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1

Bob did what he could to appease them. I would consider them to be the insulted party here. Appease is being used in the sense of soothing or pacifying. Adults don't need to be soothed or pacified.


1

Appeasement as a national policy got negative connotation during WWII: "The term is most often applied to the foreign policy of the British Prime Minister Neville Chamberlain towards Nazi Germany between 1937 and 1939. His policies of avoiding war with Germany have been the subject of intense debate for seventy years among academics, politicians and ...


0

I would interpret "Bob did what he could to appease them." to imply that he did not agree with their position, but he attempted to placate them anyway.


7

The term appease itself is fairly neutral: appease - verb pacify or placate (someone) by acceding to their demands. assuage or satisfy (a demand or a feeling). It's not defined as being disparaging, and you can use it fairly neutrally. I appeased my growling stomach by eating a sandwich. We appeased the opposing parties, by ...


0

It's "kind of a negative" word. You know how during a war, when country X is invaded, some people "go along" with the invaders, so as to cause less death, etc? That's "collaborating." So, "even worse" than appeasing, is collaborating - let's say. I would say that usually -- not always -- appease has a somewhat negative connotation. It's a bit like ...


0

The word I would use is "relativized" to refer to diminished relative importance.


0

"On hold", "Set aside", and "Later" might also be good headings if you're looking for something less formal. All along the same lines as @Chris Sunami's popular "Postponed".


0

As this is related to programming workflow, a computer term would probably be in order. From Wikipedia: In computing, preemption is the act of temporarily interrupting a task being carried out by a computer system, without requiring its cooperation, and with the intention of resuming the task at a later time. Such a change is known as a context ...


0

"Downgraded Priorities" can describe the now lesser-important tasks and projects.


3

Postponed Tasks Postpone: 1. to put off to a later time; defer: 2. to place after in order of importance or estimation; subordinate (dictionary.com)


1

Superseded? In the context of "The superseded"


2

The It in the sentence here is the dummy subject it inserted by Extraposition. That means the clause in question is a subject complement that's been displaced. Travelling to the US took me five hours. To travel to the US took me five hours. Notice that without extraposition the infinitive subject seems awkward, but the gerund sounds fine. That's why most ...


0

To contrast a list of 'High-Priority' tasks which you'd be focusing on, have you considered titling this list simply 'Nonessential Tasks'? At first glance my ear told me 'Inessential' would be a better fit, but according to this question, nonessential would be more appropriate for your situation.


2

Deprioritize/deprioritized and abandoned come to mind when I think of a list of items in this manner. Example would be 'The Deprioritized List of _' or 'The Abandoned _ After seeing your comment I would simply suggest interrupted.


0

You could say that the second thing "took priority" over the first thing. You could call a list of things like this a "priority list". Priority: a thing that is regarded as more important than another. "housework didn't figure high on her list of priorities" the fact or condition of being regarded or treated as more important. "the safety of the country ...


0

Idiomatically, the standard format is... It took [1] (some amount of time/effort) to (do something) | before (something happened), etc. 1 an optional "patient" noun/pronoun may appear here (the person who made the effort). As a native speaker, my instinct is to interpret five hours travelling to the US as a complete noun clause representing some ...


1

I cannot define the rules, but the first statement implies "[doing something] took five hours [whilst you were] travelling to the US". If you want to use "travelling " you should say "Travelling to the US took me five hours". i.e. "It took me five hours to [do something]" or "[doing something] took me five hours".


2

I checked out page 228 of the book (thanks to your precise reference). In the said context, draw will mean attract or bring upon itself. This usage is akin to: This form of felony usually draws (attracts) a year of imprisonment. or: He drew the ire of his peers with his controversial remarks. Also, the word within in this context is not ...


0

I understand you totally seeing that my mother tongue is Arabic, the word in Arabic has a meaning of human-to-human connection. for example, if you haven't seen someone for a long time you could say that to him, the correct literal translation would be something like 'humanize' even though that wouldn't make sense mainly because that in the English language ...


1

"Could" is a modal verb in English that has various meanings in various sentences. This is more of a grammar for usages of modal verbs that you could have found by searching, but anyhow, I always find subscription-only LDOCE pretty helpful, so I'm quoting its definitions here: Past ability: used as the past tense of 'can' to say what someone was able ...


