New answers tagged

1

I've heard the phrase 'burn the (or a) candle to the quick', but that was long ago and I'm also searching for a reference to it. It means to use something completely up, and I believe the 'quick' is the base part of the candle where the wick is either anchored or begins.


13

Could be a non-sequitur. Per MW: a statement (as a response) that does not follow logically from or is not clearly related to anything previously said This is from Latin, and literally it means: "it does not follow."


1

aboriginal means: a person, animal, or plant that has been in a country or region from earliest times. an aboriginal inhabitant of Australia. mid 19th century: back-formation from the 16th-century plural aborigines ‘original inhabitants’ (in classical times referring to those of Italy and Greece), from the Latin phrase ab origine ‘from the beginning....


1

When I was a child, we always spent hours on the piazza, which was a large screened porch on the front of the house. There was another piazza in the back. That was 90 years ago in a neighborhood in Somerville, Massachusetts. With our Boston accents, it was pi azz zah, Weezey


1

"Incapacitation," or "incapacity" would also work for use outside the more formal constructs of employer-employee relations.


1

Lost Work Time –Google search: On the job illness and injury resulting in lost work time among a national cohort of emergency medical services professionals. –ncbi.nlm.nih.gov LOST-WORKTIME INJURIES AND ILLNESSES: CHARACTERISTICS AND RESULTING DAYS AWAY FROM WORK, 2002 –bls.gov Lost Time FORMULAS for CALCULATING RATES OSHA Recordable Incident ...


1

As @HotLicks commented, sick leave is broadly used to mean: a period of time during which you do not work because you are ill [Macmillan Online Dictionary] More formal (official) term for this period would be medical leave (of absence).


0

Divergent perspectives, perhaps? basically that they're seeing the same actions, but their perspectives or viewpoints are different, with the connotation that they're getting more so over time. Maybe something about incompatible viewpoints, although I think that comes back to the negative associations like "he said, she said" - it suggests that these ...


0

My two options closest to what you're after: faithful. From Merriam-Webster: faithful implies unswerving adherence to a person or thing or to the oath or promise by which a tie was contracted steadfast Now, or if you want to make sure that refers to the man's keeping his word, perhaps you could modify those and say steadfast in his word, ...


1

Is there a reason "honorable" doesn't suit? especially since you seem to be looking for something with that kind of connotation specifically? The two basic definitions I seem to find mean either 1. in keeping with that standard code of conduct called honorable (as in chivalry, or actions considered honorable in a specific group) OR 2. having and keeping ...


0

It looks slightly awkward since thermocompression is such a long composite word. It becomes clearer with easier examples: "perform laser cutting" The sample is laser cut from the substrate. "perform frequency resolution" The signal is frequency resolved. All these sound right, don't they? I should be surprised however, if the hyphen were correct. At ...


1

For "2": "2" is a digit,1 as "as a digit;" if it were "42" it would "as digits" figure2 is also used for this, particularly in British English and older American English Merriam-Webster uses "as a number" or "as numbers" for this form in its definitions, such as for figure above For "two": "as a word;" "forty-two" would be "as words" (While it's ...


2

The AP style guide refers to representations such as 2 or 10 as "figures," not "numerals," since "two" or "ten" is also a numeral: nu·mer·al (no͞o′mər-əl, nyo͞o′-) n. A symbol or mark used to represent a number. (The Free Dictionary) If you don't believe that, Dictionary.com calls words numerals explicitly: noun 1. a word, letter, ...


7

'2' is an Arabic numeral (here). 'Two' is a word. You can also call it a number word.


4

When written as "2", it is a numeral. When written as "two", you could refer to it as spelled out, written out, or possibly longhand.


0

Most of the time, "plain" words have synonyms that sound more sophisticated or advanced. These synonyms are usually obscure and sometimes difficult to understand. Certain dictionaries, Google's in particular, will classify them as archaic, meaning the word is dated, rare, meaning the word is uncommonly used, or literary, meaning the word is almost always ...


3

It doesn't necessarily imply destruction or anything negative. Its original meaning is the point on the earth below the nuclear explosion, but it can also be used with reference to an "explosion" of activity such as commerce, industry etc. Ground zero : the point on the earth's surface directly above, below, or at which an explosion (especially a ...


2

For questions like this try http://www.etymonline.com first. In the case it shows 1680s, from dis- "entirely, very" + obsolete gruntle "to grumble" (Middle English gruntelen, early 15c.), frequentative of grunt (v.). EDIT: And taking a quote from @max-williams's link, [...] instead of being negative, the “dis-” prefix in “disgruntled” is an ...


3

thus adverb literary or formal As a result or consequence of this; therefore: 'Burke knocked out Byrne, thus becoming champion' Synonyms: consequently, as a consequence, in consequence, thereby, so, that being so, therefore, ergo, accordingly, hence, as a result, for that reason, ipso facto, because of that, on that account In the manner ...


0

From looking at the Oxford English Dictionary entries for "thus" and "thusly"—which are behind a paywall, as is the entire online OED—I can tell you the following. The first documented usage of "thusly" occurs in 1865 in the New York-based Harper's Magazine. "Thusly", like "thus", is an adverb, and a synonym for one of the older documented usages of "thus", "...


1

"thus" has various meanings, one of which is synonymous with "therefore", and another meaning "like this" or "in this way". http://www.thefreedictionary.com/thus In this manner: Lay the pieces out thus. See Usage Note at thusly. To a stated degree or extent; so. Therefore; consequently: Thus it was necessary for me to resign. For example: Few ...


1

Agile able to move quickly and easily. relating to or denoting a method of project management, used especially for software development, that is characterised by the division of tasks into short phases of work and frequent reassessment and adaptation of plans. As a software developer using agile as a term of personal characteristic may be misleading due ...


0

Adaptive from Adaptive Behavior as described as follows: "Adaptive behavior is a type of behavior that is used to adjust to another type of behavior or situation. This is often characterized as a kind of behavior that allows an individual to change a nonconstructive or disruptive behavior to something more constructive. These behaviors are most often ...


3

As Gandalf states adaptable would fit the bill. So would flexible. (Of a person) ready and able to change so as to adapt to different circumstances: 'you can save money if you’re flexible about where your room is located' References: http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/english/flexible


2

Even though these actually aren't consistent in form, this is what I personally would use: France's birth rate the US birth rate the UK birth rate For any country that isn't an acronym, I would use the possessive (e.g. Greece's, Russia's). For the US and UK, it feels more awkward to use the possessive to me. But if consistency is important, "the US' ...


3

Dictionaries do not list all those words with prefixes/suffixes unless they have some popularity. The de- prefix means 1. the opposite of 2. removing something — OLD. Decalibrate — Wiktionary (intransitive verb, of a measuring instrument) To lose calibration and therefore not be accurate. "Aneroid and electronic instruments, decalibrate ...


3

If I were referring to a measuring instrument, I would say it has "lost calibration" or that the "calibration has drifted". I can't think of a single verb. You could use "miscalibrated", but that might imply the calibration had never been correct.


3

In bird culture that is considered a d*ck move... But in all seriousness OP, your example just sounds like 'double standards'. dou·ble stand·ard(noun) or double standards (plural noun): a rule or principle that is unfairly applied in different ways to different people or groups. EXAMPLE:"During snack time, Jane always received 3 cookies while Tim received ...


11

Is that hypocricy?? That is hypocrisy. Hypocrisy noun (pl.hypocrisies) [ mass noun ] The practice of claiming to have higher standards or more noble beliefs than is the case. His target was the hypocrisy of suburban life. She was irritated to be accused of hypocrisy. Oxford Dictionary of English What do you call a person who tells ...


-5

Referring specifically to your example, that attitude is generally defined as male chauvinism: the beliefs, attitudes, or behavior of male chauvinists (men who patronize, disparage, or otherwise denigrate females in the belief that they are inferior to males and thus deserving of less than equal treatment or benefit). (dictionary.com)


1

Perhaps expend? to use (time, energy, effort, etc.) for a particular purpose Source: Merriam Webster "This budget expends more energy compared to last year's."


