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I'm from NW Ohio. I find that it is okay to omit "to be" when the relevant action is a matter of frequent routine. For instance, to accept "This bedroom needs rebuilt", I have to imagine myself an inspector or foreman of some sort who often has occasion to pass judgment on whether parts of dwellings pass muster.


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It is also possible to explain: The car needs (being) washed. And I think that is as logical as "Your hair needs cutting". I don't know spoken Pennsilvanian American English, though I have read a lot of American literature, but I guess this construction is a special construction after to need that you can't extend to other verbs.


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"Somebody needs killing" is a commonly heard saying in the SE United States. I have heard examples in the SE similar to the ones cited from PA/Ohio Valley. The construction of the phrasing seems to be a way to to create a Passive Voice. Rather than saying: Somebody needs to wash the car. Somebody needs to clean the room. Somebody needs to feed the ...


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Merriam-Webster's Dictionary of Synonyms (1984) includes explicate and expound—together with elucidate, interpret, and construe—in a group under the heading word explain. Here is its treatment of expound and explicate: Expound implies careful, elaborate, often learned setting forth of a subject in order to explain it (as in a lecture, a book, or a ...


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i seem that this boy is inapt ![enter image description here][1] [1]: http://i.stack.imgur.com/ZNktI.jpgi hacve hjgg hskf hsiu juauud jhzg huwgy ahdhud abdgyd hadvv bayvwui aylua hsta


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"Explicate" from the Latin ex (out) + plicare (to fold), means to make clear and intelligible. "Expound" from the Latin ex + ponere (to put) means to explain. It's possible to expound (put your explanation out to an audience) but not so clearly that you explicate the matter (unfold the meaning) for your listeners.


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Scribe is a word that describes the act of skillfully writing by hand. It traditionally relates to skilled copiers of books/documents, and its standard use refers to professional handwriting, rather than any writing done by hand.


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The new software will curtail (the number of) such instances. Reduce in extent or quantity; impose a restriction on (Oxford) From the definition and quoted examples on Vocabulary.com, you can see that the both the meaning and the usage contexts meet your requirements. To curtail something is to slow it down, put restrictions on it, or stop it ...


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winnow: to reduce a large number of people or things to a much smaller number by judging their quality Cambridge Dictionaries Online "The new software will winnow [out] the manual update of database files"


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If the software will eliminate the need to do something, it obviates the need. If it doesn't entirely eliminate the need to do something, it makes the need all but a thing of the past.


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calligraph (verb): Write in calligraphic style (Source: ODO) 'the invitations were meticulously calligraphed in black ink' To write beautifully or ornamentally (Source: OED) Thanks to Ermanen for supplying the OED definition


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Though this is used mostly in the context of retirement from the workplace, of being "made redundant," it fits your criteria quite closely: superannuate (v.) To set aside or discard as old-fashioned or obsolete. (AHD, 4th edition) Or a less formal option: phase out (v.) (idiomatic) To remove or relinquish the use of something little by ...


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It depends how you will use the two words. The both words can be used as passive or active verb depending on the situation. Let's look at this example: My boss asked me to (take, get) the office key from his office assistant. Here, if you use (take), your expression may sound harsh. Example 2: The detective (got, toke) the suspect by force as he left the ...


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Perhaps if you rearrange the sentence it will become more clear to you. When I finish my degree, I'd like to work as a doctor. versus When I am finishing my degree, I'd like to work as a doctor. They are both valid grammatically, but as you can perhaps see when ordered like this, the sentences mean two different things entirely. The first means ...


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Both of the options are grammatically correct but the first one is in my opinion slightly more colloquial. I would also be tempted to reiterate the word option as in: You can choose either option A or option B. Of course there are situation where one or the other will have slightly different connotations. For example if you say You can have either ...


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Gives refers back to the thought and has nothing to do with the parenthetical. Do not add the parenthetical to the grammatical number of the verb. HTH. The thought of her commotion, and the the hope that the neighbors heard her, gives her enough strength to push the door open. The parenthetical ought to be ignored for grammar.


