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3

People often express their pride and/or current frustration at having enjoyed something before it became popular by saying that they liked it before it was cool. There are many variations on this phrase. Here are some I pulled from a corpus: I supported Bernie Sanders before it was cool I used to eat Peruvian food before it was cool I was tea ...


0

The word 'hipster' comes to mind ;) While 'hipster' embodies richer character than just shirking away from mainstream stuff, that particular character seems to be the strongest evidence of being one. This article highlights that aspect: http://bostinno.streetwise.co/2012/01/17/the-scientific-explanation-of-why-youre-a-hipster-hate-mainstream-music-from-...


2

You like things when they are still cool. Some more ideas in this Stanford article The Tipping Point of "Cool" Research shows that popular products can quickly lose their cache if they become favored by the masses. [...] other words, as soon as chic goes mainstream, [...]. Cool had suddenly become uncool, and when too many others liked an item it ...


0

Scardy-Cat Wimp Weirdo Thats it


2

Bob is such a feartie - Scots colloquial


2

Wuss is a good one if you want to be informal. It can be a general term of weakness whether mental or physical. "Bob is such a wuss, he even gets scared watching Harry Potter"


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Yes, one of the meanings of to lead is: to cause someone to do something, especially something bad: [ + to infinitive ] The brochure led me to believe that the price included home delivery. also in the passive form: It's worrying that such a prominent politician is so easily led. I think you can use the verb in your sentence. ​to lead ...


0

skittish adjective easily frightened. I read your question and this immediately popped into mind. Admittedly, this is a secondary definition, and it is often used in reference to animals, but I've heard (and used) it frequently in reference to children, and those are pretty close. :-D


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The french word for it would be peureux, however all the words I see in the translation have already been said, and don't really compare to it.


1

Consider the second meaning of spooky: (of a person or animal) easily frightened; nervous. I've mostly heard this in reference to animals, as in: "Those deer are spooky; they'll run away as soon as you start walking toward them!"


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Cowardly Coward [kou-erd] noun 1. a person who lacks courage in facing danger, difficulty, opposition, pain, etc.; a timid or easily intimidated person. ... or, the definition I prefer, "one who is too easily cowed." Dictionary


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You can always perform a Google search on the above mentioned words such as 'timid + synonyms and select the word you feel best suits the situation: adjective: timid; comparative adjective: timider; superlative adjective: timidest synonyms: easily frightened, lacking courage, fearful, apprehensive, afraid, frightened, scared, faint-hearted; ...


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Apprehensive uneasy or fearful about something that might happen: Dictionary.com If Bob is always worrying about something that might happen, then he'd be scared easily. "Bob seems really apprehensive lately"


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Bob is a scaredy–cat. He gets scared so easily. scaredy–cat: an unduly fearful person. Credits: @bill


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skittish (Webster) adjective 1. apt to start or shy: a skittish horse. 2. restlessly or excessively lively: a skittish mood. 3. fickle; uncertain. 4. shy; coy.


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I think chicken-hearted is a better option than timid as timid can also mean shy or lacking confidence and jumpy is usually used in the context of being anxious or excitable: chicken-hearted Oxford dictionaries Easily frightened; cowardly. or yellow-bellied American Heritage dictionary Slang Cowardly. or lily-livered or white-livered ...


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Bob is so jumpy. He gets scared so easily. jumpy: subject to sudden, involuntary starts, especially from nervousness, fear, excitement, etc.


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Bob is timid. Timid Pronunciation: /ˈtimid/ ADJECTIVE (timider, timidest) Showing a lack of courage or confidence; easily frightened: I was too timid to ask for what I wanted. (Source: Oxford Dictionaries)


1

The Wikipedia article on teeth cleaning gives prophylaxis, odontexesis, and odontexis. However, this medical jargon seems more applicable to the professional cleaning done by a dental hygienist. I do not know of a one-word noun for "brushing of teeth", but "tooth brushing" might be more natural than "teeth brushing" because noun adjuncts are more often ...


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Just write- dentifrice 1. [n] a substance for cleaning the teeth; applied with a toothbrush http://lookwayup.com/lwu.exe/lwu/d?s=f&w=dentifricing#n/2555378


3

Headcount or head count: The act of counting people in a particular group. (AHD) Head count reveals prisoner's escape: Robert John Dwight, 33, was found to be missing during a head count by prison officers at Silverwater jail about 9.00pm AEST yesterday. (www.abc.net.au/news)


2

The term you are seeking is roll call, which applies to any process in which a list of names is checked against the people present.


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opinionize Wiktionary (intransitive) To claim matters of fact as opinion. a more standardly-used word, but which doesn't quite mean the same thing is opine dictionary.com to hold or express an opinion. opinionate Oxford dictionaries 1 [WITH OBJECT] To hold as an opinion; = opine, opinion; to believe, suppose, think. 2 [NO OBJECT] ...


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Kindly try to understand that there is a big difference between fear and hate. XENOPHOBIA= a fear of foreigners or strangers Type of: social phobia any phobia (other than agoraphobia) associated with situations in which you are subject to criticism by others (as fear of eating in public or public speaking etc) SEE https://www.vocabulary.com/dictionary/...


2

As I just happened to stumble across a word for this in Dutch, Wikipedia helped me find the desire path or desire line: A desire path (also known as a game trail, desire line, social trail, herd path, cow path, goat track, pig trail or bootleg trail) can be a path created as a consequence of erosion caused by human or animal foot-fall or traffic. The ...


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CONNOTATION and SUBTEXT can't be used interchangeably.Connotation and denotation are the subject matters of elementary logic: Denotation = Span/Scope(meaning) Connotation = depth/designation/go in the making(quality) Subtext = meaning underneath a text, speech or dialogue(motives) When we mean 'MAN', it denotes 'all men', its connotation is 'animality &...


