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13

In Britain we could say, The power/electricity is back on.


9

We (folks in California) sometimes say "Power has been restored."


8

The generic name for such products is adhesive bandage, more informally sticking plaster Band Aid is a US proprietary brand. The equivalent in the UK, and across much of the Anglo world, is Elastoplast Years ago people in Britain used to use the word Elastoplast and no doubt many still do. But I sense it has given way to some extent to sticking plaster, ...


6

I have quite often heard the following: Power is back Power is back on Power has returned Power is up, along with the corresponding “power is down” when the electricity supply is interrupted Power is back up More formally, in the news or so; Power has been restored (to the affected areas) In my experience, the word power is used much more often than ...


6

I don't speak German, but looking at this page it seems to me Geländekante can apply to any abrupt change in "level". Those examples range from "height discontinuities" of hundreds/thousands of feet (cliffs, Ayers Rock) to mere inches (kerb between road and pavement, small mismatch in a loading bay area). So I think the short answer is there is no ...


5

Why in this sense is —used to express mild surprise, hesitation, approval, disapproval, or impatience "why, here's what I was looking for" - Merriam Webster> It is old-fashioned, yes. But people say this sort of word without thinking, and can be surprised to find they still use it. My neice only realised she said "blimey" a lot when she went to the ...


5

"traffic" (noun) Vehicles moving on a road or public highway. Google All the vehicles driving along a certain road or in a certain area MW no traffic very light traffic light traffic moderate traffic heavy traffic slow traffic congested traffic traffic jam


5

The closest that I can think of is a semordnilap. It's when a word or phrase makes another word or phrase when spelled backwards. https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/semordnilap Note that semordnilap is palindromes spelled backwards. :-)


4

In this context, you use "blithe" when something that would normally cause great concern is not a concern to the subject. The subject does not care about something that people would normally care about. This lack of caring frees the subject to do something unusual. This lack of caring allows the person to be "happy and without worry" when a normal person ...


4

When two people are fighting, and one hits the other with their forehead, this is often called a "headbutt." Is this the sort of situation that you're considering?


4

Here is the explanation. re- a prefix, occurring originally in loanwords from Latin, used with the meaning “again” or “again and again” to indicate repetition, or with the meaning “back” or “backward” to indicate withdrawal or backward motion: regenerate; refurbish; retype; retrace; revert. Dictionary.com "remote" means (or meant) "moved ...


4

Perhaps dogmatic? Merriam-Webster: "expressing personal opinions or beliefs as if they are certainly correct and cannot be doubted" or, upon looking for synonyms for dogmatic, there's doctrinaire: dictionary.com: "dogmatic about others' acceptance of one's ideas; fanatical: a doctrinaire preacher"


4

A cliff or precipice is at the boundary to an abrupt change in altitude. Google: cliff a steep rock face, especially at the edge of the sea. synonyms: precipice, rock face, crag, bluff, ridge, escarpment, scar, related: shelf


3

Are you looking for "plaster" or do you need specific brands? https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Band-Aid


3

I think you want the phrase wholesale acceptance. For example, one might say or write: "The shooter's wholesale acceptance of white supremacy may have made him an easy recruit for neo-Nazi groups like Stormfront." Cambridge Dictionaries Online wholesale adjective involving everyone or everything; complete What the system needs is wholesale reform. ...


3

It's not particularly "elegant" but the term I think of is "bought it" ("buy it"). 3 [transitive] informal to believe something that someone tells you, especially when it is not likely to be true: Note the "informal" on the definition. I told him my name was "The Great and Powerful Oz" and he bought it. Means that the subject believes that my ...


3

The adjective blithe used to mean happy and carefree, but over time it has also come to describe someone who isn't paying attention the way they should. (vocabulary.com) carefree and happy and lighthearted “was loved for her blithe spirit” lacking or showing a lack of due concern “spoke with blithe ignorance of the true situation”


3

Evangelism means "the preaching of propagation of the gospel" (usually the Christian Gospel). Evangelicalism means "adherence to evangelical doctrines", i.e. those of "evangelical" Christian groups. Evangelical Christian groups lay a great emphasis on personal salvation, belief in the Bible, and evangelism. Dictionaries sometimes give definitions that ...


3

A canonical adjective (e.g. sad) fulfils four grammatical criteria. It can: follow a copula (predicative use): The news was sad ... precede a noun (attributive use): The sad news ... be premodified: The news was very sad ... have a comparative/superlative form: The saddest news ... There are many verbs whose pairs of present and past ...


3

The fancy latinate term having the opposite sense to perjorative is approbative. From Wiktionary: approbative: A word or grammatical form which denotes a positive affect expressing the appreciation or approval of the speaker. From the Collaborative International Dictionary of English: approbative (adj.): Approving, or implying approbation. From ...


3

Commuting is a special kind of traveling. You do it regularly in order to get back and forth to school, to your job, or to your family. Think of a commuter train. Such a train picks passengers up in the morning in the outskirts of the city, has no runs between approximately 10 am and 3 pm, and then starts delivering passengers back to the outskirts again ...


3

One of the most used words in English -- OK. Go here for the story of its derivation as a bit of satire.


3

There is the recently coined term frenemy A person with whom one is friendly despite a fundamental dislike or rivalry. Oxford Dictionaries Online The earliest listing on ngram is 1968.


3

I don't believe that one can be in discrete/discreet as it's not a state that one can be in. I would assume, given the context, that it would be indiscreet.


3

delay[s] Examples "If you can use an alternative route, please do so. If you can't, then expect delays when you get to the site area." ITV News Information on disruptions and delays to easyJet flights is explained in this short video. EasyJet


2

Hope this table clarifies the usage. Note that in these examples, words smaller and greater perform two functions whereas less and lesser perform one function each. It is incorrect to say 3 is lesser than 5.


2

I would go with personal based on your example. 1 : of, relating to, or affecting a particular person While subjective is a synonym for personal, it has a connotation that you can control it. I wouldn't say your requirement for sleep is something you can change as easily as your opinion on a matter. Antonyms for subjective include objective, unbiased, ...


2

speculation and propaganda These are not as similar in meaning as you might think. From Merriam Webster: speculation: ideas or guesses about something that is not known and... propaganda: ideas or statements that are often false or exaggerated and that are spread in order to help a cause, a political leader, a government, etc. 2: the ...


2

The British English word is 'Plaster'.


2

Perhaps you can use subtleties, fine points or refinements



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