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342

Yes it did, and the formal version was (drumroll, please....) you. In Early Modern English, thou was the singular and you was the plural. Plural you came to be used as a polite form of address (similar to the French vous, which is also used for the plural), but over time this polite form became more and more common, eventually displacing the singular thou ...


78

That is quite simply a whiteboard. Blackboard can be defined as: A smooth, hard, dark-colored panel for writing on with chalk. Whiteboard can be defined as: A panel covered with white, glossy plastic for writing on with erasable markers.


77

If you're looking for a single word that will express thanks at the same time, I would avoid both satiated and sated; with apologies to @F'x, "sated" is not at all common in conversation, and when it is used it usually has more to do with sex than food. (Not always, but often enough that your hosts will look at you strangely for a moment before relaxing and ...


58

Yes. As far as I know, you actually is the formal, originally plural version (ye/you/your) and thou was the informal version (thou/thee/thy/thine). Over time, thou became impolitely informal and is now no longer used, though interestingly enough nowadays it might even be perceived as more formal than you because it's archaic and survives almost exclusively ...


41

I believe gnaw is the word you're looking for. a : to bite or chew on with the teeth; especially : to wear away by persistent biting or nibbling b : to make by gnawing <rats gnawed a hole>


34

It seems Middle English developed the distinction between formal (you) and informal (thou) versions: this distinction did not exist in Old English. The formal pronoun you was originally a plural form of thou; it can be seen in many languages that a plural form is seen as more polite, which is probably related to the Majestic Plural ("we, King blah blah, ...


34

A great thing about English is its rich lexicon. These are the seasonal adjectives that come to mind: hiemal/hibernal vernal estival autumnal Incidentally, two of the above also have verb forms: hibernate and estivate.


33

Mark Rosenfelder has a list. So too does Wikipedia Here is a partial selection of those which I might use Words from Algonquian languages: Caribou Chipmunk Eskimo Hickory Hominy Husky Moccasin Moose Mugwump Muskrat Opossum Papoose Pecan Pemmican Persimmon Powwow Raccoon Skunk Squash Squaw Terrapin Toboggan Tomahawk Totem Wampum ...


33

Perhaps you're looking for conforming: 2 a: to be obedient or compliant—usually used with to <conform to another's wishes>  b: to act in accordance with prevailing standards or customs <the pressure to conform> —source Merriam-Webster Or conformity as a noun: 3: action in accordance with some specified standard or ...


32

MT_Head's answer is spot on — saying "I'm full" isn't rude. I don't think there is another single word that is similarly polite and well-understood. If you want to avoid saying "I'm full", you could say things like, "I've had plenty," or "I've had too much already." Host: "Would you like any more?" Guest: "Oh, no thank you, I've had plenty. ...


32

It seems that the concept without cause is not a true criterion. Assuming we are not talking about supernatural events, there are physical, biological, social, political things that happened that contributed to the ultimate event. The real sense behind the phrase is no known cause or no understood cause. I would therefore propose inexplicable not ...


30

Piece of junk refers to something that is cheap, shoddy, or worthless. It can be used as an oject as in "This piece of junk won't boot." or a modiying adjective as in "This piece-of-junk computer won't boot" (with or without hyphens). Related adjectives can be used with the name of the device. These include: "Junky", "shoddy", "trashy", "lousy", ...


28

Words relating to the "senses/perception" in a "neuronic/biological" context: pertaining to the senses: sensory pertaining to vision: ocular or optic or visual pertaining to smell: olfactory pertaining to taste: gustatory pertaining to sound/hearing: auditory or aural or acoustic pertaining to touch: tactile or tactual or haptic unable to feel/touch: ...


28

It's a battlement or crenellation. This consists of a parapet (a short wall on top of a roof) with cops or merlons (the solid parts) and crenels or embrasures (the parts you can look through or fire arrows through). Those links are all to Wikipedia, which I know you might not consider a reliable source (although all of those articles contain references). ...


27

That would be sister-in-law: sister of one's spouse, the wife of one's brother, or sometimes the wife of one's spouse's brother. Edit: as ShreevatsaR points out in the comments, if you're looking for a single word that means only "wife of one's brother" and nothing else, then you're out of luck.