-1

In the first few cases, "could" is not past tense, but rather conditional. Although, I don't recall ever learning formally about a conditional tense in English. I think it's usually just called a modal construction, and described as something that is possible in the present or future. edit: so maybe that is indeed considered past tense, though just not ...


1

If they were sick, you could nurse them; if they were children, you could mind or simply watch them. In a bit of a stretch, you might perhaps be able to comfort or guard someone. If you don’t mind phrasal verbs — and you shouldn’t — then you could watch over or look after someone easily enough. But I get the idea that you mean something more like babysit ...


0

You may looking for words like these : "consort" "intimacy" "bonhomie"


1

The answer to the question that I think you're asking is "you wouldn't". You can't just magically figure out the meaning of every word just by using context clues. To "figure out" the definition of the word, you'd look the word up in a dictionary, exactly like you've already done.


2

Envy (as a verb) may not necessarily imply a wish to lose or subsume one’s own identity in favor of another’s, but I think it is as close a word as you will find.


0

New Answer, After Re-Reading the Q It appears that I completely misread what the question is asking for. Some of what I answered previously is still relevant so I'll leave it at the bottom. Using the suggestion that you call it a crossing (read below), I would suggest using words such as available, and engaged to describe the crossing. Basically, the key ...


0

Unfortunately, the term moving bridge is inaccurate. A better term would be operatable bridge to indicate the bridge has multiple configurations which may change with different usages. Changing the usage of the bridge is operating the bridge, which remains in the same location throughout all of its operations. In the particular case of the swing bridge ...


0

Short answer Present and Past Simple verb forms do not usually have an auxiliary verb. However auxiliaries are needed for sentences with negation, inversion, code (stranding), or emphasis. When we need an auxiliary for one of these reasons we use the 'dummy' auxiliary DO: I like cheese. (normal declarative sentence without DO) I don't like cheese. ...


2

Full Answer I worked. I did work. The word did in the second sentence is an example of do-support. This occurs because of the special role of auxiliary verbs in English. (I have changed the order of the examples for easier reading.) English auxiliary verbs Most verb phrases in English involve at least one AUXILIARY verb. These verbs appear before the ...


-1

Unfortunately, the standard terms here are "open" and "close" the bridge. Normally, this is unambiguous, though perhaps a little confusing since, when the bridge is open, it's closed to road traffic and, when it's closed, it's not. You were in a rare situation where it was ambiguous. Any phrase that always means "Are you about to put the bridge in the ...


-2

In Trinidad & Tobago the word cab is almost never used by the local population. Taxi generally refers to any vehicle specially licensed and insured to transport a fixed number of paying passengers at any given time. These vehicles license plate usually begins with the letter H followed representing it is a vehicle licensed for hire and at present two ...


0

The confusion is that you meant "Is the bridge going to move?" but the technician understood "Is the road going to be usable?" which is the answer he would expect most people to want. "I want to use the road" not "I'm interested in the mechanics of bridges". When the bridge is in the "open" position the road is closed. When the bridge is in the "closed" ...


-2

... to relocate ? This moves a moveable bridge without opening, closing, swinging, drawing, raising, lowering, turning, rotating, folding, unfolding, connecting, unconnecting, spanning, un-spanning, sliding, unsliding, trafficating, de-trafficating, de-bridging and bridging, ..... I believe that moveable bridges are relocateable and can be relocated. ...


0

I did work could mean 'I performed work' with work as a noun ( e.g. I did work on the second paragraph last week but it's still not right). I still think that the most common use is to contradict the suggestion that you didn't work. E.g.: 'You were supposed to do your homework, but I see you've done nothing...' 'No, I did work, but my dog got hungry...'


2

There are three common usages for the auxiliary verb do: Emphatic do - strongly stressed, often contradicting something in context Q: Why didn't you tell her? A: I did tell her. Active do - pro-verb substituting for active (non-stative) verb What I want to do is buy that house now ~ *What I want to do is own that house now Do-Support do - dummy verb, no ...


