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You might call him or her a true-lover. (Not a true lover.) Yes, I imagine that this was coined just now - no idea whether anyone else has ever used it or ever will. But I'll bet that it will be understood. But no -- it does not imply single love, but rather someone who believes in true love. Closer to what you are asking would be single-lover (also ...


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no exit boxed in hemmed in at an impasse in a blind alley at a dead end reached a stalemate (not quite the same) deadlocked (not quite the same) dead wrong guilty


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Nice answers all of you. I would prefer resigned


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After all answers given to this question, I have reached on one that is Loyal


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You can try these words: changeover - a change from one system or situation to another. conversion - the process of changing or causing something to change from one form to another. transformation - a marked change in form, nature, or appearance If you specify your requirement clearly, we can help you better. Source


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Not sure if there is a single, definite word for what you're looking for. But having worked for a long time in the software industry , the single most used phrase I've seen, that describes the process of "change of requirements" is- "Change Request". According to Wikipedia, "change request" is defined as- A change request is a document containing a ...


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I don't think there is a word for this. "Respecification" is tempting, but only exists in Wiktionary with dubious etymology ("re" + "specification"). It does not have any entry in the OED or any other dictionary I could find. It also yields a mere ~85,000 Google results, which these days is not an indication of common usage. Personally, I am a software ...


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I think respecification as a general term may convey the meaning: The act or process of respecifying; a change from a previous specification. Specification/Specifications: An explicit set of requirements to be satisfied by a material, product, or service. Ngram shows an increasing usage of the term since the 50s. Source: ...


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Responding to the updated question where you've clarified that you're hopelessly trapped and cannot escape, I suggest the most idiomatic description is: They've got you cornered Which is self-explanatory. Please note the distinction from @Joseph Neathawk's Painted yourself into a corner In the former scenario, they cornerned you; in the latter ...


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What about at mercy All of these answers are suggesting that the author is trying to describe a negative outcome. To me he seems to be trying to describe a situation where he is 'at the mercy of' an authority/situation/weather, having extinguished all of his possible action points. "At mercy" is not inherently desperate, it just shows acceptance and ...


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I got tripped up by Misogynist (a person who hates, dislikes, mistrusts, or mistreats women.) "Mi-so-guy-nist" when it's actually "mi-soj-uh-nist", as well as many others on this list.


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They have rather different meanings, depending on what counts as "meaning". They both assert the same thing, under the same circumstances. But their connotations are quite distinct. Although you are in possession of a valid visa presupposes that you have a valid visa. I.e, that you have a valid visa is a fact which the speaker acknowledges and cannot deny, ...


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Both indicate that a valid visa is not a sufficient condition for being permitted across the border. The one with although assumes that the addressee indeed has a valid visa. The one with even if allows for that as a possibility but does not assume it.


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There is no difference except that the first is poor style. Sentence 2 uses even if in its normal meaning. It introduces a condition that may or may not be true, just like if does. The difference to if is that even if implies an expectation that the statement in the main clause would normally not hold under the assumption. Sentence 1 uses although in a ...


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They are both accurate, but they have potentially different meanings. 1) Using the one with although indicates, in the example given, that the person concerned is indeed in possession of a valid visa. But 'although' they have a visa they will not necessarily be able to cross. 2) The second using even if can also be substituted in the above case, but it can ...


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No, one is not more correct than the other.


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The ONLY time there should EVER be an apostrophe in "it's" is when it's a contraction of "it" and "is". There is no apostrophe in the possessive form. Period.


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There is a little bit of information which would be more helpful in answering the question. Lacking that information, I assume that the image of the girl about which the comments were posted is not particularly lewd, and that the vulgar comments reflected the attitudes of the people who made the comments, and did not accurately describe the image itself. If ...


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'Hobson's Choice'--means one is given a choice but permitted only one choice. Named after Thomas Hobson (1544-1631) a livery stable owner in Cambridge England. To rotate his horses Hobson gave his customers the choice of taking the stall nearest the stable door or taking no stall at all. Hobson's choice is no choice.


