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51

If you are looking for an adjective I think you may use divisive: causing a lot of disagreement between people and causing them to separate into different groups. (M-W)


26

Goodwill may be a term that you are looking for: "The goodwill amounts to the excess of the "purchase consideration" (the money paid to purchase the asset or business) over the total value of the assets and liabilities." More generally, you seem to be talking about the intangible assets of the business, if you're defining "extra" as anything beyond ...


21

Here's a picture that might help you, taken from a guide for grade 3 teachers. It sounds like it's called Heel sitting. There's also Kneeling as noted by @Roddy of the frozen peas, but kneeling does not necessarily mean that your buttock is resting on your heel though. Google kneeling Mary for some examples. Kneeling just means being down on one's knee, ...


19

A wedge issue is one which actively (as opposed to passively) divides people into polarized groups. A typical one in American politics is abortion, another is gun control. A wedge issue is a political or social issue, often of a controversial or divisive nature, which splits apart a demographic or population group. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/...


18

If you are looking for a noun for the division (besides division), perhaps you are thinking of schism? Google defines it as a split or division between strongly opposed sections or parties, caused by differences in opinion or belief. At one time it applied more specifically to divisions within a church, and that's still sometimes the first definition ...


14

As someone who spends a lot of time writing software to control railway signals, the usual term is throw a set of points. Alternative terms are specific to the direction: Pull the points moves them such that the train moves off the main line ("Reverse" position). Push the points moves them back to the straight line position ("Normal" position). Push and ...


14

There isn't really a specific word for this in English. In general, the value of a business is not just the value of the building, fixtures, and fittings; a successful business simply has a greater value than an unsuccessful one. You might apply tangible1 and intangible2 as this page does: Although there are relatively easy ways to value certain parts ...


13

Could be a non-sequitur. Per MW: a statement (as a response) that does not follow logically from or is not clearly related to anything previously said This is from Latin, and literally it means: "it does not follow."


13

I'm not 100% sure of what you want but if none of the above answers fit, what you might want is "litmus test" in the following senses: From Merriam-Webster: a test in which a single factor (as an attitude, event, or fact) is decisive Or: From Wikipedia: a question asked of a potential candidate for high office, the answer to which would determine ...


11

Common words to describe a "an opinion on a subject which, by definition, divides a group of people", would simply be controversial or confrontational. If not, I take the description to mean they are entrenched in their positions, so that 'idealogical' line might reference their impasse. There's a 'line in the sand' so to speak. You said you couldn't use ...


11

If you're buying a company then the value of that company is factored into the price, usually some multiple of the yearly revenue. The specific multiple is determined by industry and often by credit agencies. The total value of the company, the valuation, therefore includes the physical and financial assets, as well as a measure of how much money it is ...


9

In the context of a (UK) railway train track, it's change the points. (4720 written instances). Cambridge Dictionary points (plural) mainly UK, US usually switches a place on a railway track where the rails (= metal bars on which the trains travel) can be moved to allow a train to change from one track to another Ex: The train rattled as it went ...


9

Because disciplinary simply means concerned with discipline, and discipline can mean not chastisement but field of knowledge, disciplinary expertise means expertise in a particular area. That is, it is the same thing as domain expertise. Compare with interdisciplinary meaning related to more than one branch of knowledge. Without the inter- part, it simply ...


8

An ideological fault line is often used to describe a gap in politics between two groups. For instance: The ideological fault line between Republicans and Democrats often comes down to whether they feel income redistribution by tax is just. The word bellwether is often used to describe an issue that is useful for disambiguation of whether an individual or ...


7

Demarcation as a noun, and demarcate or demark as a transitive verb come to mind. demarcate: to delimit or set apart (Merriam Webster), or ~1.1 to separate or distinguish from (OED) demark: another term for demarcation.(OED) demarcation, ~1.1 a dividing line (OED) So, for example, you could say something like "Republicans and Democrats are ...


