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1

I learned a similar style of writing in my 3rd level college "Technical Writing" course. Technical Writing is commonly used in instruction manuals and in industrial documentation. These are areas where it would be inappropriate to use the same style of language as if you were writing a "Dear John" letter. It is used to convey ideas quickly without flowery ...


0

The first one ("Who will you preach then?") is not correct. When used as a transitive verb, preach takes its subject matter, not its audience as an object. Any of the following would be correct: Who will you preach to, then? This is a question about the audience, and is typical of how the question would be formed by native speakers. Whom will you preach ...


0

I found a verb that fits my request: Journaling. To journal.


0

They are different. Your first example is not a sentence; "someone addicted" is read as "somewhone who is addicted"; i.e., "addicted" acts as an adjective, not a past-tense verb. As others explained, the second style "became addicted to" is the normal form.


0

To take note of. This may imply pen and paper depending on the context, but it can also just mean to make a mental note. http://idioms.thefreedictionary.com/take+note+of


0

If it's retail, then I'd say to "stock" something.


0

Each and every area of specialisation (real estate, shipping, air freight) tends to have their own local special words or phrase to describe the aggregation of another item to the grouping. It can be very frustrating trying to identify each of the special words, or worse, choosing a suitable well understood phrase for such packaging. My personal example ...


1

Interesting question. I'm not sure if "listing" is appropriate, since in your example he merely finalized an agreement or made a decision to try to sell it; "listing" it or "putting it on the market" seems like a later and separate act, requiring preparation and time. But I suppose that by "adding it to their inventory," a realtor/office could either be ...


2

May not be quite what you're looking for, but you could say he is Cataloguing the house. The verb Catalogue both implies collecting information and that the item in question is one of many.


0

Addicted may honestly be too strong of a word because it can imply that when a person does not do the thing they are addicted to, they can have adverse side effects. Also, if you want to get really technical, according to Oxford dictionary online it should be an actual substance that a person is addicted to instead of an activity (although I would think ...


8

What you are probably looking for is "to list [a house]". For example: The real estate agent finished taking pictures yesterday, and is going to list my house tomorrow.


0

If we are thinking about the group as a single entity, then we use snowboards. This would be the most common way to conceptualize your example sentence. However, if we are thinking of members of the group individually, then British English users often use a singular verb with a collective noun. This is most apparent when BrEng users talk about companies as ...


1

When you're talking about the act of changing, you have to say "It has changed" (and you're talking about the time that it changed). But if you say "It is changed", you are talking about the state after the act of changing. For example: The policy has changed (referring to the time that it changed). And the policy is changed now.


-1

Correctly it's "snowboards" - the subject is a group of men, hence singular. However, you will commonly see groups, teams, governments etc. used with a plural verb, which tends to emphasise the individual nature of those comprising the group.


2

We're been living here since April. are been (verb)-ing is a literal borrowing from the syntax of the speaker's native language. Some European and other languages follow this structure and one unfamiliar with the English structure tends to unconsciously use it in English. One can find lots of examples in Indian English today.


3

Correctness is one things; appropriateness another. It is certainly possible to use the construction: SINGULAR SUBJECT has been PAST PARTICIPLE. However, this works best when the actual agent is named, because otherwise it is an unidentifiable anonymous agent that can sound like pretentious bureaucratese. Compare: It has been decided that a reply ...


1

One verb for ingesting liquids, including viscous and partly solid ones like yogurt, is slurp.


3

You also need a 'to' in there somewhere, which is an obligatory preposition with some verbs of which 'respond' is one. But 'has been responded to', when used in the passive, with no object following, can sound awkward. I think I would say A response has been given to the query as requested.


1

The verb for ingesting yoghurt in your mouth is simply eating.


0

You could go with gobbled [down] or ate yogurt. eat hastily without proper chewing


3

Technically you can chew yogurt and it is recommended but it is not a usual verb to use with yogurt and it would sound strange to use in everyday speech. Obviously the most common verb is eat. Foods that are already mostly liquid, such as jello or yogurt, should be chewed the same as solid foods to allow the saliva to break them down before entering the ...


3

I have never had yoghurt which is of a sufficiently tough-enough consistency to require chewing. According to my dictionary the verb chew does involve use of the teeth, and biting and/or gnawing.


1

In this case, go is exactly equivalent to be, because there is an extra to in the sentence. ... moving things to wherever they ought to go. [Simplified sentence] It's the same as someone carefully sorting through objects, "This goes here, that goes over there..." — wherever references the final position of the cosmos' constituents. Without that to in ...


2

Go is not a substitute for be. However, either is acceptable in this context, depending on which of two different metaphors the writer might be using: that of being in a place or that of going to a place.


2

I think you are confusing the word augment with the word argument. (Or your source is confusing them.) Augment: To make (something already developed or well under way) greater, as in size, extent, or quantity Intensify: To make intense or more intense In this way, augment and intensify can be used as loose synonyms. Though I would caution against any ...


1

Further to oerlekens and the OED saying that "best" has been used as a verb since 1863, I found it as a verb in Shakespeare's Henry VI Part 2 (act 2, scene 3). This was probably written in 1591. I never saw a fellow worse bested, Or more afraid to fight, than is the appellant, The servant of this armourer, my lords. Admittedly, the meaning given in the ...


