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In typography, normal characters are said to sit on the baseline, the provided Wikipedia link says (in part) the baseline is the line upon which most letters "sit" and below which descenders extend.


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I'm not sure there are unambiguous, widely used precise terms for this, but this is what I've come up with: autophobia: a fear of being alone or of one's self So this one has two meanings at best, and the fear of loneliness is the better known one. However there are sources that support the second meaning as well: Autophobia may mean one of two ...


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There are a few interesting options but most of them just describe the situation straightforwardly: "I... I just saw her last week," he said, trailing off. "She can't be..." "I... I just saw her last week," he said, growing quiet. "She can't be..." "I... I just saw her last week," he said, suddenly whispering. "She can't be..." "I... I ...


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Here are the relevant definitions in Merriam-Webster's Eleventh Collegiate Dictionary (2003): aphorism n [etymology omitted] (1528) 1 : a concise statement of a principle 2 : a terse formulation of a truth or sentiment : ADAGE ... apothegm n [etymology omitted] (ca. 1587) : a short, pithy, and instructive saying or formulation : APHORISM And ...


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He may put in just enough effort to learn some trivia to impress others. Is the need to impress others with something that isn't a total fabrication the most important aspect of the word you are searching for? Is it alright if the word is vulgar slang? If you answered yes to both, then search no more, here's part of Wikipedia's discussion on the ...


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Well, apparently I'm the oldest person in the vicinity because I can tell you for certain that "red" in this context does not refer to blood, Valentine's Day, or anger. Nor is it a vague reference to something psychedelic. Reds were (are?)* downers, typically Seconal, which some folks consider(ed)* a good-time drug. In addition to the reference in ...


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I think the best one is SWINDLE. (especially when you deceive him/her to get money).


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I would say that Y was double-crossed. Or X double-crossed Y.


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"Account manager" is the usual business terminology, but the UK implementation of EU data protection rules has the term "data controller". This is somewhat technical. Others have suggested "agent", but "my agent" implies that the person works for you. "Representative" shortened to "rep" is similar but sounds better to me.


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How about "agent", like an insurance agent? Another option would be "case manager" (literal translation), but then there would need to be a case for them to be in charge of.


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If the item that separates is being emphasized, it can be used in this way. For example, I could say, "my home in the Midwest US is separated from Europe by the Atlantic Ocean." In fact, there's a lot of land between us too, and some mountains as well, but I'm pointing out the fact that the ocean is the biggest obstacle between us. Perhaps your colleagues ...


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I would say in a less discrete context, your colleague's approach can work quite well. For example: Lisa and her great-great-grandmother grew up in the same small town, separated by two world wars, a depression, and decades of change. I agree, though: your example using weekdays is pretty jarring.


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I'd say, in this case, that "separate," used in this context, implies that you're listing all the things that separate those two days, so saying that Monday and Friday are separated by Wednesday is incorrect usage. Either of your suggestions would be better.


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Generically speaking, people entrusted to take care of something for you become custodians of that which they are protecting. Typically custodians of large amounts of money are referred to trustees. In your case, your company has arranged for an internal means by which to mitigate the risks associated with the safekeeping of computer data specific to each ...


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One definition of there is "in or at that place" (Merriam-Webster). M-W gives some example sentences: Stand over there. [Stand in that place.] Put the package there on the table. [Put the package in that place on the table. Turn there at the church. [Turn at that place at the church.] So when you say "My cousins learned Korean there," it's a ...


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It sounds to me like it should be (insurance) case manager or (insurance) case worker


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In the "service firm" sector, another possibility related to liaison is "account rep" or "account representative", the person at a company who deals with matters concerning a subset of customers/clients/accounts to which they have been assigned. In an insurance company, it could be a "claims adjuster" -- the person who is handling a claim you submitted.


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With many service providers, I've run into account manager, as the person in charge of my account at their company, and thus my contact with the company, who's familiar with my needs and history with the company.


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From Oxford Advanced Learner's: liaison - communication or cooperation that facilitates a close working relationship between people or organizations My liaison at the insurance company is in charge of my case. Perhaps, for a less formal-sounding option, the word agent is colloquially used. From Merriam-Webster: agent - a person who does ...


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Proponent(s) would be a great fit. From Oxford's entry: proponent (noun) a person who advocates a theory, proposal, or project A very similar word that works is proposer(s).


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Bakery refers to: A place where products such as bread, cake, and pastries are baked or sold. Also called bakeshop. (AHD). To refer to the production and warehouse processes, I think you can use the expression: Bakery production facility. Bakery Production Facility for D.....’ Donuts at Sharjah Industrial Area Located at the ...


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This problem actually lies in the words you choose to use after these words. I am afraid that I will ruin the relationship. I fear that I will ruin the relationship. I'm scared that I will ruin the relationship. I'm concerned about ruining the relationship. I'm worried that I will ruin the relationship. These all have very close meanings ...


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Toward is a graphical variant of towards, meaning it is the same word which can be spelt in 2 different ways.


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I would say desk job indicates a job requiring sitting. In terms of sitting position I would say do not slouch but sit up straight. And in terms of back-friendly I would recommend good posture.


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Sedentary would describe a very inactive occupation. However, it doesn't specifically mean sitting. Posture might work for sitting position... Seated posture to be more specific, but, again, it doesn't directly specifically mean sitting.


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A profession in which one sits for long periods is a sedentary profession, and a seated position might also be described as sedentary. A back-friendly posture might be called ergonomic, but that sense is more of a marketing buzzword than a "proper" usage. I might just stick with back-friendly for that.


