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28

I'd suggest fundamentally impossible when writing for an audience which is not familiar with the field, while obviously impossible would work for an audience which is familiar with it.


23

Armchair pundits often like to level the accusation of a work being derivative: Imitative of the work of another artist, writer, etc., and usually disapproved of for that reason. (ODO) But beware: that's so overdone that it, itself, has become a cliche.


22

A profession in which one sits for long periods is a sedentary profession, and a seated position might also be described as sedentary. A back-friendly posture might be called ergonomic, but that sense is more of a marketing buzzword than a "proper" usage. I might just stick with back-friendly for that.


22

Yes, I use it and so do many people that I know. Nowadays it usually comes in the idiom A bit of a palaver, which refers to an argument. Usually an argument involving more than two people. I suspect that nowadays its use amongst younger people is dying out but it is used by my fellow Britons in our decrepitude.


20

Since you're talking about physics, why not "physically impossible"?


18

With many service providers, I've run into account manager, as the person in charge of my account at their company, and thus my contact with the company, who's familiar with my needs and history with the company.


16

They are generally referred to as guardian statues. One of the most popular types is guardian lions. For example, Chinese guardian lions ("Foo Dogs") are well-known and it is mentioned that they share symbolism with Staffordshire dogs: While Staffordshire dogs originated in 19th-century England, like foo dogs they were used as symbols of protection and ...


14

From Oxford Advanced Learner's: liaison - communication or cooperation that facilitates a close working relationship between people or organizations My liaison at the insurance company is in charge of my case. Perhaps, for a less formal-sounding option, the word agent is colloquially used. From Merriam-Webster: agent - a person who does ...


14

I would suggest intrinsically unworkable where the important part is intrinsic, expressing the fact that the problems with the experiment are internal, not related at all to any changeable conditions. I realize this recasts your question a bit, but I think it better conveys the underlying concept that a given proposal can't ever work. Intrinsically ...


12

This is a very commonly used word in the West of Scotland (Glasgow etc.). We use to mean a disturbance - usually about something inconsequential. So you might say, "there was a big palaver on the bus when the inspector came on and some guy couldn't find his ticket". It is marginally colloquial (I don't think a police officer would use it in court, "we were ...


11

I would say "knock-off" http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/knockoff You could also use "copycat"


8

The bereaved: verb (be bereaved) Be deprived of a close relation or friend through their death: she had recently been bereaved (as adjective bereaved) bereaved families (as noun the bereaved) those who counsel the bereaved ODO


7

I would say desk job indicates a job requiring sitting. In terms of sitting position I would say do not slouch but sit up straight. And in terms of back-friendly I would recommend good posture.


7

In the "service firm" sector, another possibility related to liaison is "account rep" or "account representative", the person at a company who deals with matters concerning a subset of customers/clients/accounts to which they have been assigned. In an insurance company, it could be a "claims adjuster" -- the person who is handling a claim you submitted.


7

Since you said "lots of", how about pastiche, instead of a simple rip-off 1.1 An artistic work consisting of a medley of pieces imitating various sources:


6

My first instinct would be to say "school pageant," but my vocabulary is old-fashioned and I don't really know 21st-century popular culture; "pageant" might be exactly the wrong word at this point in history. "Christmas pageants" used to be a staple of schools, but aren't so common anymore; "beauty pageants" are common and could give connotations to the word ...


5

Here are the main guidelines to choose the right suffix among -sion, -tion, and -cion. The first two are the more common while -cion is actually quite rare. (ODO) Words ending in -sion If the ending is pronounced as in confusion, then it should be spelled -sion. Here are some examples: collision; division; revision; persuasion; explosion; ...


5

Palaver is mildly pejorative. It's often used to mean idle chat that's leading nowhere, too much talk and not enough action; sometimes it refers to talk that is intended to distract attention from the issue at hand. I hear it used now and then, as a noun. The ngram. Here's my planetary location on the Dictionary of American Regional English map (they ...


4

It sounds to me like it should be (insurance) case manager or (insurance) case worker


4

Just from reading the question's title, I would've suggested taboo... but, obviously, that doesn't fit in the physics world. So instead, I'd recommend something like infeasible, i.e. the antonym of feasible, defined as "capable of being done, effected, or accomplished". (Note that you could also use unfeasible.) Alternatively, borrowing from a more ...


4

It "violates the laws of physics". You could be more specific and state which laws it violates (for example, conservation of energy).


4

It's basically used to describe an informal chat. Depending on your intonation, you could be stressing the irrelevance of the topic of discussion (e.g. when something more important should've been addressed, or you found the topic of discussion a waste of time), or you could be stressing you just talked for hours on end with a friend. It's not just an ...


3

I'm not sure there are unambiguous, widely used precise terms for this, but this is what I've come up with: autophobia: a fear of being alone or of one's self So this one has two meanings at best, and the fear of loneliness is the better known one. However there are sources that support the second meaning as well: Autophobia may mean one of two ...


3

How about "Talent Show" or "Annual Talent Show" to emphasize that it's a recurring event?


3

First off, Plethorically isn't even a standard word. See this ngram. It's not even listed as a word derivative in Oxford So no, I wouldn't use it if I were you. Now for using it with obnoxious: "plethorically means an excessive or overabundant amount of something": No it doesn't. You're thinking of plethora. And maybe it's just me, but "a plethora of ...


3

Physics, and all of science, is based on the assumption that "Laws", as deduced from thousands (and in some cases millions or billions) of observations will always yield the same result. [Of course, with our understanding of quantum mechanics this means that an experiment will faithfully reproduce the probability that we can calculate for its outcome.] ...


3

This is basically lifted from the German Wikipedia entry -- the term is not that uncommon in German, though with negative connotations. The word has its origins in Greek (παραβολή), and from there was adapted by Latin (parabola), Portuguese (palavra), and eventually, English. The general meaning is "idle talk". In many African cultures, this is ...


2

For this specific area: a piece of open ground, usually paved or laid with concrete or gravel, and often adjoining or surrounding a building or buildings? I would call it a "patio": A paved outdoor area adjoining a house. Some of the other suggestions are good but the benefit of "patio" is that it implies that it's a solid, open surface. It's ...


2

both caring about everything (eg. Marks, Social Standing, Achievements), and yet not caring about everything (eg. not doing homework, procrastinating, purposefully aggravating others) Your question is confused, you are not describing a person/feeling that at the same time cares and not-cares for everything. The person you describe discriminates ...


2

Proponent(s) would be a great fit. From Oxford's entry: proponent (noun) a person who advocates a theory, proposal, or project A very similar word that works is proposer(s).



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