New answers tagged

-1

Litotes is the word you may have heard in class.


3

The phrase goes back as far as the Roman poet Juvenal who, in the late 1st or early 2nd century, wrote: let her be handsome, charming, rich and fertile; let her have ancient ancestors ranged about her halls; let her be more chaste than the disheveled Sabine maidens who stopped the war--a prodigy as rare upon the earth as a black swan! "Black swan" at ...


0

Could be an awkward translation of The king is dead, long live the king! The original phrase was translated from the French Le roi est mort, vive le roi !, which was first declared upon the accession to the French throne of Charles VII after the death of his father Charles VI in 1422. In France, the declaration was traditionally made by the duc d'Uzès, ...


1

Live on To persist; endure: Although The Beatles broke up decades ago, their music lives on. thefreedictionary.com They are saying that although the person may be dead, his legacy is still persisting.


-2

I think you're looking for "criminalized!"


2

I owe you (one) is a colloquial expression: (informal) said to thank someone for helping you and as a way of saying that you will do something for them in the future: Thanks for the help, Bill - I owe you one. (Cambridge Dictionary)


2

Entering "alone" into http://www.oldenglishtranslator.co.uk/ comes up with a few: syndrig 1. separate alone single not joined with others distinct ánhaga solitary being lone dweller recluse one dwelling alone ánstapa lonely wanderer Further looking about comes up with usages, here's ánstapa in lines 12-15 of The Panther: ... Is þæt ...


2

in·form·ant inˈfôrmənt/ noun a person who gives information to another. another term for informer. In this case it would be plural informants I could be this single word choice. As informants take part in the "acting" of an investigation.


2

Narcissistic comes from a morality tale about vanity so I'd use it for someone too vain for their own good. 'Conceited' has more of a sense of arrogance and unjustified self-regard.


1

Conceited has more of a sense of someone who has come to learn this state (through their view of their achievements), whereas narcissistic is more of a subconcious or innate condition - hence narcissistic being applied frequently to children (or others who have still an opportunity to learn). For examply, in psychology, children are described as going ...


3

In English, you'd say that you "placed out" of a class. That means you get credit for it without having taken it, and it implies that you took some kind of placement exam or assessment test that demonstrated that you had sufficiently learned the course material. From The Free Dictionary: Place out of To qualify for a waiver of some requirement or ...


0

Maybe he means the fact that there exists the other meaning of stool, 'a small seat without a back'. Usage of the word stool in this context is very prevalent, particularly in India.


1

Since the topic is code, I'd suggest efficiency, readability, or brevity, along with the previously mentioned clarity and simplicity.


5

It is just called a "stake". A piece of wood or other material, usually long and slender, pointed at one end so as to be easily driven into the ground as a marker or a support or stay.


0

You raise animals and grow plants.


-2

If livestock is propagated for something it produces, then it is raised, i.e. we raise sheep for wool, chickens for eggs, and cows for milk. If they are being harvested then they are grown, i.e. we grow lamb, chickens and cattle for meat.


0

When a non-finite verb form is the object of a preposition, it is almost always a gerund, i.e., the present participle (or -ing) form of a verb used as a noun. The only reason we can give is that it's idiomatic in English, which is only a way of saying that's the way it is. Of course, this being English, there's an exception: He was accused of breaking ...


1

I always thought of it as an "insulating sleeve."


17

lingua franca From the Merriam Webster dictionary: lin·gua fran·ca \ˈliŋ-gwə-ˈfraŋ-kə\ noun : a language that is used among people who speak various different languages Full Definition often capitalized : a common language consisting of Italian mixed with French, Spanish, Greek, and Arabic that was formerly spoken in Mediterranean ...


0

Are you talking about the "steampunk" fashion/style? It is a low-tech homage inspired by the writing of Arthur Conan Doyle and H.G.Wells. (Think: 19th century mad-scientist or inventor.)


1

In forty years working in IT when referring to hardware we always used the word cable when referring to something that carried data from one device to another: ethernet cables, printer cables, monitor cables, never a cord. The connection that supplied power was a power cord, never a cable. But that was in the context of people who worked with hardware. ...


2

Both terms are non-specific and the two overlap quite a bit. A braided steel cable (with no insulation) is used to pull cable cars up hills in San Francisco, while a braided chord (with no wires) is used to pull down the window shade next to me in this room. One definition of cable is that it consists of multiple strands. By this definition a single ...


0

A wire is its own object, while a cable consists of 2 or more wires (or some other materials) that are wrapped in some sort of coating. For example, your laptop charger cord contains conductive metallic wires inside it. A wire hanger has no protective coating outside of the wire.


1

gewgaw, as defined by Wiktionary Showy; unreal; pretentious. It has a nice 600 year history, too. 1678, Dryden, John, All for Love, Scene II, The rattle of a globe to play withal, This gewgaw world, and put him cheaply off. Another example: 1855, Alfred, Lord Tennyson, Maud; A Monodrama, X, stanza 1, Seeing his gewgaw castle shine, New as ...


0

Kitsch 1: something that appeals to popular or lowbrow taste and is often of poor quality 2: a tacky or lowbrow quality or condition "Kitsch." Merriam-Webster.com. Merriam-Webster, n.d. Web. 13 May 2016. There is a strong air of, shall we say, unoriginality about kitsch. Of course, if it was done a long time ago, we call it neoclassical.


0

I would use the phrase "purely cosmetic", as it reflects that the only function is to affect the appearance of something rather than its substance.


0

Throw your weight around. from Cambridge Dictionary on-line disapproving (UK also throw your weight about) › to act as if you have a lot of power or authority Also turn on the heat, come on strong describe more aggressive behaviour than is strictly necessary.