3

Feet to fanny. Started early in the 20th Century in 1926, The Portland Children's Theatre (Portland, Maine USA) would perform children's stories live for the public in schools, auditoriums, and outdoor venues such as playgrounds and parks. Proper theatre etiquette was taught in an introduction to the event by "Koko, the clown" who would interact with the ...


6

Sitting Kneeling ...where the thighs are near horizontal and the buttocks sit on the heels - for example as in Seiza and Vajrasana (yoga). Some health experts warn: While sitting on the ankles - puts pressure on the knee joints. This may be in the form of a kneeling to standing jump challenge. Students often sit in this position.


22

Here's a picture that might help you, taken from a guide for grade 3 teachers. It sounds like it's called Heel sitting. There's also Kneeling as noted by @Roddy of the frozen peas, but kneeling does not necessarily mean that your buttock is resting on your heel though. Google kneeling Mary for some examples. Kneeling just means being down on one's knee, ...


1

Not as an additional payment, but you may pay more for a business that is a 'going concern' rather than just premises that you intend to close down, refurbish and then reopen potentially as a different type of business.


0

In a work environment, say if you were investigating a issues, you could lose a lot of time going down a rat hole or rabbit hole See this old question : "Going down the rathole" vs. "Going down the rabbit hole."


0

Try "boondoggle." A "boondoggle" is an unnecessary or wasteful project. You might also try "black hole." When used figuratively, a black hole is something that you can invest endless resources into--time, money, whatever--and they will completely disappear without any kind of pay off or coming to any kind of gain.


2

Timesink is a word that is going to convey both the investment of time as well as the futility. It is usually used in the case of, for example, a video game, and would work in your situation as well.


0

Distraction - a thing that prevents someone from giving full attention to something else. Vain - producing no result; useless.


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To remove vulgarity, one must first define vulgarity. In a case with a famous outcome the Justice Stewart wrote, "I shall not today attempt further to define the kinds of material I understand to be embraced within that shorthand description; and perhaps I could never succeed in intelligibly doing so. But I know it when I see it, and the motion picture ...


9

Because disciplinary simply means concerned with discipline, and discipline can mean not chastisement but field of knowledge, disciplinary expertise means expertise in a particular area. That is, it is the same thing as domain expertise. Compare with interdisciplinary meaning related to more than one branch of knowledge. Without the inter- part, it simply ...


5

Could the word discipline be used rather than disciplinary? MW dictionary for discipline: http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/discipline #3 definition is "a field of study". The author is using a root word (discipline) with common usage with a common suffix. Not all prefixes and suffixes of all words are in the dictionary; These are not normally ...


5

In that case you're buying at a premium: a sum over and above a regular price paid chiefly as an inducement or incentive [Merriam-Webster]


1

A "Master". Especially for trades. Master Goldsmith. Master Coder.


14

There isn't really a specific word for this in English. In general, the value of a business is not just the value of the building, fixtures, and fittings; a successful business simply has a greater value than an unsuccessful one. You might apply tangible1 and intangible2 as this page does: Although there are relatively easy ways to value certain parts ...


11

If you're buying a company then the value of that company is factored into the price, usually some multiple of the yearly revenue. The specific multiple is determined by industry and often by credit agencies. The total value of the company, the valuation, therefore includes the physical and financial assets, as well as a measure of how much money it is ...


26

Goodwill may be a term that you are looking for: "The goodwill amounts to the excess of the "purchase consideration" (the money paid to purchase the asset or business) over the total value of the assets and liabilities." More generally, you seem to be talking about the intangible assets of the business, if you're defining "extra" as anything beyond ...


0

I can't tell, since you also throw in the suggestion of a more precise meaning, but in most of the cases that I'm guessing you have in mind there is no added precision. There is mainly a shift from words of Anglo-Saxon origin to words of Latin (e.g. French) origin. In the latter context, and especially for academese, I'd offer the adjective "hifalutin". ...


1

The closest adjective I found is ornate: 1.1(Of literary style) using unusual words and complex constructions


1

"You're doing God's work." Even though the word "God" is used, it's not really religious; I hear it used by religious and non-religious people. The meaning is more like, "You're doing important work." It soothes the pain indirectly, by implying that the work is worthwhile and appreciated. It can be used to encourage someone doing something frustrating or ...


0

Based on the question, it seems likely that you are looking for a nounal (or potentially adjectival) form to describe the kind of thought, idea, or view that would divide or distinguish people. For that, the word distinctive seems appropriate: e.g. … Among historic Calvinists and Puritans, the doctrine of the exclusive baptism of believers (and that by ...


1

There's a common idiom for this: "jack of all trades, master of none". However, that doesn't give you your two words, because if you said "Tom is a jack at martial arts" no one would have any idea what you meant. Thus, as @Catija suggested I would use "generalist" for the "master of none". For the master level there are many terms available depending on ...


1

In this specific case alone Duper intensifies super, usually in a childish, peppy or playful way. One of Barney the Dinosaur's catchphrases is "Super-Dee-Duper!", as if to intensify the sentiment even further. You can see that there's a DVD called Barney: Super-Dee-Duper Day! here. I consider the usage significant, because Barney has been famed as a Public ...


3

Super duper is a rhyming reduplication of "super". The expression is informal and somewhat dated (usage attested from the '40s): reduplication of super, (informal) extremely pleasing, impressive, etc: often used as an exclamation(First Known Use: 1940) M-W Super-duper: (old-fashioned, informal) excellent - OLD Your colleague ...



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