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The bereaved: verb (be bereaved) Be deprived of a close relation or friend through their death: she had recently been bereaved (as adjective bereaved) bereaved families (as noun the bereaved) those who counsel the bereaved ODO


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Trepidation would emphasize the fear and anxiety: noun [MASS NOUN] 1 A feeling of fear or anxiety about something that may happen: ODO


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Here are the main guidelines to choose the right suffix among -sion, -tion, and -cion. The first two are the more common while -cion is actually quite rare. (ODO) Words ending in -sion If the ending is pronounced as in confusion, then it should be spelled -sion. Here are some examples: collision; division; revision; persuasion; explosion; ...


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Unless a specific preexisting term is identified, I believe the neologism archophobia is in order: noun a morbid dread at the commencement of creative work Origin From the Greek ἄρχω meaning begin, make a beginning and φόβος, meaning panic flight, fear, object of terror Liddell & Scott, A Greek-English Lexicon Archophobia is ...


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There is a phrase exactly for this situation: blank canvas paralysis. It is a fairly new coinage and it is originated in painting where painters can't start painting and keep staring at the blank canvas; but it can be applied to any situation. Whenever you are about to start something new, you risk ‘Blank Canvas Paralysis’, the inability to get started. ...


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WORD FOR THE FEELING OF DREAD/COMPLACENCY THAT COMES WHEN STARTING SOMETHING NEW (some combination of dread, complacency and intimidation that causes a person to freeze--TAGS: [meaning] [word-choice] [adjectives] [vocabulary]) Due to the wording of your request all single-word answers must reference either the “intimidation” or the “inertia” factors of your ...


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Lassitude might approach the feeling of mental paralysis: n. A state or feeling of weariness, diminished energy, or listlessness. American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. From etymonline.com: early 15c., from Middle French lassitude (14c.), from Latin lassitudinem (nominative lassitudo) "faintness, ...


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both caring about everything (eg. Marks, Social Standing, Achievements), and yet not caring about everything (eg. not doing homework, procrastinating, purposefully aggravating others) Your question is confused, you are not describing a person/feeling that at the same time cares and not-cares for everything. The person you describe discriminates ...


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People attending a funeral are known as mourners. The closest relative(s) of the deceased can be said to be the chief mourner(s). Members of the deceased's family might also be designated as close family mourners. I am not sure that these descriptions extend beyond the time of the funeral and its wake, however. A week later they might be known simply as ...


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Teenagers are notorious for being contradictory. or Teenagers have a tendency to be paradoxical. They say one thing, but do another According to Collins Dictionary: paradox 1. a seemingly absurd or self-contradictory statement that is or may be true ⇒ religious truths are often expressed in paradox 2. a self-contradictory proposition, such ...


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torpor noun a : a state of mental and motor inactivity with partial or total insensibility b : a state of lowered physiological activity typically characterized by reduced metabolism, heart rate, respiration, and body temperature that occurs in varying degrees especially in hibernating and estivating animals : apathy, dullness


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You might manage to express that idea with // insouciant which is such a self-concious sort of word that although it means 'devil-may-care' it implies a bit of an act. Otherwise perhaps a paradox: 'deliberately unperturbed', 'with studied indifference', 'puritanically laid-back'. Mix and match until it resonates. //Insouciant 1829 careless, ...


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I think it depends on your level and aim. For a trip abroad vocabulary lists for specific situations are good. Archer Martin, Nobel chemist taught himself useful Dutch from Detective stories. As you suggest, look up words that are difficult and jot them down. Stephen Fry tells people he read dictionaries. So long as you enjoy the books, the most natural ...


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First off, Plethorically isn't even a standard word. See this ngram. It's not even listed as a word derivative in Oxford So no, I wouldn't use it if I were you. Now for using it with obnoxious: "plethorically means an excessive or overabundant amount of something": No it doesn't. You're thinking of plethora. And maybe it's just me, but "a plethora of ...


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Your final sentence should be more personal and more action-oriented. Show them your passion through personal language. Sweep them off their feet with action-oriented language. Answering your specific question, I would write "...to give my students what my mentors gave me." You bear the burden of a great gift and hear the call to pass it on. ...


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"Atonement" is to attain forgiveness for some sin or transgression, e.g. "I atoned for betraying my friend". It is something that you do. "Expiation" means to clear away the record, to make it as if it never existed. It is not something you can do - you cannot expiate your own sins. It is very similar to the difference between pardon and absolve - ...



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