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0

From an engineering perspective, one does not pursue a requirement. The team implements the requirement. Or, the design satisfies the requirement. One pursues a goal or objective (or a dream). Also, are you stating a future state in you are in the process of achieving the "optimally utilize..."? Or do you have a solution that you want to sell? Just the ...


2

No. "Is there any chance of you being home?" is the grammatically correct form (sometimes people leave out the "is" or "is there", but this is very informal and I wouldn't recommend it until you're more sure of yourself). "Is there any chance you are home?" is also grammatically correct, and sometimes the "is there" is left out, giving you "Any chance you ...


0

"To communicate effectively" is the preferred option, as it avoids splitting the infinitive. Splitting the infinitive means that a word intrudes between "to" and the verb (in this case, "communicate").


2

I (usually) have concerns about my language. Correct, but the adverb often might be more suitable. I'm usually being concerned about my language. This is unacceptable. Compare 'I'm usually being asleep' / 'I'm usually being cold'. Use 'I'm usually/often concerned about my language'. Stative verbs, being used to describe states, often are not ...


0

First we should be picky about where we place the 'adverbs' (-ly words). 'I usually cry with my face to the wall' and 'I cry usually with my face to the wall' differ! So 'I usually have concerns about my language' means that you 'worry' about it all the time! On the other hand, if you say 'I have concerns about my language, usually on the speed or while ...


5

The word "permeates" works very nicely in the context you've provided. Permeate is often used in the phrase "X permeates every aspect of Y," and Y is frequently "life/lives." Here are a few examples I grabbed from online sources: a headline--Ebola crisis permeates every aspect of people's lives, a line in a movie review--A love and passion for comics ...


-1

It's possible you're thinking of "metastasize", although that's usually used of negative things, like cancer.


6

I propose "pervade" ...seems to pervade my whole life. Pervade meaning to be present throughout or spread through all areas of something


0

Through a process of osmosis or diffusion? OSMOSIS: 2: a process of absorption or diffusion suggestive of the flow of osmotic action; especially : a usually effortless often unconscious assimilation, learned a number of languages by osmosis—Roger Kimball DIFFUSE: 2: not concentrated or localized, diffuse lighting; diffuse sclerosis — ...


0

Unperturbed is not an adjective in that sentence. An adverb answers how an action happens or happened, or in this case how "he" continued. How did he continue? Unperturbed. Unperturbed can also be used as an adjective, specifically a participial: The unperturbed snail continued to inch along. Hopefully that clears up your confusion. Take away this: The ...


0

A big question. How did words (nouns, verbs, adjectives, function words) come into existence? To be honest, we can't explain that. There are things in the early stage of language that will remain a secret. As to the question of "is" and "to be" one may guess that such function verbs occur relatively late. At an early stage one could do without: "He boss" was ...


0

We often use the present tense for things that are generally true; in other words that are true most of the time, or all the time. For example: I live in London. In historical lists, and the plots of films and novels, the series of actions can be seen as fixed and unchanging. They are always the same. When you open the book tomorrow or watch the film ...


1

You might use this , if you were discussing a book in which one of the characters dies, and you are speaking from the perspective that he is not dead yet , but you know he will die ! You would not use this sentence in real-life, unless you were a crazy dictator who had decided to execute at some point in the future (on that persons 102nd birthday) . ...


3

Narrative is most often in the past tense, but it is nevertheless quite common to use the historic (or narrative) present tense. When using the historic present, the viewpoint moves along with the events described, so is is the only choice here. You could say (in a present-tense narrative) He died when he was 102 years old, and that would locate the death ...


0

The OED has the word diabolify, meaning "To make a devil of; to figure as a devil." But even the quotation they use includes a self-conscious "(if I may coin such a word)"; it's not something I have ever come across, though I expect it would be understood. On the other hand, you might be able to do something with the (very rare, but not vanishingly so) noun ...


0

Reach out is a useful expression: Lit. to extend one's grasp outward. He reached out, but there was no one to take hold of. I reached out and grabbed onto the first thing I could get hold of.


12

Both extend and offer are correct and current usage. "As we were walking I offered her my hand." "I offered my hand and he shook it." "I approached him and extended my hand." "He stared at me for a moment and then reluctantly extended his hand."


3

"Extending your hand" is indeed correct, understood exactly in this way, and of long use for precisely this. At least one dictionary even lists "extend your hand" as a phrase with precisely that meaning. The OED doesn't, but does have a definition: To stretch forth (the arm or hand). Also, to hold out, put forward (a staff, etc.). And includes examples ...


4

Some further research stated, that there seem to be two (Old / Middle) English verbs - one strong, one weak - today's "wake" stems from, hence the two forms for past tense: This appears to be irrelevant, but that it is is actually more interesting than if it isn't, because we'd actually expect this dual-form to happen here, because wæcnan was a strong ...


15

This is rather a knotty little group of verbs that have gone all over the place in Modern English, though they were very clearly and regularly distinguished in Old English. Let’s start with the etymology, and then move on to current usage.   Etymology The words watch, (a)wake, (a)waken all share a common root. The Proto-Indo-European root was ...


5

Garner’s Usage Tip of the Day: Miscellaneous Entries. seems to indicate that the preferred choice between the alternative forms of the past participles 'waked' and 'woken' is determined purely geographically. It is probable that the choice of past simple reflects this to a limited degree, though Garner does not list 'waked' as a 'preferred' choice: wake; ...


0

She collected stickers last year. This is an observation. A statement of fact with no particular emphasis. She was collecting stickers last year. This catches attention because it draws attention to the fact that there were multiple occasions when she was collecting stickers. "Throughout" is not there, but the past progressive hints at the idea that she ...


0

The past progressive emphasises to me just how much time she was spending on this activity. The past simple does not do this.


1

As others have indicated, the usage seems established, if only by dint of previous usage. However, I find it an awkward expression because it is imprecise, ambiguous (perhaps only to those of us who over-think), and requires interpretation. The problem is with, “She pointed me...” Does it mean, “She physically re-positioned me (to face in a particular ...


1

Definition: Point as a verb merriam-webster: to show someone where to look by moving your finger or an object held in your hand in a particular direction. Example:point the way to new knowledge — Elizabeth Hall Used in the sense of 'towards', there this Example construction: merriam-webster: We can leave when the minute hand points to 12. Standard ...


1

It must have been a reply to a comment or question. "Are you going to think about it?" "I have been, all the time since lunch." Otherwise, it doesn't seem to make sense.


0

Phrases of the form "a(n) [singular noun denoting a group] of [plural noun]" are sometimes treated as singular, and sometimes as plural. One major factor is the first noun; to take an extreme example, I believe that all forms of English allow "a lot of people agree" and forbid *"a lot of people agrees". Another major factor is the language variety; UK ...


1

While both phrases are grammatically correct, I think there is a slight semantic difference: using will (in this case, you'll instead of you) puts more emphasis on someone's determination to do something. To use your example, "I hope you read lots of good books this year" basically means "I hope it works out for you to read lots of good books this year." ...


0

Recognizing the validity of the first answer: set implies a plurality of icons, all suggesting..., so some people use the plural form of the verb. Technically incorrect; still communicates.


0

The correct usage when the subject is a singular object — such as A new set — is the corresponding conjugation, which, according to at least two sources, is suggests. GingerSoftware Grammar Checker and Reverso Grammar checker both correct this as follows: Source: A new set of icons suggest that voice-activated sharing to social networks ...


0

I would say that I hope you read more books this year sounds better to me. I hope you'll read more books this year is almost more literal (you will as we're taking about the fututre,) though is acceptable too, and both make perfect sense to me.


1

"Are you using…" refers to what you are currently doing, though there's nothing about it that distinguishes from an instantaneous time-frame (what you are doing right now) a short one (today, perhaps) or a very long one covering years or more. "Do you use…" refers to what one tends to do. For that reason, if you want to be specific as to what the person is ...


-2

Use "giftation" or "giftion" as nominalizations of "to give" that exclude the gerund.


