Hot answers tagged

76

I'm not sure why no one has said it, but the best answer is right in your question: I may have inherited a heart condition from my biological father. I have a situation similar to the one you describe, and my whole life this phrase has never failed to convey the meaning of the genetic-only relationship.


33

If you're looking to emphasize his lack of involvement, a common description for a father-by-biology-only is: "sperm-donor". (US) Note that this term is often used outside the context of a formal sperm donation arrangement, usually pejoratively, emphasising that biological father did not provide a parenting role.


22

Try birth father also called a biological parent. It means a biological mother (birth mother) or biological father(birth father). Here is a definition from another site. This site defines it as the man who was someone’s father when they were born rather than the man who has adopted them. It is closer in meaning to what the op asked.


22

It is only ever used in a formal medical sense, with examples from the sixteenth century. Stool derives from the name given to an enclosed chamber, or commode, used for producing stools. The most usual form is in the plural. d. A discharge of fæcal matter of a specified colour, consistency, etc.; the matter discharged (chiefly pl.). (OED sense 5d). It is ...


17

lingua franca From the Merriam Webster dictionary: lin·gua fran·ca \ˈliŋ-gwə-ˈfraŋ-kə\ noun : a language that is used among people who speak various different languages Full Definition often capitalized : a common language consisting of Italian mixed with French, Spanish, Greek, and Arabic that was formerly spoken in Mediterranean ...


14

I've heard "absent father" used in this situation. In fact, parental absence or absenteeism is recognised in psychology.


12

"Stool" is more formal than poop or poo but sometimes more comfortable to say than feces or excrement. You could say "I've been having loose stool" to express that you don't quite have diarrhea, but it's somewhat in that direction. An example from Angel in Disguise: A Memoir The next morning after the children had their breakfast, I asked Verna ...


8

Unfortunately, the term Baby Daddy seems to be the term most used in common practice today. This seems to have started with descriptions of celebrities and their children in the tabloids. This term has deplorably now entered the common nomenclature. Baby Daddy - slang: the biological father of a woman's child; especially : one who is not married to or ...


8

I'd say that all that he is, is progenitor. A person or thing from which a person, animal, or plant is descended or originates; an ancestor or parent: 'his children were the progenitors of many of Scotland’s noble families' In my mind that properly defines both the role in siring and the lack of any involvement afterwards. Reference: ...


7

You can try: genetic father Which suggests that it is only your father in terms of genetic material... kind of like the sarcastic use of "sperm donor" but without other potential misleading connotations. Or if you like sarcasm and relying on the audience inferring the meaning: invisible father


7

If you're able to change the usage a bit, I'd offer sire. Changing the usage to something more like: Having been more sired than fathered, I never knew the man. helps to differentiate between that alternate meaning of sire, which is a title of respect and nobility.


7

It would appear that Shakespeare used "leaves" (and, presumably, "leaf"): Crossing the sea from England into France, This fellow here, with envious carping tongue, Upbraided me about the rose I wear; Saying, the sanguine colour of the leaves Did represent my master's blushing cheeks, When stubbornly he did repugn the truth About a certain ...


6

I guess you could describe them as your estranged biological father to cause someone to be no longer friendly or close to another person or group Merriam-Webster


5

It is just called a "stake". A piece of wood or other material, usually long and slender, pointed at one end so as to be easily driven into the ground as a marker or a support or stay.


4

Summary (paraphrased from Etymonline): Gadfly probably comes from gad (n), a goad, but "the sense is entangled with gad (v) 'rove about'". Gadabout comes from gad (v) plus about. The noun, gad, is older than the verb, gad (from gadden); both are older than gadfly. (The verb gad may perhaps be derived from the noun gad.) Gadabout is comparatively recent. ...


4

seeker from bing: NOUN 1.a person who is attempting to find or obtain something: "a tenacious seeker of the truth" ·


4

There are several terms, the best one to use depends on nuance. To express the connotation of a parent who should have been there but wasn't, use the (mildly) pejorative term absentee father. absentee: a person who is expected or required to be present at a place or event but is not. Google


4

Be interesting to hear other examples of what the teacher considers to be formal words. How did the teacher define 'formal'? Does it mean words only used in certain settings or instances, words not commonly in use or just words that are not usually thought of, or perhaps are not specifically defined, as colloquialisms ? English is widely spoken around ...


3

So many names for this chap. Here's another one: genitor. The word comes up every now and then in Countdown, a letters and numbers quiz in UK, that's how I know it.


3

Although normally used to describe being awake when one should normally be asleep, the word wakefulness (the noun form of wakeful, defined below) can work here. Wakeful adjective 1.1 (Of a period of time) passed with little or no sleep - ODO You can say that someone got 10 hours of wakefulness. Here's one instance from a web search (emphasis mine): ...


3

In English, you'd say that you "placed out" of a class. That means you get credit for it without having taken it, and it implies that you took some kind of placement exam or assessment test that demonstrated that you had sufficiently learned the course material. From The Free Dictionary: Place out of To qualify for a waiver of some requirement or ...


3

The "person who gives you information" is called an expository character. Expository adjective Intended to explain or describe something - ODO Here's an example of the phrase in use (bold added; italics in original): Finally, according to Rowling, next to Albus Dumbledore, Hermione is the perfect expository character; because of her ...


3

The phrase goes back as far as the Roman poet Juvenal who, in the late 1st or early 2nd century, wrote: let her be handsome, charming, rich and fertile; let her have ancient ancestors ranged about her halls; let her be more chaste than the disheveled Sabine maidens who stopped the war--a prodigy as rare upon the earth as a black swan! "Black swan" at ...


2

Entering "alone" into http://www.oldenglishtranslator.co.uk/ comes up with a few: syndrig 1. separate alone single not joined with others distinct ánhaga solitary being lone dweller recluse one dwelling alone ánstapa lonely wanderer Further looking about comes up with usages, here's ánstapa in lines 12-15 of The Panther: ... Is þæt ...


2

Ernest Weekley, An Etymological Dictionary of Modern English (1921) gives no indication that the terms gadabout and gadfly use gad- in an etymologically shared sense. Here are Weekley's entries for the the relevant terms (I omit his coverage of gad in the sense of "God," as in gadzooks): gad1. Spike. O[ld] N[orse] gaddr, spike, nail, associated with the ...


2

In the classic psychoanalyst model, such a person was called the analysand (as opposed to a patient). However, I can't think of any way to make this relevant to your question. Nonprofessional therapists (those without doctorates) often refer to those seeking their services as clients. But that doesn't seem to fit either. The term accepted by the National ...


2

There is a term in formal garden design to describe a location where paths split into three (or four or five) which in English is called a Goose-foot and in French a 'Patte d'Oie'. The Wiki Link specifically talks about French garden design, but Goose-foot was used both as a term and a feature in Stuart period gardens in the UK. Be aware though that it is by ...


2

Many words have been used, but I don't think anyone mentioned that different terms are appropriate for different situations. "Biological father", or more unusual "genetic father" just describes the biological situation without any judgement. It will even be used to describe the husband of the wife who raised the child in cases where people doubt it. "My ...


2

I have heard this used: Bio-dad. It is often used as pejorative, though much less powerfully than "sperm donar". Most often used to refer to a biological father who is less involved than a step-father, or to a biological father who has little-to-no interaction with the child.


2

Although, as others have noted, stool is mainly used when discussing medical conditions related to fecal matter and is almost never used informally, it does appear in other contexts once in a while. For example, in a classic Saturday Night Live skit, Phil Hartman, playing Frank Sinatra, says to Sting, playing Billy Idol, "You don't scare me. I've got ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible