Tag Info

New answers tagged

3

The verb corresponding to declension is decline. However, your example of day - daily is not an example of declension. It is an example of word formation (with the adverbial suffix -ly). Declension adds/changes inflections, not suffixes.


1

You need a sound reason for using the past perfect. If you switch arbitrarily from past perfect to past simple and then back again, you may end up with something like this, a possible flashback: I had driven to the motel. I went to my room. I changed into smarter clothes. I had gone across to the bar. The first three sentences work, in my opinion, (see ...


-1

Relevant mathematical terms include extend or extension, continue or continuation, and generalize or generalization. For example, from wikipedia’s Gamma function article: In mathematics, the gamma function ... is an extension of the factorial function, with its argument shifted down by 1, to real and complex numbers. ... This integral function is ...


0

If I have interpreted correctly your definition, an expression such as affinity could come close to the Arabic equivalent as in to have a special affinity affinity a feeling of closeness and understanding that someone has for another person because of their similar qualities, ideas, or interests You could express the idea of no longer being ...


0

They're used interchangeably, but remember, speech refers more directly to one person's faculty of speech, specifically, their capability to produce discernible language. Talk comes from tell/tale/tally, which refers more to giving an account of something. So speech is used in situations that involve the technical capacity of producing language; i.e. ...


1

The idea of this word is beautiful. I know nothing of Arabic, especially not how to read it, but knowing that there is a word that describes a feeling that I have spent many years trying to describe is a comforting thought. Though I can't read this word, nor the phrases accompanying it, I can feel it, and I think this is what much of the world's ...


3

More than grammar , it's a matter of usage. That aside, "speak" and "talk" are often interchangeable. Nevertheless, "speak" is a tad formal than "talk". The President speaks before Congress. I talk to my friends on the phone. Formations can take different forms: When did the baby begin to talk is more idiomatic than when did the baby begin to ...


1

In American English, "speak to" is more formal, to the point of harshness. "I will speak to him" can be code for "I will berate him vigorously." "Talk to" is about conducting a dialog; it implies reasonability and affability. The negation is a little different. If you say "never speak", the issue is the content: "Let us never speak of this again." If ...


0

This is how I would put it: Participants are often being implored to finish their tasks by the end of November, as planned, and under no circumstances to let them drag on into December. To underscore the urgency of timely completion of the task, I might also send reminder messages to each participant, specifying a "drop-dead due date" for each task: ...


1

Submariners do not refer to submarines as floating. While a submarine may often be trimmed to be neutrally buoyant, it can also hold depth while under power and negatively or positively buoyant due to the dynamic pressure of water flowing over its control surfaces.


3

Literally it was the practice of police to write a transcript of a verbal statement that was not precisely what the suspect actually said at interview. The suspect would sign it either without checking thoroughly or without realising the incriminating details that were included or aware of the contents but signing under threat or coercion. It is common in ...


2

A submarine operates by changing its buoyancy. If the average density of the submarine is less than that of the surrounding water it floats on the surface. To dive the submarine increases its density by taking water into buoyancy tanks. When its overall density increases above that of the water it sinks. Once the necessary depth has been reached the vessel ...


-2

If disoriented is a past participle, then one must assume that the infinitive, "to disorient" exists. Afaik it doesn't, so disorientated seems more probable.


1

Procrastinate is a slightly different kind of verb -- you can say it is internally transitive. It never takes an object. The meaning is usually "to delay action" or "to postpone action" -- in any case, "action" is part of the meaning, and is the internal object. As such, the object is within and the transition, too, is within the word. It's a ...


2

This is incorrect usage. 'Procrastinate' can be used only intransitively. Incidentally, there is no indirect object in your sentence.


-1

It is British English. If I'm disoriented them I'm unsure which way is up; I might feel sick and dizzy. Associations similar to vertigo. I could get disoriented flying an aircraft in thick fog or scuba diving in low visibility. Playing a computer game I could become disoriented, certainly, if the images are moving too fast for my brain to make sense of them ...


