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1

No, I don't think so; I've never seen the word used that way in US English. We don't motivate inanimate objects/ ideas; motivation is a purely emotional thing here.


0

The word in statistics is correlation. Let's say there are two multi-dimensional entities A and B. In order to find their similarities, we need to be able to observe and compare their dimensions. But what is a dimension, except thro the information emanating from an entity. We correlate their information to find similarities, dependencies or ...


2

One word is engage [with object] Arrange to employ or hire (someone): he was engaged as a trainee copywriter [with infinitive] Pledge or enter into a contract to do something: he engaged to pay them £10,000 against a bond [ODO] You engaged Max to design your logo. Or possibly contract [with object and infinitive] Impose an obligation ...


2

How about enlist? Maybe this sounds better than assign?


0

Feed. Feed means to give food. Food includes drink. "Did you feed them?" "Well, I gave them a drink." It's hard to believe that English wouldn't have the word. I guess we naturally put more emphasis on the eating part of food because it's the slower part.


2

Is there some thing wrong with "You are wrong to equate the two."? equate - Consider (one thing) to be the same as or equivalent to another; Cause (two or more things) to be the same in quantity or value


0

A is equivalent to B is an assertion. Disputing it is not the "act of making two things equivalent/equal". It's the act of saying, "No they aren't". Disputing the assertion You could say No, their relationship is an inequality Inequality: Difference in size, degree, circumstances, etc.; lack of equality OED The condition of being unequal; ...


-1

I suspect this has to do with the popular title Supreme Ruler, assigned to someone with absolute authority over a wide domain. In this case, to rule supreme doesn't directly translate to "rule in a supreme manner", but to "rule under the title of Supreme", and merely implies supremeness by that title.


0

I agree with the notion that "at" sounds better for a specific activity or task while "in" sounds better for a general category. That said, in my humble opinion - English is not my mother tongue - I think there is also a subtle nuance in the intended usage of "at" or "in". When you hear someone say "she excels at school" and you find it alright, maybe you ...


9

Predicative Complements Many verbs take a Predicative Complement. This is a phrase that fills a special slot set up by the verb, one that portays either the Subject or the Object. Here are some examples: She was elected treasurer. The elephants were ecstatic. The made me furious. She felt warm. In the sentences above, the word treasurer portrays the ...


11

To rule supreme is something of a "fixed collocation", meaning rule unchallenged... supreme - highest in rank or authority; paramount; sovereign; chief. (Source) To rule supremely (a relatively uncommon usage) would mean rule exceptionally well... supreme - very ​great, or the ​best. (Source)


20

Use of adjectives rather than adverbs in such constructions is common. The adjective modifies not so much the verb as the verb’s subject. Such adjectival predication is by no means confined to such more or less copulative verbs as be and seem, but works with more active verbs as well. Thus New Hampshire’s license-plate motto, which is ...


2

Take the sentence, Order and method ruled supreme in his life. We would expect, Order and method ruled supremely in his life. Now look at the sentence, Order and method were supreme in his life. That looks correct. I suggest that the original sentence is shorthand for, Order and method ruled[, and were] supreme in his life.


0

Everywhere except on Google He is a man who has... is all singular. They are men who have (bad hearts). -is all plural. The interesting question is how google rates both your versions the same.


0

I'd just say he has a bad heart. But generally I would only say that if he has a heart condition, it's rather old fashioned to say it to describe someone as wicked. It would be better to say he has bad intentions, or is unethical or immoral.


0

Bolded certainly registers on Ngram when you run a Google Books search for it. Here's the resulting Ngram chart for the years 1900–2008: I imagine that if you could see the results for 2009–2015, they would show continued growth, though perhaps not at the rate depicted here. The earliest Google Books match for bolded in the sense of "set in boldface ...


0

This is a lyric from a Glen Campbell song, "By the Time I Get to Phoenix." In this line, he says "And she'll cry just to think I'd really leave her" He's already left her, and he's thinking about how she will react when she realizes he is gone. So the first part is the future tense, when she wakes up she will cry, and I think that the "I would really ...


