New answers tagged

1

I've never met this usage before and also the article (I post below) appears to show its rare usages as a curiosity. I don't recommend that you use it. "Do, perform (due) diligence" are more common usages. Diligencing. Do you like it? It is surely more elegant than the clunky “doing due diligence”, a corruption of “exercising due diligence”. “...


1

As it stands, the sentence is wrong. The inclusion of "that" is the most glaring error, but the reporting of a question is not a question and should be ordered differently. As @deadrat says in comments, English interrogative clauses have a different word order from English declarative clauses, and indirect speech counts as the latter. The principal ...


0

Daniel, when you are using 'help' as you are here, 'to make something easier or better', you should use 'with'. Here is a reference which should be useful, Help with something - He always helps with the housework. Oxford Dictionary


2

Oxford learner's dictionaries cinch something (especially North American English) to fasten something tightly around your waist; to be fastened around somebody’s waist Merriam-Webster verb: to fasten (something, such as a belt or strap) tightly around someone or something So she was saying that the piece of clothing is tightened around your ...


0

In earlier days the barrels at the harbor went down the slope (ramp) to the vessel. To get those vessels up into the warehouse took a lot more energy..


0

You can't say "I'll ride you home." as the most natural interpretation is that you will climb onto your mom and say "Giddyup!". You could argue that "I'll drive you home" would suffer from the same problem, ie that it sounds like you will get in your mom, shut the door, put her in gear, and proceed to drive her like a car. However, this is impossible, and ...


0

The expression “I’ll ride you home” can be used by a tired three-year-old, talking to an adult family member (or guardian), or a person talking to his steed (horse, elephant, dolphin, dragon, etc.) or his vehicle.  In most cases, this is an indicator of mental aberration.


-1

Group 1&2 are correct. Because in first group have is a helping verb and sentence is in present perfect tense.... in second group have is a verb and sentence is in simple present tense.... so 1&2 are right


2

Maybe, it can be better explained using: The last three steps establish the two-way-data-binding. using the third-person plural simple present form of the word vs The last step establishes the two-way-data-binding. which is the third-person singular simple present form of the word


-1

Part of the confusion you have is due to the construction of the sentence. It does not make sense with establish or establishes. What is being established here? What is two-way-data-binding? The last three steps establish the two-way data binding relationship Would make more sense, in which case establish would be the version to use.


0

Yes you are correct. The plural of establish is establish.


-1

Yes, consider using another word instead of "coming": The boy enters, singing. Or the boy sings along the way, or something like that, unless you mean that the boy is having an orgasm while he's singing.


0

This might seem old-school but: "The boy comes a singing"


0

The question is whether the construction, 'raining blows down on the victim' is a pathetic fallacy or any other literary technique? Passively, something rains down (on); actively, somebody rains something on something else. In the usage under consideration, human trait is not ascribed to nature, which would make it pathetic fallacy. Human action is ...


0

The verb form of rain actually means this (incidentally with an exactly matching example with yours): to deal, hurl, fire, etc., repeatedly: to rain blows on someone's head. So, the author used raining only as a regular verb and not as a pathetic fallacy. Mentioning this just for completeness sake: pathetic fallacy means the following as per ...


2

Pretty much the same meaning, I'd say. Both have implied additional words: [Upon] ... cleaning up my bedroom, I found my valuable watch. or On [the occasion of] cleaning up my bedroom, I found my valuable watch. [While] [c]leaning up my bedroom, I found my valuable watch.


1

Pre-booking specifically denotes that you have booked something in advance, Book (something) in advance: a pre-booked hotel reservation (ODO) whilst booking Reserve accommodation for (someone): his secretary had booked him into the hotel (ODO) merely connotes these meanings and booking would refer to the reservation more generally and ...


