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It is not uncommon for active skills like writing and speaking to lag behind passive skills like reading and comprehension. Sometimes you make fast progress and sometimes there seems to be no progress at all, but there is always progress when you persevere.


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Try to write little texts about what you know, what you like, what interests you. Try texts of 5 lines, then ten lines. The more you write, the better you will get in using and activating your vocabulary. At first you will find it hard to find a topic to write about. Begin by explanations of new words you have looked up. Try definitions of things that need ...


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The term exists in the field of software engineering: Composability is a system design principle that deals with the inter-relationships of components. A highly composable system provides recombinant components that can be selected and assembled in various combinations to satisfy specific user requirements. It is not a "standard" English word and many ...


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They are casting directors. For some major productions, the process of selecting actors for sometimes hundreds of parts may often require specialized staff. While the last word remains with the people in charge, artistic and production, a casting director or "CD" (and sometimes the casting associate) is in charge of most of the daily work involved in ...


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As apparently no one suggested it yet, you also might want to consider "globetrotters." globetrotter: a person that frequently travels to different places around the world.


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In English, discriminatory or not, we informally call a group of people who move a lot either "nomads" or "gypsies". However, I don't think of these words as discriminatory because in general "nomads" is a neutral term usually descriptive of a native population, and "gypsies" is a romantic term, at least when applied to a band of wanderers. On the other ...


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A "Mary Sue" is a fictional character that fulfills the personal wishes of the author: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mary_Sue


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I think you could easily say that they are reminiscing and being sentimental. Freud, with deep introspection, would gather that there is a delusion of history. He is right. I for one like the term: romanticizing: deal with or describe in an idealized or unrealistic fashion; make (something) seem better or more appealing than it really is.


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Saudade: It describes a deep emotional state of nostalgic or profound melancholic longing for an absent something or someone that one loves. Moreover, it often carries a repressed knowledge that the object of longing may never return.[2] A stronger form of saudade may be felt towards people and things whose whereabouts are unknown, such as a lost lover, or ...


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How about "nostalgic romanticization" and "nostalgic romanticism?"


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A carnival club is a civic organization (probably in a Catholic community) that organizes a float for the carnival parade that celebrates the beginning of Lent. They are similar to the Mardi Gras Krewes of New Orleans. Sloterdijk was a German philosopher and there is a suburb of Amsterdam with this name. It is not likely that there is a carnival crew in ...


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There is a commonplace longing for the good old days. For example, there is often a longing for the turn-of-the-century era (1900 not 2000) that is thought to be kinder and gentler than the later 20th century, as exemplified in Hollywood sagas like Meet me in St. Louis. A reading of some authors, like Stephen Crane's Maggie, Girl of the Streets, paints a ...


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It is also referred to as the Golden Age fallacy in Midnight in Paris. It's a mixture of romanticisation of the past, and minor negationism; ignoring the negatives and focusing only on the positives. It's closely related to "the grass is always greener".


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I have known people who say "drowned" as the present tense (i.e. "Without a life-guard, people will drowned"), drownded as the past tense, as well as "drownding" instead of drowning. I think it is common in the Midwest.


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All of the things I can think of are adjectives, and so to make them nouns you would add 'thing' or 'entity' or something similar. Possible words are: "Physical" thing or entity "Material" thing or entity (literally meaning composed of matter) "Because the ship is material" (or physical) would also work.


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Corporeal might fit. of a material nature; physical Also, Descartes suggested this many years ago in Res Extensa: Res extensa (often translated "corporeal substance" by Descartes) is one of the three substances described by René Descartes in his Cartesian ontology, alongside res cogitans and God. Translated from Latin, "res extensa" means ...


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Consider "matter." Any passengers on a starship could be killed instantly, mashed to a a pulp by inertial forces, because the ship itself is matter (or material) i.e. subject to the laws of physics.


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"In Reality" or "In Fact" since everything is subject to those laws that isn't imaginary.


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This is mostly anecdotal (I can't find/don't have/remember my sources): English as a language can be limiting. Compared to another language, say German, we simply don't have the fluidity of vocabulary to make up words. The common perception is that the German language lends itself to fairly easily building of words, some a portmanteau of pre-exisiting ...


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All languages in the world have borrowed words from other languages. That is how language works. In the title to your question there are four words of non-English origin: "foreign", "used", "modern" and "vernacular".


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There are words that are retained in their original language because they impart a certain feel, say, of elegance, snobbery, belonging, etc. hors d' oeuvres, maitre d', and garçon were retained by French restaurants, and came to be generalized because of the connotation of elegance and sophistication of French restaurants. The same could be said of concierge ...


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"Lethologica" describes this phenomenon as well. It is a fairly esoteric word, though. It is a noun. "The inability to remember a word or put your finger on the right word." http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/lethologica


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If you meant by non-native speakers, then: pidgin - a grammatically simplified form of a language, used for communication between people not sharing a common language. Pidgins have a limited vocabulary, some elements of which are taken from local languages, and are not native languages, but arise out of language contact between speakers of other languages. ...


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Fremdschämen which means what you are technically explaining and there is cringe-worthy.


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lethologica is not a medical condition but just the inability to remember a word or put your finger on the right word Word replacement? Catachresis is the misuse or strained use of words, as in a mixed metaphor, occurring either in error or for rhetorical effect. Though a using more words than required is a pleonasm, the concept is not based on ...


