New answers tagged

0

Bowed her head, winked assent, dipped her head, touched her hat, gave a thumbs up, angled her chin down, or tilted her head. It's hard to say "nod" without saying "nod," but there are physical cues that are roughly equivalent, at least in some contexts.


1

banter (especially for male/female interactions) or "taking the piss out" (British)


3

Perhaps it is facetious, defined by oed as Treating serious issues with deliberately inappropriate humour.


1

Try mask, defined by Merriam Webster under synonym discussion Suggests some often obvious means of hiding or disguising somethin. A- you smell bad! B- uh! You're masking it (with your demeanor)


1

Draggle to soil by dragging over damp ground or in mud. to trail on the ground; be or become draggled. to follow slowly; straggle. Also, "drabble" (Ref. - http://www.legendsofamerica.com/we-slang-d.html) Also, "dragging death"


1

Wrangle means to "round up, herd, or take charge of (livestock)." It doesn't explicitly mean to drag someone in a literal sense, but the word does carry a connotation that its subject is being controlled forcibly. Source: Many hundreds of hours spent watching westerns with my father.


1

There's not a lot of historical discussion readily available. So we can imagine that "lasso'd and dragged" would fit the style of language associated with the old West. Or possibly just dragged, since that already implies that a tethering of some sort has occurred. Another possibility is "drawn" which doesn't have a specific connection to the American ...


6

roping: Definition: verb (used with object) 10. to catch with a lasso; lasso. (Dictionary.com) Example: Yes, for instance, roping bandits with that Mexican lasso that the cowboys gave her last season. Also try leashing, tethering, noosing.


14

It's called "lassoing" — Dictionary.com verb (used with object) lassoed, lassoing. to catch with or as with a lasso. "He lassoed the villain and dragged him along the ground."


10

I would say "dragging" — M-W verb to cause (something) to move along the ground, floor, etc., by pulling it "The cowboy tied the outlaw up and took off on his horse, dragging the outlaw behind him."


1

The verb "back" means something entirely than you think it does. The usual meaning of "to back" is to give support (financial, moral etc. ) to some cause. There is "to back away" meaning turning away and "to back off", there is "to back" meaning "covering the back of an item", wind can "back" (turn into a direction anti-clockwise, which is the opposite of ...


1

We will be back soon and we'll be back soon are both correct. We will back soon is wrong because back is an adjective not a verb and thus needs to be introduced with a verb, such as be. Edit: We will back soon could actually be grammatically correct, but back would have to take on a different meaning when used as a verb -- "to support" or "advocate for," ...


0

One of the many sites on body language (this one called Entrepreneur) suggests, for assent: Start with the eyes, making solid contact, then nod in assent and raise your eyebrows while you listen. You’ll look alert and interested. A perked head position, nodding in agreement. A head tilt to the side is a submissive signal, exposing the throat and ...


2

Bobbing one's head — ODO Make a quick, short movement up and down "I could see his head bobbing about" "Unlike Garrett's bewildered reaction, Clara only gave a slight bob of her head to acknowledge him." Synonyms: nod, incline, bow, dip, duck


0

I've never heard "databasing" as a verb, and it's long, clunky, and confuses me. I expect it to mean "the act of analyzing a real world entity relationship, and writing the DDL to implement a database". "After the shopping cart is "databased", checkout can be "formed"" You sound like you are referring to the entry of a record or other atomic information. ...


0

Consider the gerund form databasing, derived from the verb database — TFD tr.v. databased, databasing, databases To put (data) into a database. It's hard to find a better one, so consider databases as tables and we'll have: Tabulation, a noun from the verb tabulate — TFD tr.v. tabulated, tabulating, tabulates 2 the act of putting ...


1

The first makes more sense than the second, although both are grammatically correct. The issue is that 'the system design' is an outline, or a template, or an intended architecture. It's not logical for anyone or anything to be able to assist such an abstract thing. This idea would be better expressed as 'Steps to improve the system design'.