5

You're wasting energy: loss of something valuable that occurs because too much of it is being used or because it is being used in a way that is not necessary or effective an action or use that results in the unnecessary loss of something valuable from Merriam-Webster


0

The use of EMEND suggests to correct, to facilitate a more accurate change, as opposed to AMEND that does not necessarily correct but modifies and or amplifies the intent.


1

According to RusCusine.com appetizers, as in any cuisine culture, and Russia is not an exception, serve as small snacks before main course. Russian appetizers (in Russian, they are called “zakuski”) were meant mainly not to provoke keen appetite but to have them with strong drinks. (From what I have heard, what the Russians consider "small snacks"...


2

In most cases, "the" is used with country names that are a description (the United States, the United Kingdom, the Soviet Union, the Republic of Korea), but not single-word names, (America, Britain, Russia, Korea [without "Republic of"]). The Netherlands is historical: think "Nether Lands" (i.e., the low countries). You would also use "the" before countries ...


0

I know this answer is a bit late, but I came across a new-to-me word that I think fits well: Eristic. As an adjective it means of, relating, or given to controversy or logical disputation, esp for its own sake, and it may also be a noun meaning One given to disputation or argument. Because it also may mean "the art of disputation", it has more of a sense ...


0

A vehicle seems a likely choice--though it technically could mean any vehicle (boat, auto, motorcycle, space-ship or plane) you're most likely to hear it used with land vehicles. Examples: "Please step away from the vehicle." or "Please step out of the vehicle."


3

A wheeled vehicle is a general expression you may use: a vehicle that moves on wheels and usually has a container for transporting things or people. The Free Dictionary


0

There is absolutely nothing wrong with skeptical customer. Eg (source): The skeptical customer discounts much of what you say and a good deal of what you show, is looking for tricks and evasions and won't communicate any more than is absolutely necessary to get information on which to base a buying decision.


1

You can use skeptical in this case, yes. If you're looking for another/a more idiomatic phrase, what you are describing (especially since it is a chronic trait) sounds like a classic example of a doubting Thomas someone who rarely trusts or believes things before having proof : a doubtful or skeptical person


0

You might say the statements are converses of each other. i.e. "While people with a high rate of A tend to have strong memories, the converse is true for those with low A." It doesn't reduce the sentence by many words, but it does help avoid repeating yourself.


0

Intermediate coming between two things in time, place, character, etc. "an intermediate stage of development" Often used to describe something that is between high and low, e.g. "intermediate" skill would be neither novice nor expert, but somewhere in between.


1

I would describe it as notable. It's not too high or low but there is still a reason to bring it up. TFD Notable worthy of being noted or remembered; remarkable; distinguished


0

I like your choices very much. You might also want to include some words whose meanings are often misunderstood or are useful but uncommon, such as Fortuitous, Harry, Enormity, Iconoclast, Peripatetic, Catamount, Tantamount, Dissolute, Virago, Flagellate, Disinterested, Thaumaturge, Grimalkin, Knavery, and Perspicacious. I'm sure many will laugh at this list....


2

This is difficult to answer without more information about you, the learner. There are different levels to vocabulary. Beck, Kucan, and McKeown identify three tiers in their research (Bringing Words to Life). Tier one: basic words that one learns to read in early grades Tier two: high utility words that span a variety of genres of discourse Tier three: ...


8

According to this set of risk ratings (low, moderate, high, extreme), the level between high and low is moderate. Moderate adjective Average in amount, intensity, quality, or degree - ODO Here's an example found on the internet, where it's used in the title of an article: Moderate Risk: Key to Professional Success - Howard, Jeffrey P.


0

No, it reads better as: "the value of x is always 1 unless otherwise stated" it would also work as "the value of x is always 1 unless stated otherwise" I can see why the use of "the otherwise", the use here is an adjective, however "otherwise" the word effectively means "the alternative" and so is typically used standalone.



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