Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

42

You could call a person who does that a pedant: Pedant (noun) a person who annoys other people by correcting small errors and giving too much attention to minor details; one who unduly emphasizes minutiae in the presentation or use of knowledge (Merriam-Webster)


26

Your question really poses 2 questions: one where coworkers try to correct you, and one where they pretend not to understand you. The currently chosen answer seems to handle the first question with @Nicole's pedant. However for the second I would submit: Obtuse Annoyingly insensitive or slow to understand: 'he wondered if the doctor was being deliberately ...


25

The only one I could find is cow/kine. However, kine is mentioned as an archaic plural of cow in most dictionaries including OED but Wikipedia and Wiktionary mentions as regional or dialectal also. Wordsmith does not count it as archaic and includes a contemporary usage: Kine is one of the very few words in English (other examples: I/we, me/us) that ...


18

I'm not sure whether pronouns count: "I" versus "We". There are also some prefixes: e.g. "byte" versus "kilobyte"; and "ester" versus "polyester"; and possibly "pole" versus "dipole".


16

The Equatorial Guinean currency, the ekwele, has plural bipkwele.


14

Maybe "pretentious, punctilious, pompous, ostentatious, supercilious, hairsplitting, nit-picking...". My advice, keep it civil. Avoid placing the word "ass" after any of the preceding. Take the high road.


12

A late answer, and it's a bit radical, but perhaps these people are genuinely trying to help you! Perhaps they seem themselves as friends, mentors, experts or educators. Sometimes the use of the wrong word is not only confusing for listeners but also a signal that you don't fully understand what you are talking about. Those who deeply understand a domain ...


10

There are a number of words that have a more personal attachment to them, such as keepsake: anything kept, or given to be kept, as a token of friendship or affection; remembrance. memento: an object or item that serves to remind one of a person, past event, etc.; keepsake; souvenir. remembrance: something that serves to bring to mind or keep in mind some ...


6

"all words that occur commonly with a given word" – it's called "collocation." Look up the collocations of the word you have in mind. E.g., morning in the Online OXFORD Collocation Dictionary. adjectives: this, tomorrow, yesterday | Friday, Saturday, etc. | early, late The side of the mountain appeared pink in the early morning light. | ...


6

Memorabilia can be used to refer to personal items, though its usual meaning relates more to events, teams etc. From Merriam Webster: objects or materials that are collected because they are related to a particular event, person, etc.


5

There almost certainly is not, nor is there a need for one; the commonly used 'googling' would be perfectly clear if used in context. eg. "Jim kept googling answers at trivia last night." Also worth noting: Coining new neologisms is out of scope for EL&U.


5

Numbers between 0 and 1 are fractions, and fractions expressed as a decimal are decimal fractions. decimal fraction a fraction (as .25 = 25⁄100 or .025 = 25⁄1000) or mixed number (as 3.025 = 325⁄1000) in which the denominator is a power of 10 usually expressed by use of the decimal point. Merriam-Webster


5

Passive-Aggressive is a good way to describe the behavior, if not the people themselves. You are communicating information. They willfully disregard this and take control of the conversation by focusing on how you say things. More, they won't respond until you use the words they want you to use. This is textbook passive-aggressive behavior.


4

Obstinate person, or maybe 'Obstinate besserwisser' (or 'Obstinate wiseass') seems like a possible description to me. Obstinate adjective 1. firmly or stubbornly adhering to one's purpose, opinion, etc.; not yielding to argument, persuasion, or entreaty. 2. characterized by inflexible persistence or an unyielding attitude; inflexibly persisted in ...


4

You are always emulating her. (Verb) to try to equal or excel; imitate with effort to equal or surpass: to emulate one's father as a concert violinist.... Sons often emulate their fathers. http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/emulate (Some dictionaries define it as equalling or excelling [not trying to]. So sometimes people use ...


4

According to Merriam-Webster, both these words can be used to refer to something the truth of which is in doubt: Debatable: 2a : open to dispute : questionable Arguable: 1 : open to argument, dispute, or question However, a second meaning for arguable is that can be plausibly or convincingly argued That is, arguable can be used to ...


3

The problem with catch-all words is that they tend to be bland. Situation and circumstance are good bland catch-all words: NOUN 1 A set of circumstances in which one finds oneself; a state of affairs: Condition(s) is another relatively bland word that can catch all three elements of feeling, activity, and company: NOUN 2 The ...


3

You can use a concordancer. Here's a link to a concordancer. It basically searches various language corpuses, and pulls out strings of text with the given word in. You can sort by the word to the left, or to the right. You can also choose to sort be two/three/four etc words to the left or right as well. And you can set the length of the readout from 10-1000 ...


3

I propose hoity-toity, especially for its second meaning according to Merriam-Webster: having or showing the insulting attitude of people who think that they are better, smarter, or more important than other people There is also another lovely (I think at least) word I just came across (same source) : highfalutin meaning: pretentious, fancy ...


3

"Captious" describes a person who consistently seizes the opportunity to pounce on other prople's (perceived) mistakes. Merriam-Webster defines it as: Marked by an often ill-natured inclination to stress faults and raise objections


2

There's a scene in the movie, "2010," that comes to mind. An astronaut and a cosmonaut are enduring a challenging experience. The cosmonaut says, "Easy as cake!" The astronaut corrects the cosmonaut, replying, "Pie! Easy as pie!" Later, the cosmonaut says, "Piece of pie." Again, the astronaut responds with, "Cake! Piece of cake!" We weren't given ...


2

Nitpicking: "minute and usually unjustified criticism"(m-w.com) pretty much describes your colleagues. Thanks, I learned something, I would say it's better just to humor them and let it go one ear and out the other because life is just too short. Don't take it personally.


2

This seems like a research grant offer. As for the first part of your question. The answer is yes. Most research grants and fellowships are given to PhD students alone and the fact that it states the first four years and not having a doctoral yet implies that is also the case here. As for your second part, Most third-party organizations offering research ...


2

I don't honestly think you'll do much better than many populations, though you may want to say "...of seabirds". You may want to concentrate on the verb. These populations could be decimated (even though I prefer the historic usage to the modern), heavily/adversely affected, harmed, etc. The end result could be something like "In the past oil spills have ...


2

In American politics, 'pivot' has lately turned into a buzzword that essentially means 'change of policy focus or direction'. In your query sentence, "the U.S. pivot towards Asia" means "the U.S.'s increased focus on issues relating to Asia".


2

"Any amount of" is often used in Ireland to mean "a large amount of". This can be confusing to people only used to other forms of English, where the only figurative use of "any amount" is normally in the negative to refer to a small amount. However, it makes sense if you compare it to the idiom "any number of" used more widely to mean "a large number of" or ...


2

To run the wickets is apparently a term from the game of croquet, and not as one might expect cricket. It means to complete the game in one turn. The following is a piece of an article in Country Roads magazine: Cochran said [ . . . ] “If you’re really good at it, you can run the wickets in a single turn just like you run the table in pool.” ...


2

There are hundreds of written language systems with unique characters. Each writing system has a unique name for its set of characters, which is often (but not always) the name of the language itself. Not all of the writing systems have alphabets. For example: Chinese has logographic characters representing morphemes. Japanese has logophonetic ...


2

"Counter-intuitive" contains "in", though it refers more naturally to the answer than the question.


2

Debatable means it could go either way. Arguable means that one can make a good case to support the issue/opinion.



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible