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In the sentence you provided, the main clause initializes a summation of properties for the subject, this transformation. Specifically, you're trying to say what this transformation changes. In the subordinate clause, you're also giving a summation of properties, but with regards to a different verb. You're trying to say what this transformation (it), ...


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This is called do-support and is required when you have a negative such as never before the subject. Other examples from Wikipedia: Never did he run that fast again. (wrong: *Never he did run that fast again. *Never ran he that fast again.) Only here do I feel at home. (wrong: *Only here feel I at home.)


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Baby Talk The speech patterns and sounds of young children learning to talk, characterized by mispronunciation, imperfect syntax, repetition, and phonetic modifications, such as lisping or stuttering. The intentionally oversimplified manner of speech, imitative of young children learning to talk, used by adults in addressing children or pets. ...


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I would call it coochie-cooing, from the phrase often used when tickling a baby (you can see Fred Flintstone learn to do it here). This is a specific form of baby-talk or motherese: noun 1. the simplified and repetitive type of speech, with exaggerated intonation and rhythm, often used by adults when speaking to babies. —Dictionary.com Be aware, ...


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Coochie, coochie coo! The natural benefits of baby talk There are several names for this: ‘baby talk’, 'motherese’ or ‘infant directed speech’. And although you might feel funny and friends and family might laugh as you converse with an infant, we do this without thinking and without explicit intention of speaking like this. Men, women and ...


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Shame (dictionary.com) n. the painful feeling arising from the consciousness of something dishonorable, improper, ridiculous, etc. In the example above, however, the mothers are using the verb Shaming v. to cause to feel shame; make ashamed


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I believe that's called "guilt tripping" someone. "Guilt trip" VERB make (someone) feel guilty, especially in order to induce them to do something: Ex. "a pay increase will not guilt-trip them into improvements." (Source: Oxford Dictionaries)


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No. This would imply that "rescue" is a form of transport - akin to saying "flown to a safe place" or "driven to a safe place". While driving and flying may form part of the rescue, they are not part of the definition of the word rescue, which involves changing someone's situation from "being in danger" to "being safe". The actual act of rescue might ...


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welcomed is the correct one. The (implied) subject, doing the welcoming, is us, not the donations, which is the object. The sentence means "Monetary donations are welcomed by us" (passive voice) rather than "We welcome monetary donations" (active voice) Try substituting other nouns for donations, and it should become clear that the other form is an idiom (...


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The Collins dictionary shows a few alternatives that I like, such as "crossroads": crossroads, critical moment, decisive moment, change, crisis, crux, moment of truth, point of no return, moment of decision, climacteric, tipping point A google search for turning point synonym shows "landmark" amongst other options - which I quite like, depending on ...


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Sometimes we say "He keeps score of all the nice things we do for each other," so you might could call him a scorekeeper or call the activity "scorekeeping/keeping score." Other adjectives you might try to describe the person: shrewd calculating unforgiving cunning


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You could consider the adjective "unmagnanimous". Whilst not exactly what you're looking for it could work in the context you describe. http://www.yourdictionary.com/unmagnanimous It's an antonym for "magnanimous", which can be described as follows: magnanimous |maɡˈnanəməs| adjective -very generous or forgiving, especially toward a rival or someone less ...


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You might be looking for eclose: (of an insect) emerge as an adult from the pupa or as a larva from the egg. From wikipedia, emphasis mine: Like other types of pupae, the chrysalis stage in most butterflies is one in which there is little movement. However, some butterfly pupae are capable of moving the abdominal segments to produce sounds or ...


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"Should", "need to", "have to" and "must" are all fine auxiliary synonyms (in increasing order of urgency). (Incidentally, your "of" should be "for" and "that you are allowed to stay until 27/06/2016" should be "by 27/8/2016 in order to stay past that date" or "by 27/8/2016 to forestall your eviction")


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Good question! I believe you mean to use the word prevailing instead of availing, as availing is defined as making use of an opportunity or benefit, whereas prevailing means to be victorious over opposing forces; since you are struggling and wresting yourself free in your sentence, I suggest you use prevailing. In regard to which sentence construction is ...


