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44

It's fine to say "closed" to just mean "not open", eg "The shop is closed on sundays.". To avoid confusion between temporary closure and permanent closure, when a shop goes out of business people would often say it has closed down.


41

Audience could also work in some contexts, especially if you are doing something to delight or entertain others. E.g. David's card tricks were a hit at the party, because his audience was willing to go along with his silly antics.


34

That person would be called observer. What is observer? Well, a person who watches or notices something.


33

The "primary" hand is generally called dominant. Dominant hand Operant hand generally used for performing fine motor-skills tasks (e.g., writing, holding dental instruments) Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012 via TFD From that, I would surmise subordinate hand for the other one.


27

While closed is correct and the most common, the people of (at least) Great Britain also use the word shut In which case, to say that a store is shut today suggests that it is only temporary. There again, you could just use " the store is not open today" to mean the same thing.


22

The non-dominant hand is commonly called the off hand. Also the weak hand. See any combat arts forum. http://www.bladeforums.com/forums/showthread.php/206957-Question-Knife-position-Dominant-Hand-or-Off-Hand


18

If it's a demonstration, the viewer could be the -- viewer.


16

You might consider, obsolescence-prone and obsolescent-/obsolete-prone If you're concerned about the problems of owning or maintaining rundown, obsolescence-prone freight equipment, talk it over with U.S. Railway Equipment Company. Chances are we'll have some interesting dollar-saving suggestions. During periods when business generally is slumping, ...


14

The answer is closed. When a shop is not open it is closed, irrespective of the reason - holiday, fire, renovation, bankruptcy, epidemic of plague etc. And the comment from @568ml is pertinent. If you say it is closed, without further qualification such as -"tomorrow", "on Mondays", "until the end of the month" etc. it could be taken to mean that it is ...


13


9

A student, if the purpose is to teach.


9

Obviable: capable of being obviated And since obviate doesn't get the recognition it deserves... Obviate: to make (something) no longer necessary : to prevent or avoid (something)


8

The common thread among your first three examples is that they are verbs. Things that are able to 'do' those verbs may then be suffixed with -able. This is the same with other words like write (writeable), read (readable), eat (eatable / edible), etc. Obsolete is not normally considered to be a verb (it's an adjective), so is modified differently (e.g. ...


8

If you want to get technical then you can use the word observing followed by the actual holiday. Observe: to show regard for by some appropriate procedure, ceremony, etc.: to observe Palm Sunday. http://www.dictionary.com/browse/observing Usage: Bob: I'm going to the Apple Store on Queens Road tomorrow, care to join me? Alice: I ...


7

You would say such couples were cohabiting. cohabit: intransitive verb To live together as or as if a married couple - Merriam-Webster They cohabited in a small apartment in the city.


7

One important word not mentioned here yet is witness. the person you demonstrate to would witness you "flipping a chair for him". witness also refers to someone who testifies in court for what they have witnessed.


6

"monged" is a british slang word which is similar in meaning to "stoned" or "wasted", usually on drugs which have a tranquilising effect (marijuana, valium, opiates etc). https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/monged Moore is (in my judgement) implying that they have read so much Dylan Thomas that it has made them slow and sleepy and perhaps lacking in good ...


5

It all depends upon the perceived state of your relationship and how much you want to reveal. A simple "Boyfriend/girlfriend" (sometimes even just "friend") is acceptable even for a couple living together. In some places, the law gives rights to couples who live together more than a certain amount of time, also called common-law marriage or a de facto ...


5

Impression "a mark, indentation, figure, etc., produced by pressure. "the act of impressing; state of being impressed"


4

I would use the term that fits the role or relationship. Are they there to learn or to evaluate? Or is the demonstration more of a dog and pony show intended for a general audience. Or are you accosting people on the street hawking your toy robots? If you were just looking at the mechanics of demonstrations, I'd probably use recipients, audience, or ...


4

Summary (paraphrased from Etymonline): Gadfly probably comes from gad (n), a goad, but "the sense is entangled with gad (v) 'rove about'". Gadabout comes from gad (v) plus about. The noun, gad, is older than the verb, gad (from gadden); both are older than gadfly. (The verb gad may perhaps be derived from the noun gad.) Gadabout is comparatively recent. ...


3

In a business world, that process is called vertical integration which means: an arrangement in which the supply chain of a company is owned by that company. Usually each member of the supply chain produces a different product or (market-specific) service, and the products combine to satisfy a common need. [Wikipedia] The term backward integration is ...


3

One article describes it as a mental illness: obsessive-compulsive spartanism. That's fairly negative, but you might not want the added baggage of diagnosing someone with a mental illness, so just spartanism might be a good alternative. Spartanism is a little more neutral to me than negative, but some folks might see it as slightly negative. An article in ...


3

There is the perfectly good word demonstratee ... it's not common but it is part of the English language. Given it's logical connection to demonstrator the meaning should be apparent to people who don't know it and it ties in to your view that you are demonstrating (as opposed to showing or teaching...).


3

Although normally used to describe being awake when one should normally be asleep, the word wakefulness (the noun form of wakeful, defined below) can work here. Wakeful adjective 1.1 (Of a period of time) passed with little or no sleep - ODO You can say that someone got 10 hours of wakefulness. Here's one instance from a web search (emphasis mine): ...


3

"Real" isn't specific so it can mean (almost) whatever the speaker wants. If someone has never had a good relationship with their biological parents, they may use "real parents" to refer to the people who brought them up. Conversely children who know they were adopted may want to find their "real" - as in biological - parents. This means that using "real ...


3

Something that is becoming obsolete is obsolescent. adjective becoming obsolete; passing out of use, as a word: an obsolescent term. becoming outdated or outmoded, as machinery or weapons. Biology. gradually disappearing or imperfectly developed, as vestigial organs. So, any object that can become obselete is obsolescent to some extent.


2

How about supersedable? Wiktionary: 'Capable of being superseded' - "This document is temporary and supersedable"


2

An impulsive person acts without thought. based on emotional impulses or whims; spontaneous Whether there is a specific word for being impulsive due to anxiety is uncertain. People who are anxious often act impulsively, trying to soothe their anxiety rather than following reason.


2

You can simply use admin for administrative matters.



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