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41

Empty promises. empty promise (idiomatic) A promise that is either not going to be carried out, worthless or meaningless.


7

debater a person who disputes; who is good at or enjoys controversy eristic 2. a person who engages in disputation the art or practice or debate or argument gainsay Gainsay comes from an Old English word that means "contradict" or "say against," If you know someone who constantly corrects others, tells them that they're wrong, and ...


6

It is legitimate to use these terms garbage and trash interchangeably in American English: garbage noun 1.1 A thing that is considered worthless or meaningless: trash noun 1.0 chiefly North American Discarded matter; refuse. ODO American English In many contexts, garbage might have a unique meaning as the etymologies ...


5

Palpable: 1.1 (Especially of a feeling or atmosphere) so intense as to be almost touched or felt: ODO From etymonline.com: late 14c., "that can be touched," from Late Latin palpabilis "that may be touched or felt," from Latin palpare "touch gently, stroke" (see feel (v.)). Figurative sense of "easily perceived, evident" also is ...


4

John was walking at grade and slipped on a patch of ice. When John slipped he did not fall to grade as he caught himself with his right hand [...] In construction, grade has several potential meanings: grade Definitions (8) The surface or level of the ground. A classification of quality as, for instance, in lumber. The existing or ...


4

It's an idiom, with several different expressions: It took all I had... It took everything I had within me... I took all I had in me... Etc. It means one has to harness every bit of willpower one has in order to do (or not to do) something; one does it against their natural desire. I was so beaten down emotionally and it took all I had within me to ...


4

"To be a shell" means to be hollow, with nothing inside. So the subject of the song is "skin and bones" which determine his exterior, but has no internal substance, no soul.


4

Food that's particularly bland and tasteless is often described as pablum (or Pablum): a brand of soft, bland cereal for infants It's amusing to note that when Pablum was introduced in 1931, media reports at the time said the cereal tasted like "boiled Kleenex" and "had the consistency of mucilage and smelled like the inside of an old ...


4

Shoe leather (I'm thinking of Charlie Chaplin trying to eat his boot). Stale matzoh. (My mother described the most successful diet she ever went on like this: she stopped taking a lunch to work. The only food in her office was a box of ancient matzoh.) Stone soup.


4

Polemic (polemicist) or Controversialist. polemic (noun): A person who argues or writes in opposition to another, or who takes up a controversial position; a controversialist. Cf. polemicist n. [OED] polemicist (noun): An author of polemics; a controversialist. [OED] controversialist (noun): a person who likes to disagree with other ...


3

In my Google searches, in several books "vacuous promise" appears as a synonym for "empty promise". It has a more dramatic tone that may or may not be a good fit with your work. It can convey undertones of thoughtlessness on the part of the person making the promise. From Google's definition: adjective: vacuous having or showing a lack of ...


3

Isn't the verb force enough? You forced a pin into the plug and deformed it in the process There is a traffic jam ahead. You forced your way to a different lane to continue the journey. There is enough space, but the markings on the road say you cannot switch lanes there. Someone asks you to perform a difficult piece at a concert. You forced ...


3

It sounds like you're talking about brute force. A steamroller might convey the appropriate imagery. He is like a steamroller; nothing will stop him from getting work done. Someone who acts carelessly this way may do so with reckless abandon.


3

Perhaps: To act in a devil-may-care manner. a very casual attitude; a worry free or carefree attitude To act in a like a bull in a china shop Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary - Page 181 2008 - like a bull in a china shop If someone is like a bull in a china shop, they are very careless in the way that they move or behave More: go for ...


3

"You cannot just do whatever you want. You must obey the rules". or, "You cannot just throw caution to the wind. or, "We couldn't find any player for the concert, so he just improvised.


3

As others have noted, this could be described in basic terms as sitting with sitting with crossed legs or with a leg crossed, but to be more specific, Allan Pease's Body Language: How to read others' thoughts by their gestures (Sheldon Press, 1981) refers to this specific position as an "American figure four" because it is supposedly a sitting position ...


3

"Once bitten, twice shy." "Older and (or but) wiser."


3

I think that would be "unanimous".


3

"Bestiary" comes from the French "Bestiare" which itself comes from the Medieval Latin, Bestiarum Vocabulum where bestia (beasts) + -arum (genitive plural of) and voc[a] (to name/call/summon) + -bulum (noun suffix denoting vessel/instrument); And roughly translated "Instrument for Naming Beasts." I am not a teacher of the Latin language, so if you'd like to ...


3

Short answer: apocryphal is routinely used to mean not [convincingly] true. Although the concepts are intertwined, the definition of apocryphal denotes authenticity not authorship: adjective 1 (Of a story or statement) of doubtful authenticity, although widely circulated as being true: ODO The connotation of authorship is rooted in the ...


2

Any work marked by humanistic values and devotion to human welfare, regardless of its size and impact, could be termed "humanitarian". A humanitarian is a person concerned with the welfare of mankind. As an adjective, humanitarian is used to describe something or someone who displays the characteristics of someone concerned with human welfare. ...


2

Are you possibly mishearing "chibi"? (Urban Dict.) (I don't have enough rep to comment, or I would have :/ )


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Folklore: noun [MASS NOUN] 1 The traditional beliefs, customs, and stories of a community, passed through the generations by word of mouth. ODO Which includes: Folk wisdom, Folk memory, Folk music, Folk remedies, Folk medicine, etc. From etymonline.com Folklore: "traditional beliefs and customs of the common people," 1846, ...


2

This is a Welcome (city) sign, as stated in Wikipedia Wiki: A welcome sign (or gateway sign) is a road sign at the border of a region that introduces or welcomes visitors to the region.1 Examples of welcome signs can be found near political borders, such as when entering a state, province, county, city, or town, and they are increasingly found in ...


2

Sounds like you mean to "buck the system" in one word might be to "defy" as in against the odds she defied the norm ...


2

It looks like this is an Italian name; you share the name with a well known Italian physicist from Sicily: Ettore Majorana. Wikipedia also has an article on the surname in general, and Ancestry.com has a page specifically for the spelling "Maiorana", though they mainly have information on the name in the United States, that indicates that the name comes from ...


2

You cannot: fit a round peg in a square hole. ride the shoulder. just fake it. You cannot flippantly yield yourself to your own devices. You must obey the rules. So he just winged it. I believe this is the attitude you're looking for: With all these edits I'm just going to have to throw in the towel and say fuck it, just use/do whatever you ...


2

An empty promise or a false/fake promise can be used. But an empty promise is the best one.


2

Since answers are spreading into other parts of speech, I would use brash or brashly to refer to the action or the way it was performed. Here are a few definitions of the word, which all suggest an aggressive, somewhat reckless spirit. Brash (adj.) impertinent; impudent; tactless: "a brash young man". hasty; rash; impetuous. energetic or ...


2

It took everything within me - I used every bit of mental and physical strength in me to not move over to the said object.



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