1

When the third person is used, you have to put an 's' at the end of it. He seems OK. However, if the auxiliary verb "do" is used with the verb, then "do" gets the 's'. He does seem OK. That works for a question aswell, because "do" is used together with the verb. Does he seem OK? Therefore, the "s" cannot be on the root verb itself.


1

Second one. Question structure is: Auxiliary + Subject + Verbal root + (complement) The verbal root is "seem", not "seems", so you'll say: Does it seem OK to you? More generally, you'll always use the verbal root when following an auxiliary.


0

I think your example only works with the word circle, because it is contextually known that a circle is drawn around something. So it is perhaps not illogical when the thing you're centring around a point is itself round (and around a centre). It could be considered a contamination of revolve around / drawn around with centred on, though. But I don't think ...


2

Ask is a transitive verb: it takes a Direct Object (DO), in its simplest form a noun phrase: Anne asked me [DO a question]. If we want to represent Anne's exact words, we use the question she actually asked, followed by a question mark and enclosed in quotes, in that DO position: Anne asked me "Who is your favorite actor?" The quotes mark this ...


1

Affirmative: that man was Negative: that man wasn't Interrogative: Was that man...? Affirmative statement: Tell me who that man was. Interrogative: (only 1 interrogative form at the beginning) Can you tell me who that man was? Interrogative: Who was that man? Affirmative: Anne asked me who my favourite actor was. (There's no question mark.) Question ...


0

The "required that" cues the present subjunctive which in English is simply the infinitive form of the verb and is distinguishable from the present tense only in the third person singular. Example: She required that her son sit and eat his breakfast.


0

I believe the phrase you are looking for is turning point. http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/turning%20point


0

If we are ignoring the 'in a hole in the ground' part and just discussing There lived a hobbit. Then I would say that this is fairly common in English when asking someone to think of something new. It is a way to introduce something new into the conversation. At the start of a book is a perfect example. The simplest example is when you want to tell ...


0

In a hole in the ground there lived [verb] a hobbit [subject]. The prepositional phrase "in a hole in the ground" functions as adverb of place (where). This is the normal or usual way of writing this type of sentence: "A hobbit lived in a hole in the ground." The subject sentence is written in the format adverb-verb-subject. Writers resort to this ...


1

@G. Tomevi: Taken alone, "So does coffee." is incomplete, yes. But since it follows a sentence which contains THE complete thought, it becomes complete. Sentences of this construction should normally follow a sentence which contains the complete thought, or part of the whole context. In this case, "Tea has caffeine." does the job of providing the complete ...


0

"Was graduated from" was indeed correct in the early 1900s because the school was considered to be the one graduating students. So when the phrase is put into other tenses, they should follow the rules of passive voice. Mike was graduated from university. Mike will be graduated from university. Mike is being graduated from university. etc.


1

No, it's correct. It's just old. As @PeterShor and others comment, this is an example of the subjunctive mood, which expresses hypothetical situations and which is no longer commonly used in English. Other, more exlicit, forms of your example include: If a son should strike his father... Should a son strike his father... If a son were to ...


0

Your sentence is a perfect example of a dummy verb. A dummy verb is a type of auxiliary verb used in place of another verb. Often used to do exactly what you said: avoid saying the same word twice. It's often used in answers also: Q: "Do you take this man to be..." A1: "I take him." Would be awkward, so A2: "I do." Do is standing in for take. See ...


0

Your sentence is correct, but it's also fine to say tea has caffeine, but so has coffee. Now, this isn't a educated grammatical answer, but I think 'do' is working a little like a pronoun. You know the way you can simplify a specific noun with 'it', say, when it's clear what you're referring to? Coffee has caffeine. it is bitter. Notice we're ...


-3

Tea has caffeine, and so does coffee. His question was: "Why can't you use the word "has" in place of "does"? The use of 'does' is correct. But you're right, there should be no comma. In fact, if I were to correct the sentence, I would rewrite it as follows: Tea has caffeine. So does coffee. To better understand why "does" is used instead of "has" (and ...


0

mold, cast, machine, frame, outline, assembly-line, process, execute, efficiency, having things down to a "science" or a "recipe." These are what I came up with after inputting manufacture using thesaurus.com and using some of my own ideas.