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Unpublish — Macmillan verb to remove content from a site on the web after it has been available for some time "Facebook has unpublished our page due to users using the page to 'bully' others," Snapchat Leaked told Britain's Metro tabloid." Unpublish — Wiktionary (transitive verb, chiefly computing) To remove (something ...


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Yes, it is possible and common. The meaning is as one may expect, to connect/relate some(usually two) concepts, ideas, etc. Take a look at these examples: If we attempt to bridge two concepts that are very far apart, more energy will be consumed (and lost) to achieve it. ...and by Doctors Without Borders It may be possible to bridge two ideas which ...


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It looks slightly awkward since thermocompression is such a long composite word. It becomes clearer with easier examples: "perform laser cutting" The sample is laser cut from the substrate. "perform frequency resolution" The signal is frequency resolved. All these sound right, don't they? I should be surprised however, if the hyphen were correct. At ...


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Since it is for software, consider preprogram — ODO verb 1. Program (a computer or other electronic device) in advance "a preprogrammed function key" "The instrument we provide is preprogrammed for immediate operation." 1.1 Program (something) into a computer or other electronic device before use "preprogrammed messages" "All ...


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Clipping (morphology) — Wikipedia In linguistics, clipping is the word formation process which consists in the reduction of a word to one of its parts (Marchand: 1969). Clipping is also known as "truncation" or "shortening." ... Clipping is different from back-formation – back-formation may change the part of speech or the word's meaning, ...


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Personally, I would say, "Remember, I'm in college; I need this job."


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Both words mean to bring someone around to support an argument advanced, in this case that particular someone is potential employer and the argument is that your friend is qualified. Sticklers claim that you must persuade a person to act and convince a person only to believe. Of the distinction, Steven Pinker says in A Sense of Style "...few writers ...


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collaborate- different people working on the same project but in different areas in order to work towards a common goal. co-operation -different people working on the same project but in the same areas in order to work towards a common goal. (or achieve a common goal )


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First: Its tail slipped from beneath its skirt. I've always heard "slip beneath" as a synonym for "hide," as in an animal slipping beneath a rock. Now, some other options: peep out poke out sneak out slide out You could also reword the sentence to the effect of something like "Its skirt shifted to reveal a tail." And of course, there's the option to ...


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There is nothing wrong with the sentence. Whether the two words "collocate" or not is irrelevant.


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Belie has two meanings. The first is to betray or contradict, in the English idiom, to give the lie to: Court transcripts showed that his sworn testimony belied his later claims. The second meaning is to give a false impression: His youthful appearance belied his age. The second meaning is applicable to the translation. The sense of the ...


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You are not wrong, but most casual AmE speakers would not use the subjunctive mood (even though it is correct). I happen to like it, and I don't mind sounding affected now and then. Much more "common" would be something like:Whether or not our work is finished, daylight is fading. We're done.Whether our work is finished or not, daylight is fading. We're done....


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Conventionally, we verb nouns and noun verbs all the time. It's accepted and is a lot of fun. It's just a noun per se and a verb in context. HTH.


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You could also use the word; horde. A horde is a disparaging word for ‘a large group of people’, as in hordes of fans descended on the stage. Instances of hoard being used instead of horde are not uncommon: around a quarter of citations for hoard in the Oxford English Corpus are for the incorrect use. Oxford Dictionary of English


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Called in is correct, and called is also correct as @Rome_Leader points out. The word were sounds more correct to me (American) than got: The kids ran home right after they were called in for dinner.


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I'd say mob is your best bet. A mob surrounded him and beat him up.


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Skate over/around — Cambridge To avoid dealing completely with something or to fail to pay enough attention to it. "I didn't understand what the teacher said about prepositions, because she only skated over it." Skim over — ODO 3.1. Deal with or treat (a subject) briefly or superficially "she skimmed over her meeting with ...


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You might try skipped through: I didn't watch the whole movie, I just skipped through it on my computer.


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"John was promoted" is correct and does not imply that he promoted himself. "John promoted" would only be used if it was necessary to use as few words as possible, for example in a newspaper headline.