7

Perhaps the word you are looking for is shibboleth: a custom, principle, or belief distinguishing a particular class or group of people, especially a long-standing one regarded as outmoded or no longer important. (from the Oxford Dictionaries web site). The word means "ear of corn" in Hebrew; it was considered difficult for foreigners to pronounce ...


6

Many of the other answers would fit the question -- but if you're looking to describe an issue so polarizing & divisive that it would cause an argument or fight, I'd go with contentious.


6

Sitting Kneeling ...where the thighs are near horizontal and the buttocks sit on the heels - for example as in Seiza and Vajrasana (yoga). Some health experts warn: While sitting on the ankles - puts pressure on the knee joints. This may be in the form of a kneeling to standing jump challenge. Students often sit in this position.


5

In that case you're buying at a premium: a sum over and above a regular price paid chiefly as an inducement or incentive [Merriam-Webster]


5

Could the word discipline be used rather than disciplinary? MW dictionary for discipline: http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/discipline #3 definition is "a field of study". The author is using a root word (discipline) with common usage with a common suffix. Not all prefixes and suffixes of all words are in the dictionary; These are not normally ...


4

If a guy says "TV is my alma mater" he probably means: I didn't go to college, but TV taught me what I need to know. But perhaps he means Even though I went to college, I didn't learn anything important there. Instead I learned it from TV. So I guess what I am saying is: even if he says "TV is my alma mater" he is still talking about ...


3

Super duper is a rhyming reduplication of "super". The expression is informal and somewhat dated (usage attested from the '40s): reduplication of super, (informal) extremely pleasing, impressive, etc: often used as an exclamation(First Known Use: 1940) M-W Super-duper: (old-fashioned, informal) excellent - OLD Your colleague ...


3

In the strange British pastime of cryptic crosswords, words are often used in deliberately misleading ways, to create the puzzle. Nearly always if there is an apparently meaningless phrase in a crossword clue, it is indeed a completely meaningless phrase, and the words in it need to be taken in a different way (using different meanings of the original words, ...


3

The report is about Peter. The authors place in the report enough information favorable to Peter and eliminate enough information unfavorable to Peter so as to slant the report in his favor. I.e., people reading the report will think highly of Peter. Peter has to decide whether the report (which isn't necessarily about him) is good or bad. People decide to ...


3

Feet to fanny. Started early in the 20th Century in 1926, The Portland Children's Theatre (Portland, Maine USA) would perform children's stories live for the public in schools, auditoriums, and outdoor venues such as playgrounds and parks. Proper theatre etiquette was taught in an introduction to the event by "Koko, the clown" who would interact with the ...


3

Headcount or head count: The act of counting people in a particular group. (AHD) Head count reveals prisoner's escape: Robert John Dwight, 33, was found to be missing during a head count by prison officers at Silverwater jail about 9.00pm AEST yesterday. (www.abc.net.au/news)


2

If you want to say what the wind does to the flag, rather than what the flag does in the wind, use flutters (light wind), whips (strong fast wind), ruffles (gentle irregular wind), and search synonyms for those -- just make sure they are verbs that can take a direct object (the wind does X to Y, not just the wind does X)


2

Trivial — ODO adjective 1. Of little value or importance "huge fines were imposed for trivial offences" "Trivial" would satisfy your sentence. Keep in mind the difference between something seeming trivial and actually being trivial.


2

Using your example “A stance on taxes divides people into Democrats and Republicans”, of the few verbs that come to mind (partition, segment, and segregate), segregate seems best: A [particular] stance on taxes segregates people into Democrats and Republicans.


2

A cleavage or a cleaving issue: New Yorker cover shows Donald Trump cleaving the GOP elephant. Cleavage (MW): a division between two things or groups In political science: cleavage is the division of voters into voting blocs In cross-cutting cleavage one finds: "Cleavages" include such things as racial, political, religious divisions in ...



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