0

A programmer answer rather than English usage -- the verb is construct, since a factory makes objects, and that involves calling a constructor function. AbstractConnectionFactory will construct an concrete instance of IDbConnection.


0

Keep it short and simple, especially in programming names. A good verb for what a factory does is: Make


4

Factory comes from Manufactory - the verb is Manufacture. man·u·fac·to·ry (măn′yə-făk′tə-rē) n. pl. man·u·fac·to·ries A factory or manufacturing plant.


2

The closest verb is "to fabricate". Relate to the german words "Fabrik" -> "fabrizieren".


1

As a verb meaning to use someone for their money: Gold digging - this is more seen in noun form as gold digger, a person engaging in such activities as the receiver. As a noun for a person being used in such fashion: Sugar daddy, and the feminine sugar mommy (a lot rarer). This generally implies the person is willing to give away money as "payment" for ...


3

The verb should be is. There is no doubt about that, since the subject of the sentence The best form of transportation is singular. However I do not consider the sentence idiomatic (perhaps because a singular subject and a plural object sounds awkward). I would say: The best form of transport in the city is (by) bus. The by is optional. There are ...


0

This is not uncommon, especially when someone is learning a language. If one is reasonably proficient in the language and is still doing this, we might call it word play.


0

If these things matter, then come to us. If this list (or just one thing on it) matters, then come to us. (And as I edit this I realize I have just rephrased what @PellMel wrote in a comment.)


4

Those are gapping constructions. Gapping deletes a repeated verb and other repeated constituents, leaving behind two constituents, one of which (in Ross's formulation) must be inside the verb phrase and the other must be outside the verb phrase. A classic of grammatical analysis was Ross's paper Gapping and the order of constituents, which showed that the ...


1

Let me use two different sentences to explain. 'I decided to get a degree in computer science when I was in university.' 'I have decided to reply to your question.' The first, in the past tense, refers to an act that took place in the past and is not directly relevant to what's going on at this present time. If you were writing a history you would use the ...


-1

"I ate apples." implies one or more specific instances of eating apples (e.g., answering the question: "which fruit did you eat last Saturday at brunch"), or, the admission of a truth about yourself as an eater of apples in a specific instance (i.e., the affirmative answer to a "Yes or No" question about a specific instance). "I have eaten apples." implies ...


1

It's an example of coordination (i.e., two elements linked with "and"). Elements common to the two coordinands can often be omitted in the second one. Eg, coordinated subjects, common predicate: John and Mary went to the shops. Coordinated verbs, common object: John noticed, and bought, a painting. Coordinated objects, common subject and verb: ...


1

These are two idioms involving There-Insertion. (1-3) are examples of one idiom, (4-5) of another. There's no Vcog-ing means 'No one can Vcog', where Vcog is a cognitive verb (doubt, tell, guess) that is the VP of a gerund complement clause. I.e, the NP following no in this idiom (which is an NPI, by the way) is parseable as [np [s [vp Vcog-ing ... ...


7

I'd say that 1-4 are hybrid constructions where "no" is a determinative functioning as a determiner in construction with a gerund-participial VP head. In 1. and 4. the post head NPs are objects, but in in 2. and 3. the post-head dependents are not NPs but interrogative complement clauses where 2. means There’s no telling the answer to the question "what ...


1

Taking your questions out of order: What part of speech are these -ing forms. They are examples of the gerund -- a verb form that functions as a noun. Note well the distinction between "functions as a noun" and "is a noun," as this bears directly on your question. Gerunds are verb forms, but there are also "verbal nouns", which often have the same ...


0

@AJB: I am sorry, you may get frustrated again, because both are grammatically correct. :) In "As you go through various settings, you will have the option to allow certain activities...," to allow is an infinitive-adjective which describes the noun "option." As adjective, it answers the question "What [kind of] option?" Answer: (the option) to allow For ...


0

Both of these usages are correct. The important point to keep in mind is to use First form of verb after to(except in the case of Gerund) and verb+ing after of in such contexts.



Top 50 recent answers are included