4

When I lived in Great Yarmouth, the townsfolk would say simply 'the bridge is up', meaning the main bridge over the harbour had been lifted to allow ships to pass. If people arrived late for work a frequent excuse was that 'the bridge was up'. If traffic was passing over it normally 'the bridge was not up'. I can never remember any confusion over what was ...


6

It is not a single-word answer, but to prevent ambiguity I would suggest calling the bridge “open” or “closed” to road traffic or to maritime traffic. And if you are cycling, it makes sense to ask “When will the bridge be open to road traffic?”—which is what your “technician” seems quite sensibly to have ...


7

Swing bridges such as the one in the illustration you've borrowed from Wikipedia (or perhaps they borrowed it from you ?) are swung. I think that the position of the bridge when it is swung open, or swung closed, depends on whether you are on the roadway or on the waterway. Lifting bridges, of which draw bridges are a type, may be lifted or raised and ...


8

The answer is in the definition of drawbridge: a bridge of which the whole or a section may be raised, lowered, or drawn aside, to prevent access or to leave a passage open for boats, barges, etc. Source: http://www.thefreedictionary.com/ Moveable bridge and drawbridge are synonymous but drawbridge is also a specific type of movable bridge. It ...


2

It is perfectly grammatical indeed, but this way of sentence construction is used to emphasize that you really performed the action you are talking about. Thus I did work (and I did get results) means that you really worked (and that you really got results). More information on emphasis you can find here: http://www.michellehenry.fr/emphasize.htm and ...


-1

In your question, I assume, you are treating “work” as a verb, not as a noun. Hence: Present tense: Do | Work Past tense: Did | Worked You wouldn't say I do work, but you would say I work. Hence, you wouldn't I did work, but you would say I worked.


0

I think the easiest way of answering this looks through the lens of a 'Thank you for+noun' sentence. Every sentence of this structure needs to have a noun follow the preposition for, which is often a gerund form of a verb ie. "Thank you for running errands." This works fine since running easily becomes a gerund. This is not so for 'willing' which is the ...


0

Disclaimer: I'm not a linguist nor grammarian. I came across this Wiki article during my research for an answer. It mentions "attributive verbs", which seem to me like verbs that can be used (with some modifications) in certain situations to act as so-called attributive adjectives to a noun. This doesn't quite match what you're describing, which are verbs ...


0

I have often used the phrase 'Some people think, and some people thunk.' where thunk is a verb with synonyms such as flunk (which, co-incidentally, rhymes with thunk), fail etc. This usage also makes a witty double pun with thunk ( flunk,fail ) in reference to thunk ( a flat hollow sound ). Thunking could therefore be defined as not thinking. Language is ...


0

From what I gather, you're asking what the term is for verbs constructed by another verb + adverb. Since an adverb is just a way to describe a verb (or noun/adjective/other adverb), technically any "descriptive" sounding or specific verb can fit into this definition. This link describes some verbs that fit your definition. The opposite of what you're ...


2

This use of exist instead of be is common, not only in mathematics, but also in philosophy. Although in everyday life, we make little distinction, if any, between the two, in general, the verb be when used independently, seems to carry with it a sense of sentient existence, whereas exist lacks that connotation, and is therefore more "neutral". Now, for the ...


1

Yes, it is correct as written. It is a stylistic choice used to draw attention to some portion of the sentence. This is the rhetorical device called anastrophe, itself a type of hyperbaton. Anastrophe is defined by the OED as: Inversion, or unusual arrangement, of the words or clauses of a sentence. Poetic Use As mentioned here, Coleridge uses ...


2

You're right, this is an older usage. It looks like the object was fronted or "topicalized" to the front of the infinitive. This no longer works in English but I guess it used to! Similar rules exist is German and other Germanic languages.


5

"Follows" just means "comes after," sometimes also meaning "along the same path as". If you want to say that it comes "right after" the other thing, say "immediately follows". Of course when there are only two items, these concepts are identical. And often the distinction isn't relevant. If I'm following you to your home, it doesn't matter if someone ...


1

The difference between the two options is partly a matter of nuance. The first one, using "was", allows the reader to wonder if perhaps the well no longer exists, while the choice using "is" makes it clear that the well is still there (at the time of writing), and there is more chance the reader could throw a coin into the same well. The phrase "that was in ...



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