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0

If the complicated language is deliberately intended to confuse, you might say it is obfuscated, cryptic or obscure. On the other hand, if it is more of a stylistic feature, perhaps expressing something about the character of the author, you could say it is arcane or ostentatious or overwrought. (As a pedantic aside, "accepting" and "failing to reject" are ...


3

The first sentence is verbose and uses a convoluted language. verbose: Using or expressed in more words than are needed: much academic language is obscure and verbose ODO convoluted: (Especially of an argument, story, or sentence) extremely complex and difficult to follow: the film is let down by a convoluted plot in which nothing ...


1

While not considered neutral, haughty tends to be one who disdains those below him. I understand that the idea of superiority is not intended but it would be understood that disdain of bad manners would strongly imply a connection between bad manners and the people who would employ them.


1

Majority is overused, anyway. Best to restrict it to matters of voting. Usually, the word most works just fine. Instead of majoritatively, use mostly.


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The term for a four month period is quadrimester. Quad = 4 mense= month


1

Yes, see: Wiktionary: Majoritively By means of a majority. (proscribed) Consisting of more than half (50%); predominantly. However, it certainly isn't a common word, and honestly, I don't see that it fits well in the example you gave. You might instead choose "usually", "frequently", "commonly" or "most often" instead.


0

'Smug' is also a possibility. It is worth considering at least.


2

Often when someone finds a new word, they need to look up not only that word, but also others. Then you'll understand not just one word, but several. Abjection: a low or downcast state: each confession brought her into an attitude of abasement - H.L. Menchken. See: abasement, degradation, humiliation, decadence, decadency, degeneracy, degeneration, depth ...


2

'Supercilious' is what you are looking for.


0

It means exactly what it says: the hands of a sparrow. This is a literary metaphor, so you have to figure it out for yourself. If somebody told you that so and so had hands like a sparrow’s, what would that be saying to you? Whatever you come up with, that’s what it means. Although your question is, as far as I can tell, new to ELU, it has been often ...


2

The quotation is from the English translation of García Márquez’s book “One hundred years of solitude”. (Actually, you ought to give us this information and not expect us to look it up.) It means “hands like a sparrow’s claws”. It is not a common expression in English, but any speaker of the language will understand it.


1

"Intellectual snobbery" pretty much fits the bill. It's a pejorative term for prejudice against people or pursuits who/which are perceived (the implication is, wrongly perceived) as insufficiently intellectual. An example of intellectual snobbery: A person prefers opera to comic books purely because opera is perceived as 'high art' and comic books are ...


0

Thin hands and long nails. I couldn't find a link, though.


1

So, was I too naive to believe "use 10 cent words"? Yes, that was ridiculous. The world may not be simply about "getting ideas across"? If you delete the "may" we then have a true sentence: The world has nothing to do with "getting ideas across". As Napoleon said: "The world is about getting power, nothing else." The world is about making ...


1

A forecast is a prediction of something in the future and is most often used in this context. That said, it appears that futurecast is now synonymous in weather reports; Googling "futurecast" leads to dozens of weather reports. So, my guess is that someone started using this and it caught on and is now acceptable.. though I prefer forecast and "futurecast" ...


1

Although they are Greek words, sympatheroi (plural), sympathera (feminine singular) and sympatheros (masculine singular) could work well. The words mean "my child's parent(s)-in-law", literally "co-parent(s)". They are used in the first person (Hello, Sympathera!) as well as the third person. Sympatheroi has a niche use in the Uniform Parish Regulations ...


1

transparent & skin-tone Note that 'skin-tone' applications can also be "transparent," which is, actually, translucent.


1

Water lotion and milk lotion/skin milk are common names for those, though I am not sure if there are specific terms that are used as definitions.


8

A slice is always a piece, but a piece is not always a slice. In general, a slice is a portion created with a single cut, and either it is wedge-shaped, or it is relatively thin in one of its dimensions because it is a cross-sectional cut of a much longer object; while a piece is a portion created by any means at all (cutting, tearing, shattering, biting, ...


-3

(I'm not a native speaker, so take this with a grain of salt) IMHO, "piece" is used for uncountable nouns, like "fruit" ("piece of fruit"), for one in a group or kind of things, or some abstract part of a whole. "Slice" seems to me should be used when you want a portion of something that can be divided in parts. So, in the case of pizza, asking for "a ...


0

I would lean toward specification. We create detailed design specifications or simply design specifications. These encompass the appearance and behavior, and provide guidance for implementation while not allowing deviation from the embodied concepts.


1

I have never heard them described at conceptions, but I often hear the term 'concepts' to describe documents produced during the early stages of a project, but I would usually expect to see design mock-ups rather than read about features. I think it could still work for your purpose, however. For me, Conceptual design is suggestive of a new, innovative ...


2

While it is somewhat broader, the term gloater may apply to observe or think about something with triumphant and often malicious satisfaction, gratification, or delight: gloat over an enemy's misfortune [Merriam-Webster] If you will accept a phrase and want to be a bit literary, you could call the person a smug Cassandra (as noun a Cassandra) A ...


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The first step would be to create a top level layout. This displays the appearance and major features of the site. You can use this to show your customers how the site meets their goals. This is also used to drive the detailed design and implementation steps.