1

Objects in liquids can have positive, negative or neutral buoyancy. At positive buoyancy they will float upwards, and negative buoyancy they will sink downwards, and at neutral buoyancy they will remain where they are. A submerged submarine will be in these various states at various times. During the times it is at a steady depth it will have neutral ...


1

One would not usually describe a submarine as 'floating', particularly if submerged. It could be termed to be "at sea", to be "underway" (or "under way"), or to be "making way". A couple of other suitable terms are available, depending on the situation. More-or-less-technical terms (British English, recognised by mariners internationally due to their use in ...


0

Float has two distinct, but related meanings. In fact, it is possible to see the two meanings as being (1) quite the same thing, or (2) contradictory, depending on context. To stay on the surface, as an air-filled ball or a piece of cork, even a drop (film) of oil, on a body of liquid. To keep off the bottom of a body of liquid (the surface at the ...


5

The OED has fifteen separate main meanings of the verb float, each with many sub-meanings. Only one of them, 3a, deals with an object floating on the surface of a liquid. Another (I think under '5') deals with the submarine situation. Yet others deal with such things as a parachute 'floating to the ground' i.e. floating whilst sinking. If you are seriously ...


-2

Submarines are driven by an engine and can change course. So I would not say they float, they move.


26

I don't want to detract from medica's accurate answer, except to add another point of view about the word float and then discuss the jargon of submarine operations. First, there is room for poetic license with the word float, to the point where these uses are as natural and accurate as the precise meaning you might be looking for. Parachutes, paper ...


19

Objects under water can float, rise or sink. This is a Galileo-type thermometer: Depending on the temperature of the fluid in which the sealed glass fluid containing sealed bubbles are suberged, they will either rise, sink, or float at certain levels. Per Wikipedia: The only factor that determines whether a large object rises or falls in a particular ...


0

"Y" and "w" are never doubled. With two syllables or more e.g. "omit" where the final syllable is stressed, the rule also applies, but in e.g. "prohibit", where it is not, the "t" is not doubled. There is a difference between words ending in "L" where British English always doubles the "L" but American English does not unless it conforms to the rules above. ...


1

None of the words mentioned ends in a "consonant sound." So, that explains, I guess.


1

Yes, w, like y is a consonant with vowel-like properties (a semi-vowel, so to speak); at the end of a word, it does not get doubled. In fact, you will rarely see it doubled. We were wowed by his raw talent. The teacher cowed the students. They slowed down the traffic. He mowed the lawn. They had a pow-wow.


0

This is just my idea, and I have no intention of stirring things.


0

Dispute to engage in argument or debate. to argue vehemently; wrangle or quarrel. i.e. That is just my idea and I have no intention to dispute the matter.


0

I have no intention *of contending, quarreling... You could also phrase it as "I do not intend to contend or quarrel over this point"


3

It is not how any of this dialog has gone. Your statement "With freedom come choices" when "reversed" can be parallel-scanned (a take on your usage of "scan") not as "With choices come freedom", but as "With freedom, choices come." I think it can be better understood, if we "reverse" "With a whole chicken comes legs" to "With legs come a whole chicken" and ...


0

This is a case of subject-verb agreement. The only difference is that your subjects are in the ends of the sentences, rather than the beginnings where you'd expect to find them. In "With freedom come choices," the subject is "choices." Since the subject is plural, use "come" instead of "comes." If it helps to change the word order, think of it as, "Choices ...


-2

This has to do with the plurality of 'choices.' The 'comes' form of to come is only correct in the third person singular (he/she/it). as choices id plural, 'come' is the correct word. Regarding your other examples: This is incorrect. Smiles is plural, so it should be "With happiness come smiles." This is correct, as the 'horse and carriage' is counted as ...


-1

'Opened' is 2nd form, apparently it is used in past tense while 'open' is first and third form (depends). You just say " He opened the door himself " as he did, it's past tense and if you want to say the door was already open(ed) you say it was 'open'.


