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22

A profession in which one sits for long periods is a sedentary profession, and a seated position might also be described as sedentary. A back-friendly posture might be called ergonomic, but that sense is more of a marketing buzzword than a "proper" usage. I might just stick with back-friendly for that.


18

With many service providers, I've run into account manager, as the person in charge of my account at their company, and thus my contact with the company, who's familiar with my needs and history with the company.


16

They are generally referred to as guardian statues. One of the most popular types is guardian lions. For example, Chinese guardian lions ("Foo Dogs") are well-known and it is mentioned that they share symbolism with Staffordshire dogs: While Staffordshire dogs originated in 19th-century England, like foo dogs they were used as symbols of protection and ...


14

From Oxford Advanced Learner's: liaison - communication or cooperation that facilitates a close working relationship between people or organizations My liaison at the insurance company is in charge of my case. Perhaps, for a less formal-sounding option, the word agent is colloquially used. From Merriam-Webster: agent - a person who does ...


8

The bereaved: verb (be bereaved) Be deprived of a close relation or friend through their death: she had recently been bereaved (as adjective bereaved) bereaved families (as noun the bereaved) those who counsel the bereaved ODO


7

I would say desk job indicates a job requiring sitting. In terms of sitting position I would say do not slouch but sit up straight. And in terms of back-friendly I would recommend good posture.


7

My first thought was that it could be sublunary, which Oxford Dictionaries Online defines as: Belonging to this world as contrasted with a better or more spiritual one That seems to be more or less exactly the meaning you are going for, and searching through the Gutenberg Project online version (with thanks to Andrew Leach’s comment to the question) ...


7

In the "service firm" sector, another possibility related to liaison is "account rep" or "account representative", the person at a company who deals with matters concerning a subset of customers/clients/accounts to which they have been assigned. In an insurance company, it could be a "claims adjuster" -- the person who is handling a claim you submitted.


6

Trepidation would emphasize the fear and anxiety: noun [MASS NOUN] 1 A feeling of fear or anxiety about something that may happen: ODO


5

Here are the main guidelines to choose the right suffix among -sion, -tion, and -cion. The first two are the more common while -cion is actually quite rare. (ODO) Words ending in -sion If the ending is pronounced as in confusion, then it should be spelled -sion. Here are some examples: collision; division; revision; persuasion; explosion; ...


5

"Fin de siècle" is a French expression used in English to mean "end of the century" not "turn of the century". (Wikipedia) It's not exact, I know, but related. Might be of help.


4

The negative "vice" has its roots here: Middle English, from Old French, from Latin vitium fault, blemish, crime, vice while the prefix "vice-" has its roots in the Latin vice in place of [Merriam-Webster Unabridged Dictionary]


4

WORD FOR THE FEELING OF DREAD/COMPLACENCY THAT COMES WHEN STARTING SOMETHING NEW (some combination of dread, complacency and intimidation that causes a person to freeze--TAGS: [meaning] [word-choice] [adjectives] [vocabulary]) Due to the wording of your request all single-word answers must reference either the “intimidation” or the “inertia” factors of your ...


4

It sounds to me like it should be (insurance) case manager or (insurance) case worker


3

Unless a specific preexisting term is identified, I believe the neologism archophobia is in order: noun a morbid dread at the commencement of creative work Origin From the Greek ἄρχω meaning begin, make a beginning and φόβος, meaning panic flight, fear, object of terror Liddell & Scott, A Greek-English Lexicon Archophobia is ...


3

There is a phrase exactly for this situation: blank canvas paralysis. It is a fairly new coinage and it is originated in painting where painters can't start painting and keep staring at the blank canvas; but it can be applied to any situation. Whenever you are about to start something new, you risk ‘Blank Canvas Paralysis’, the inability to get started. ...


2

I believe the character misspoke, whether intentionally or not. The phrase is really meaningless when spoken backwards like that. I think the editors just missed it before the show aired.


2

First off, Plethorically isn't even a standard word. See this ngram. It's not even listed as a word derivative in Oxford So no, I wouldn't use it if I were you. Now for using it with obnoxious: "plethorically means an excessive or overabundant amount of something": No it doesn't. You're thinking of plethora. And maybe it's just me, but "a plethora of ...


2

Lassitude might approach the feeling of mental paralysis: n. A state or feeling of weariness, diminished energy, or listlessness. American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. From etymonline.com: early 15c., from Middle French lassitude (14c.), from Latin lassitudinem (nominative lassitudo) "faintness, ...


2

both caring about everything (eg. Marks, Social Standing, Achievements), and yet not caring about everything (eg. not doing homework, procrastinating, purposefully aggravating others) Your question is confused, you are not describing a person/feeling that at the same time cares and not-cares for everything. The person you describe discriminates ...


2

Proponent(s) would be a great fit. From Oxford's entry: proponent (noun) a person who advocates a theory, proposal, or project A very similar word that works is proposer(s).


2

Bakery refers to: A place where products such as bread, cake, and pastries are baked or sold. Also called bakeshop. (AHD). To refer to the production and warehouse processes, I think you can use the expression: Bakery production facility. Bakery Production Facility for D.....’ Donuts at Sharjah Industrial Area Located at the ...


2

This problem actually lies in the words you choose to use after these words. I am afraid that I will ruin the relationship. I fear that I will ruin the relationship. I'm scared that I will ruin the relationship. I'm concerned about ruining the relationship. I'm worried that I will ruin the relationship. These all have very close meanings ...


2

One definition of there is "in or at that place" (Merriam-Webster). M-W gives some example sentences: Stand over there. [Stand in that place.] Put the package there on the table. [Put the package in that place on the table. Turn there at the church. [Turn at that place at the church.] So when you say "My cousins learned Korean there," it's a ...


1

If the item that separates is being emphasized, it can be used in this way. For example, I could say, "my home in the Midwest US is separated from Europe by the Atlantic Ocean." In fact, there's a lot of land between us too, and some mountains as well, but I'm pointing out the fact that the ocean is the biggest obstacle between us. Perhaps your colleagues ...


1

Sedentary would describe a very inactive occupation. However, it doesn't specifically mean sitting. Posture might work for sitting position... Seated posture to be more specific, but, again, it doesn't directly specifically mean sitting.


1

It falls under zoomorphism. Zoomorphism is a derivative of a Greek word zōon that means animal and morphē means form or shape. It is a literary technique in which the animal attributes are imposed upon non-animal objects, humans, and events and animal features are ascribed to humans, gods and other objects. literarydevices.net


1

People attending a funeral are known as mourners. The closest relative(s) of the deceased can be said to be the chief mourner(s). Members of the deceased's family might also be designated as close family mourners. I am not sure that these descriptions extend beyond the time of the funeral and its wake, however. A week later they might be known simply as ...


1

Teenagers are notorious for being contradictory. or Teenagers have a tendency to be paradoxical. They say one thing, but do another According to Collins Dictionary: paradox 1. a seemingly absurd or self-contradictory statement that is or may be true ⇒ religious truths are often expressed in paradox 2. a self-contradictory proposition, such ...


1

You might manage to express that idea with // insouciant which is such a self-concious sort of word that although it means 'devil-may-care' it implies a bit of an act. Otherwise perhaps a paradox: 'deliberately unperturbed', 'with studied indifference', 'puritanically laid-back'. Mix and match until it resonates. //Insouciant 1829 careless, ...



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