0

Suicided as it is used today is a relatively new word to the English language. What it means is that someone was bullied to the point that they took their own life. Example: "Aaron Swartz was suicided by the U.S. Department of Justice." "After Swartz's death, the prosecution has come under scrutiny and not only from his family and supporters. MIT's ...


1

The main verb is come. The other verbs are part of circumstancial clauses.


1

If the blinds are vertical, use the same verb as you would with curtains: draw (open) the blinds or draw back the blinds For roller blinds (without slats) which you pull on a cord, say: roll up /down or pull up/down the blinds For horizontal blinds with slats (venetian blinds) use the verbs: open and close to adjust the amount of light that enters ...


0

Do you say 'to raise/lower the blinds' or 'to pull the blinds up/down?' or 'to draw the blinds'? + What would you say if you just wanted to turn the slats? To bring them up or down with the cord: Raise / lower the blinds Note, pull the blinds would to me mean to raise them, i.e. let more light in. To turn the slats to allow more light in: Adjust the ...


1

One of the meanings of draw is to pull (think of draft horses), so whichever way you are drawing curtains or blinds, open, closed, left, right, up, down, it is an acceptable usage. If you want to be more specific, you certainly can use a different verb (raise, lower, open, close, etc.)


3

"Raise/lower" would be correct. Instead of "pull", one tends to hear "put" instead. i.e. "put the blinds up", "put the blinds down". Being British, I've only ever heard "draw" used when the curtains/blinds move sideways from the sides of the window to the middle, not with blinds that go up and down. As for just turning the slats of Venetian blinds, that's ...


-6

Jack is not the kind of man who avaoids work. ==> "who avoids" becomes "avoids" after reduction. So answer is 4.


2

Both of the sentences are correct. Can an adjective be placed in front of a verb? The answer is yes. Consider some examples given below: It was such a delight to see him so happy swimming in the pool, with his own audience of doting adoring people. [from the book A Mummy's New World by Deborah Harrow] I was playing out in the backyard, and when ...


4

The positional nature of English grammar gives your two sentences different structures in spite of the similarity of their wording. To see this, let's look at a similar pair of sentences that have the same structure: 1a. The busy duck was diving for food. 2a. The duck was diving busily for food. (Ignore the slightly awkward placement of "busily" in ...


1

'Busy', in the first sentence, seems to modify 'duck' rather than 'diving' - as in a declaration of the duck's status. Whereas 'busily' unambiguously refers to 'diving' in the second sentence.


1

You'd better to use recommend instead of suggest, because there is a slight difference between their meaning [1 and 2] and Google books results confirms this claim. (961 results for "recommend me a book" and 322 ones from "suggest me a book") "We use “suggest” when talking about giving someone an idea in general, and we use “recommend” when telling someone ...


3

In this instance, recommended is a better option than "suggested". If you want to use "suggested" you could say: My friend suggested that I read this book.


2

Yes, suggested fits in to this context. You could also say recommended


1

"This book was suggested to my by a friend." Is perfectly fine. An alternative would be to say "A friend suggested this book to me." The second sentence puts more emphasis on the friend, whereas the first sentence focuses more on the book. A lot of this is active/passive voice and I learned about from here ...


0

Yes, "looks" is a stative verb in "He looks tired." It means he appears tired. The adjective describing the subject is a predicative adjective, meaning that as a complement to the subject, it appears after the verb. An attributive adjective appears with the noun it modifies, usually before. In the "the red ball," "red" is attributive. In "the ball is ...


-1

Sorry to say that second one is completely natural for native speakers. Please review some grammar of the English language: http://www.getitwriteonline.com/archive/022205posscasegerunds.htm


0

One writes language, whereas one depicts reality. If the product makes use of or otherwise appeals to a structured linguistic system, then it's writing -- if not, it's depiction.


