New answers tagged

3

Although normally used to describe being awake when one should normally be asleep, the word wakefulness (the noun form of wakeful, defined below) can work here. Wakeful adjective 1.1 (Of a period of time) passed with little or no sleep - ODO You can say that someone got 10 hours of wakefulness. Here's one instance from a web search (emphasis mine): ...


1

Summary (paraphrased from Eyomoline): Gadfly probably comes from gad (n), a goad, but "the sense is entangled with gad (v) 'rove about'". Gadabout comes from gad (v) plus about. The noun, gad, is older than the verb, gad (from gadden); both are older than gadfly. (The verb gad may perhaps be derived from the noun gad.) Gadabout is comparatively recent. ...


0

"Late 16th century: from gad1, or obsolete gad ‘goad, spike’, from Old Norse gaddr, of Germanic origin; related to yard1." -- gadfly. Dictionary.com. Dictionary.com Unabridged. Random House, Inc. http://www.dictionary.com/browse/gadfly (accessed: April 30, 2016). Is the etymology give for the 'gad' in 'gadfly'. I would suggest that to goad or to be spiky in ...


0

Holy holy is a substitute swear OR you could possibly have misheard him say holy moley - this features in comic books, I believe


0

The phrase "non sequitur" means a conclusion that does not follow from the previous argument or the cited evidence. For example, suppose someone said, "Bob has been fired from his last three jobs. Bob is not a very good employee." That makes reasonable sense. "Bob is not a very good employee" is a plausible conclusion that one might draw from the fact that ...


3

In a business world, that process is called vertical integration which means: an arrangement in which the supply chain of a company is owned by that company. Usually each member of the supply chain produces a different product or (market-specific) service, and the products combine to satisfy a common need. [Wikipedia] The term backward integration is ...


1

I think you are referring to 'In-House Production: In-house refers to conducting an activity or operation within a company, instead of relying on outsourcing. A firm uses its own employees and time to keep a division or business activity, such as financing or brokering, in-house. The process is called internalization: Internalization ...


0

The protagonist of 1984, Winston, works in the Ministry of Truth, which is responsible for editing all documentation that conflics with the current positions and declarations of the state. Winston's workplace is described as follows: In the walls of the cubicle there were three orifices. To the right of the speakwrite, a small pneumatic tube for ...


0

The original idea was of a place where unwanted or undesirable evidence was hidden and destroyed with the intent of manipulating the course of history. By extension it is used to refer to a place where things are lost and forgotten forever: A memory hole: is any mechanism for the alteration or disappearance of inconvenient or embarrassing ...


0

monitor, onlooker, inspector, receiver/recipient, beholder, examiner ..... The wealth of possible terms offered emphasizes the value of Phil Sweet's advice of April 25: each of the candidate terms has nuanced meaning that fits its context; select the one that best fits the role or relationship you are describing


1

The term neophyte may apply depending on the context. Oxford dictionaries has: A person who is new to a subject, skill, or belief: four-day cooking classes are offered to neophytes and experts


1

Tutee may be an appropriate description, if the demonstrator can fairly be described as a tutor.


3

One article describes it as a mental illness: obsessive-compulsive spartanism. That's fairly negative, but you might not want the added baggage of diagnosing someone with a mental illness, so just spartanism might be a good alternative. Spartanism is a little more neutral to me than negative, but some folks might see it as slightly negative. An article in ...


0

Consider: the hand is the possessor of the finger. The thing that has the component is the component's possessor. Possessor noun one who has a legal or rightful claim to ownership - M-W Note that the dictionary definition is cast in a legal setting, but here's a title that serves as an example along the lines of the part-whole concept (emphasis ...


3

There is the perfectly good word demonstratee ... it's not common but it is part of the English language. Given it's logical connection to demonstrator the meaning should be apparent to people who don't know it and it ties in to your view that you are demonstrating (as opposed to showing or teaching...).


0

In many education contexts these days, the word learner is used.


1

In that context, independence is clearly the right word. The term is used referring to other instruments as well, e.g. drums, where independence is critical. E.g. "These are exercises to help you gain independence between all of your limbs." - http://www.chellman.org/drums/extreme/ E.g. A lesson in "Essential Jazz Independence" from the Bang Drum School. ...


4

I would use the term that fits the role or relationship. Are they there to learn or to evaluate? Or is the demonstration more of a dog and pony show intended for a general audience. Or are you accosting people on the street hawking your toy robots? If you were just looking at the mechanics of demonstrations, I'd probably use recipients, audience, or ...


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The non-dominant hand is commonly called the off hand. Also the weak hand. See any combat arts forum. http://www.bladeforums.com/forums/showthread.php/206957-Question-Knife-position-Dominant-Hand-or-Off-Hand


9

A student, if the purpose is to teach.


2

marginal cost the cost added by producing one extra item of a product. from google: marginal cost.


1

You could use: reproduction cost The costs involved with identically reproducing an asset or property with the same materials and specifications as an insured property based on current prices. Insurers use reproduction cost as a method of valuation to calculate the costs involved with the risk of replacing an insured asset with an identical one ...


33

The "primary" hand is generally called dominant. Dominant hand Operant hand generally used for performing fine motor-skills tasks (e.g., writing, holding dental instruments) Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012 via TFD From that, I would surmise subordinate hand for the other one.


7

One important word not mentioned here yet is witness. the person you demonstrate to would witness you "flipping a chair for him". witness also refers to someone who testifies in court for what they have witnessed.


