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To leave something at someones disposition. The idea behind this is that the person can dispose (make use of) the thing in anyway that person deems proper. Just like "I like your disposition" means "I like your attitude [towards something]" This seems to translate properly over several languages too, since there are several in which signing a letter you ...


-2

it's a literary metaphor indicating a skinny wrinkled hairy hands with un-clipped nails looking like sparrow's claws.


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The text cited in the OP's query is taken from a 2012 book by the economist and philosopher Michael J Sandel titled What Money Can't Buy: The Moral Limits of Markets. Drawing most of its examples from the USA, its core theme is the question of how to strike an appropriate balance between those arrangements and institutions in society where it is reasonable ...


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I wouldn't say it's not a word -- it's meaning is self-evident to me, and I ascribe to the philosophy that if the listener knows the meaning of the term without prior agreement then it's a word -- but it doesn't seem to be in widespread usage. However, it sounds somewhat awkward to my ears. I might prefer "outrank" or "supersede" unless "priority" were a ...


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How... and why? How about "Request X is more important than request Y"? If you insist on unnecessarily making new words, use the hyphen. Pushing the words together suggests you don't even know you are doing it; the space is just wrong.


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"Freighted" is the adjective form of "freight", which literally means "to load with freight", but is often used figuratively. Wiktionary offers this example: "English National Opera" is a title freighted with implications, and that first adjective promises not only a geographical reach, but a linguistic commitment too. To say that one form of access ...


3

"Freighted" in this usage, means carrying meaning beyond the literal. The question "where are you going" might be freighted with implications that you shouldn't be doing so, when asked by a policeman. In the quote you gave, a close approximation might be "less emotionally stressful".


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I think both of them are awkward, if not wrong. A better, IMHO, phrasing can be: I am one of your millions of great fans. or I am a great fan of yours, amongst millions of others. or I am a bigger fan of yours than the million others you have.


11

Consound it, concern it and consarn it are all minced oaths for confound it, which is itself a minced oath for damn it, in turn arguably a minced oath for God damn it.


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"Consound it" means the same thing as "confound it". My guess is that the interjection "confound it" was thought to be too strong in Hannibal, Missouri, at the time of Mark Twain's childhood. So people changed the pronunciation slightly to avoid using "bad words". (I don't see anything objectionable in "confound it", but maybe it was perceived as a ...


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I think it is just a general interjection ... used in place of a profanity that "polite society" would disapprove. My father used to say, "Confound it".


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Autology it is. autology (TFD) the study of oneself. Autology does not necessarily apply to words alone. In fact, it's an adjective in the term 'autological word.' Ulysses contains all the major ingredients of a self-begetting narrative; yet the novel's overriding autology, especially as it connects to Stephen's story, has been largely ignored. ...


1

I have never encountered the word submit used with "money"; it is sometimes used with "payment" - but that would mean paying for something, which is different from what you usually do in a bank. COCA (the corpus of Contemporary American English) does not have a single instance of "submit money" (or of "submit the money" or "submit some money").


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Yes, majoritively is a word. As one of our resident professional linguists so succinctly put it: If you use the word when speaking English, then it is an English word. Now that that’s out of the way, what are we to make of the word majoritively? To start with, it comes from applying two common, productive suffixes to the existing word majority: -ive ...


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You are right to be careful as to words suggested as the word of the day. They are often very academic and not used in normal everyday language. Modern dictionaries give hints about the frequency of words. So the Longman Dictionary of Contempory English has indications such as S2 W3 meaning the word is one of the 2000 most common words in spoken English, ...


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Modern Talking come to my mind immediately. They are a German "non nativ English speaking" group. Most non native English music is IMO easier to understand since they learned the "correct" spelling in School vs learned the local dialect.


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To add on to the other excellent suggestions, I would like to mention Simon and Garfunkel's songs, which are often extremely moving and meaningful, with very deep (and often richly ironic) lyrics. An example: I am a Rock. Note that the vocals may not be exceptionally clear, so try to find videos with lyrics (like the one I linked). Another great song is Don ...


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I agree with Oldbag. I've used the following songs in class: We danced by Brad Paisley. The pace is slow and the words clear. There goes my life by Kenny Chesney. Love me tender by Elvis Presley. The lion sleeps tonight. Just don't listen to it more than twice a day or you'll never get the sound oit of your ears. Slower Beatles songs such as In my ...


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In what we call "country music" (look for the musicians to be wearing cowboy hats) the songs are often "stories" being told - so the wording is pretty clear, and there is also a good context. The final "g" sound in verbs is often omitted: "lovin', huggin', kissin', goin', etc., but it's relatively slow-paced and easy to catch on. (US)


-2

It is a southern term meaning how are you, what are you you to.


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No, this is a mistake of one or another sort. The adjective scathing per the OED means: Of invective, etc.: Very sharp and damaging; searing, ‘withering’, cutting. And for the derived adverb scathingly, it provides such citations as: 1847 Tait’s Mag. XIV. 238 ― A feeling of his insignificance flashed scathingly on the quivering pride of Robert ...


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If you want a term that will be understood by most reasonably educated laymen (as opposed to something only social anthropologists would understand), you might consider... "Just-so" stories a collection written by the British author Rudyard Kipling highly fantasised origin stories Obviously Kipling himself didn't intend to undermine the ...


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The term etiological myth seems like a good match for your description. According to Wikipedia: An etiological myth, or origin myth, is a myth intended to explain the origins of cult practices, natural phenomena, proper names and the like. For example, the name Delphi and its associated deity, Apollon Delphinios, are explained in the Homeric Hymn which ...