0

Is there a nominalized form of "to give"? There are three; give, gift and completely separately, give. Of the sense of the verb meaning "to transfer to another person, to donate" we have the noun give referring to the actual thing donated from Old English until around the early 14th century then dying out. We also have it used for the act of giving ...


2

Perhaps the related gifting might be preferred, but that has another more usual sense. You're right; there does seem a lack of an ideal noun here. 'Donation' (sense (1) below) works (as Janus suggests it might): donation noun an act or instance of presenting something as a gift, grant, or contribution. a gift, as to a fund; ...


0

"a gift" (noun) - something that is given to another person or to a group or organization "give" (noun) - "the ability of a material to bend or stretch. e.g. "This fabric has a lot of give." "giver" (noun) - " someone who gives something to another person." Edit, after the OP edited. Giving is the word for the act of giving. "Giving is the ...


0

To sequester: can fit the context you are describing: (TFD) (Law) To take temporary possession of (property) as security against legal claims.


1

Perhaps you are thinking of confiscate?


0

Verbs have many properties, tense (e.g., present, past), number (viz., singular and plural), mood (e.g., imperative, conditional), but here the inconsistency is in in verb's grammatical aspect. There are four grammatical aspects: Simple "I ate", "I eat", "I will eat" "I lasted", "I last", "I will last" Progressive (ongoing) "I was eating", "I am ...


2

Whether "Nig" is a back-formation from the well-known racist term for American Black people, or branches off from that other pejorative, “niggardly,” what’s plain is that the mere utterance of the word so traumatizes many of us that—-unlike any other word I know—-even the linguists of EL&U have great difficulty extricating themselves sufficiently ...


4

Not that long ago I asked a question about 19th century north American slang which contained the following ... Bob, be honest, never take a man's trick wot don't belong to you, nor clip cards, nor nig, for then you can't look your man in the face, and when that's the case there's no fun in the game... The excerpt is dated 1858, and none of the users ...


0

In this, recast is a past participle: it is equivalent to saying rewritten, or re-expressed. Recasts would be odd, because the equation is the object, not the subject of the recasting. It's confusing because cast and its compounds are among the few words where the past participle is the same as the present. Hit is another case.


5

Not only is the form you ask about reasonably common today, but use of it goes back more than 200 years. From a letter to Mr. Urban dated September 12, in The Gentleman's Magazine, and Historical Chronicle (September 1808): Now, to arrest the attention of my friends, and dispose the friends of others who may think with me, with your leave, I will point ...


2

Rule One: If the verb is modal*, then match the verb: The verb used is to be (I am/I'm, You are/You're/, He is, etc.) because the verb in the first sentence is am though contracted to I'm. The response therefore would use that verb too, but in the second person; you are or you're. We tend not to end on contractions, so "Of course you're" would be strange, ...


1

Compare Of course you do having trouble finding your car. with Of course you are having trouble finding your car. If A uses “having” (present continuous?), then B's answer should be in the same tense. The other form would be: A: I have trouble finding my car. B: Of course you do.


1

"Forwent" isn't used much because so few people know the word. Here is a message using the word that I posted today on facebook: I added a layer to my torso and used liners in my gloves but forwent the balaclava. I would have been more comfortable with it.


3

They are forms of middle-voice, in that they are neither the active or the passive voice. To reiterate those voices first before examining the middle, the active voice is where the subject is the agent or actor; the thing that does the action: The bird flew. The boy kicked the ball. The boy is kicking the ball. The passive voice is where the ...


0

"This book is reading easily " is not correct. it could only be understood as active voice, and as you presumably know, books cannot read anything. "This book reads easily.", however, is accceptable, because of the passive meaning other posters have explained.


2

Only in June was it creating repositories. Only in June it was creating repositories. (ungrammatical) In example (1) we see the auxiliary and subject change places. In example (2), the auxiliary and subject are the same as they would be in a normal sentence. It is ungrammatical. Only in June did it create repositories. Only in June it ...


1

I would say I wish to be given a heavier workload. Or I wish I could have a heavier workload. "Take on" suggests too strongly (to me) that the extra workload will be pushing me to my limits. Which may not be the case.



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