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3

Consider sappy. According to American Heritage, it means both (Slang) Excessively sentimental; mawkish. (Slang) Silly or foolish.


4

'To be frank': frank is an adjective meaning 'honest' 'To speak frankly': frankly is an adverb meaning 'honestly'


6

Mawkish: excessively and objectionably sentimental. falsely sentimental, esp in a weak or maudlin way. Though the audiences are tired of mawkish plays and movies, writers and producers are never tired of them. There are always audiences who in their innocence shed tears at the excess of sentiment they express. The mawkish dialogues in the ...


5

Definitions from thefreedictionary.com and oxforddictionaries.com... hackneyed - used so often as to be trite, dull, and stereotyped schmaltz - excessive sentimentality, especially in music or films


5

You might also consider: From Merriam-Webster camp : a : something so outrageously artificial, affected, inappropriate, or out-of-date as to be considered amusing b : a style or mode of personal or creative expression that is absurdly exaggerated and often fuses elements of high and popular culture Or: Also from Merriam-Webster farce : ...


6

I'd recommend "empty" or "hollow", but you may prefer "kitschy": kitsch noun 1.art, objects, or design considered to be in poor taste because of excessive garishness >or sentimentality, but sometimes appreciated in an ironic or knowing way. "the lava lamp is an example of sixties kitsch" adjective 2.considered to be in poor taste but ...


5

The OED etymology says: from Latin absolūt-um loosened, free, separate, acquitted, completed, etc; past participle of absolv-ere: see absolve. The senses were largely taken direct from Latin, in which the development of meaning had already taken place, so that they do not form a historical series in Eng. Originally a participle -- absolved, ...


5

Etymonline.com refers in its entry for absolute to the word absolve, which in turn points to the entry for solve: from PIE *se-lu-, from reflexive pronoun *s(w)e- (see idiom) + root *leu- "to loosen, divide, cut apart" (see lose) Thus, the sense in absolute is "cut away", in the sense of "cut away from any restrictions". When you say that something ...


0

You might say such a person works "tirelessly". tire·less·ly adverb not yielding to fatigue Source: The Free Dictionary


1

Read Difference Between Plain Wheat Germ & Crude Wheat Germ for a fuller explanation, but basically, plain seems to be the "processed, cooked, toasted" version of the original crude grains. According to that page, plain/toasted has shedloads more vitamins and stuff, but also more calories, so you might go for crude/raw if you're looking to lose weight.


0

Your invitation does not need the word "either." The comma preceding "it'd" is grammatically correct. And "B" is the only correct version. The pronoun "me" is used in a prepositional phrase. The word "myself" is very often misused -- by uneducated and college educated people alike. See "The Goof-Proofer" by Stephen J. Manhard or "Goof Proof Grammar" by ...


0

Repost is a word I see a lot, but it's usually loaded with the negative connotation of recycled content that everyone has already seen. Reposting can be viewed as trying to reap the benefits of somebody else's work by using their content for likes, upvotes, karma, or whatever else the site posted-to uses. Whether a repost is deemed positive or negative is ...


0

I personally like Copypasta, it implies you didn't create it, you're just copying and pasting it somewhere else.


7

In the FreeBSD operating system /usr/share/dict/words list, the following words of 6 letters or fewer match the pattern: ajaja alala anana arara ululu Bororo Carara Macaca amamau ananas ararao auhuhu banana batata marara rococo venene I believe the word list is based on (but not identical to) the 1934 Webster's New International Dictionary, Second ...


0

I think masochist fits in the respect that the subject is deriving some sort of pleasure from the deprecation, but based on that he keeps returning to that situation as if he is connected to it, the term dependent comes to mind.


-1

I have heard the word "doormat" used to describe such people.


4

glutton for punishment is fairly popular http://idioms.thefreedictionary.com/a+glutton+for+punishment http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/glutton_for_punishment


6

You are probably referring to a case of masochism: gratification gained from pain, deprivation, degradation, etc., inflicted or imposed on oneself, either as a result of one's own actions or the actions of others, especially the tendency to seek this form of gratification. masochist: a person who is gratified by pain, degradation, etc., that is ...


2

As others have pointed out, giving education is not limited to teachers. Parents may educate their children as well as teachers. To develop an intuition about why this is the case, I think it is useful to distinguish between educate, teach, and learn (verbs), and to understand the nouns a teacher, and an education. to educate: to provide schooling for ...


1

"Blotch" an irregular spot or discoloration, esp a dark and relatively large one such as an ink stain http://www.thefreedictionary.com/blotch


0

Personally I would say "MPs Income" - but seriously I would say "Illegitimate Income" - i.e. any income from sources that are not those that are Legitimate. The other phrase that is often used is "under the counter".