5

Etymonline tells us: best (v.) Look up best at Dictionary.com "to get the better of," 1863, from best (adj.). Related: Bested; besting. I'm afraid the authors of etymonline are describing the usage they find, and (luckily!!!) not trying to establish how people should use words, so I cannot (and out of principle, will not) appeal to your hunger for a ...


3

Those are examples of anastrophe, the departure from normal word order for the sake of emphasis. It does sound somewhat archaic because this figure of speech is not used as often as it once was. You'll find it a lot in Shakespeare's writing, for example, and in modern fiction that it attempting to sound "Shakespearean." It can be used with regular verbs as ...


-1

Based on popular usage, but worth checking statistically: to defer usually includes the new date "The meeting was deferred to next Tuesday to postpone usually means that the new date will be set later "Because of the weather, the game was postponed, we will inform you of the new date."


1

How exactly was it used? There is indeed a verb onset, which means to attack something or someone, or figuratively to debate, argue or contest something. It's pretty much obsolete these days though, and has been for the last few centuries, and one generally uses "set upon" instead. Without context I would guess a modern use was a novel use, turning the ...


1

No, that wouldn't be proper since "onset" is itself a noun derived from a verbal phrase, "setting on". To say something like "The syndrome onsetted..." would be awkward since "onset" is a passive event; a better word would be "began" or "commenced".


2

Grammatically, they're correct, but stylistically, they could be improved. If you added "and" or "while" to them, they would still be grammatically correct, and they would also be easier to understand. As SrJoven's comment pointed out, I saw an accident riding my bike, while grammatical, is ambiguous, and you typically want to avoid ambiguous sentences ...


0

You could augment the examples with "while" (whilst?), but all three are grammatically correct as they stand. e.g. Tom is doing laundry while singing a song. or Tom is doing laundry while he sings a song.


2

Searching for usage using Google is problematic because Google doesn't index text the way you want it to. However, they do have a tool which does: ngrams. This ngram shows no usage at all in published books for the phrase "patients are administered with", which is a fairly strong indication that nobody uses it at all.


13

When you photograph something, you take a photo. When you copy something, you make a copy. When you copy something photographically and use the portmanteau word photocopy to describe the process (and its result), you are using the noun-as-adjective photo to describe the noun copy. Because copy is the chief element in this combination, it requires the ...


2

For copies, "make a copy" is current usage. You could also say "get a copy" or "print a copy". "take a copy" sounds unusual.


1

We should distinguish between different lexical meanings of each word, since each meaning will have different grammatical and semantic requirements. Based on my own understanding, for the basic meaning of "speak" and "talk", "speak" refers to the actual act of saying something, and corresponds to the intransitive version of "say", whereas "talk" refers to ...


-2

I think talk has to do with diallogue or conversation and speak has to do with ability of communicating.


-1

"Aromatically pleased" or "aromatically delighted."


0

Yes, tense is the correct form of this adjective (state of being) OED 2.2 fig. In a state of nervous or mental strain or tension; strained; highly strung; ‘on the stretch’; excited, or excitable; keenly sensitive.


4

The word you are looking for is prophesy OED 1. intr. To speak by (or as by) divine inspiration, or in the name of a deity; to speak as a prophet. trans. To announce or utter by (or as by) divine inspiration; esp. so to announce (a future event); to predict, to foretell. a.2.a with obj. clause expressing the matter announced. Though ...


-2

the verb is prophesise or prophesize and will prophesise/prophesize is perfecly correct.


3

Tense is also an adjective. See the definition in Merriam-Webster and the ODO. Hence, Are you tense? is correct.


0

"People survived" and "People were survived" mean completely opposite things. To survive means "to live longer". So if the people survived, they are alive and someone else is dead. If the people were survived, then they are dead and someone else is still alive. If I understand your example sentence correctly, you might write: Yesterday there was a war ...


0

Saying "a million people were evacuated" means, to put it delicately, that each of those one million people received an enema. A place can be evacuated of people, but people are not evacuated of a place, they are evacuated of the contents of their bowels.


0

My old school grammar explains: A to-infinitive after a noun/pronoun has the function of a relative clause. Examples: 1 When I was in London I bought a map to show me the way ( meaning which could show me the way). 2 Where can I get a bus to take me to the Tower (which can take me to the tower). 3 I hope there will be a guide to show us round (who can ...


0

Sense 3 of evacuate in the OED has precisely the meaning the BBC uses, as well as that mode of grammatical employment . Of an army; To relinquish the occupation of (a country, fortress, town, position). Said also of the general in command, or of the authority that orders the withdrawal. absol. 1881 Dillon in Times 5 Jan. 10/1 As soon as ...


0

to evacuate can be used as a transitive verb and also as an intransitive verb meaning to move out of a place because of danger. See OALD.


1

As for your second (rhetorical?) question. Technically and formally speaking: no, computers do not ship and ships do not launch. However, colloquially, they do. And you would have to be a bit dirty-minded to infer from your first example that a million people had evacuated their bowels simultaneously... one can, intransitively, evacuate [oneself].


0

"husband-to-be" means fiance. That is, the person who will become a husband. Let someone else say what function "to be" serves. But the whole three hyphenated words serve as a noun.



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