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There is also circumlocution, defined here as "the use of many words to say something that could be said more clearly and directly by using fewer words".


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"to paraphrase" means to say something in other words. If you don't remember the exact word for something you have to paraphrase it. If you don't remember the word for elephant you have to paraphrase it: the animal in Africa that is as big as a house with a large trunk and two long tusks. .


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"Tip-of-the-tongue" is used to refer to situations in which a person knows a word but cannot produce it at the time. We say--when trying to answer a question--"It's right on the tip of my tongue."


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The extreme case is called Anomic Aphasia: With it, you are often unable to supply the correct words for the things you want to talk about.


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I find U.S. usage of "tame" in connection with plants and animals to be highly variable. My grandfather raised (not "grew") Angus cattle on a farm in Texas. As a breed, Angus are relatively gentle for beef cattle (compared to, say, Brahmas, which often show up in the bull-riding portion of rodeo competitions because they tend to be so unruly); but my ...


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You may want to consider print. print (noun) * printed material. * a printed publication, as a newspaper or magazine.


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Yes, you can use content as you have there. An example from the link: the greater part of the century was a time of content The main difference (according to the dictionary I linked to) is that content as a mass noun means "a state of satisfaction" whereas contentment means "a state of happiness and satisfaction". As to the popularity of the phrases ...


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Most desk nameplates tend to be firstname-surname. This would be best, and avoid confusion: Alexander Doe, PhD Example on Amazon


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The word is text Written or printed words, typically forming a connected piece of work


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I encountered phrases like "XXX also possible" in context of alternative ways of signing or wrighting something in academic books many times. So I don't think, there are any reasons for worrying. Besides, as for me, "likewise" is more comparative than "also", that is shows variations and alternatives of using something. It's about slight difference, you ...


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You can certainly use "likewise" anywhere it fits and there is no reason why you can't also use the word "also" in an academic paper. I personally tend to use "also" only when necessary but sure, you can do it. also (adverb) in addition in a similar way likewise (adverb) in the same way in addition They aren't exactly synonymous but they can often ...


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The simplest way to add emphasis to this construction is with "much" or "so" "I would much rather fly than drive." "I would so rather rent than own." Degrees of emphasis can be added, thus: "I would so much rather the vaccine than the flu." "I would far rather have a pool than a tennis court." "I would infinitely rather dine alone than with you." It may ...


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Generally you would think of something appropriate, For example, "I'd rather eat raw goats intestine than your mothers cooking" or add as much emphasis as the situation requires "I'd rather cut my testicles off with a blunt spoon than be seen driving a red car." Just tone it down or up depending on the situation and the reaction you want.


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In a role-playing game, one might say that a blessing and a curse are both types of charm. That is, something might be charmed with a blessing or charmed with a curse. charm3 An object, act, or saying believed to have magic power [ODO] In a programming context, isBlessed would do, although isCharmed would also work: value 1 for blessed, -1 for ...


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Your words ending in -diction are derived from the Latin word dicere: to speak/say. Besides malediction (to speak an ill) and benediction (to speak a well[ness]), there is also contradiction (to speak against), a verdict (to speak the truth), and others. Perhaps verdict is a word that fits your desires: an expressed conclusion; a judgment or opinion. ...


1

'Corollarily' is not considered a word by dictionaries currently. It is a reasonable neologistic construction, in the sense that it follows the rules of adding the suffix. There are other ways of saying what you intend with existing terms, 'theoretically', 'as a corollary'. Also, it is not particularly easy to pronounce. So I'd suggest trying to use ...


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I think concomitant would fit the definition that you're searching for. Concomitantly is a valid adverbial form of it as well. Global warming and its concomitant changes in climate may yet be a boon for agriculture in the presently parched nether regions of the earth.


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Colloquial and short, but I think "top" would do very nicely


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Corollary was originally an adjective, derived from correlation; you use it this way in your last paragraph. If a mathematician writes 'Corollary: Y can never be less than 0' where he might have written consequently, it is unsurprising that students take the word to be, and later turn it into, a noun. But this doesn't mean you can lengthen it again when you ...


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I would be against it mainly because it's so hard to pronounce. How about consequently, or as a consequence instead?


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In the context, and digging deeper into what makes one thing more important than the other, consider 'vital'.


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Good suggestions here already, especially "paramount", "foremost", and "primary" IMHO. I'd just like to add "pivotal" to the growing list. piv·ot·al /ˈpivətl/ adjective of crucial importance in relation to the development or success of something else. "the alliance that played a pivotal role in the revolution" synonyms: central, ...


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One obvious one that hasn't been mentioned here is rested. He rested to the trickling of the brook. Granted, I find the to to be a little bit awkward, but it helps emphasize that the rest achived was due to the trickling of the water rather than simply resting physically by or physically in the water. A more metaphorical option would be commune. ...


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If you get hurt, the _ thing to do is to stay calm. Most important and best are both superlatives, the fact that the former consists of two words does not lessen its greatest in quality. Nothing else which may be suggested is more important than staying calm. On the other hand, "monobest" as you described it I was thinking of inventing the word ...


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Contemplate — vb to think about intently and at length; consider calmly ( intr ) to think intently and at length, esp for spiritual reasons; meditate see reference. Scroll down to World English Dictionary. This word implies calm.



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