2

A single pictograph is a depiction, but I’d say that a sequence of pictographs (emoji, &c.) constitutes writing. There are many languages whose writing systems were originally pictographic, such as Chinese, Ancient Egyptian, and Mayan hieroglyphs, and we think of these as writing in the usual sense.


0

You'll be understood anyway. So if your primary concern is to be understood , then both sentences are ok. Personally I'd use the first. I'd say that the perfect tense is just superfluous. The first is way better. My suggestion to you is that you shouldn't make it too difficult for yourself trying to figure out 'whether or not I should use the perfect ...


0

I would argue that the proper grammar is to use the perfect. 'It's the first time he called' I would use the past. I think there's no need to worry about it, Diana. Trust me the majority of people where I live, in Massachusetts, would you the past and wouldn't even give a damn if you told them 'the right way is to use the perfect'. The other problem here is ...


0

Both sentences are correct. The phrase "last year" can mean something that is fixed and done, or it can mean a period of time. You could "correct" the second option by saying "During the past year, she was collecting stickers." Think about this sentence, "I was working last Tuesday." Tuesday has 24 hours and so duration makes sense. "I worked last ...


1

Numerous adjectives (unauthorized, unbroken, uncooked, etc.) exist as negative forms of positive adjectives (authorized, broken, cooked, etc.) by the simple prefixing of un- to the positive adjective to indicate that the positive action has not occurred. The positive action implied by each adjective is itself obviously derived from a verb form (authorize, ...


3

Grammatically speaking, both usages are fine, as @Matt points out. But idiomatically it's a completely different story. These figures from Google Books reflect my own gut feel... 1: I want to take a rest - 7 results 2: I want to take a break - 462 results 3: I want to rest - 707 results The disparity in usage between rest/break in the first ...


0

Both generally mean the same thing. However, since you're looking for a way to convey the message as a native speaker, I would recommend you drop both terms and instead use: I want to get some rest. I want to take a rest You might say I want to take a rest when you want to rest from doing something. For instance, I've been moving furniture all day. ...


1

Both are fine. "I want to take a rest" sounds a little more informal, and probably would sound a little more natural in spoken conversation.


1

In chemistry one differentiates between quantitative (how much?) and qualitative (what?) analysis. These words have been in vogue since the 19th century. There is no such phrase as quantifying or quantificative analysis. In the Analytical chemistry literature the use of "quantitate" is at least an order of magnitude more frequent than "quantify" quite ...


0

This sentence would normally be expressed using a second conditional: 'Your career would be in better shape if you spent as much time....' It could also be expressed using a first conditional: 'Your career will be in better shape if you spend as much time.....' However if you are referring to a past event you would use the third conditional: 'Your career ...


0

I believe that you should write "... in better shape if you were to spend ...". The use of "were" implies a possibility, something that is a matter of conjecture.


0

I'm not sure why divide doesn't pass muster-- yes, you can say "divides others"-- but when it comes to relationships between people, there's: sunder - to split apart (an organization, two people, etc.) especially in a violent way ... which is most commonly seen in the word asunder-- "tear asunder"-- because sunder is such a rare verb. (Also sundry, ...


1

By Googling "contraction antonym oxford" Oxford offered the following: contraction: shorten (a word or phrase) by combination or elision. "these sources were called quasistellar objects, which was soon contracted to quasar" synonyms: shorten, abbreviate, cut, reduce, abridge, truncate "the name ‘Jacquenard’ was soon contracted to ‘Jack’ in ...


0

Upset would be the normal word to use. Otherwise Disrupt (Merriam-Webster has a rather narrow view) b : to throw into disorder "agitators trying to disrupt the meeting" Sociologists also use: alienate, antagonise, upset, dissaffect. estrange.


0

From the Oxford dictionary Rift - verb: (usually as adjective rifted) Tear or force (something) apart


0

Another sheep-related one is tup, though that might be considered slang. It's in Late Night on Watling Street where two lorry drivers fight, IIRC.



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