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i wanted to put this in an answer, just so that people who may have read or contributed would see it pop into visibility. the word i was looking for was "sagaciously". i know it doesn't mean exactly what i took from it (from the context of usage), but normally when i hear of some manager or expert or someone "nodding sagaciously", there is an appearance of ...


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There are two aspects in which monogamous isn't exactly right: Monogamy is explicitly about spouses or at least partners, not about the first and last love of your life who maybe doesn't know about her luck yet, or worse, isn't as thrilled as she should be. Even serial monogamy is monogamy in the proper sense of the word. If 1 is not a problem, I would ...


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You could go with sobrinicide although (a) technically that would only refer to a cousin on your mother's side (patruelicide would be a paternal cousin) and (b) no one would know what you are talking about. Still, somebody has to coin new words, might as well be you. Edit: while I was typing this, Avner Shahar-Kashtan made the virtually identical ...


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@Josh61 gives a good answer using existing terms, but it shouldn't be too difficult to coin a more specific term - or is it? All these killing words are hybrid constructions, combining the -cide suffix (which can be traced back to Latin cida "cutter, killer, slayer") with a first element that is usually derived from Latin or Greek. So all you need to do is ...


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To my knowledge, there is no such accepted term. As Josh points out, parricide can be used to refer to any close relationship, though the main sense is that of killing a parent (i.e., patricide and/or matricide). For lack of an accepted, specific term, you could use one of two fairly rare, but etymologically sound, neologisms that have been coined: ...


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I think parricide is the correct term to use in your case: The murdering of one's father, mother, or other near relative. One who commits such a murder. Source: Killing one's relations: Source:http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_types_of_killing


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It's not exactly about the situation itself, but about the action. There's nothing left but to bite the bullet. Biting the bullet is an idiom for accepting the simple, obvious negative consequences. It's the opposite to worming your way out. You got in trouble, you plead guilty and accept the punishment.


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Impossible to avoid or prevent inevitable adjective impossible to avoid or prevent unavoidable adjective impossible to stop from happening inescapable adjective impossible to avoid or ignore unstoppable adjective impossible to prevent or stop uncontrollable adjective if a situation or event is uncontrollable, you cannot stop it, change it, or improve it ...


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I suppose there is a consensus that a single-word solution is not as easy as it sounds. I tried to find ones that would be close fits, but maybe these examples can lead to a hybrid that does take care of your needs. Soulmate seems like it would be a close single-word solution. However, I don't believe it guarantees love. Soulmate: a person ideally ...


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Such circumstances are often referred to as a fait accompli, borrowing from the French. A situation which cannot be changed and has been imposed by others.


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I'm going to suggest inextricable as an adjective. It is used with situation or fate also which fits well to the idea. It is also used in technical contexts. Unavoidable; inescapable: bound together by an inextricable fate. Source: http://www.thefreedictionary.com As a noun, I can suggest impasse. It is often used in bargaining and discussions ...


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What you would want is to mitigate the consequences of your behaviour, meaning make (something bad) less severe, serious, or painful (Oxford dictionary). But, to make it one word, the situation is unmitigable (found in a few dictionaries, usage examples).


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FUBAR is a neologism created from the informal military acronym for f@#$ed up beyond all repair, referring to a situation where there is no solution that will provide positive results. There are bowlderized versions for sensitive ears, such as fouled up beyond all repair/recognition. And there is the TARFU variant, meaning totally and royally f@#$ed up. ...


-1

Maybe a checkmate situation accurately defines what you want to say. If you wish to be particularly vulgar, you could use the colloquial term 'clusterfuck'


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This is not an English idiom, but a literal translation of a Biblical Hebrew expression. Yamin means, primarily, the right hand in its aspect as the instrument of power and dexterity; the "right hand of God" might be better translated as the "strong arm of God". Attributive use of the word in construct case (= 'of the right hand') to designate direction is ...


