any recognition. The general public usually adopts much quicker when spoken to by politicians, philosophers, celebrities and alike. However you ...


2

The word you may be looking for is cohort. Nathaniel achieved first place in the 2015 cohort of linguistics graduates.


3

I think you may use course: noun (CLASSES) a set of ​classes or a ​plan of ​study on a ​particular ​subject, usually ​leading to an ​exam or ​qualification: Tim did a three-year course in ​linguistics at Newcastle. (Cambridge University)


0

Perhaps you might mean duplicitous? Which is basically saying one thing (when it suits your immediate purpose) and the opposite, in absolute contradiction (when it suits your later purpose); in the hopes that no one will point out the inconsistency.


0

I think you are confused by what "keep the difference" means. Two of the definitions of difference are: the state or quality of being unlike 7a. the result of the subtraction of one number, quantity, etc, from another He doesn't mean 1: expect rate Y to continue, even though it is different from X. He means 7a: Retain possession of the ...


0

This means that your client would like to pay you at X USD per hour. Since he overpaid for this he would like you to take the remaining money and apply it to the next bill.


2

The extra amount that you received for your previous work will be subtracted from your next paycheck. In other words, if you make $500 a week and were paid $600, expect $400 next week. However, given that it's an issue of payment, it never hurts to clarify further.


1

Verbose/ Wordy using or containing more words that are needed (according to Oxford dictionary) Long-winded continuing for too long and therefore boring


1

The adjectival form of 'dialogue' (variant spelling is 'dialog') is dialogic also dialogical, adj. pertaining to or characterized by dialogue. [dialogic. (n.d.) Random House Kernerman Webster’s College Dictionary. (2010). Retrieved January 25 2016 from http://www.thefreedictionary.com/dialogic ] Thus, aside from technical senses of 'dialogic' ...


0

Fans of French cinema might be inclined to describe exceedingly wordy films as Rohmeresque, after the great Éric Rohmer, in most of whose movies practically nothing happens outside the conversations of the characters. A Google Books search turns up two dozen unique matches for Rohmeresque, going back to this one from The New York Times Film Reviews (1975) ...


0

The dialogues were verbose or prolix.


-3

Must as a general rule is used as only option or one of the important options. For example if I say, you must go to school for learning this language and I say you should go to school for learning this language then the difference is in first sentence I am telling you that it is not possible to learn this language without going to school while in second ...


0

George is cutting off his nose to spite his face by attacking John. "Cutting off the nose to spite the face" is an expression used to describe a needlessly self-destructive over-reaction to a problem: "Don't cut off your nose to spite your face" is a warning against acting out of pique, or against pursuing revenge in a way that would damage oneself more ...


-2

Petard https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Petard George made a petard of himself by attacking John.


3

"Debased" : lower the moral character of (someone). George debased himself by attacking John


-1

"Dishonored", "Defamed" and "Disgraced" all mean the same thing. Take your pick.


0


2

There's an expression: "Whoever slings mud, loses ground." It means that when you demean someone else, you demean yourself as well. "Mudslinging" means insulting or attacking another person in order to harm his reputation or get him metaphorically dirty. "Losing ground" means falling behind in a competition, or being forced to move backwards. And it's ...


1

It's a third party opinion. How about simply "George made a fool out of himself by attacking John".


3

The problem with "slinging mud" or even getting into a "mudfight" with someone is that you'll often end up covered in the same mud. In fact, it's so very likely, that the concept is specifically stated in the definition example... Casting aspersions with intent to discredit. The campaign degenerated into mutual mudslinging, each candidate trying to ...


0

If you attack him publicly on this, you'll only be pissing into the wind.


8

George scored an own-goal by attacking John.?


41

You could consider using the verb backfire which means: (Of a plan or action) have an opposite and undesirable effect to what was intended: 'overzealous publicity backfired on her'. Your example (You need to change the word order): George's attack on John backfired on himself. [Oxford Online Dictionary]


33

George shot himself in the foot by attacking John. To do or say something that inadvertently undermines one's interests. TFD


0

It's called fancy, just kidding it's usually called: Fence builder A carpenter can build a fence too, well, if it's made of wood, of course, anything related to woodworking can be done by a carpenter.


38

George undermined himself by attacking John. ie, 'mining' under what respect you have, causing your own self to 'fall'.


2

A charlatan may use chicanery; i. e., "actions or statements that trick people into believing something that is not true; deception or trickery," but they are not synonyms. "Charlatan": a person who falsely pretends to know or be something in order to deceive people." (Merriam-Webster)


1

A basic difference is that personnel refers to many people and employee refers to one individual. Oftentimes, in a company, there will be a "personnel department" that handles employment, benefits, hiring, and other tasks related to the employees of the company. "Personnel department" is also known as "Human Resources" or "HR." Some temporary employment ...



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