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The term for a four month period is quadrimester. Quad = 4 mense= month


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From the Online Etymology Dictionary: cock "male chicken," Old English cocc "male bird," Old French coc (12c., Modern French coq), Old Norse kokkr, all of echoic origin. Old English cocc was a nickname for "one who strutted like a cock," thus a common term in the Middle Ages for a pert boy, used of scullions, apprentices, servants, etc. A ...


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The first sentence is verbose and uses a convoluted language. verbose: Using or expressed in more words than are needed: much academic language is obscure and verbose ODO convoluted: (Especially of an argument, story, or sentence) extremely complex and difficult to follow: the film is let down by a convoluted plot in which nothing ...


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Often when someone finds a new word, they need to look up not only that word, but also others. Then you'll understand not just one word, but several. Abjection: a low or downcast state: each confession brought her into an attitude of abasement - H.L. Menchken. See: abasement, degradation, humiliation, decadence, decadency, degeneracy, degeneration, depth ...


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The quotation is from the English translation of García Márquez’s book “One hundred years of solitude”. (Actually, you ought to give us this information and not expect us to look it up.) It means “hands like a sparrow’s claws”. It is not a common expression in English, but any speaker of the language will understand it.


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Yes, see: Wiktionary: Majoritively By means of a majority. (proscribed) Consisting of more than half (50%); predominantly. However, it certainly isn't a common word, and honestly, I don't see that it fits well in the example you gave. You might instead choose "usually", "frequently", "commonly" or "most often" instead.


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While not considered neutral, haughty tends to be one who disdains those below him. I understand that the idea of superiority is not intended but it would be understood that disdain of bad manners would strongly imply a connection between bad manners and the people who would employ them.


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Majority is overused, anyway. Best to restrict it to matters of voting. Usually, the word most works just fine. Instead of majoritatively, use mostly.


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"Intellectual snobbery" pretty much fits the bill. It's a pejorative term for prejudice against people or pursuits who/which are perceived (the implication is, wrongly perceived) as insufficiently intellectual. An example of intellectual snobbery: A person prefers opera to comic books purely because opera is perceived as 'high art' and comic books are ...


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So, was I too naive to believe "use 10 cent words"? Yes, that was ridiculous. The world may not be simply about "getting ideas across"? If you delete the "may" we then have a true sentence: The world has nothing to do with "getting ideas across". As Napoleon said: "The world is about getting power, nothing else." The world is about making ...


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A forecast is a prediction of something in the future and is most often used in this context. That said, it appears that futurecast is now synonymous in weather reports; Googling "futurecast" leads to dozens of weather reports. So, my guess is that someone started using this and it caught on and is now acceptable.. though I prefer forecast and "futurecast" ...


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Although they are Greek words, sympatheroi (plural), sympathera (feminine singular) and sympatheros (masculine singular) could work well. The words mean "my child's parent(s)-in-law", literally "co-parent(s)". They are used in the first person (Hello, Sympathera!) as well as the third person. Sympatheroi has a niche use in the Uniform Parish Regulations ...



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