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Shot heard round the world The "shot heard round the world" is a phrase referring to several historical incidents, including the opening of the American Revolutionary War in 1775 and the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria in 1914. The latter refers to the beginning of World War One. WWII was just the the obvious sequel; to be ...


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Another military possibility is "(initiate)/(initiation of) hostilities", where "hostilities" has the meaning of overt conflict rather than dislikes.


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Countries are also said to be on or to go on "a war footing", that is, they are prepared or are preparing, financially, industrially, and socio-psychologically, for the eventuality of war. The very preparedness for war can lead to war : the military industrial complex can make billions from it, and a bellicose people is an impulsive people.


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I think that they are generally referred to as war pretext incidents: in July 1917, Duan used the incident as a pretext for declaring war on Germany. The anti-war movement must address the issue of the “pretext” and “justification” to wage war. Regarding the MH17 Malaysian airline crash, is the Obama administration in the process of “creating a ...


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Charcuterie. From French : chair 'flesh' & cuit 'cooked'. Reference : http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charcuterie


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The meaning is right in the previous sentence: "Their hours together were not always easy to arrange, and all the more precious." "Snatched hours" means hours /stolen/taken out with some difficulty/ from their very busy schedule.


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Short answer: apocryphal is routinely used to mean not [convincingly] true. Although the concepts are intertwined, the definition of apocryphal denotes authenticity not authorship: adjective 1 (Of a story or statement) of doubtful authenticity, although widely circulated as being true: ODO The connotation of authorship is rooted in the ...


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I personally don't see a distinctiom between "as best I can" and "the best I can" used in the context of everyday speech. After reading posts off the link provided by javaNoobs, 3 of the members from that site came to the conclusion that "as best" can be used as an idiom whose usage as such is well established by Merriam-Webster’s Dictionary of English ...


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There is a difference: 'as best I can' implies that the person can do something better than anybody else when trying his or her best. 'the best I can' implies person's effort within his or her own ability without reference to other people's ability. It is not an error at all, it is a slightly different meaning. And it is not the superlative form of 'as ...


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I'm uncertain if the proximity to the target is in the future or in the past. If it's in either direction, I would try closest instead of nearest. Come to think of it, perhaps the proximity is related to duration, in which case I would still suggest closest.


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The meaning could be [A] a musky smell must [5] n: musk AHDEL ... musk AHDEL 1. a. A greasy secretion with a powerful odor, produced in a glandular sac in the abdomen of a male musk deer and used in traditional medicines and formerly in the manufacture of perfumes. b. A similar secretion produced by certain other animals, such as an otter or civet. c. A ...


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Must:(n) Mustiness, dampness, or mould. a pervasive smell of must. (ODO) I think it refers to the smell of damp, wet leaves on the ground.


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It might make more sense to pull up a few definitions for these nouns: Log: "1. A rough bulky piece of timber unhewed; a block; a piece of wood." (Lloyd's Encyclopædic dictionary, Vol. 4, 1895, page 626, "lœwigite—loganite") "1. A section of the trunk or of a large branch of a felled tree, either in its natural state or cut up for use in ...


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"precipice" to be on the edge of something. Although it is defined as danger I think you will find it is used in many different ways and could fit. "damn it felt like I was on the precipice of a great .........". http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/precipice


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How about antagonistic? Or maybe, pugnacious.


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You could Shakespeare "Floriare" depending on how scientific you wanted to go... lol good luck! http://www.wisegeek.com/what-is-flora-and-fauna.htm


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"Bestiary" comes from the French "Bestiare" which itself comes from the Medieval Latin, Bestiarum Vocabulum where bestia (beasts) + -arum (genitive plural of) and voc[a] (to name/call/summon) + -bulum (noun suffix denoting vessel/instrument); And roughly translated "Instrument for Naming Beasts." I am not a teacher of the Latin language, so if you'd like to ...


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You could use aghast - "struck with overwhelming shock or amazement; filled with sudden fright or horror" For example: "I... I just saw her last week," he said, aghast. "She can't be..." Apologies for any formatting errors as this is one of my first posts on the site.


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I asked the same question with roughly the same background here (without knowing about this one), and the word I went with eventually was "nasce", from the noun "nascence". "Nasce" is Italian and "nascence" is English, and that was good enough for my program. "Fall" (usually applied to lambs) and "arrive" are more correct but weren't specific enough for me. ...


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contentious, quarrelsome, cantankerous, O.E. contekors, grizzle guts, obstructive, argol-bargolous, quarrelsome; argy-bargy (—1887) [is mostly Scottish], scolding; ill- natured, disputatious, boiler (sl)


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unanimity juːnəˈnɪmɪti/ noun agreement by all people involved; consensus. (definition from Google)


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debater a person who disputes; who is good at or enjoys controversy eristic 2. a person who engages in disputation the art or practice or debate or argument gainsay Gainsay comes from an Old English word that means "contradict" or "say against," If you know someone who constantly corrects others, tells them that they're wrong, and ...


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I think that would be "unanimous".


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Polemic (polemicist) or Controversialist. polemic (noun): A person who argues or writes in opposition to another, or who takes up a controversial position; a controversialist. Cf. polemicist n. [OED] polemicist (noun): An author of polemics; a controversialist. [OED] controversialist (noun): a person who likes to disagree with other ...


