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13

Could be a non-sequitur. Per MW: a statement (as a response) that does not follow logically from or is not clearly related to anything previously said This is from Latin, and literally it means: "it does not follow."


11

Is that hypocricy?? That is hypocrisy. Hypocrisy noun (pl.hypocrisies) [ mass noun ] The practice of claiming to have higher standards or more noble beliefs than is the case. His target was the hypocrisy of suburban life. She was irritated to be accused of hypocrisy. Oxford Dictionary of English What do you call a person who tells ...


8

According to this set of risk ratings (low, moderate, high, extreme), the level between high and low is moderate. Moderate adjective Average in amount, intensity, quality, or degree - ODO Here's an example found on the internet, where it's used in the title of an article: Moderate Risk: Key to Professional Success - Howard, Jeffrey P.


7

'2' is an Arabic numeral (here). 'Two' is a word. You can also call it a number word.


5

You're wasting energy: loss of something valuable that occurs because too much of it is being used or because it is being used in a way that is not necessary or effective an action or use that results in the unnecessary loss of something valuable from Merriam-Webster


4

When written as "2", it is a numeral. When written as "two", you could refer to it as spelled out, written out, or possibly longhand.


3

thus adverb literary or formal As a result or consequence of this; therefore: 'Burke knocked out Byrne, thus becoming champion' Synonyms: consequently, as a consequence, in consequence, thereby, so, that being so, therefore, ergo, accordingly, hence, as a result, for that reason, ipso facto, because of that, on that account In the manner ...


3

It doesn't necessarily imply destruction or anything negative. Its original meaning is the point on the earth below the nuclear explosion, but it can also be used with reference to an "explosion" of activity such as commerce, industry etc. Ground zero : the point on the earth's surface directly above, below, or at which an explosion (especially a ...


3

Dictionaries do not list all those words with prefixes/suffixes unless they have some popularity. The de- prefix means 1. the opposite of 2. removing something — OLD. Decalibrate — Wiktionary (intransitive verb, of a measuring instrument) To lose calibration and therefore not be accurate. "Aneroid and electronic instruments, decalibrate ...


3

If I were referring to a measuring instrument, I would say it has "lost calibration" or that the "calibration has drifted". I can't think of a single verb. You could use "miscalibrated", but that might imply the calibration had never been correct.


3

In bird culture that is considered a d*ck move... But in all seriousness OP, your example just sounds like 'double standards'. dou·ble stand·ard(noun) or double standards (plural noun): a rule or principle that is unfairly applied in different ways to different people or groups. EXAMPLE:"During snack time, Jane always received 3 cookies while Tim received ...


3

As Gandalf states adaptable would fit the bill. So would flexible. (Of a person) ready and able to change so as to adapt to different circumstances: 'you can save money if you’re flexible about where your room is located' References: http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/english/flexible


3

The "person who gives you information" is called an expository character. Expository adjective Intended to explain or describe something - ODO Here's an example of the phrase in use (bold added; italics in original): Finally, according to Rowling, next to Albus Dumbledore, Hermione is the perfect expository character; because of her ...


3

A wheeled vehicle is a general expression you may use: a vehicle that moves on wheels and usually has a container for transporting things or people. The Free Dictionary


2

This is difficult to answer without more information about you, the learner. There are different levels to vocabulary. Beck, Kucan, and McKeown identify three tiers in their research (Bringing Words to Life). Tier one: basic words that one learns to read in early grades Tier two: high utility words that span a variety of genres of discourse Tier three: ...


2

Even though these actually aren't consistent in form, this is what I personally would use: France's birth rate the US birth rate the UK birth rate For any country that isn't an acronym, I would use the possessive (e.g. Greece's, Russia's). For the US and UK, it feels more awkward to use the possessive to me. But if consistency is important, "the US' ...


2

For questions like this try http://www.etymonline.com first. In the case it shows 1680s, from dis- "entirely, very" + obsolete gruntle "to grumble" (Middle English gruntelen, early 15c.), frequentative of grunt (v.). EDIT: And taking a quote from @max-williams's link, [...] instead of being negative, the “dis-” prefix in “disgruntled” is an ...


2

The AP style guide refers to representations such as 2 or 10 as "figures," not "numerals," since "two" or "ten" is also a numeral: nu·mer·al (no͞o′mər-əl, nyo͞o′-) n. A symbol or mark used to represent a number. (The Free Dictionary) If you don't believe that, Dictionary.com calls words numerals explicitly: noun 1. a word, letter, ...


2

In most cases, "the" is used with country names that are a description (the United States, the United Kingdom, the Soviet Union, the Republic of Korea), but not single-word names, (America, Britain, Russia, Korea [without "Republic of"]). The Netherlands is historical: think "Nether Lands" (i.e., the low countries). You would also use "the" before countries ...


1

For "2": "2" is a digit,1 as "as a digit;" if it were "42" it would "as digits" figure2 is also used for this, particularly in British English and older American English Merriam-Webster uses "as a number" or "as numbers" for this form in its definitions, such as for figure above For "two": "as a word;" "forty-two" would be "as words" (While it's ...


1

"thus" has various meanings, one of which is synonymous with "therefore", and another meaning "like this" or "in this way". http://www.thefreedictionary.com/thus In this manner: Lay the pieces out thus. See Usage Note at thusly. To a stated degree or extent; so. Therefore; consequently: Thus it was necessary for me to resign. For example: Few ...


1

Agile able to move quickly and easily. relating to or denoting a method of project management, used especially for software development, that is characterised by the division of tasks into short phases of work and frequent reassessment and adaptation of plans. As a software developer using agile as a term of personal characteristic may be misleading due ...


1

Perhaps expend? to use (time, energy, effort, etc.) for a particular purpose Source: Merriam Webster "This budget expends more energy compared to last year's."


1

According to RusCusine.com appetizers, as in any cuisine culture, and Russia is not an exception, serve as small snacks before main course. Russian appetizers (in Russian, they are called “zakuski”) were meant mainly not to provoke keen appetite but to have them with strong drinks. (From what I have heard, what the Russians consider "small snacks"...


1

You can use skeptical in this case, yes. If you're looking for another/a more idiomatic phrase, what you are describing (especially since it is a chronic trait) sounds like a classic example of a doubting Thomas someone who rarely trusts or believes things before having proof : a doubtful or skeptical person


1

I would describe it as notable. It's not too high or low but there is still a reason to bring it up. TFD Notable worthy of being noted or remembered; remarkable; distinguished


1

Is there a reason "honorable" doesn't suit? especially since you seem to be looking for something with that kind of connotation specifically? The two basic definitions I seem to find mean either 1. in keeping with that standard code of conduct called honorable (as in chivalry, or actions considered honorable in a specific group) OR 2. having and keeping ...


1

When I was a child, we always spent hours on the piazza, which was a large screened porch on the front of the house. There was another piazza in the back. That was 90 years ago in a neighborhood in Somerville, Massachusetts. With our Boston accents, it was pi azz zah, Weezey



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