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Both. The first, as strangely Orwellian as it sounds, shows a speaker who is the one manipulating John into adaptation--perhaps there are better words to use, but adapted doesn't break the sentence or confuse the reader unless they assume "adopted," or some other word, was the intended choice. The second is pretty straight forward and reads fine.


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The classification of noun phrases in relation to the verbs they appear with are called thematic relations or theta roles. Different verbs have different theta role structures. In the case of "The students received the food with joy," "The food" can be viewed as the theme, defined as something that "undergoes the action but does not change its state" (...


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Verbs like 'broke' and 'run' are ambiguous. It takes context to disambiguate them. Many philosophers and linguists would say that it is the phonological forms /run/ and /broke/ that are ambiguous and that there are actually two words for each form ('run1' and 'run2', 'broke1' and 'broke2'). Context helps listeners figure out which word is being used. ...


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Pragmatics is the technical term for The branch of linguistics dealing with language in use and the contexts in which it is used, including such matters as deixis, taking turns in conversation, text organization, presupposition, and implicature. —Oxford Dictionaries Online In Real Life (as opposed to textbooks) utterances do not ordinarily appear ...


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Situations like your example where the context may initially be different than what the reader is expecting, and require a second reading/different interpretation to understand, are referred to as garden path sentences. A garden path sentence, such as "The old man the boat," is a grammatically correct sentence that starts in such a way that a reader's ...


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You have to keep in mind that <l> and <ll> are both extremely common in English, regardless of region. For example, bill is always spelled <bill>, and nil is always spelled <nil>; excel is always spelled <excel>, and retell is always spelled <retell>. There are a lot of individual rules, but there's no single over-arching ...


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"Exclude" is keeping the thing outside of the castle walls (wherein you are). "Disclude", properly, is a setting-apart – e.g., the guy in the jail cell. My feeling is that "Disclose" is sufficient for the purpose of meaning "revealing/stating of information" (and that "Divulge" is distinct in that it connotes the revealing of information sensitive in ...


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None of these sound natural, either the verb or the preposition. Here are examples of idiomatic (natural sounding) English: The car is parked. The car is parked in the driveway. The car is parked on the street. The car is parked next to the fire hydrant. The car is standing in the 'no standing' zone. The parked car is in the ...


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In the example above, the word "parked" describes the position along with what kind of car. A speeding car would not be standing, lying, sitting or parking. If I had to use this in a sentence I would re-word to " A car was parked in the street" and not apply sitting, lying or standing. As for a "ball" you would not say "A bouncing ball was lying in the ...


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'Stands' would be normal, but any of the others can also be used. 'Sits' gets fairly frequent usage. I'm not sure if 'sits' indicates anything different from 'stands' here. 'Lies' would tend to indicate something the matter with the car. A wreck of a car would lie on the street, and maybe lesser broken down cars.


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A parked car usually stands. The only time it lies is if it is not in an upright position and is e.g. lying in a ditch, or lying on its side/upside down in the road. As for sitting. how exactly would it do that? Edit One commenter has produced an example, from American fiction, of a car sitting. My own belief is that this would be rare in Britain, but I ...


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More often than not..."awakened" is used in a sense where one was being shown the truth behind some idea or thought. I.E. - "The world was awakened to the evils of terrorism on 9-11." Where as "awoken" would be more regarding a literal waking up from sleep. So, according to the contextual meaning of your mentioned sentence were awoken is the most ...


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Betrothed is probably the only single-word verb you'll find--while its usage has changed over the centuries, it was invented at a time (13th century) when most marriages were arranged, so its earliest meaning corresponds to what you're after. It wasn't until the 18th century that marriage for love entered the picture, so any usage earlier than the 18th ...


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The two examples are not a sentence and it is not meaningful to classify "shot to death" as "adjectival phrase". In newspaper headlines, it is common to omit the verb to "be" and an article because it doesn't cause confusion and the headlines need to be as concise as possible. It should be A UCLA engineering professor was shot to death in apparent ...



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