0

Self-centered certainly applies: limited to or caring only about yourself and your own needs Very closely related to egocentric: regarding everything only in relation to oneself; selfish; confined in attitude or interest to one's own needs or affairs. Shallow: Lacking depth of intellect, emotion, or knowledge, Unfeeling: Not sharing in the ...


3

You could go for inebriates as well. From thefreedictionary.com in·e·bri·ate (n-br-t) tr.v. in·e·bri·at·ed, in·e·bri·at·ing, in·e·bri·ates To make drunk; intoxicate. To exhilarate or stupefy as if with alcohol.


-1

Perhaps 'subtheory' 'praxis' 'scaffolding' ...


-3

It's short for "God's Little Acre" -- -> "God's Little Acre is a 1933 novel by Erskine Caldwell about a dysfunctional farming family in South Carolina obsessed with sex and wealth." - Wikip. The joke is: "Ty has promised to donate any profits generated by a 1-acre (4,000 m2) parcel of the farm to the church, but is terrified that gold will be found on ...


2

God's acre is a name for a churchyard or burial ground. It comes from the German "Gottesacker", which literally means "field of God". It has been in use since 1610–20. ( Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary) It comes from a Christian belief that the dead will rise again after the second coming of Jesus Christ. In this way, the deceased's ...


0

One of the meanings of exemplar[1] : a model or pattern to be copied or imitated: So when you say "he listed several exemplars", if the aim is to specify that he listed several (original) patterns/models to prove/demonstrate his point. ...the usage can be justified. However,the sentence #2 appears wordy. E.g. With regard to th.ese ...


1

[I don't think I can answer this succinctly, but if I ramble on for long enough I can try and convey the meaning for you] In its most boring meaning, an exemplar is just something which is intended to be copied by other people. However, this, I believe, is not the meaning that the Original Poster has doubts about. So, what I discuss below is the following ...


1

Maybe one or more of the following words/compound words will suffice: essential component fundamental part stepping stone


0

Whether long face is idiomatic or literally physically descriptive can be determined by the context. The idiomatic expression is far more common. Commentary on someone's literal long face would be quite personal and possibly discourteous. Idiomatic use: Why all the long faces in here? Did Grandma just die? Physically descriptive: Alice looked in the ...


1

So, you could say she sent a thank you note for your thank you note ;) Yes, 'Cheeky' is an entirely appropriate word to use here.


0

How about unruly? : difficult to control : not readily ruled, disciplined, or managed (Or is that generally more applicable to crowds?)


1

You're spoilt for choice, there are many adjectives and a few nouns which describe the woman's behaviour adequately. You might need to rely on a combination of two or three terms. boorish rough and bad-mannered; coarse: "boorish behaviour" mulish stubborn; obstinate; headstrong (if she willfully disobeys standard protocol despite regular admonitions) ...


1

Matt Gutting's suggestion of the American term scofflaw probably comes closest to what you are getting at. The girl in question is also a persistent rule-breaker. In addition, Americans might describe her as being entitled or displaying a sense of entitlement.


-1

I'm always partial to the term "megalomaniac." It usually refers to someone who is actually in a position of power, flaunts it, and doesn't let others forget about it. But I see no reason it couldn't apply to a snobbish, undeserved sense of superiority, particularly if you're looking for an insulting or emotionally charged term.


0

The term rebel is the most fitting. Dissent, dissident, and dissension can be useful here but there are issues with there use, mostly that they aren't usually used in this context. From Mirriam-Webster: rebel noun : a person who opposes or fights against a government : a person who opposes a person or group in authority : a person who does not obey ...


2

Another possibility might be "Loose Cannon" which can mean a person who is out of control, does whatever they want with no regard for others, possibly creating danger for others in the process.


0


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The term I would expect to be used for such a person is prima donna. : a person who thinks she or he is better than everyone else and who does not work well as part of a team or group (Source: Merriam-Webster) If instead, you want to emphasize her lack of regard of workplace order, I would suggest insolent. : rude or impolite : having or ...


0

Offender comes to mind: n. One that offends, especially one that breaks a public law. Insubordinate, as a noun, also: n. a person who is [not submitting to authority; disobedient]. The first link above also leads to several synonyms of offender that may also prove useful: Wrongdoer Malfeasant Other scathing synonyms include transgressor, ...


1

contumacious (kon-too-may'-shus) adjective 1. stubbornly perverse or rebellious; willfully and obstinately disobedient.


7

She seems, in a word, to be insubordinate, both to policy and regulation and to her superiors. not obeying, or not showing respect to, someone who has authority over you source: Macmillan


1

Rogue is another possibility. From Merriam-Webster: used to describe something or someone that is different from others in usually a dangerous or harmful way From dictionary.reference.com: no longer obedient, belonging, or accepted and hence not controllable or answerable; deviating, renegade: "a rogue cop; a rogue union local"


-2

Maybe she is trying to grab your attention. Your, meaning, the plural of the whole class or whole school. You should perhaps lavish praise upon her, telling her how charming and extraordinary she is. And then when opportune, reveal to her that she has narcissistic personality disorder. IOW, she has a narcissistic personality. The downside of your success ...


11

Scofflaw is a possibility: A contemptuous law violator Merriam-Webster.com


1

Nonconformist and maverick come to mind. They can both have positive and negative traits but they always disagree with others and tend not to follow rules intentionally. A passage from an article about nonconformists at workplace: (emphasis mine) These employees just want to rebel, regardless of the cause. They won’t follow procedure and are most likely ...



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