4

It's both. Or, it's either or. There is really no way to syntactically say for sure in a sentence whether a passive participle is acting as a predicative subject complement or whether it is part of a passive verb construction. Whether to interpret devastated here as an adjective or the matrix verb depends entirely on the semantics of the sentence. If it's ...


-1

The Wikipedia article on treading water has some terms for this, and whilst some imply person in the water can swim, dog paddle implies poor if any swimming ability. More experienced swimmers often find their own method of staying above the surface. These techniques often involve sculling, flutter kick, and other unofficial techniques of staying above ...


0

When desperate, an individual has been said to "thrash the water to foam." Less desperation will allow one with some presence of mind to flail, flounder, founder, and possibly fail in a struggle to survive drowning and suffocation.


3

To flounder might be a suitable word. From Google: Flounder struggle or stagger clumsily in mud or water. "he was floundering about in the shallow offshore waters". (To do it successfully would probably be treading water).


3

You are looking for (to) float: to stay on the surface of a liquid and not sink: An empty bottle will float. You can float very easily in/on the Dead Sea because it's so salty. (Cambridge Dictionary)


3

Sterile (adj.) not able to produce children or young I believe "scientifically sterile generations" means that those generations are not able to produce science. That is not exactly the same as those generations having nothing to contribute to science. You can contribute to science, without producing science. Older generations can produce science, and the ...


0

Poor educational system is a singular countable noun and therefore needs a determiner -- in your case I think a. Also, the last part (able just to regurgitate) has a nonconventional word order. I would suggest the following: "... such a poor educational system produces a scientifically sterile generation that is only able to regurgitate."


-1

I have a Biblical world-view, and using exegete as a verb seems to exactly fit within that world-view; when asking someone to exegete from their world-view, whatever it may be.


0

I would say that they're different and can mean very different things. It depends on the context. For the quote you provided an educational resource could be things like books, supplies for the classroom, and various other resources that aid the learning process or make it possible to educate. An education resource could be something quite different. It ...


6

In the United States, Canada and Australia, primary and secondary education together are sometimes referred to as K-12 education, and in New Zealand Year 1–13 is used. The purpose of secondary education can be to give common knowledge, to prepare for higher education, or to train directly in a profession. -Wikipedia Education As @ab2 kindly affirmed K-12 ...


1

I think you might find "compulsory education" works for you. What it means depends on the region you're in but it literally means "required education" - or the years of education required by government. Compulsory education refers to a period of education that is required of all persons and is imposed by law. Depending on the country, this education may ...


0

Some alternative examples I can think of: The doctor authorised (the) discharge of the patient. All clear for takeoff. The government ordered (the) lockdown of its embassy. All of the words in bold seem like they may have started life in this form as jargon specific to the sector they pertain to (they are all technical terms) but have made ...


-1

I have always thought of a gerund as encompassing a broader concept, more than a specific instance. M-W's definition therefore gives a hint: the (one or a very specific) act of (the broader or overall set of acts of) broadcasting. In this way, the title is, while not technically incorrect, awkward. I would have preferred "The judge decided to allow a or the ...


4

stalking, from Hunting Behavior in Cats Click on the link to see a good picture. You’ve seen it in your kitty – a slow move forward, then perfect stillness. Her tail swishes side to side just before she pounces on the hapless catnip mouse. Stalking behavior is seen in all felines, who creep up on prey until they are close enough to pounce. Hiding ...


1

Stalking would come to mind first, or for a phrase moving with stealth, prowling, but it really depends exactly what mood you want to convey.


1

If the socks started you wearing shoes, would you have any question about where the preposition went? I think that the reason that "from" is not usually dropped is mental association with "keep". "To keep you doing something" means the opposite of "to keep you from doing something", the preposition is vital, and I think that has carried over to other verbs....


0

Here is your example sentence, with the relevant part in bold: She is one of those gifted writers who turn out one best seller after another. In this context, it is the gifted writers (plural) in question who turn out bestsellers, and she is apparently a member of that club of bestselling writers. So, turn it is.


