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1

A B ------------------ |l rear r| H|e i|C |f g| G|t h|D | front t| ------------------ F E G = lower left H = upper left A = top left B = top right C = right upper etc. People might not understand what you mean, though, without a legend or diagram.


1

I departed from Jared is technically correct, but it sure sounds wrong. When I read it I'm left questioning - not "who is Jared?", but "what is Jared?". Separated sounds a lot better, or perhaps I parted ways with Jared.


1

You are trying to be discreet: : not likely to be seen or noticed by many people Merriam-Webster


1

The first part implies that she is kind of nervous about it since she's never experienced anything like this before. Therefore, I'd cross out eagerness and excitement. Based on the definition of apprehension on dictionary.com: anticipation of adversity or misfortune; suspicion or fear of future trouble or evil I'd choose fear. She's likely to be ...


0

In your example sentence, answers 2 and 3 are most likely, but 1 is also possible. It could be a mixture of these, based on further context. How would the context make a difference? Mainly, it depends on the type of situation she's in. Her friend is taking her to the bridal shop to get fitted for her dress. This is the first time she's been a bridesmaid. ...


0

On certain days, I take an odd route home to protect my privacy. OR in order to have some time to myself.


1

The distinction you are looking for does not exist, however, if you include both terms within the same context, your readers may intuit your meaning. If you want to be completely sure no misunderstandings occur, fight the urge to put it so succinctly. Simply write it out: The right handle on the front side vs. the front handle on the left side. or ...


1

I would say that the phrase 'front-left' in that situation is completely ambiguous. The reason is that a box does not have hands. An observer will have no option but to relate to their own point of view. If I am standing at the back of the box and facing it, front-left means E. If I stand at the front of the box and face it, front-left means F. The same ...


2

I know of no unambiguous way in English to refer to any single handle out of the eight you’ve indicated on your ASCII box without resorting to circumlocutions. Front-left and left-front are both inherently ambiguous, and I am not aware of anyone distinguishing them in any meaningful way. The simplest and least invasive rephrasing I can think of would be to ...


0

right-rear and left-rear are far more common than rear-right and rear-left. The same is true with right-front and left-front. P.S. The other handles are unnecessary :)


2

I don't believe there is a verb that describes the OP's request: a reluctance to casually meet (or be seen by) friends in public places. A person who prefers not to exchange pleasantries with strangers might be called unsociable, an introvert, or a deep thinker; but someone who cannot even bring themself to say “Hello” to a colleague or a friend they ...


-3

elusive, shy, reclusive, fabian, secretive, surreptitious


1

enisle The Oxford Dictionaries define enisle as: Isolate on or as if on an island. It supplies this example: "in the sea of life enisled, we mortal millions live alone" In the context of the question at hand, the subject is purposefully isolating him/herself from social contact for private time. The beauty of enisle is the word picture it paints of ...


1

If you want to connote the fact that you are trying to avoid being seen while you are going out, you could use the phrase slip out, as in "I slipped out" or "I slipped out of the building". From the Free Dictionary’s definition for slip out: [for someone] to exit quietly without bothering anyone. (of something) to sneak out of a place unnoticed.


-3

Reclusive is the word your looking for.


1

Dodge from Dictionary.com: verb (used with object), dodged, dodging. to elude or evade by a sudden shift of position or by strategy: Used in a sentence: In high school I would dodge the headmaster, while walking around school, to avoid detention.


0

undercover; under cover When you do something under cover, it is done out of public view. Very often it is used in regards to investigatory work to describe an agent of law, such as "undercover officers." The expression is also commonly used to describe daylight, or lack of it, as in "under cover of darkness," or "under cover of nightfall." e.g. ...


2

I think sneak works really well here. It has less of the negative connotation implied by other suggestions like skulk, creep, and furtive. Example usage: I snuck/sneaked out for a minute to get a breath of fresh air. I am just going to sneak out for a minute to gather my thoughts. She likes her co-workers, but she enjoys sneaking out alone on occasion. ...


1

Inconspicuous; inconspicuously To travel inconspicuously means to go unnoticed, to not be seen, to not be conspicuous, to not stand out or to not be prominent. e.g. The police waited outside for the suspect unaware that he inconspicuously escaped behind them.


0

How about hiding from, as in: I am hiding from my friends so that I can have some time to myself. Hide from the Free Dictionary: To keep oneself out of sight or notice.


0

How about stealth? From Dictionary.com: Noun Secret, clandestine, or surreptitious procedure. A furtive departure or entrance.


1

If I take your question as 'the act of seeking solitude', as a verb, there are only two I can think of, both uncommon. 'Sequester' in the sense of setting aside someone or something apart from normal activity, or 'cloister', which describes people retreating from society(usually for religious reasons). You might say 'She's currently sequestered from all ...


-3

To creep, creeping around, or being creepy... Sentence: "I saw some guy creeping around the water tower the other night." ...just keep it on the down low cause nobody is supposed to know... LOL


1

I would use the word skulk. You are skulking about to avoid being seen. http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/skulk


3

I would say you are going out surreptitiously. A surreptitious action is done secretly. He made a surreptitious entrance to the club through the little door in the brick wall.


4

If you are being somewhat secretive about your movements, you are being furtive.