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Like all that pertains to crime, it seemed never to have known a youthful era. This sentence says a couple things. It says that everything that pertains to crime seems to have never known a youthful era. It also says that 'it' (a wooden jail, apparently?) is a member of this class of things, and that therefore 'it' also seemed to have never known a ...


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Lounge is old formal. Where you would have two rooms in a house to sit in (apart from the Drawing room for the gentlemen to withdraw to, from the Dining Room, for cigars and brandy after the meal) In around the 19th century (I think) the term Living Room was used more commonly. Front room just means the living room is at the front of the house as ...


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Aside from suggest, the salesperson may be trying to market the substitute item...? to do things that cause people to know about and want to buy (something) (From Merriam)


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It falls under zoomorphism. Zoomorphism is a derivative of a Greek word zōon that means animal and morphē means form or shape. It is a literary technique in which the animal attributes are imposed upon non-animal objects, humans, and events and animal features are ascribed to humans, gods and other objects. literarydevices.net


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They are generally referred to as guardian statues. One of the most popular types is guardian lions. For example, Chinese guardian lions ("Foo Dogs") are well-known and it is mentioned that they share symbolism with Staffordshire dogs: While Staffordshire dogs originated in 19th-century England, like foo dogs they were used as symbols of protection and ...


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Although the word "fetish" has several meanings, (from a magical object, to a sexual obsession/perversion) it would be appropriate in your example: "Red hair is one of my biggest fetishes."


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You've left a comment underneath an answer here that provides a critical piece of information: You're looking for an alternative to turn-on, which isn't sufficiently neutral. That being the case, I'm not sure a noun is what you want. I just checked a thesaurus, which offered: attraction, aphrodisiac, thrill, stimulant, rush, inducement and I don't ...


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"Turn-on" is probably the best word to fit there. Here's the definition: To be or cause to become interested, pleasurably excited, or stimulated. Or to excite or become excited sexually. "Attraction" is another one: the action or power of evoking interest, pleasure, or liking for someone or something


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Here are the main guidelines to choose the right suffix among -sion, -tion, and -cion. The first two are the more common while -cion is actually quite rare. (ODO) Words ending in -sion If the ending is pronounced as in confusion, then it should be spelled -sion. Here are some examples: collision; division; revision; persuasion; explosion; ...


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Teenagers are notorious for being contradictory. or Teenagers have a tendency to be paradoxical. They say one thing, but do another According to Collins Dictionary: paradox 1. a seemingly absurd or self-contradictory statement that is or may be true ⇒ religious truths are often expressed in paradox 2. a self-contradictory proposition, such ...


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People attending a funeral are known as mourners. The closest relative(s) of the deceased can be said to be the chief mourner(s). Members of the deceased's family might also be designated as close family mourners. I am not sure that these descriptions extend beyond the time of the funeral and its wake, however. A week later they might be known simply as ...


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The bereaved: verb (be bereaved) Be deprived of a close relation or friend through their death: she had recently been bereaved (as adjective bereaved) bereaved families (as noun the bereaved) those who counsel the bereaved ODO


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You can try indifference or nonchalance. Also, superficial Concerned with or comprehending only what is apparent or obvious; not deep or penetrating emotionally or intellectually


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both caring about everything (eg. Marks, Social Standing, Achievements), and yet not caring about everything (eg. not doing homework, procrastinating, purposefully aggravating others) Your question is confused, you are not describing a person/feeling that at the same time cares and not-cares for everything. The person you describe discriminates ...


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I agree that it will probably be difficult to find a single word for this. How about "steady half-heartedness" or "courteous ennui"?


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I think' Apprehension 'is a good word to define such feelings As an example: I was apprehensive about the outcome of the new project undertaken by me.


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You might manage to express that idea with // insouciant which is such a self-concious sort of word that although it means 'devil-may-care' it implies a bit of an act. Otherwise perhaps a paradox: 'deliberately unperturbed', 'with studied indifference', 'puritanically laid-back'. Mix and match until it resonates. //Insouciant 1829 careless, ...


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I rarely recommend brute-force as a learning approach, but I will recount the following experience: I grew up in Europe and had to take the American SAT college entrance exam many years ago. I bought an SAT study book containing a massive list of 1500 advanced English words, and spent 2 months memorizing them (often using mnemonic techniques, which I'd ...


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The pattern you see is by no means a rule for English pronunciation. For instance, the word "exit" is pronounced the same whether it is used as a verb or noun. Most of the words that do follow the convention have a pattern of a prefix and a root in their construction: conduct, combat, direct, project, attribute, increase, etc. Again, not a rule, but ...


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What an observant question! The initial-stress-derived noun rule you reference is just a convention. Buttress isn't one of the words where it typically applies, i.e. it's commonly pronounced with similar emphasis in its noun and verb forms. There are many words where this occurs: refrain and accord are two examples.


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I think it depends on your level and aim. For a trip abroad vocabulary lists for specific situations are good. Archer Martin, Nobel chemist taught himself useful Dutch from Detective stories. As you suggest, look up words that are difficult and jot them down. Stephen Fry tells people he read dictionaries. So long as you enjoy the books, the most natural ...


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First off, Plethorically isn't even a standard word. See this ngram. It's not even listed as a word derivative in Oxford So no, I wouldn't use it if I were you. Now for using it with obnoxious: "plethorically means an excessive or overabundant amount of something": No it doesn't. You're thinking of plethora. And maybe it's just me, but "a plethora of ...


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Tim, there is a term "neurasthenia". It is more a medical diagnosis than what you are talking about, but I thought you might find it interesting. If you Wiki it, you will read about Buzz Aldrin suffering from it, with a meaning similar to Scott M's "lassitude" or Little Eva's "enervation", but you should know that Russian psychiatrists make a bigger deal of ...



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