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1

"Doesn't". It's because a future "will" is suppressed after "if". That is, a future event is described, and "will" would be used in an independent sentence, but after "if" there is no "will". For instance, suppose Harry will eat too much tomorrow, and this will make him sick, reporting this with "if", comes out this way: "If Harry eats too much tomorrow, ...


0

1) is the best - 2) sounds wrong to me. I think the reason is that the first part of the sentence is in the future so that the second part should be in the present for this type of sentence, but I don't know what the grammatical rule is for it.


3

Best is a valid verb. It's usage in the given sentence is also valid. From the google definition verb, informal outwit or get the better of (someone).


-1

May be it is a typo? Since a and s are side by side in keyboard layout.


8

Janus Bahs Jacquet's answer put me on the right track, and I was able to find the answer I was thinking of: In linguistics, an ergative verb is a verb that can be either transitive or intransitive, and whose subject when intransitive corresponds to its direct object when transitive. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ergative_verb


5

I’m not aware of a single term that describes exactly verbs that display this type of alternation between intransitive subject and transitive direct object, but it is a common feature of many unaccusative verbs in English (in particular anticausative verbs, and if you used unaccusative verb as a term to refer to this ‘group’ of verbs, you would likely be ...


0

You could say "The waiter who served us was extremely rude." I'd just say "Our waiter was extremely rude" or "The waiter we had at lunch was extremely rude."


1

What is it that sometimes I can put a noun instead of an ING verb You are not putting anything instead of anything, you are just changing the order of some words in your sentence — and yes, you change the meaning of the sentence. To illustrate, let's rewrite your first sentence a little bit: I insist on [someone] getting a present for them. Is ...


1

The meaning is not the same. 'Getting' can mean both buying a present ready to give, and receiving a present as a gift. The two sentences change who is doing the action, which person is "getting the present" and what kind of 'getting' is being described. "I insist on getting a present for them" means: I will act, I will get a present. Then I will give the ...


1

According to the traditional rule, you don't use a comma between parts of a sentence that could not stand alone, parts that take some elliptical words from the rest of the sentence. In both of your examples, the part after the comma is elliptical. However, those who follow that rule are usually not against introducing some extra comma's to aid the reader, or ...


-1

"Angry enough to die" expresses a sullen inward anger rather than a violent anger. It is depressive anger, without hope of changing things outwardly. It is the anger of the self-absorbed. Cf. Jonah from the bible.


0

"As I was waiting in line I was having a lady next to me disrespected very badly." The above is bad English and bad grammar. Should be: "As I was waiting in line, a lady disrespected me very badly." or, if it was the lady who was disrespected: "As I was waiting in line, I witnessed a lady being disrespected very badly."


-1

A simple second conditional without the third clause would be very easy to construct: If the world were perfect, workers would wear respirators. The third clause, without the conditional, would also be very easy to construct: Workers wear respirators even when dust levels are low. Ambiguity arises in combining the two constructions. Should the ...


0

A gerund after "promise"? Sure; no problem. "He promised cleaning the fish would be easy."


0

I have checked two dictionaries and can't find that "to promise" can mean to suggest. "to promise to do" is the typical construction when "to promise" is followed by a verb. What language competence has the person who said "to promise can also be followed by a gerund in the meaning of to suggest"? Added: I've just had a look at BNC, 50 random examples with ...


2

to give short shrift Per Wiktionary: A quick rejection, especially one which is impolite and undertaken without proper consideration. In fact, I actually like the definition that Google puts at the top of the search page for the phrase even better: rapid and unsympathetic dismissal; curt treatment. Merriam-Webster and OED, however, favor the ...


2

This is an example of when someone takes the opportunity to downplay Something someone else says


0

Clean (clean up), Cleanse: Giuliani cleaned up New York City. Claire cleansed Dennis (of whatever held him back). Purify is to remove that which debases: Christ purified his heart, as if he had been born again.


-1

It's a good starting point to look at hyperbole word and look at its opposites, that would be one of the words you need. Per Wikipedia, "some opposites of hyperbole are meiosis, litotes, understatement, lackluster, prosaic, dull and bathos". Understatement is a universal word, but depending on a context, litotes, meiosis and others could be used. ...


0

The ordinary verb have can be an action verb with meanings such as 'experience' or 'receive'. I'm having a holiday. We had a sudden shock. "As I was waiting in line I was having a lady next to me disrespected very badly." This usage of "I was having" paints a picture that you either directly or indirectly set up the disrespect.


0

The example makes sense, but it is rather odd sounding. It means that the lady's being disrespected affected you and was a bad experience for you. Other such "have" sentences are completely normal English. For instance, "As I was waiting in line, I had a piece of the ceiling fall on my head." It is certainly not a causative "have" construction. ...


0

That means you have caused her to be disrespected by arranging a negative response from other people in the queue such as telling them she jumped in the queue.


0

If you were not doing the "disrespecting" (somebody else was), it seems that you "saw" or "observed" the lady being disrespected. You could say, for instance. "I was sorry to see the lady disrespected so badly." As others pointed out, "having" her disrespected would imply that you arranged for her to be disrespected!


1

Verbs that normally are used without any object such as He died/laughed/was laughing/wept don't have a passive because you have no object that can be transformed into a subject in a passive sentence. Not possible: He was died/laughed/wept.


