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Grammer Nazi's www.ekast.co has a motto that says "We don't misspell, we just try not to plagiarize."


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You might consider "effusive", or "gushing": effusive (adj): extravagantly demonstrative of emotion; gushing gushing: (v) to act or utter in an overeffusive, affected, or sentimental manner. (n) an extravagant and insincere expression of admiration, sentiment, etc Or, particularly in a situation where you're clothes shopping and the sales ...


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I think you are referring to: Hard sell practices: high-pressure selling techniques. (*Typically: get ~ give someone ~.) They gave me the hard sell, but I still wouldn't buy the car. The clerk gave the customer the hard sell. Advertising and sales practices denoted by aggressive or forceful language. A hard sell is designed to get a consumer to ...


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This is one behavior commonly associated with a pedant is, per Merriam-Webster: ped·ant noun \ˈpe-dənt\ : a person who annoys other people by correcting small errors and giving too much attention to minor details


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Perhaps spellchecker? (Whether we like it or not.) [Oxford Dictionary Online] [Who says computing terms can't be applied to people, as in Thank you, Mr. Spellchecker. Maybe I meant to write check instead of cheque.] And as @DanBron points out, our slightly stuffier crowd might deem him or her autocorrector.


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I don't believe there's an exact word for "someone who corrects others' spelling errors", but there is one for a person who is meticulous in spelling, generally: orthographer (lit. "right writer"): One versed in orthography; one who spells words correctly, according to approved usage. If there is a single word which indicates (as @ermanen puts it) a ...


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There is also spelling nazi as a neologism which is derived from grammar nazi. Urbandictionary and tvtropes have entries for spelling nazi and there are some usages in Google Books. a person who freaks out when a little spelling mistake has occured or has be a constant little a**hole about it. people that care more about the spelling of words and ...


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A stable career might be misconstrued as one that doesn't advance. A career is defined as something long term, or a life's work. So long-term might be unnecessary. You could say something like: I have finished my studies and I am now searching for a position as a xxx with the xx industry. I am looking for a company I can commit to and who will commit to ...


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Perineum might be what you are looking for. "Mound of Venus" is another possibility. Consider, also, girdle or pelvic girdle. Another possibility is loins.


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It might be of interest that ee is a productive suffix in English. This means you can use it in situations that it has never been used in before. It will still be grammatical and easily understood. It is straightforwardly formed by adding ee to the base form of a transitive verb to form a noun. The referent of the noun is understood as a/the person whom ...


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At first blush, the most natural word to complete the sentence Motivation fosters the dedication needed to ____. is succeed, which accords well with the concept of "to be good at what you do".


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The -itis suffix is sometimes used informally make up a name for something that has perceived disease like qualities. In some cases the speaker may be joking or simply using the term to make a point. In other cases the speaker may believe that they are describing a genuine malady but lacks a better or "official" word to describe it. While medically -itis ...


1

It's a silly made up phrase. As @John Lawler stated, -itis is the ending indicating inflammation. Arthritis means inflamed joints. Appendicitis means inflamed appendix. Phlebitis means inflamed veins. Air-conditioningitis would mean the air conditioner was inflammed, which is not exactly possible, as it's not a biological unit. It could be in flames, but ...


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The 'recordee' is more commonly referred to as the 'subject (1.2)', 'target' or 'the do-er-of-recorded-matter' (actor/player/musician etc).


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According to Wictictionary: recordee: (plural recordees) One who is recorded. Ngram shows that is a very rare term. It is important to have such texts orthographically transcribed by a native speaker, preferably the recordees themselves, as this is an almost indispensable aid to phonetic transcription and subsequent segmentation.


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A affects B, but not the other way around. A affects B, but not the converse. A affects B, but not reciprocally.


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When the opposite is true: Jasper likes Lauren, and vice versa. When the opposite is false: Jasper likes Lauren, but not vice versa. This simple negation works well.


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Also note the term sillcock (wiktionary: “A faucet designed to be installed horizontally on the outside wall of a building, typically to attach a hose”). Closely related terms include “Water spigot ... valve, hose hydrant, hose bibb, or sillcock” as noted in a caption in the valve wikipedia article.


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This might not be exactly what you're looking for, but if I was being accused of hating long hair when I haven't said anything about long hair, I'd reply with something like "Quit putting words in my mouth." Therefore I'd say the colloquialism putting words in your mouth describes this scenario pretty well. It literally describes the act of claiming you said ...


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This is commonly known as the fallacy of "denying the antecedent". To see why this is the case, you can rephrase your statement as follows. Let P be "A person has short hair", and let Q be "I like them." Then by simple substitution, your friend's false assertion is logically equivalent to P implies Q. Not P. Therefore, not Q. This is ...


2

If someone made that assertion they would be constructing a false dichotomy.


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In the US it's called a bibb or bibcock [American Heritage]


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It's describing events in the past. This is indicated by "By 2013", which is in the past. It's a particular device called the historic present tense, by which the events being described are intended to be more immediate and vivid: the reader is actually there in the midst of the action. In linguistics and rhetoric, the historic present or historical ...


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I think it is called outside tap or garden tap: Fitting an Outside Tap - How to Install a Garden Tap Yourself


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It just means release into a field (a place where crops are grown). The phrase "field release" implies that the organism is no longer being kept in an enclosed environment from which it cannot escape.


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Why reinvent the wheel? The manual's target audience understands what an AND operation is, so it makes more sense to say "The values are ANDed together" than "A logical Boolean operation is performed on the values".


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You don't necessarily need a verb. Conjunct and conjunctive are both adjectives for this. Instead of: These values are anded together. Try: These values are conjunct. or These values are conjunctive.