18

If it's a demonstration, the viewer could be the -- viewer.


41

Audience could also work in some contexts, especially if you are doing something to delight or entertain others. E.g. David's card tricks were a hit at the party, because his audience was willing to go along with his silly antics.


34

That person would be called observer. What is observer? Well, a person who watches or notices something.


0

To add onto the excellent answer above, I got curious about the use of "un" with "perishable", and guessed I would find mostly stylized choices...I did find a few artistic uses. However, here's what I found out about "un" unto itself (very cool): This is from: The Un-Believable Un-Verb September 21, 2009 By Ben Zimmer Check out the whole article at: ...


2

Let's look at the common ones first, nonperishable and imperishable: nonperishable: not subject to rapid deterioration or decay. source A supply of nonperishable food was kept for emergencies. Nonperishable and its typically plural noun form, nonperishables, are used for concrete objects, like food, supplies, and medications, that are intended to ...


1

It doesn't, no. "woman" in English just means any female of the human race, though it's more commonly used to refer to older women who have gone through puberty (prepubescent women are usually called girls instead). "wife" is only used when the woman is married.


0

Things that cause changes in pronunciation Generally sound changes are not "forced" on people, and they certainly don't require literacy. There are three main factors that are relevant here: sound laws, reduction, and leveling. All of these can cause pronunciation changes. Sound laws (also called "regular sound changes") are generalizations that we can ...


0

The change from Ich to I was due to the influence of the French language in written English. The change was gradual and the use of "ich" can be found till the 19th century: was the form of I found in the dialects of the West Country, West Midlands, and Kent. It began to disappear from written English with the onset of the Chancery Standard in the ...


1

Fam, mans thinks you be bear overthinking this. Language is always evolving. I'm a similar age to you, and I'm constantly surprised by the new slang that people are coming up with, that I wont hear about for months after they enter common parlance. However, it's not a big issue. The English language is vast enough to convey almost any meaning without ...


1

Attorneys [-at-law] in early American history were those who were supposed to be learned in the law, and were designated as one's legal representative - a person who was authorized to appear in court and speak for a person on legal matters, and to make legal decisions for them, often in their absence. Attorneys were officers of the court. Attorney - "such a ...


2

If you Google for "ceiling phobia," a condition called altocelarophobia seems to be a thing: alto- (high) celaro- (ceiling) phobia (irrational fear) an irrational fear of high ceilings So, by analogy: obcursu- (falling) celaro- (ceiling) phobia Behold obcursucelarophobia: an irrational fear of falling ceilings.


1

May be not exactly what you are looking for, but Anablephobia is some what related.


0

"Imploration." http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/imploration I believe its use frequency is "rare", and people seem to prefer the gerund version or even a synonym. However, for artistic and connotative reasons, I would prefer to make this word more popular.


2

If it's only a faint copy which has to be carefully studied to be read, you can call it a "second page writing". Unlike carbonless copy paper which uses micro-encapsulated dye, a second-page writing relies only on pressure applied on the front sheet. There are a few methods that make the writings clear, and reading a second-page writing, or "indented ...


5

Impression "a mark, indentation, figure, etc., produced by pressure. "the act of impressing; state of being impressed"


2

Debossing which wikipedia describes as a debossed pattern is sunken into the surface of the material. Or, indented writing which the Norwich Document Library describes as indented writing, or second page writing, is the impression from the writing instrument captured on sheets of paper below the one that contains the original writing.


3

"Real" isn't specific so it can mean (almost) whatever the speaker wants. If someone has never had a good relationship with their biological parents, they may use "real parents" to refer to the people who brought them up. Conversely children who know they were adopted may want to find their "real" - as in biological - parents. This means that using "real ...


1

I voted for @Hugh "parataxis" suggestion. But, you may reword the sentence as follow: "My only way to describe it is the fusion of the very essence of the best, medicinal grade cannabis in the world awaking my olfactory receptors via stem cells and ...". You may keep your initial text for the '...' or replace it by "it's how I felt it".


-1

As far as I know, "more or less" relates to quantities. For example, "She has more or less 500 books at home". I believe it's similar to "She has 500 books or so at home" and "She has about/approximately 500 books at home". On the other hand, when a question is asked with "how", we might answer it saying "so-so". "A: How was your day today? B: It was so-so". ...


0

Both examples about "Information" sound odd. "Information was kept in secret." This means the act of keeping the information was secret (and unexpected). e.g. "My telephone provider recorded every call I made, without telling me. They kept information in secret." It would sound more natural to say "They secretly kept information." "Information was ...


1

You are right, "to forget", but I think it is a common mistake, expecially among non natives: You cannot use forget if you want to mention the place where you have left something. I've left my book at home. NOT "I’ve forgotten my book at home." (OLD) To Leave (not take): to not take something or someone with you when you go, either ...


1

Both are correct. Both mean very different things. You can keep kittens in secret. You can keep information in secret. Doesn't mean the information is a secret. It just means you're keeping the fact that you're keeping information is a secret. You could be keeping widely published dictionary. Not sure why you don't want people knowing you have a ...


2

You can simply use admin for administrative matters.


1

"Franchise player", one that the whole organization is built around...


0

I'd suggest, wunderkind, boy wonder, and whiz kid wunderkind : a person of remarkable talent or ability who achieves great success or acclaim at an early age. [German : Wunder, wonder, prodigy (from Middle High German, from Old High German wuntar) + Kind, child; see kindergarten.] AHDEL boy wonder : a young man whose skills or ...



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