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The best way to rewrite this sentence, which seems to be a bit droopy in syntax, is: "The strong belief she had had in the brouhaha she had made, and it's capability to have had ensured the neighbours heard her, gave her enough strength to push the door open." Of course, this sounds very awkward as well, so here's another alternative: "Her belief in ...


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I take it from the title, you want to know why you can use the present tense: "Second is the age of reason that opens in late 1770s and remains until 1800." After all, we're well past 1800, so why don't those verbs have to be in the past tense: "opened in the late 1770s," "remained until 1800"? This use of the present tense is called the "historical ...


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(I suspect the OED has rather detailed definitions of this, but something seems to be wrong with their website at the moment so I can’t check without wading through thousands of lines of XML code.)   The main difference between putting your hand and bringing your hand is in what the verbs emphasise: put emphasises the destination, bring emphasises the ...


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Personally, for #1, I think put is a better choice. This is because you are doing something "at" shoulder height. Bring could be used when the sentence is "Bring your arms forward TO shoulder height". For #2, I think brought seems more natural. Put seems to sudden and doesn't show the continuous state of shock.


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The most natural way to fill in that blank is: I finally blurted out.


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I'd call it spluttering. From Oxford Dictionaries Online... Splutter - Make a series of short explosive spitting or choking sounds


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The copular verb/linking verb is "were" (to be), the linking verb number 1. It is followed by "known", the predicative complement. Here "known" is used as an adjective. "known" is followed by "as brocade pictures". Here I think the terms for this part will diverge. I would say this word group is a complement to the adjective "known". I don't think that ...


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I think there is a very slight nuance in meaning, but usages vary. For me, 'laugh over' is more for situations of private amusement, shared with another of the same mind. "We had a laugh over your phone message". Slight emphasis on the shared quality of the laughing. With 'laugh about', the emphasis is on the actual laughing and it can be a solo ...


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I should start by admitting that although I can describe a usage distinction between Did you [verb] when [context]? and Have you [verbed] when [context]?, I can't explain exactly why it applies. Consider... 1: Did you ever go to the opera when you were a drunk? 2: Have you ever been to the opera when you were drunk? ...where #1 probably refers to ...


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Smell not taste is the correct verb because they can sense blood with their nostrils: A shark's primary sense is a keen sense of smell. It can detect one drop of blood in a million drops of water (25 gallons or 100 liters) and can smell blood 0.25 mile (0.4 km) away. Its paired nostrils are on the underside of its snout. Water continually flows ...


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"Who" refers to people; "that" may refer to either people or things. Use "who" if doing so would help your reader identity the antecedent. That's not a problem with your text. "... the only way to do this was by taking control ...."


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Buy is for a consumer, and purchase is for a customer. or Buy is for final use, and purchase is for reuse. The purchase of raw materials goes toward buying for ultimate consumption.


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I am an Indian English speaker and I think it's safe to say we have influences from both British(from the colonial times) and American(more recent) English. Intuitively thinking about it, I'd say I would use the following to quieten - to make quiet - eg. "Indonesia seeks to quieten noisy mosques during Ramadan" to quiet - to be quiet - eg. "She told the ...


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Per the Google Books ngram server, even in the British English corpus, quiet as a verb has long surpassed quieten in frequency. The preference for quiet as a verb is stronger in the American English corpus, but both forms are found in both corpora, and in both of them quiet as a verb is and has been the more frequent. The OED uses quieten as a synonym in ...


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The (probably AAVE) word I always heard for this growing up was ragging. It was kind of a sport at my school. You never knew when an impromptu game of Dozens might break out, so it paid to keep your skills sharp and figure out everyone's weaknesses up front. Ragging doesn't have to be true. However, it will be far more effective the more truth it contains. ...


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Wind-up is a word I may use, however it may not fit your one word request, so I propose: Antagonise to make hostile; annoy or irritate Definition from Collins Dictionary


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Apart from the plethora of UK colloquial slang, the only single verb I can think of that I still see regularly in books or hear in conversation is; Mock to criticize and laugh at (someone or something) for being bad, worthless, or unimportant to laugh at or make fun of (someone or something) especially by copying an action or a way of behaving or ...


