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32

Gore (road): A gore, gore point, or gore zone is a triangular piece of land found where roads or rivers merge or split. When two roads merge, the area is sometimes referred to as a merge nose. Gores on freeways in the United States and Canada are frequently marked with stripes or chevrons at both entrance and exit ramps. the term is more ...


21

There are a number of terms used within the railway industry to define sections of track infrastructure where conventional signalling is used. Technically, a Track Section (sometimes Track Circuit) is the piece of track between two signals, not between two stations. A Berth is a location within which a single train may be located. This is usually a group ...


17

I think the most suitable single-word is tech-savvy. It is an informal word and it is defined as an adjective in dictionaries, but I see the noun usage also. (for example, the plural tech-savvies is not uncommon.) Well informed about or proficient in the use of modern technology, especially computers [OD] Note: OED gives techno-savvy also. ...


10

Scapegoating? Scapegoating (from the verb "to scapegoat") is the practice of singling out any party for unmerited negative treatment or blame as a scapegoat. Scapegoating may be conducted by individuals against individuals (e.g. "he did it, not me!"), individuals against groups (e.g., "I couldn't see anything because of all the tall people"), groups ...


9

To frame someone Informal. to incriminate (an innocent person) through the use of false evidence, information, etc. (dictionary.reference.com/)


7

Wiktionary has blameshift verb (biblical) To blame another for one's own wrong-doing. Blameshifting ... pointing the finger at another when trying to save one's skin. Dictionary.com only gives the noun: blameshifting noun the act of transferring responsibility for an error or problem to another; also written blame shifting


5

There is somniloquent: Somniloquent We are [referring to] sleep-talkers, a less-often encountered term than sleep-walkers, even though the former are more common. Medical terminology has dignified words for them both: somnambulants and somniloquents. Some sufferers have been known to do both at once: you might call this the Lady ...


5

On the East Coast (US) it is often colloquially referred to as "the zebra stripes": "There is a disabled car on the zebra stripes by Exit 5.


5

not quite what you want perhaps: a misdirect, a diversionary tactic used by magicians.


4

Although I don't think this is a word used in the railroad industry, I'd be tempted to call uninterrupted track between two stations a segment.


4

It is probably just a typo for lemures.


4

Possibly pore over to make a close intent examination or study (of a book, map, etc) ⇒ he pored over the documents for several hours Collins


4

Analyze definitely implies thoroughness: Analyze: to study (something) closely and carefully to learn the nature and relationship of the parts of (something) by a close and careful examination


4

peruse pəˈruːz/ verb formal examine carefully or at length. "Laura perused a Caravaggio" read (something), typically in a thorough or careful way. "he has spent countless hours in libraries perusing art history books and catalogues" (Source: Google.com) As Dan pointed, this also means 'to glance over'. See definition #2 below. pe·ruse (pə-ro͞oz′) To ...


4

I agree with Avon that "frame" (or "frame up") is the best short term for the tactic that the OP asks about. A longer phrase that suggests the same thing is "set [someone] up to be the fall guy." Although a "fall guy" in some instances is a willing participant in a conspiracy to obstruct justice—pleading guilty to a crime in order to let others off the ...


4

same magnitude and opposite direction


3

I believe the word you're looking for is probably "Allodial". Allodial is an adjective so you'd have to combine it with words like claim, title or land. However any sovereign government has the eminent claim to its domain and may enact laws to prevent this type of action or simply boot you out because they already owned it. The only truly "unowned" land is ...


3

In my neck of the woods - originally from the UK - we simply call someone with such proficiency a techie which reference.com defines as "a person who is skilled in the use of technological devices, such as computers " However, most such definitions rely on a fuzzy definition of the word 'technology'. Given that definitions of technology can be as broad as ...


3

No. The "station" is the passenger platform, or a building that houses or is adjacent to one or more of those platforms. The track that runs between stations is a section or length of track. The entire length of track between two endpoints is often called a "line".


3

The word that comes directly to mind to describe what you are requesting is Technologist The other term that is used to describe those that do not know of a world without a pervasively available Internet and always-connected devices at arm's length: Digital Native A Technologist is more someone who specializes in Technological things. Digital ...


3

Latin may give access. Can you upload a Latin Dictionary with a search facility for '*****idus'? I've dredged up these examples without this facility: (Smith's Shorter on line) tepor, warmth, tepidus; torpor, torpidus; foetor, stench, foetidus; Many of your lost etymologies may have split off in classical, or in late Latin. for example: valor, ...


3

Such triple series are typical of special Latin verbs that we have to translate with to be + adjective such as cande:re to be bright white. They have an adjective ending in -idus and a noun ending in -or. I guess that there are about 30 of such verbs. What exactly do you mean by etymological fallacy? That in English the noun has developed new meanings? I ...


3

I'd be inclined to go for Condescending on that one: Having or showing an attitude of patronizing superiority This usually includes talking down to people who don't echo the person's own views.


3

The main root of both words is a form of finish: From the etymologies: finite: early 15c., "limited in space or time, finite," from Latin finitum, past participle of finire "to limit, set bounds; come to an end" (see finish (v.)). Related: Finitely; finiteness. infinite: late 14c., "eternal, limitless," also "extremely great in ...


3

In AmE we often use the word "digest" as an analogy to describe this... As in: You ate it. (You read it.) It was broken-down into nutrients in your stomach. (You extracted the information.) It went through your intestines and out your other end. (You absorbed what was necessary, and discarded the superfluous.) We also use the eating word "ruminate" ...


3

to ape, according to The Oxford Dictionaries means: Imitate the behavior or manner of (someone or something), especially in an absurd or unthinking way And from Oxford Learner's Dictionaries: ape somebody/something (especially North American English): to copy the way somebody else behaves or talks, in order to make fun of them synonym mimic We ...


3

slander Slander is the act of making a false, negative spoken statement about someone. Words falsely spoken that damage the reputation of another. In law, the word slander is contrasted with libel, which is the act of making a false written statement about someone. If you misrepresent or malign someone, particularly in a public way, that's ...


2

In the written record of American English, both prickly heat and heat rash are used significantly more than sweat rash: The fact that heat rash has been gaining usage in the written record may reveal the stubborn American tendency to eschew British colloquialism, but it offers no proof that it has overtaken the historical dominance of prickly heat.


2

The closest English expression I can think of for what you're describing would be: laugh, clown, laugh. It's an English translation of the Italian, "Ridi, Pagliaccio," a line from Leoncavallo's opera Pagliacci. It is sometimes used in a literal sense, to refer to a performing artist; however, it can also be used in a broader figurative sense, to refer to ...


2

Computer literate comes to mind, and apparently digital literacy is supposed to be a term now. I think they're both too unspecific to mean anything useful, but they haven't been mentioned. (Technical literacy mentioned in another answer). Since you mention becoming adept "easily," I wonder if you're looking for a technology equivalent of natural athlete or ...



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