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Logically speaking, the verb conjoin really should be acceptable. A conjunction is the act or product of conjoining. It's the same stem, so if one form is deemed sufficiently precise to refer to the operation, why shouldn't the other be? The counterpart, for "or-ing", would be disjoin. Conjunction has a more specific meaning in propositional logic than in ...


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Why not to combine ? (as suggested by Wiktionary.) And: (logic, transitive) To combine (a value) with another value by means of this operator. 2006, Gary R Wright, W Richard Stevens, The Implementation If an internal node is encountered that contains a mask, the search key is logically ANDed with the mask and another search is made of the ...


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"Colloquial" refers to informal, non-technical usage. This is the opposite of the formal, technical terms utilized in scientific disciplines, such as geology. Full Definition of COLLOQUIAL 1 : of or relating to conversation : conversational 2 a : used in or characteristic of familiar and informal conversation; also : unacceptably informal b : ...


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Any of those from the English Thesaurus? [ADJ] (Fewness): few, scant, scanty, thin, rare, scattered, thinly scattered, spotty, few and far between, exiguous, infrequent, hardly any, scarcely any, reduced [ADJ] (Infrequency): infrequent, rare, few, scarce, uncommon, infrequent, unprecedented. [ADJ] (Rarity): rare, subtile, thin, fine, ...


1


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It's possible you just want esoteric adjective intended for or likely to be understood by only a small number of people with a specialized knowledge or interest. [Google D]


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You may be referring to : sophisticated: The term refers to something that is not common but exquisite. The adjective is also used with reference to terminology, Ngram. having or appealing to those having worldly knowledge and refinement and savoir-faire; "sophisticated young socialites"; "a sophisticated audience"; "a sophisticated lifestyle"; "a ...


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erudite - showing great knowledge or learning. This carries no implication of being old-fashioned, which on rereading the question I may have incorrectly assumed. It certainly has the self-referential property (erudite being an erudite word). anachronistic - belonging or appropriate to a period other than that in which it exists ... conspicuously ...


1

I'm guessing rare, obscure, and arcane are not rare, obscure, or arcane enough for you, so how about recondite: little known; abstruse. or recherché: rare, exotic, or obscure. Which definition has the precise example, in the dictionary, of: "a few linguistic terms are perhaps a bit recherché for the average readership" If you want to say ...


1

I feel the consensus opinion is that (1) it's possibly/probably true that "mail" is used more - in general - in the USA than in Britain. I really feel that's about all you can say about usage in bre/ame in this case. (2) the specific, clean 'reversal' you point out (mail/post on one side, post/mail on the other) is probably spurious; it does not exist. ...


-2

Empathetic really annoys me! It seems to imply over-empathising. Like being so touchy-feely that it appears pathetic to others. Empathic, every time.


1

Taking stock of a situation is business and strategy allegory to figuring out your current capacities and capabilities. It is an allegory derived from stock-taking of inventory,the physical verification of the quantities and condition of items held. Examples of stock-taking analysis, that might be familiar to some people: Luke 14:28-31: For which ...


2

The most direct way to express the idea in English is "pondowner" or "pond owner". In fact, there's a magazine called "Pond Owner Magazine"¹. It's also fairly conclusive that there's a well-known video game character in the popular Zelda series, who exactly meets your description (a person who owns a pond and leases rights to fish in it), who, in English, ...


1

I'm tempted to make a joke revolving wealth, lifestyle and attitude, but I'm not going to do it. There is no such thing. Generally speaking, owners of an object do not have any word associated to them, because owning something is not a job, so there is no real need to describe them. Jobs describe the involvement of items, but never imply ownership, such as ...


-1

I was just now wondering that question. Mathew 10:8 and Mathew 10:9 "... Freely you have recieved, freely give." "Do not take along any gold..... Sandals... staff(etc.)... ; for the worker is worth his keep." I prayed to God and asked him to help me understand and I thought the pupose of not bringing anything(like an extra tunic) with you is probably to ...


1

I agree with the commentator above that "circumlocution" has a connotation of intentionality. I would use "floundering" for the behavior originally described, although that might have more of a connotation of incoherence than intended by the original question.


1

It depends on the context, but in photography the tones are sometimes called: White Highlight Midtone Shadow Black


2

In the UK we use the specific phrase 'stop and search' (sometimes hyphenated, 'stop-and-search'; either can be correct) to describe police stopping a person on the street and briefly searching them for illegal materials. In news items and popular discourse the phrase is primarily used in the context (as you described) of people of visible minority ...


3

Leaflet midrib from uoregon.edu Figure 10.-Coconut tree and its parts. a, tree: 1, trunk (rakau); 2, base of trunk (tona); 3, roots (aka); 4, leaf (rou niu); 5, center keaves (tira). b, leaf parts: 1, midrib (takai niu); 2, leaflet (mata rou niu); 3, leaflet midrib (tuaniu). c, flower parts: 1,whole flower (karoro); 2, flower sheath (taume); 3, ...


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The "spine" of both the leaf and each pinna of the leaf appears to be called the midrib. [Adityamadhav83 via Wikimedia] Cocos nucifera is a large palm, growing up to 30 m (98 ft) tall, with pinnate leaves 4–6 m (13–20 ft) long, and pinnae 60–90 cm long [Wikipedia] Pinnately veined leaves have one large central vein, called the midrib, ...


3

I think the term used in botany is rachis: In plants, a rachis is the main axis of a compound structure. It can be the main stem of a compound leaf, such as in Acacia or ferns, or the main, flower-bearing portion of an inflorescence above a supporting peduncle. Source:http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rachis#In_botany Pinnately Compound ...


0

Simply because no one has suggested it yet, and it's quite common: foreclose: take possession of a mortgaged property as a result of the mortgagor's failure to keep up their mortgage payments. Related: repossess: retake possession of (something) when a buyer defaults on payments.



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