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I think you are looking for exemplum. It is a story demonstrating a moral story and it can either be real or fictional. A real exemplum can be a founding myth or from actual history. Exemplum is a rhetorical device that is defined as a short tale, narrative, or anecdote used in literary pieces and speeches to explain a doctrine or emphasize a moral ...


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I believe what you have heard is an eggcorn. It's simply someone who has misheard and reused the phrase "I'll avenge".


18

Revenge is most commonly used as a noun, e.g. "I vow to take revenge on him for stealing my girlfriend." The words "to take" are optional, and you could just as easily say: "I vow revenge...". You can also substitute "upon" for "on", but it sounds more pompous. Revenge is less commonly used as a verb. The construction is always in a very specific form, from ...


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I believe temper is the most appropriate word. A tendency to be of a certain type of mood. to have a good, bad, calm, or hasty temper He has quite a (bad) temper when dealing with salespeople. State of mind. [Wiktionary] state of feeling or frame of mind at a particular time usually dominated by a single strong emotion ...


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In medicine, there is the Karnofsky Scale : 100 - Normal; no complaints; no evidence of disease. 90 - Able to carry on normal activity; minor signs or symptoms of disease. 80 - Normal activity with effort; some signs or symptoms of disease. 70 - Cares for self; unable to carry on normal activity or to do active work. 60 - Requires occasional ...


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How about the simple "speechless"? Unable to speak, especially as the temporary result of shock or strong emotion


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verklempt — popularized by Mike Myers in his Saturday Night Live skits "Coffee Talk with Linda Richards" .


-1

This is not a single word but an idiom. drag your feet/heels as in: The government promised to provide universal health care, but now it's dragging its feet over the issue. We expected the company to drag its heels when it came to paying compensation to the injured workers, but now it doesn't want to pay anything! Examples from EnglishClub. ...


0

I cannot think of a word that would cover all the situations in which one might not find an appropriate English word to use. Perhaps the questioner could use an appropriate phrase such as 'words are inadequate to describe my feelings'. Other languages draw fine distinctions not available in English and vice versa. We also do not have an appropriate word for ...


1

The clinical word for this is Aphasia. It ranges from forgetting a word here or there to total language block. Aphasia (/əˈfeɪʒə/, /əˈfeɪziə/ or /eɪˈfeɪziə/; from Greek a- ("without") + phásis (φάσις, "speech")) is an acquired language disorder caused by damage to the brain.1[2] This class of language disorder ranges from having difficulty remembering ...


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Psychologists would use level of arousal or arousal level, or if the dimension is calmness-anxiety/fear, anxiety level/level of anxiety. A more common but less precise term might simply be mood.


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Why not use the "Man of La Mancha" sing along number "the knight of the woeful countenance?" Sing that in your head, it's sure to help you remember what it means!


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If the context is social, if you are talking to someone in an office setting or maybe to a student, then I would use words like: exuberance liveliness pep vigor to refer to that scale of "activeness", where active and calm are at two poles and calm means something like "normal" or "manageable" or "under control". If the context is "active", like a ...


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I think what you're looking for is temperament, which Merriam Webster defines this way: the usual attitude, mood, or behavior of a person or animal Temper is usually used to talk specifically about a mood of anger, irritability, impatience, etc. For example, "He has a temper" means "He becomes angry often" and "He lost his temper" means "He became ...


0

If this fear of asking a girl out gives an almost pleasurable sensation of fright: Why not- thrill tingle


2

I don't think we have a nice simple word for this! There are a few common phrases for not being able to find the right word: "it's on the tip of my tongue": when the word or phrase may actually come "what can I only describe as ...": when you have given up finding the perfect word and just describe what you mean There is also the word "wordless" or the ...


0

Perplexed, at a loss for words.


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I don't know an appropriate word for this ... In all seriousness, the phrase Words cannot express ... is often used for these situations. For example, words cannot express the sadness experienced by one who witnesses the death of a loved one. There is a hint of a paradox in this, as the fact that the phrase is composed of words itself, and is ...


2

I would suggest tongue-tied for want of anything better. We don't in English have anything quite like the French bon mot, unless we say 'the appropriate word', which is a bit of a mouthful.


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This kind of fear or phobia is also called: Dating anxieties: Dating, by its very nature, is a situation in which two people have not already committed to a permanent relationship. So, for many people, if not most people, dating relationships are experienced as insecure attachments and therefore anxiety producing. (from psychologytoday.com) ...


1

It is called love-shyness colloquially. The person is called a love-shy. It can be applied to women also but it is usually associated with men. The term can cover the fear of any romantic interaction with the opposite sex. love-shy men are unable to get girlfriends/wives either because they don't know how, or they are too affraid. it means ...


0

If you want to ask a girl out and have no fear of rejection, you have self-confidence. If you are scared to ask a girl out, it is probably because you are shy.


0

This remind me of the impression when I struggled through "What is the life?: Physical aspect of the living cell" by Erwin Schrodinger. We call the continuation of action without any more interest, but because of habit or previous efforts "惰性的に...する (do job, read, speak, run on inertia, or on inertia force)" in Japanese. I wonder the concept of inertia can ...


6

When you decide to continue a task until completion, you decided to see it through.


0

If you were an economist you might talk about the "marginal increase in temperature of the soup". Outside economics the word is not used very much in that sense.


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Completionism is how this is described in the video-gaming community. If a game has collectables and sidequests, a completionist will feel the urge to collect every item and complete every quest. It's done to earn the 100%.


1

A completist Feels compelled to finish a collection or series. Since the book is by a favorite author and that provides motivation to persevere, it could be called completism. Definition



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