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A game is a contest or pastime but match is a formal contest in which two or more persons or teams compete. (vocabulary.com) As @Marius Hancu remarked, "It really depends on the sport". Adding further, some sports in the UK usually take match. - golf, cricket, tennis, football Sports that originated in the US usually take game. baseball, basketball. ...


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It really depends on the sport. In tennis, the order of divisions/units is: point, game, set, match in terms of distinguishing value required for victory. You would not say "boxing game," only "boxing match." However, you can hear both "football match" or "football game." Search at Google Books (not vanilla Google) for each case to find real usage.


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If you really want to understand the naming of animal groups, it might help to classify the types or origins of classification terms. There are words that have simply been borrowed from the past (e.g. an exaltation of larks) or from a particular language, dialect or regional speech. These are often popular among poets. There are other words that are more ...


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Circumspect - Unwilling to take risks as there may be danger involved. Eg. The batsman was very circumspect in playing deliveries outside off-stump, having got away by edging a few early on in his innings. (You'd hear a lot of this in Cricket commentary.)


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"Once bitten, twice shy." "Older and (or but) wiser."


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shirt backing I once had an omelet in England that tasted like shirt backing. (same as cardboard but sounds cooler).


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No. English does not have possessive pronouns that distinguish the two concepts. If we want to specify one or the other, we rely on context or must supply further information (e.g., My team's project).


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English is context based, not verb or adjective based. What this means is that sentence word order, in addition to the context of that sentence, reveal the meaning of the words. e.g. Our (yours and mine) father spoke with their (our friends') mother and his (some other guy's) sister. The meaning is clear if you know the context of "our", "their", and ...


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To me, your description suggests that the described actions are being performed continuously and in the present tense, even as the victim is attempting to react to them. I would therefore suggest: Moving the goalposts (or shifting the goalposts) "To change the criterion (goal) of a process or competition while still in progress, in such a way that the new ...


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Where I live in the American Midwest, garbage and trash are not the same, although there is a lot of overlap. "Garbage" is somehow dirtier than trash. "Kitchen garbage" is one of the dirtiest, although it ranks with "diaper garbage". "Trash" is stuff that's being thrown away, but not because it might rot or stink: office trash is mostly paper, boxes and ...


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Shoe leather (I'm thinking of Charlie Chaplin trying to eat his boot). Stale matzoh. (My mother described the most successful diet she ever went on like this: she stopped taking a lunch to work. The only food in her office was a box of ancient matzoh.) Stone soup.


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Food that's particularly bland and tasteless is often described as pablum (or Pablum): a brand of soft, bland cereal for infants It's amusing to note that when Pablum was introduced in 1931, media reports at the time said the cereal tasted like "boiled Kleenex" and "had the consistency of mucilage and smelled like the inside of an old ...


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Banal is a rather harsh adjective you could use to describe tastelessness. If you wish to really exaggerate you could say: "The dish was mortally banal"


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Given the difference in the responses I'm seeing, it appears to be a dialect issue. There isn't one answer covering all US English dialects. I live in an area that speaks Midland, with a bit of South Midland, and the two words are nearly synonymous to me. My father-in-law (from New England) does seem to have some kind of distinction. I say "nearly" because ...


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"To be a shell" means to be hollow, with nothing inside. So the subject of the song is "skin and bones" which determine his exterior, but has no internal substance, no soul.


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Generally, when a person is "in a shell", it means that they are reclusive, unresponsive, even antisocial.


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In Canada, we generally use the word "garbage", especially when referring to kitchen waste. Also "take out the garbage" generally a phrase referring to kitchen waste, something a wife might say to husband (we generally forget) or sons (for some reason daughters rarely take out the garbage) "trash" usually refers to non-food waste. But having said that, ...


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When I was a teenager, newly moved to Rockland County, NY (NYC suburb), I was surprised that garbage and trash were two different things. Garbage was, and still is, your ordinary household refuse, while trash is stuff you don't throw away on a regular basis (i.e. old shoes, things you stored in the garage, etc.) There are two garbage pickup days per week, ...


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"Learn" is this context is intentionally misspelled to add humor to the context. It shows that they have much left to learn since they misspelled the word "learn" itself.


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Most people familiar with the language would recognise that lurn is not an English word. It's time to lurn together... ..in one-word, it's being . Incidentally, if you google "lurn", you get a result similar to "learn.


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They are generally interchangeable but "trash" is less formal and with "trash" there's a stronger connotation is of negative value or something more actively repulsive, compared to zero value. This bit of language also relates to American culture that tends not to see the potential value in various waste streams, that might be reclaimed even by somebody ...


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It is legitimate to use these terms garbage and trash interchangeably in American English: garbage noun 1.1 A thing that is considered worthless or meaningless: trash noun 1.0 chiefly North American Discarded matter; refuse. ODO American English In many contexts, garbage might have a unique meaning as the etymologies ...


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Yes, they can be used interchangeably. There is no difference in meaning. They are synonyms. Garbage can be seen as slightly more formal but the phrase take out the garbage is informal. You could say dispose of the garbage instead to sound more formal.


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I think "lurn" is an intentional misspelling of "learn".


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As others have noted, this could be described in basic terms as sitting with sitting with crossed legs or with a leg crossed, but to be more specific, Allan Pease's Body Language: How to read others' thoughts by their gestures (Sheldon Press, 1981) refers to this specific position as an "American figure four" because it is supposedly a sitting position ...



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