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72

It is often called: dirty money: Profit from the sale of narcotics, prostitution, guns, or other illegal activities. Money that needs to be laundered. money obtained illegally. Source:http://www.thefreedictionary.com


67

From dictionary.com... ill-gotten gains Benefits obtained in an evil manner or by dishonest means, as in They duped their senile uncle into leaving them a fortune and are now enjoying their ill-gotten gains . [Mid-1800s] I think one reasonably consistent distinction between this and @Josh61's suggestion is... dirty money was usually already ...


32

A classic cliche for describing money "earned" in this manner is filthy lucre or just lucre: filthy lucre Money; money or other material goods acquired through unethical or dishonorable means, dirty money. (See The Free Dictionary's entry under money.) Lucre itself has taken on the shameful meaning imparted to it originally by the adjective filthy: ...


19

Perhaps dilettante or dilettantish conveys what you describe. According to Merriam-Webster Online dictionary: a person whose interest in an art or in an area of knowledge is not very deep or serious. Plural: dil·et·tantes or dil·et·tan·ti


19

In addition to loot and booty, which are limited, and dirty money, which is quite general, I would offer up the more specific blood money. Loot and booty are more specifically for theft or ransacking of a national treasure, such as a tomb filled with gold. Dirty money is quite general and can be used for any illegally or unethically acquired gain. Blood ...


15

It's a... no-win situation ...often summed up by saying you're... damned if you do, and [you're] damned if you don't Sometimes it's appropriate to call it a... Catch-22 [situation] ...where it's inherent in the context that you're required to simultaneously observe two or more mutually contradictory constraints. Particularly when successive ...


15

I think "lost cause" fits your description the best. PS. I just reread the examples of your description and I think you should use "no way out" in those situations.


14

Graft. Graft is corruption usually through bribery; political favor for political donation.


13

This may verge into theology here; but if you want to talk about the relationship of a deity to time, one common word is eternal: : having no beginning and no end in time : lasting forever : existing at all times : always true or valid (merriam-webster.com) Saint Thomas Aquinas, in his Summa Theologica, defines eternity (following the Christian ...


12

You might say "one woman man", meaning for that particular man, there was only one woman. Usage: He was a one woman man, and after his wife died, he never remarried. Equally you could say, "one man woman", meaning for that particular woman, there was only one man. Usage: She was a one man woman who remained single after her love married another. In ...


11

There is a word eidolism which means a belief in ghosts; see this Google search. Though it doesn't appear in most dictionaries, and may be one of those words that largely exists only as a definition on esoteric word lists, it does appear in some odd books. But I couldn’t find any actual usage of the corresponding word you’d expect to refer to a believer in ...


10

Possibly obscure, but Kobayashi Maru? Although some might argue, in a Kobayashi Maru situation, a trick is exactly what is called for.


10

The Everlasting:    Sempiternal, Æviternal, Omniëssent, & Omnitemporal It is not clear why eternal or everlasting wouldn’t be good enough as is, but if you want a higher-falutin’ term, the most obvious answer is sempiternal, which the OED defines as: Enduring constantly and continually; everlasting, eternal. That takes the Latin semper meaning ...


10

Per Wikipedia: Haute cuisine: Gourmet is a cultural ideal associated with the culinary arts of fine food and drink, or haute cuisine, which is characterised by refined, even elaborate preparations and presentations of aesthetically balanced meals of several contrasting, often quite rich courses


9

Two terms used in British law are "immoral earnings" and "the proceeds of crime". The former refers specifically to money made through prostitution; the second to any material profit from criminal activity.


9

I would use "eternally devoted" or "devotes his/her life to his/her wife/husband/woman/man". I know these are not one words but they are the most pithy way I could think of to describe what you're describing.


9

From Merriam-Webster... technophile - someone who likes and enjoys technology and modern machines (such as computers) More informally, there's gadgeteer, gadget man, gadget freak, etc. (gadget - a small, unique-use mechanical or electronic device). Personally, I often also use propeller-head (often disparaging: an enthusiast of technology and ...


7

Per Collins English Dictionary: sciolist — (rare) a person who gives their opinion on subjects of which they have only superficial knowledge


7

In the FreeBSD operating system /usr/share/dict/words list, the following words of 6 letters or fewer match the pattern: ajaja alala anana arara ululu Bororo Carara Macaca amamau ananas ararao auhuhu banana batata marara rococo venene I believe the word list is based on (but not identical to) the 1934 Webster's New International Dictionary, Second ...


6

You are probably referring to a case of masochism: gratification gained from pain, deprivation, degradation, etc., inflicted or imposed on oneself, either as a result of one's own actions or the actions of others, especially the tendency to seek this form of gratification. masochist: a person who is gratified by pain, degradation, etc., that is ...


6

I'd recommend "empty" or "hollow", but you may prefer "kitschy": kitsch noun 1.art, objects, or design considered to be in poor taste because of excessive garishness >or sentimentality, but sometimes appreciated in an ironic or knowing way. "the lava lamp is an example of sixties kitsch" adjective 2.considered to be in poor taste but ...


6

Mawkish: excessively and objectionably sentimental. falsely sentimental, esp in a weak or maudlin way. Though the audiences are tired of mawkish plays and movies, writers and producers are never tired of them. There are always audiences who in their innocence shed tears at the excess of sentiment they express. The mawkish dialogues in the ...


5

If it was me trying to describe someone like this, I'd refer somehow to an animal that is well known for monogamy. “They showed Swan-like dedication to each other.” “She's a real Turtle-Dove.” “He's an old Albatross.” None of these are particularly good, but you could choose any one of the animals that mates for life, and create a term around ...


5

In informal conversation, it's possible to leave out lots of words and still communicate clearly. Obviously everyone knows what your boss is trying to say, so that goal is accomplished. That said, as a native speaker I find this particular shortening to be taking it too far. It is unnatural to me to leave out the you in Can you talk?. It sounds like the ...


5

Etymonline.com refers in its entry for absolute to the word absolve, which in turn points to the entry for solve: from PIE *se-lu-, from reflexive pronoun *s(w)e- (see idiom) + root *leu- "to loosen, divide, cut apart" (see lose) Thus, the sense in absolute is "cut away", in the sense of "cut away from any restrictions". When you say that something ...


5

The OED etymology says: from Latin absolūt-um loosened, free, separate, acquitted, completed, etc; past participle of absolv-ere: see absolve. The senses were largely taken direct from Latin, in which the development of meaning had already taken place, so that they do not form a historical series in Eng. Originally a participle -- absolved, ...


5

You might also consider: From Merriam-Webster camp : a : something so outrageously artificial, affected, inappropriate, or out-of-date as to be considered amusing b : a style or mode of personal or creative expression that is absurdly exaggerated and often fuses elements of high and popular culture Or: Also from Merriam-Webster farce : ...


5

Definitions from thefreedictionary.com and oxforddictionaries.com... hackneyed - used so often as to be trite, dull, and stereotyped schmaltz - excessive sentimentality, especially in music or films


5

StuartLC beat me to it. :( The word for mercy killing is euthanasia. Usage: The veterinary team could not heal the dog; it had to be euthanized. Many religious people take issue with euthanasia as being no different than any other form of murder.


5

If you are an adult and take that subject seriously, you may be called a "spiritualist". If you simply believe they exist and fear their possible appearance, you are "superstitious", even though this word is not specific for ghosts and can be used for several other beliefs which are not based on reason or knowledge.



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