Hot answers tagged

41

You could consider using the verb backfire which means: (Of a plan or action) have an opposite and undesirable effect to what was intended: 'overzealous publicity backfired on her'. Your example (You need to change the word order): George's attack on John backfired on himself. [Oxford Online Dictionary]


38

George undermined himself by attacking John. ie, 'mining' under what respect you have, causing your own self to 'fall'.


33

George shot himself in the foot by attacking John. To do or say something that inadvertently undermines one's interests. TFD


32

Date as a synonym of "anus" is Australian slang. The definitions I've found are a bit vague in terms of what specific anatomical feature it refers to (some say "anus," some say "buttocks"), but other people responding to this post have provided evidence that this vagueness may just be due to some dictionary-writers misunderstanding the meaning. (For example, ...


12

The Australian National Dictionary has an entry for "date" meaning anus and vagina. http://australiannationaldictionary.com.au/index.php The link does not work well. You have to fill in "date" in the search field. 1919 W.H. Downing Digger Dialects 18 Date, a word signifying contempt.] 1961 M. Calthorpe Dyehouse 214 “In your bloody date! What do ...


8

George scored an own-goal by attacking John.?


7

A brat. a : child; specifically : an ill-mannered annoying child a spoiled brat b : an ill-mannered immature person Merriam-Webster While there are many other terms for this idea, this one is commonly understood in American English.


4

Of the many synonyms on offer, adage is a good fit: A proverb or short statement expressing a general truth


3

It can be described as a set phrase: (grammar) A common expression whose wording is not subject to variation. (Yourdictionary.com)


3

I would say that such phrases are hackneyed, which the OED defines as: 7a. To make common by indiscriminate everyday usage; to render too familiar, vulgar, trite, or commonplace. Also with out, about, upon. But I also see them as platitudes and clichés.


3

Although you can indeed haave a yearning hope for something, yearning itself is a feeling of intense longing for something. So yearning for something doesn't intrinsically include hope, no. Edit: would probably be better if I explained why this is the case. I could, say, yearn for a reconciliation with my ex-girlfriend, even though I know for a fact ...


3

To plug can be defined as: 9 a recommendation or other favourable mention of a product, show, etc, as on television, on radio, or in newspapers (Collins Dictionary Online) So this means that Branum encourages self promotion by recommending one's own projects. Show-plugging, film-plugging, book-plugging, church-plugging, recipe-plugging, and many more ...


3

You are probably looking for spicy or hot: adjective (FOOD) ​containing ​strong ​flavours from ​spices. hot food contains strong spices that cause a burning feeling in your mouth, piccante. The sauce is very hot – be careful! (Cambridge Dictionary)


3

Consider: Spicy: flavoured with or fragrant with spice. Piquant: having a pleasantly sharp taste or appetizing flavour. Tangy: having a strong, piquant flavour or smell. Peppery: strongly flavoured with pepper or other hot spices Picante: (of food) spicy. (Oxford Dictionaries)


3

The problem with "slinging mud" or even getting into a "mudfight" with someone is that you'll often end up covered in the same mud. In fact, it's so very likely, that the concept is specifically stated in the definition example... Casting aspersions with intent to discredit. The campaign degenerated into mutual mudslinging, each candidate trying to ...


3

"Debased" : lower the moral character of (someone). George debased himself by attacking John


3

I think you may use course: noun (CLASSES) a set of ​classes or a ​plan of ​study on a ​particular ​subject, usually ​leading to an ​exam or ​qualification: Tim did a three-year course in ​linguistics at Newcastle. (Cambridge University)


3

Consider, class (Education) chiefly US a group of students who graduated in a specified year: the class of '53. CED graduating class The body of students who graduate together this year. WordNet by Farlex


2

The word you may be looking for is cohort. Nathaniel achieved first place in the 2015 cohort of linguistics graduates.


2

A charlatan may use chicanery; i. e., "actions or statements that trick people into believing something that is not true; deception or trickery," but they are not synonyms. "Charlatan": a person who falsely pretends to know or be something in order to deceive people." (Merriam-Webster)


2

There's an expression: "Whoever slings mud, loses ground." It means that when you demean someone else, you demean yourself as well. "Mudslinging" means insulting or attacking another person in order to harm his reputation or get him metaphorically dirty. "Losing ground" means falling behind in a competition, or being forced to move backwards. And it's ...


2

The extra amount that you received for your previous work will be subtracted from your next paycheck. In other words, if you make $500 a week and were paid $600, expect $400 next week. However, given that it's an issue of payment, it never hurts to clarify further.


2

Terrible Twos Not used so much as a term for the person, but the development stage of that toddler. Charlie is in his terrible twos, and it's been so difficult! Dictionary.com defines as: "A stage of development in which toddler behavior is a particular challenge." Additionally, this term is widely used throughout parenting (Parents.com) and health ...


2

You might be referring to an idiom: "...a phrase or a fixed expression that has a figurative, or sometimes literal, meaning. [...] There are thousands of idioms, and they occur frequently in all languages."


1

Saying - A common phrase or expression, esp. a proverb, a maxim, an adage (OED).


1

I'm rather found of colloquialism a word or expression used in casual language by common people. yourdictionary.com


1

The obvious answer would be: Prejudiced: having an unreasonable dislike of or preference for somebody/something, especially based on their race, religion, sex, etc. Synonyms: narrow-minded, bigoted, intolerant Biased: having a tendency to show favour towards or against one group of people or one opinion for personal reasons; making ...


1

How about a universalizer? Those who universalize typically make sweeping generalizations.


1

The adjectival form of 'dialogue' (variant spelling is 'dialog') is dialogic also dialogical, adj. pertaining to or characterized by dialogue. [dialogic. (n.d.) Random House Kernerman Webster’s College Dictionary. (2010). Retrieved January 25 2016 from http://www.thefreedictionary.com/dialogic ] Thus, aside from technical senses of 'dialogic' ...



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