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29

I might call this man overconfident: Excessively confident; presumptuous; foolhardy. Also cocky, cocksure, overweening. Also, (informal) too big for one's britches. cocksure too certain; overconfident: He was so cocksure he would catch the cougar that he that he didn't even bother to wear pants.


26

Calligrapher 1: a professional copyist or engrosser 2: one who practices the art of calligraphy Merriam-Webster


25

¨Coming through¨ is equally useful whether the person is in your way or not. It is generic enough that nobody need feel insulted by any suggestion that they are a stupid obstacle. It simply announces ¨I am making my way through a potentially awkward space and I hope nobody will obstruct me¨, issues no command telling anybody how (or whether) to deal with ...


14

Calligrapher, as suggested by other answers, is most suitable for the majority of uses. A couple other words may apply, depending on the context: An engrosser is someone who copies out an official document in fair copy, such as was done for the United States Declaration of Independence or the Constitution of India. A penman is essentially a synonym for a ...


14

As a counterpoint to Kevin, I have heard non-Jeep branded vehicles that are of the same 'format', called "jeeps" (and in fact, would have used that word myself for the top two images). I would not use SUV for the second image as I generally think of SUVs as more of a full-size enclosed vehicle (e.g. a Tahoe or Navagator), although it obviously is a "sports ...


13

Redolent would be useful in this case. Its origins are in a word simply meaning to give an odor, and it now is used most commonly to describe an evocative smell, and often one that triggers nostalgia. Modern usage requires it to be attributed to something, either an item the smell reminds you of ("redolent of ripe cherries") or more figuratively of a ...


11

The phrase "Behind you" seems appropriate. It is most commonly used in places like restaurants where waiters end up in situations that one could bump the other by taking a step back sending dishes flying


10

I usually say/hear: Stay put, you're fine!


9

I think it could be said that the hunter is hubristic. If there's a more precise word for this situation in another language it should be incorporated into English forthwith.


9

The word you're looking for is inebriated. While inebriated, a person is often likely to attempt daring and dangerous feats, and to consider it a good idea to make such an attempt without their pants.


9

Without context it is hard to say, but there are a few options I can think of: If you are performing an activity and encounter a person who is not in your way, say nothing. The status quo will be maintained. If you are performing an activity and encounter a person who is not in your way, but are feeling friendly, say, "Hi" or offer another casual greeting. ...


6

In a modern civil law context, damages: A sum of money claimed or awarded in compensation for a loss or an injury: He or she sues not only for personal injury but for damages for the loss or destruction of the motor vehicle. Also sometimes compensation: Something, typically money, awarded to someone in recognition of loss, suffering, or ...


5

In French there is an expression for that "la madeleine de Proust" The smell of a madeleine (the cake) made the writer Marcel Proust remember old events. See the article on wikipedia


5

Nostalgia a sentimental longing or wistful affection for the past, typically for a period or place with happy personal associations. Additional source on Nostalgic Smells Olfactic Memory could also be what you're looking for.


5

That's a very tricky problem. On the one hand you don't want them to bump into you, on the other hand cultural norms (here in South-East England) forbid you from invading the privacy of strangers by speaking to them - or, god forbid, even perhaps startling them, which would be rude. I would cough loudly to make them aware of my presence. If they're ...


4

It means "This was how a wag [person who likes to joke] imagined one investment banker advising another in a lift [elevator]". Edit Here is the definition of wag (plus examples of usage) from oxforddictionaries.com: NOUN dated A person who makes facetious jokes. EXAMPLE SENTENCES Janey was sure that it was a joke by the wags in the ...


4

There are lots of ways of talking about starting cars. Except for (1) and (2), these are fine. There is an English grammar rule being violated in (1) and (2). Native speakers know it, because they follow it, but they usually can't state it. Non-native speakers need to be taught the rule, however, because it's not obvious. When a noun modifier consists of ...


4

You don't say what you consider to be short term, but in the U.S. there are a number of terms set by different regulatory bodies that may apply. The broadest term for the practice is simply short-term trading or short-term speculation. The economist Joseph Stiglitz included among short-term speculators those who bought and sold "within the trading day, and ...


4

You're probably thinking of day trading or short-term speculation.


4

The OED defines an exponent as: One who sets forth in words, expounds, or interprets; in recent use occas. one who ‘interprets’ music, an executant. Also, that which serves to explain or interpret. A proponent on the other hand is: A person who puts forward or advocates a theory, proposal, or course of action; a propounder, a proposer. In later use also ...


4

I would call such man a reckless hunter. Or, if he thinks that his tool is bigger than it is in reality, an overconfident hunter.


4

You could call it a 4x4 (four by four), which literally means it is a four wheel drive vehicle, but typically that usage also implies a rugged build and off-road capabilities. You'll very rarely hear of a 4x4 SUV just called simply a 4x4, but people use that generic term for Jeeps and Suzukis all the time.


3

Searching for Indian English piquant shows multiple references to food, and definitions of piquant tend to indicate pungent or indeed spicy food. For food, this is agreeable, but in this case, it's indicative of a hot situation. In American English, a person who is in a piquant situation is in "hot water".


3

I'm not a native speaker, but I'd try something in the lines of "feature-equivalent".


3

To make it easy to compare the terms for all forms of ice-containing precipitation used by US weather scientists, I have pulled together the following comprehensive list of such terms from the meteorological glossary of weather.com. (Strangely, the 'wintry mix' that others have also mentioned in their responses doesn't appear in this glossary, even though I ...


3

"adrenaline" and "epinephrine" are synonyms, and both words are current usage anywhere in the world. In medical contexts, in the U.S., you are likely to hear "epinephrine" more often than adrenaline. In non-medical contexts, phrases like "adrenaline-charged", "adrenaline-junkie", "adrenaline rush", are "fixed" and I've never heard "epinephrine" being ...


3

According to OxfordLearnersDictionary; stove: (especially North American English) (British English also cooker) (North American English also range) a large piece of equipment for cooking food, containing an oven and gas or electric rings on top. - She put a pan of water on the stove. (North American English, British English) Most people don't want ...


2

The eastern third of Texas has a number of rivers that lie in plains with very gradual changes in topology. As a result, sedimentary deposits tend to build up fairly quickly. Dredging the mud makes the rivers deeper (and therefore more navigable), and it provides earth for various purposes such as dikes, levees, and erosion control. When I was growing up in ...



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