0

Try wedge in to force (one's way) into or through


1

It sounds like you have tried to apply the same rule as seen in words like "bovine", "feline", etc, but with the latin for the tortoise family, which is "testudo". I'd expect the word generated from this process to be "testudine", not the words you list. This does appear to exist as a word: http://www.thefreedictionary.com/Testudine Strictly speaking ...


2

Old English (as also the Early Modern English of Shakespeare) distinguished the parts of the leaves. Petals then, as now, are modified leaves. The Old English word approximating the meaning of 'petal' is blÆd: Old English blÆd Modern English a leaf blade (From Old English to Modern English Translator, 'leaf'.)


7

It would appear that Shakespeare used "leaves" (and, presumably, "leaf"): Crossing the sea from England into France, This fellow here, with envious carping tongue, Upbraided me about the rose I wear; Saying, the sanguine colour of the leaves Did represent my master's blushing cheeks, When stubbornly he did repugn the truth About a certain ...


0

Sorry guys for doing this question here. I wanted to delete the question but i am unable to do. I think there is another place which is more appropriate to do this question it is Stack-exchange "English Language Learners". I have done the question there. Thanks all of you guys who have commented, down voted, up voted and answered my question. The question ...


1

The most common or important definitions are listed first in the dictionary. For example, cat: noun a small domesticated carnivore, Felis domestica or F. catus, bred in a number of varieties. any of several carnivores of the family Felidae, as the lion, tiger, leopard or jaguar, etc. Slang.a person, especially a man.a devotee of jazz. ...


0

When you search for a word in google, it lists out antonyms and synonyms. Kindly refer to the example sentence given below the word. It will surely help you in understanding the context in which its use. Pickup 5 words to start with and then as you progress collect more words. Also,maintain a diary which you can refer at the end of every week.


2

Although, as others have noted, stool is mainly used when discussing medical conditions related to fecal matter and is almost never used informally, it does appear in other contexts once in a while. For example, in a classic Saturday Night Live skit, Phil Hartman, playing Frank Sinatra, says to Sting, playing Billy Idol, "You don't scare me. I've got ...


1

Sometimes, the meaning of a word is defined by the context in which it is being used. I'd recommend to collect words from reading different pieces of text, than using a dictionary.


4

Be interesting to hear other examples of what the teacher considers to be formal words. How did the teacher define 'formal'? Does it mean words only used in certain settings or instances, words not commonly in use or just words that are not usually thought of, or perhaps are not specifically defined, as colloquialisms ? English is widely spoken around ...


12

"Stool" is more formal than poop or poo but sometimes more comfortable to say than feces or excrement. You could say "I've been having loose stool" to express that you don't quite have diarrhea, but it's somewhat in that direction. An example from Angel in Disguise: A Memoir The next morning after the children had their breakfast, I asked Verna ...


22

It is only ever used in a formal medical sense, with examples from the sixteenth century. Stool derives from the name given to an enclosed chamber, or commode, used for producing stools. The most usual form is in the plural. d. A discharge of fæcal matter of a specified colour, consistency, etc.; the matter discharged (chiefly pl.). (OED sense 5d). It is ...


1

This character is sort of a nickname for the Japanese flag (旭日旗/きょくじつはた) with its well-known symbol of the rising sun. If you can picture red stripes coming out of a great red sun, and then imagine the flag sitting on a baseball hat or a flagpole, you might have a slightly disrespectful, but a vivid mental picture of how the sport has become popular in the ...


1

iTunes calls them Plays and so do I.


0

Some good answers here but just wanted to add devil's advocate - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Devil%27s_advocate


1

"Contrarian" is a good term for someone who always has to bring up a contrary point. I like it because it is neutral, even though the behavior itself can be quite annoying. The noun form gives it dignity, as if there's an important role a contrarian plays in a group.


0

Consider, quester Someone making a search or inquiry. WordNet by Farlex He quested after his lost son. verbs.colorado.edu quest noun A long search for something that is difficult to find: a quest for the meaning of life Cambridge Dictionaries Online


0

The word bias has a negative connotation, its meaning what I could find from google :- inclination or prejudice for or against one person or group, especially in a way considered to be unfair Someone's inclination towards something can't necessarily be called as a bias unless it is for some unfair reasons. While apathy means showing lack of interest ...


0

Perhaps: She did some soul-searching after her son's death. soul-searching, noun: A penetrating examination of one's motives, convictions, and attitudes. adj: Displaying the characteristics of deep or painful self-analysis http://www.thefreedictionary.com/soul-searching


2

Many words have been used, but I don't think anyone mentioned that different terms are appropriate for different situations. "Biological father", or more unusual "genetic father" just describes the biological situation without any judgement. It will even be used to describe the husband of the wife who raised the child in cases where people doubt it. "My ...


2

I have heard this used: Bio-dad. It is often used as pejorative, though much less powerfully than "sperm donar". Most often used to refer to a biological father who is less involved than a step-father, or to a biological father who has little-to-no interaction with the child.


1

I would choose begetter to descibe this situation. I am German and we use the word "Erzeuger" which normally simply means "producer" but in the sense of relationship begetter is more apropriate I guess. (and besides I really don't think it is so wrong to use a special term for this)


-7

If you consider all of humanity over time, the proper word is "normal". Matrimony is not the only way that children appear. It was only recognized by culture a few thousand years ago. It may well be that people did not even understand that a "father" was necessary for a woman to get pregnant until perhaps 10,000 or 20,000 years ago. In many parts of the ...



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