0

Memorization is also a term you could use for what you describe. Dictionary.com defines it as follows: http://www.dictionary.com/browse/memorization verb (used with object), memorized, memorizing. to commit to memory; learn by heart: to memorize a poem. verb (used without object), memorized, memorizing. to learn by heart: I've always been ...


1

"Scold" is more specific in that it means to lecture someone or to verbally reprimand someone. "Reprimand" can mean to lecture or scold someone, but it can also mean another type of punishment. "Reprimand" however is especially used to mean a formal punishment, e.g. "The FBI reprimanded the agent who had been careless with classified information. As a result,...


3

This is called learning by rote. A kind of learning style that isn't really learning but repeating exactly as you were told. See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rote_learning.


3

The noun for this is "polyglot". "Polyglotism or polyglottism is the ability to master, or the state of having mastered, multiple languages." "Multilinguist" is a synonym for this.


5

"Bilingual" describes someone who is versatile in two languages. If you want to describe someone who has mastered multiple languages, you could call them a "polyglot", although this is properly "someone who speaks 5 or more languages." (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Polyglot_(disambiguation)) Also relevant is the word "biliterate," simply meaning "able to ...


0

I would say fixedly. It means to maintain the eyes unwaveringly focused on a subject. But now Pasha was staring fixedly at the floor--and at one specific spot.


0

Spellbinding- adj- Holding one’s attention completely as though by magic; fascinating. Entralling- adj- Capturing and holding one’s attention; fascinating. Transfix- verb- (usually be transfixed) Cause (someone) to become motionless with horror, wonder, or astonishment. Those three are the first to come to mind. (sorry cannot post more than three links, ...


0

I believe your client is wrong. To help persuade him, you could point out that as is it parses like a list of three items: 1) time 2) quality 3) "value matters" making the reader think What are "value matters"? You want it to be a rephrasing of "When time matters, quality matters **and** value matters, count on TEAM." But when you put the three ...


79

Consider either misplace or mislay; both have similar meanings: Misplace to put (something) in the wrong place; to lose (something) for a short time by forgetting where you put it Mislay to lose (something) for a short time by forgetting where you put it Misplace can also mean to give something undeserved, such as "misplaced trust" Google ...


2

Note that traffic sign is a general-purpose term that includes hazard warnings, speed limits, etc. A sign telling you which road to take to get somewhere (or telling you where you'll end up if you continue on your present course) is more specifically called a... signpost - sign giving information such as the direction and distance to a nearby town, ...


3

Those are generally referred to as traffic signs or road signs: signs erected at the side of or above roads to give instructions or provide information to road users. The earliest signs were simple wooden or stone milestones. Later, signs with directional arms were introduced, for example, the fingerposts in the United Kingdom and their wooden ...


1

It IS a metaphor for flaying, or at least skinning. The key is to think of the two paragraphs referring to the baatezu as a whole. Here's what's written: "they been makin' contracts since time began. They know 'ow ta peel someone with words, they do. Sign, an' most likely ye'll be peeled an' hung ta dry in their legions... They plan like bastards. They ...


0

Although it doesn't fit the exact definition, you can use the verb tramp. According to Dictionary.com, it means: walk heavily Here is an example: She shivered a bit - as the lake water was cold - but then continued to tramp into the deep. It can also be used as a noun. Dictionary.com defines this as: heavy walk Here's an example reworded ...


2

slip To move smoothly, easily, and quietly To pass gradually, easily, or imperceptibly into a different state Example: But the Aboriginal people for whom this place has very special meaning ask that you slip into the water as quietly as you would enter a church.


0

I like the word "falter". There is not a lot of context, but what's provided paints a picture of a woman who doesn't want to be there (is she being forced? self-harm? is the context more benign and innocent?). Whatever the context, she is shivering, either in fear reaction or reaction to the cold water, and in a similar position, I would not want to move ...



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