27

Contraption (often paired as infernal contraption) refers to any mechanical or electronic device for which the author has some contempt. Gizmo can similarly be employed to mock some needless or useless technological contrivance, but it is not inherently negative. I can call something a gizmo to suggest I am overwhelmed by its complexity, or simply because I ...


25

The words orient and occident are two of the set of six French words orient, occident, zénith, nadir, septentrion, midi, which form the set you were looking for. The word septentrion (north) is obsolete in English, and I can find no evidence that midi (formerly spelled midy) was ever an English word at all. In Old French, the word méridien was used ...


24

The closest thing might be the NATO Phonetic Alphabet. Alpha Bravo Charlie Delta Echo Foxtrot Golf Hotel India Juliet Kilo Lima Mike November Oscar Papa Quebec Romeo Sierra Tango Uniform Victor Whiskey Xray Yankee Zulu


24

Everyday English tuxedo - the etymology1 is worth citing in extenso. 1889, named for Tuxedo Park, N.Y., site of a country club where it first was worn in 1886. The name is an attractive subject for elaborate speculation, e.g.: The Wolf tribe in New York was called in scorn by other Algonquians from tuksit: round foot, implying that ...


23

They mean completely different things. Ostensibly means someone or something has set an expectation that a situation or condition will be a certain way; probably expresses the likelihood that it will be that way. This book ostensibly provides the reader with all the information needed to write good prose. Here the speaker is implying that some ...


23

routine: noun 1. a customary or regular course of procedure. 2. commonplace tasks, chores, or duties as must be done regularly or at specified intervals; typical or everyday activity: the routine of an office. 3. regular, unvarying, habitual, unimaginative, or rote procedure.


23

"Paramount" might be the word you're looking for. E.g. The paramount thing to do is go back to your family and tell several of them what has happened. According to context, you can also do pretty well with the colloquial "number one:" I thought the number one thing to do is to not join. That way they can't have access to all your personal info ...


22

Each city’s metro system has a “common name” that developed historically. London - “The Tube”, from the tube-shaped deep level bored tunnels Paris - metro, full name “Métropolitain” New York City - subway, because the main lines have significant underground sections Chicago - “The L” - from el, because it is mostly elevated Boston - “The T” - from MBTA, ...


22

Actually, somewhat contrary to the fine answer selected above, you was not originally the form that paired with the familiar singular thee. Rather, the nominative (and vocative) form was ye. The now-common you was originally used in objective forms alone, so accusative or dative. For example, Wordsworth draws the nominative–dative distinction when he writes ...


21

The "more posh" words are usually Latin (occasionally Greek) in origin. The more common sounding words are from original Anglo-Saxon (I'm sure a real linguist knows more). The more educated classes tended to be more likely to use Latin and other foreign terms, while the less educated classes used the vernacular (i.e. the vulgar, common language) of the day.


21

In any normal context, a fatal injury is one which either has already led to death, or appears certain to do so. There will be rare circumstances where that appearance of impending death turns out to be mistaken, but in retrospect this would constitute a misuse of the word fatal. The normal term for injuries which may well result in death is ...


21

Drownd is an archaic form of drown from which drownded is an archaic form of drowned. It is still found in some dialects either by survival or by emphasis of the -ed since the rhymes-with-round sound of drowned may not sound as obviously past-tense to some ears as others. It's incorrectly frowned upon as incorrect, by people whose dialects did not retain ...


21

An empty-nester is "a person whose children have grown up and no longer live at home". Wiktionary offers the following explanatory etymology: From birds whose offspring leave the nest when they reach maturity.


21

Well, there is always the word causeless: so you could simply say a causeless event. A rough synonym is fortuitous. You could potentially say a random event or chance event. The commentators on the physics forum are correct: as a scientific term, that isn't the technical meaning of random. But unless you're intending to use it as a technical term, so what? ...


20

The word oestrogen comes from the Latin word oestrus, and oesophagus is a Latin word as well. The oe spelling in Latin originally represented a diphthong [oj] ("oy"), but then later (in Latin) became a long vowel [ee]. When we borrowed such words into English, it was pronounced more like [i], [e], or [ɛ] (depending on the word), following English ...



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