1

Well, it is tough - you have to find a case where dying is a transitive verb. The closest I can get is the idea that some one can "die a death" of some particular quality: My uncle died a lingering death becomes A lingering death was died in that room over the next few days ... which is a bit purple, but might qualify.


1

Underplay could work. One could also use truncate but it should be accompanied by an adjective such as a blunt truncation or a dismissive truncation


-1

I think a good word for doing something like that is 'minimizing'


1

This citation is listed under an entry for checkmate in OED which reads: transf. To arrest or defeat utterly, discomfit. In mod. use, often: to defeat or frustrate the ‘game’ or scheme of (any one) by a counter-movement. This at least tells us which meaning of checkmate this is supposed to be relevant to (but not a direct example of, based on the ...


5

How about 'cut down' ? As in "he cut her speech down to a simplified version of several complex points" Although this can have a wider meaning. But the words have both a specific meaning and a general hint of the negative aspects of reduction as in 'cut it out' or 'cut from the team' and down as in lower or lesser in both senses. Or else the more ...


22

Trivializing or trivialization doesn't explicitly describe the act, but it describes the effect you're talking about. This is in conjunction with WS2's answer: you reduce (or maybe minimize, as per Centaurus) the story to the point where it is trivial.


8

The rhetorical device known as bathos is defined as an abrupt transition in style from the exalted to the commonplace, producing a ludicrous effect. [Wikipedia]


12

What you are talking about here is reduction, as expressed in reductionism or reductionist. Reduction is a perfectly valid process, not only in mathematics - reducing a mathematical argument to its simplest form - but in things such as philosophy etc. But the examples you give are of things, which I would assert are perversely reductionist. The Oxford ...


9

minimize - to treat or describe (something) as smaller or less important than it is Merriam-Webster "I don't mean to minimize his contributions, on the contrary." "During the interview, he tried to minimize his flaws." minimize - "to represent as having the least degree of importance, value, or size: minimized the magnitude of the crisis." TFD


2

Understanding the technical time distinction between the two sentences is actually quite useful in practice. The first sentence is set in the present (the present perfect tense) while the second second is set in the past (the simple past tense). Although both sentences may reference the identical past event (that is, the actual proving), each look at this ...


2

Both are correct, but they have slightly different connotations. "has been" places slight emphasis on the fact that a proof exists, while "was" places slight emphasis on the act of proving it. Given the structure of the phrase, I like the former better.


0

I'd consider homogenize but that's a specific way of dealing with a variation on the theme of corruption.


2

No one seems to have suggested "elevate"/"elevated" yet. "Elevation" does have some religious connotations, I believe, and the notion of "being elevated [to a higher level]" might capture the notion of heading in the right direction towards a pure(r) state of being.


6

A nice simple word like improve seems to fit the bill...


0

"Fill", "pass", or "ocuppy" could work


1

The dominant idea of keep is hold onto: [WITH OBJECT] 1.0 Have or retain possession of: Origin late Old English cēpan 'seize, take in', also 'care for, attend to', of unknown origin. OED The meaning of keep expands as the notion of hold onto is applied to various conditions and situations: 1.1 Retain or reserve for future use: ...


1

You could say "follows" or "uses". But "run" is a verb that isn't usually associated with "curriculum".


0

It does sound awkward - since a recipe is by definition a set of directions - "requesting" is too passive sounding. "The recipe specifies to turn down the heat," is better, because it gives the recipe back it's authoritative status.


4

The OED clearly lists checkmate as a verb, as well as a noun. It provides multiple examples of its use over the centuries, both related to the game of chess, and metaphorical senses. Some examples of the latter kind are: a1400 Octouian 1746 There was many an hethen hounde, that they chekmatyde [So MS. clearly]. a1529 J. Skelton Vppon ...


3

The only transitive verb usage I've heard in the context of chess itself is the one given as the second definition in your question. As implied by the definition, the object of the checkmate action must be the king piece of your opponent, as no other piece is used to define the state of checkmate. The object cannot be the opponent themselves (though there ...


0

We say "the law states" so it is possible for an abstract idea, in this case the law, to be a subject. However it does seem formal to use "requests" in this context. If the sentence “the recipe requests to turn down the heat” is included as part of the recipe, then yes, that sounds rather clunky. A recipe is usually a set of instructions that people often ...


2

The trick here is with the implication of the verb request. A person (or object) requesting something is well aware that the request may be denied, and presumably has an alternate plan of action prepared in that event. Inanimate objects may sometimes "request" things, but the implication that the request may go unsatisfied is an unusual one for an object ...


-1

Totally wrong. Request is a verb and the recipe cannot be a subject. therefore it is totally wrong. One of the possible correct sentence would be .... It is a requirement of the recipe to turn down the heat.


1

To my UK ears your phrase this sounds strange. As Greg Lee has said, requests sounds odd, I would use says or possibly instructs. But then further the recipe requests to also seems wrong, even if a person, rather than a recipe, were making a request. We would normally give an object for the word requests: Billy requests that the heat be turned ...


0

I don't think a recipe can request things, so I'd say the sentence is not good English. A recipe can say things ("it says to turn down the heat as soon as the water boils"), so it would seem reasonable for it to request things, but it just doesn't sound right. I don't see any prepositions in the sentence, so I don't know what to say about your question ...


1

The subjunctive mood refers only to the verb. "In a perfect world, workers would wear respirators," etc., has no subjunctives in it.



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