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"Letters have been being sent" sounds fine, to me. At any rate, it is the pattern of auxiliaries described by Chomsky in Syntactic Structures: (Modal) (have+en) (be+ing) (be+en) where the affixes are affixed to the following verb form (either auxiliary or real verb) by Affix Hopping. Your example is from Letters have+en be+ing be+en send which ...


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First, I agree that the example, as you stated it, does indeed sound a little strange. But I believe that it is the (over-)simplicity of the example -- a very short sentence, with no context around it -- that makes it sound strange. And I'm not saying anything about you; of course it is the case that these are precisely the kinds of examples that are used ...


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The formal rule is that pronouns ending in -self are to be use either intensively, that is for emphasis ("I, myself earned the money.") or reflexively in which the action of the verb is brought back to the subject ("I hurt myself.") In addition, the first person puts his pronoun last, so strictly speaking your sentence should state "James offered my ...


4

To poke fun at someone, but benevolently, is to "josh" josh intransitive verb: to engage in banter: joke transitive verb: to tease good-naturedly: kid Examples of JOSH • “Don't take him seriously. He's just joshing” • “Don’t get all hot and bothered! I'm just joshing you” Synonyms: chaff, jive, joke, tease, kid, rally, razz, ...


3

Consider the word needle. Google defines it as: provoke or annoy (someone), especially by continual criticism or questioning. Merriam-Webster defines it as: to criticize and laugh at (someone) in either a friendly or an unkind way tease, torment


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Consider razz. It is an informal verb but captures both teasing and criticism. to make playful or unkind comments about (someone) [MW] to deride, jeer; to mock or make fun of (a person or thing). [OED]


2

The word is chastise: to criticize (someone) harshly for doing something wrong http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/chastise or to inflict suffering upon for purposes of moral improvement; to discipline, especially by corporal punishment. to criticize severely. Archaic. to restrain; chasten. Archaic. to refine; purify. ...


1

The term twit might be useful Tease or taunt (someone), especially in a good-humored way. Oxford Dictionaries Online It is usually used when the object of the poke is in the wrong To taunt, ridicule, or tease, especially for embarrassing mistakes or faults American Heritage Similarly, tweak To make fun of; tease. American Heritage ...


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Here are a few that come off the top of my head: knocking someone down to size putting someone in their place deflating one's ego


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"Laugh about" is better use over "laugh over". "Laugh over" sounds like your above whatever is funny. While "Laugh about" says something is funny. It leads people on to what was so funny. Example: "I had a Laugh (about/over), some guy tripped on a banana peel, and he farted while still in position of his ass in the air."


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Scrambling Struggle or compete with others for something in an eager or uncontrolled and undignified way. Perform (an action) or achieve (a result) hurriedly, clumsily, or with difficulty. Horseplaying Rough or rowdy play that can often result in unintentional physical harm.


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1.) My parents were always yelling at my little brothers, "Hey kids! Stop that roughhousing!" Other colorful words usually accompanied these demands, but I'm saving those for another OP. roughhouse verb: gerund or present participle: roughhousing: act in a boisterous, violent manner. "in front of the stage hundreds of teens and young adults ...


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If you really wish to re-phrase it correctly, here it is: "She would cry if she knew (that) I would leave her." (or) "She will cry at the thought of my leaving her." (Further to your inquiry as to whether the tenses of the verbs (OP) are corrector not, you may refer to my comment above.)


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SUGGEST, a verb has the noun form SUGGESTION.Now,shape it in sentences of your own. ¶ What do you suggest? (as verb) ¶¶ What is your suggestion? (as noun)


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Your first example 'What is your suggest?' is wrong. To rephrase that example to be correct would be 'What do you suggest?'. To reply, one would say 'I suggest ...'. The definitions just for clarity to how to use suggest and suggestion: Suggest verb (used with object) 1. to mention or introduce (an idea, proposition, plan, etc.) for consideration or ...


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'What do you suggest?' and 'What is your suggestion?' are the correct formations. 'What is your suggest?' is incorrect as suggest is a verb and cannot be used a noun.


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See also "A Word A Day", June 24, 2015, http://wordsmith.org/words/oppugn.html, where the editor cites a usage of "oppugn" in a Jakarta, Indonesia, newspaper from July, 2011. (This reinforces the notion that "oppugn" is used by nonnative English speakers.)



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