1

I think "(work) frenzy" fits your description the best, specifically in the definition of "a bout of wild or agitated activity [eg]: a frenzy of preparations", which implies the sleepless nights. A sentence describing the situation could be "The employees were in a frenzy these past few days trying to make the deadline". Another way to put it would be "The ...


4

One expression for the activity is "to burn the candle at both ends," meaning that not only are you expending energy at one end of the day, but at the other as well, leaving precious little time for sleep. OED cites a particularly metaphorical meaning of profligacy with money, rather than effort. It's interesting that the current usage, while still ...


3

I'm fairly sure you won't get closer than workaholic: work·a·hol·ic noun (informal) a person who compulsively works hard and long hours. [Google] (AHD does not have the 'informal' tag)


1

In terms of "derivational morphology", the closest match to OP's atemporal is probably aspatial - which as the link shows is certainly in use. But per John's comment below, when applied to things like a story, narrative, alocale is more commonly used. But I might go for a slightly more "accessible" form, such as non-locational - but again, note John's ...


0

Dire straights man. Or an "impossible situation" - a situation where no resolution or victory is possible.


5

In informal conversation, it's possible to leave out lots of words and still communicate clearly. Obviously everyone knows what your boss is trying to say, so that goal is accomplished. That said, as a native speaker I find this particular shortening to be taking it too far. It is unnatural to me to leave out the you in Can you talk?. It sounds like the ...


0

Not a one word, but from the context it sounds like it's "time to face the music."


0

The best word I can think of is that it would be inevitable. It means certain to happen, or unavoidable, which fits the bill.


1

sounds like you painted yourself into a corner http://idioms.thefreedictionary.com/paint+into+a+corner


0

I believe you would call that a "foregone" conclusion. (From before+gone, as in the conclusion was gone before the discussion started.)


0

Can it be called "Faithful"? That would be the solution. To be devoted to one person only without being married is emotionally and not loyalty.


1

The words "hopeless", "fruitless", or "futile" come to mind for me. Given the definitions below, futile seems to best fit your needs. def: hopeless: feeling or causing despair about something. fruitless: failing to achieve the desired results; unproductive or useless. futile: incapable of producing any useful result; pointless eg: Given my ...


3

Personally, I'd call the case in question a blame game (“A situation in which people attempt to blame others rather than trying to resolve a problem” – wiktionary) or blame fest on the basis that it usually is someone else's fault when I'm blamed for a problem. But more generally, when one cannot avoid something, one may refer to an inexorable fate (where ...


0

grift. As in a 'grifter' or 'grifting', money obtained via a swindle. http://www.thefreedictionary.com/grifting


1

Such a situation is sometimes referred to as a "cul-de-sac" or a "dead end."


3

You can say that Ian Botham carries his team.


2

How about fate, destiny, pre-ordained, or another word along those lines? They all embody the concept of a future that is already written.


0

How about 'life monogamist'? ('life-monogamist' maybe?) Or, if you wish to explicitly include informal relations: (life) monoamorist/-amorous, monoromantic (by analogy with 'polyamorous' & words for so-called romantic orientations). However, none of these seems to be widely used. Oh, and they are of course more general than your question, so might have ...


10

Possibly obscure, but Kobayashi Maru? Although some might argue, in a Kobayashi Maru situation, a trick is exactly what is called for.


-4

How about "dilemma"? That refers to a situation that's a real stickler.


15

I think "lost cause" fits your description the best. PS. I just reread the examples of your description and I think you should use "no way out" in those situations.


4

There are numerous phrases that convey the acceptance of blame, such as come clean own up 'fess up (for confess up) take your lumps take the blame make amends [all from ODO] If you are just talking about the situation rather than the guilty persons response, you could say where the rubber meets the road ...


15

It's a... no-win situation ...often summed up by saying you're... damned if you do, and [you're] damned if you don't Sometimes it's appropriate to call it a... Catch-22 [situation] ...where it's inherent in the context that you're required to simultaneously observe two or more mutually contradictory constraints. Particularly when successive ...


0

I'd probably use 'undying love'. Maybe someone can make something from Amaranthine ==>> amaranthine - definition, etymology and usage, examples and related words


1

Anchorman: A man who plays the most crucial part or is the most dependable contributor.


4

Some possible ideas for you: A go-to player: She's the team's go-to player [=she is the player that the team relies on] when they need to score late in the game. You can also simply state that X is a most important player (MIP) or most valuable player (MVP) for the team. The teams that rely heavily on one man to win a match are called one-man teams: ...


3

Wouldn't it be called "Faithful"? I mean, monogamy does not imply any emotion, it simply restricts whose name appears on your family card at any given time. Faithful means one stays loyal to their companion Free Dictionary entry Merriam-Webster entry Whether this lasts for a lifetime or lean enough to allow for another companion to fill in should the ...


3

A little word-smithing and we can have "Monophilous" :)



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