13

The word avoid pretty much sums it up as well as possible. If you were to run into your "friend", they may ask, "Hey, are you avoiding me?". You could also use dodge, although this feels a little more dynamic. It might be better suited for when you see your friend coming, and you slip into an alley to avoid being seen. You could also use duck in the same ...


2

In such a case, you would be going out incognito.


21

I sometimes take a different route so as to steer clear of friends or colleagues when I want a private moment. macmillandictionary.com


1

To shun may be used to to refer to that action: (tr) to avoid deliberately; keep away from. (Collins) I tend to shun places where I could meet colleagues and friends when I want to stay on my own.


18

You are taking evasive action, so as to evade (and avoid) those people. http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/evade


0

The whole sentence is a comparison statement. Maskull traveled a long way, and the mountains he saw appeared to not move at all as he approached them. In this sentence, the word as is used to compare two things: what the mountains looked like at the beginning of his voyage and what they looked like at the end. If you were to extend the sentence for easier ...


1

The key issue here involves the word them, which appears in the highlighted sentence in multiple editions of A Voyage to Arcturus. I think this word is a typo—and at least one edition of the book agrees with me. From David Lindsay, A Voyage to Arcturus (1963): Maskull gazed at the fantastically piled rock all around them. "I saw these rocks from ...


1

I think this more accurately illustrates the concept "The raised nail gets the hammer." Kind of the opposite of "the squeaky wheel gets the grease"! [


-2

"irritable" is usually used to mean "gets irritated" or "often gets irritated." I personally suggest it's a "poor" word - don't use it. When you use it, you pretty much have to add an adjective like "very"; on the whole it's just much clearer to say "she gets irritated easily." You can (as you should) also be much more specific that way: "cats irritate ...


1

irritable: On the verge of anger or frustration - usually used when the condition is relatively temporary or short-lived. Ex: "She's very irritable, it must be that time of the month." irascible: Argumentative, curmudgeonly - Describes a more permanent character flaw. Ex: "I won't shop there anymore, the owner is irascible." fractious: Someone who seems to ...


1

Stormy : indicative of or characterized by storms; tempestuous: stormy seas. also, turbulent a characterized by turbulence; tempestuous: turbulent waters. Rough: Characterized by violent motion; turbulent: rough waters. The Free Dictionary


0

Perhaps charged as in following? She charged into the room to see what was amiss.


1

I'd say that is either a hustler or a fraud. Hustler noun 1. an enterprising person determined to succeed; go-getter. Definition of fraud in English: noun [MASS NOUN] 1 Wrongful or criminal deception intended to result in financial or personal gain: 'he was convicted of fraud' [COUNT NOUN]: prosecutions for social security frauds ...


1

Depending on the connotation you'd prefer, consider: irrepressible - not able to be controlled or restrained. G cheat - (tr) to escape or avoid (something unpleasant) by luck or cunning: to cheat death. TFD It is possible to "beat the system" while playing by all it's rules. You find a path to success that the creators of the system never ...


-1

approximate articulate aspirate associate confederate desolate elongate ejaculate estimate filtrate graduate infiltrate initiate isolate moderate probate, and erect


0

A wag is a person who can be counted on to make the obvious joke when opportunity arises. It may not be negative enough though, as it does imply wittiness.


0

Some comments clarified that the context is terrain. In this case, you could say The road (or path, or ground, or whatever) dropped off sharply OR rose sharply. If you google these phrases, you'll see they're extremely common. (Next time, could you provide the context in your question, please?)


0

Jungle juice is the name given to an improvised mix of liquor that is usually served for group consumption. There are countless recipes and even websites devoted solely to jungle juice. The term has also been used for similar less-than-reputable alcoholic concoctions. –Wiki No, thanks. I drink whiskey, neat. I don't want any of your jungle juice.


2

Hope this table clarifies the usage. Note that in these examples, words smaller and greater perform two functions whereas less and lesser perform one function each. It is incorrect to say 3 is lesser than 5.


0

Personally, yes, I think you'd be edging close to try-hard status with your "reprehend". You'd have to deliver it to the right audience in a flow of similarly obscure vocabulary to avoid sounding laboured. So if you were channeling Jane Austen, I guess it would be OK. It is rare enough that some native speakers would think you had misspoken. English has ...


5

The closest that I can think of is a semordnilap. It's when a word or phrase makes another word or phrase when spelled backwards. https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/semordnilap Note that semordnilap is palindromes spelled backwards. :-)


0

I've heard this called a who's buried in Grant's tomb question. The answer is evident in the question itself. (I tried to find some documentation for this, but mostly I found a lot of nitpicking saying that Grant was not actually buried at the site of his tomb because he was interred in the large tomb structure, somewhat above ground level.)


2

If you are specifically referring to a change in height of a person (a human) - then we call that a "spurt", or more specifically a "growth spurt" - when a child grows inches taller, almost overnight.


6

I don't speak German, but looking at this page it seems to me Geländekante can apply to any abrupt change in "level". Those examples range from "height discontinuities" of hundreds/thousands of feet (cliffs, Ayers Rock) to mere inches (kerb between road and pavement, small mismatch in a loading bay area). So I think the short answer is there is no ...



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