2

Murdelize is the combination of "murder" and "pulverize." It was a commonly used piece of dialogue in the original "Three Stooges" TV series used as a threat or in response to some perceived wrong. The Stooges are the earliest record of the word I could find.


0

Well, if you are looking for a more colloquial way to phrase this - "feast your ears". "Feast your eyes on..." is often used as a colloquial version of behold and so this is as perfect (albeit slightly improper) as you can get. Although I suspect you might be looking for something slightly more formal - 'hark', as others have suggested, is probably a good ...


0

I think the word you may be thinking of is "marmalise". EDIT: In spite of a downvote, I'll press on. "Marmalize", from Wiktionary: "To thrash", "To defeat decisively". Alternative spelling "Marmalise". In the UK we never really had the Three Stooges so can't comment, but as someone who is exposed to Looney Tunes cartoons virtually every day, this is ...


0

I think your reasoning is sound. Reading the original text in quickly doesn't trigger any flags for me, but upon further reflecting, the mismatched verb tense is really obvious. An alternative for the first sentence could be the conditional perfect: Once upon a time...I would have ached to... However, there's nothing wrong with: Once upon a ...


7

I'd suggest Oyez! interjection 1. hear! attend! (a cry uttered usually twice by a court officer to command silence and attention, as before court is in session, and formerly by public criers). or it's two-word equivalent, Hear ye! Behold is archaic as well, so I see no problem with recommending an auditory analogue that is archaic. This still is ...


4

Assuming it's the same word I've heard and seen many times in cartoons and old movies, the word is "murderlize" and as it's defined in the Dictionary of American Slang. It is a variation on a threat to cause bodily harm to someone, but said in a funny way..."I'll murderlize you!"


4

It is a slang term meaning "to destroy or annihilate". Usually, this destruction is done in a fantastical way with a heavy leaning on science-fiction elements. It is not a very common term and the earliest usage I could find was Calvin and Hobbes from January 2009:


2

I also suggest (though it's as archaic as hark) hist. (a sibilant exclamation used to attract attention). an exclamation used to attract attention or as a warning to be silent exclamation commanding silence, attested from 1610s; probably so chosen because the sound is both easy to hear and suddenly silent. So "Hist! The King!" would mean "Hey ...


0

In some languages, the noun denoting the 'recipient' of something is frequently in the dative case. In English, the 'recipient' can be shown in two ways: As an indirect object, usually preceding the direct object: He sent/gave me the letter; Following the preposition 'to' following the direct object: He sent/gave the letter to me. Some pronoun/pronoun ...


0

The preferred form is: When shall I start working? When shall I stop working? "When shall I start to work?" is more awkward. It could also mean "When shall I start to[wards] work?" "When shall I stop to work?" means "When should I stop [what I'm doing in order] to work?".


0

One possibility is a metaphorical word that is common, and conveys the the pain of doing so, and that would be the word "bleed". Participants are often being implored to finish their tasks by November, as planned, and in no way bleed into December. Note you would use "into" rather than "to" here.


1

Since the start or stop of an action, like working, is part of the action itself, both are possible, although the 'to' construction is somewhat, as a little Google Search shows, more common in the UK.


13

Shakespeare answers this. Hark, hark! the lark at heaven's gate sings, And Phoebus 'gins arise, Cymbeline A modern equivalent (similar to Look! for Behold!) would be Hear that!


52

I'd go with hark. verb (used without object) 1. to listen attentively; hearken.


2

The quote provided does not make any sense.


0

In earlier times the negation of verbs was simply verb + not. The use of do/does/did + not/n't is a relatively late development. The question why to do for negation is justified. Though I can't proof it I think the reason is the following: in spoken Englisch verb forms + not are contracted. English would get a lot of irregular forms if it would not use to ...


0

Several points: 1) The standard term is "a dozen donuts" (not "a dozen of donuts"). 2) The question "How much is a dozen donuts?" could mean one of two things: a) How many donuts make up a dozen? b) What does a dozen donuts cost? 3) American English usage is fussier than British English with regard to number agreement between subject and verb. In ...



Top 50 recent answers are included