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The right hand of God, has symbolic meanings of omnipotence and justice: (dextera Domini "right hand of the Lord" in Latin) or God's right hand may refer to the hand of God often referred to in the Bible and common speech as a metaphor for the omnipotence of God and as a motif in art. The Archangel Michael is also often referred to as "the Right Hand ...


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Google has its limitations too on knowing what you mean, especially if you accidentally typo a word into an actual brand. In this case, ambiance is the atmospheric feeling that you're referring to. If you're ever in doubt, you can always try putting the word into a thesaurus or dictionary website to see if it shows up there. Most will go beyond English ...


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I think you may have more success trying to google ambiance.


3

Consider sappy. According to American Heritage, it means both (Slang) Excessively sentimental; mawkish. (Slang) Silly or foolish.


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'To be frank': frank is an adjective meaning 'honest' 'To speak frankly': frankly is an adverb meaning 'honestly'


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Mawkish: excessively and objectionably sentimental. falsely sentimental, esp in a weak or maudlin way. Though the audiences are tired of mawkish plays and movies, writers and producers are never tired of them. There are always audiences who in their innocence shed tears at the excess of sentiment they express. The mawkish dialogues in the ...


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Definitions from thefreedictionary.com and oxforddictionaries.com... hackneyed - used so often as to be trite, dull, and stereotyped schmaltz - excessive sentimentality, especially in music or films


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You might also consider: From Merriam-Webster camp : a : something so outrageously artificial, affected, inappropriate, or out-of-date as to be considered amusing b : a style or mode of personal or creative expression that is absurdly exaggerated and often fuses elements of high and popular culture Or: Also from Merriam-Webster farce : ...


6

I'd recommend "empty" or "hollow", but you may prefer "kitschy": kitsch noun 1.art, objects, or design considered to be in poor taste because of excessive garishness >or sentimentality, but sometimes appreciated in an ironic or knowing way. "the lava lamp is an example of sixties kitsch" adjective 2.considered to be in poor taste but ...


5

The OED etymology says: from Latin absolūt-um loosened, free, separate, acquitted, completed, etc; past participle of absolv-ere: see absolve. The senses were largely taken direct from Latin, in which the development of meaning had already taken place, so that they do not form a historical series in Eng. Originally a participle -- absolved, ...


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Etymonline.com refers in its entry for absolute to the word absolve, which in turn points to the entry for solve: from PIE *se-lu-, from reflexive pronoun *s(w)e- (see idiom) + root *leu- "to loosen, divide, cut apart" (see lose) Thus, the sense in absolute is "cut away", in the sense of "cut away from any restrictions". When you say that something ...


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You might say such a person works "tirelessly". tire·less·ly adverb not yielding to fatigue Source: The Free Dictionary


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Read Difference Between Plain Wheat Germ & Crude Wheat Germ for a fuller explanation, but basically, plain seems to be the "processed, cooked, toasted" version of the original crude grains. According to that page, plain/toasted has shedloads more vitamins and stuff, but also more calories, so you might go for crude/raw if you're looking to lose weight.


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Your invitation does not need the word "either." The comma preceding "it'd" is grammatically correct. And "B" is the only correct version. The pronoun "me" is used in a prepositional phrase. The word "myself" is very often misused -- by uneducated and college educated people alike. See "The Goof-Proofer" by Stephen J. Manhard or "Goof Proof Grammar" by ...


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Repost is a word I see a lot, but it's usually loaded with the negative connotation of recycled content that everyone has already seen. Reposting can be viewed as trying to reap the benefits of somebody else's work by using their content for likes, upvotes, karma, or whatever else the site posted-to uses. Whether a repost is deemed positive or negative is ...


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I personally like Copypasta, it implies you didn't create it, you're just copying and pasting it somewhere else.



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