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1

may and can #8 have different meanings, the first one listed by Oxford is: used to say that something is possible That may or may not be true. He may have (= perhaps he has) missed his train. They may well win. There is a range of programs on the market which may be described as design aids. used when admitting that something is true before ...


2

There is no grammatical restriction on using the adjective able with modal verbs. We can use the adjective able with the verbs may, might, can and could, for instance. Here are some examples sentences using BE + the adjective able: People can be able to change but unwilling to change. She wished she could be able to say yes if he asked her again I may be ...


1

No, "what" should never appear in these constructions. But you could use "that". 1) All that I've done is sleep. 2) After all that I've done, I still fail to ... However, it's also fine without.


0

Your examples don't look proper. Here are my suggestions: All I have done is sleep. What I have done is sleep.


0

There is no real debate about many people creating a Singular group or team! It is singular--also a proper name! Either way, i believe it is incorrect --dont knw if cops itala is an event or team-- but am thinking of it like olympics. USA (team of many but used as one/proper name) won The olympics.


-1

Your first sentence is correct. It uses "need" because the verb has to agree with the subject (you). [I need; you need; he needs; they need] Your second sentence is also correct, however it often causes a dispute among linguists. Some consider a team plural, while others argue a team can be singular. In the UK and Australia both [Team X has won] and [Team X ...


-1

You need guns and bombs to stop them. - You are correct. Juventus have won Copa Italia. - Correct, because it refers to a team of players and not one. Therefore, the verb is in the III person plural ('they') form. This rule may not apply to an organization, where numerous individuals may work towards a common goal or mission.


0

You probably won't come across too many instances of "What have you come as?" in AmE. Dog Lover's "What are you going to come as?" is plausible, but unnecessarily complex - "What are you going as?" would serve. "What have you come as?" is more commonly expressed as, "What/Who are you supposed to be?". It's more common in the past tense, third person: ...


1

One common expression is to be entitled: qualified for by right according to law; "we are all entitled to equal protection under the law" The free Dictionary


0

"What have you come as" can be used in party contexts, such as Halloween. 'What are you going to come as for Halloween?' 'I'm going to dress up as Homer Simpson.'


0

According to the definition if you want to use the vitamins in an effective way by the body you'll have to use utilized, if you just want the body to use the vitamins but not in the most optimal way you can use used. Most people always say use, and in this example the word "easily" gives the impression that the vitamins are utilized, but in a formal and ...


1

I'm looking for a verb denoting the act of making a circle elliptic, i.e. making it oblate (or prolate for that matter). Is there a single word for it, or do I need to rewrite? No, there isn't! The great SOED dictionary records a 'rare' verb oblate but only with themeaning of 'offer as an oblation'. You'll have to say just 'make oblate'


1

Until more context is provided I would parse I just love you. to mean the same as this sentence: I love just you. Where "just you" is the direct object, in other words, you are the only one I love. Syddansk Universitet: Visual Interactive Syntax Learning So the difference is: "I love you" is non-exclusive (a mother might say that to each of ...


0

"I just love you" = "I really love you" (can also be interpreted as "I love you very much") - usually said with emotion. But, "I just like you" would have a different meaning, not in the same sense as above, as anyone can see. "I love you" is a simple declaration.


2

I, I just love you Don't know why I just do When are you coming home? Babe I'm coming home soon And I just love you too I just love you in this context means that the speaker loves without any motive, reason or cause. Like if we say something just disappeared, then it disappeared without apparent cause. It disappeared - and that is all.


1

I think that "I just love you" implies nothing else matters or could get in the way, in terms of this love. Maybe a sense that everything else is irrelevant.


0

What about Jaunting. jaunt jônt/ verb go on a short excursion or journey for pleasure. "they went jaunting through Ireland"


-1

Best alternative I've seen is from ArenaNet and their Guild Wars series. "Boons" and "Conditions".


2

It's how I dress He doesn't care about my drinking, nagging, swearing; how I dress, or cut my hair (etc...) You don't say “my dressing” because in this case dress is a transitive verb, it requires an object. Alternatively you could say: my dressing sense or style. But I would opt for clothes He doesn't care about my drinking, nagging, or which ...


1

How about flitter? flitter - verb - Move quickly in an apparently random or purposeless manner. flitter - noun - A fluttering movement.


1

Flailed. Flail. wave or swing or cause to wave or swing wildly. "his arms were flailing helplessly"


1

Maybe instead of attaching the verb to the wings, you can attach it to the breeze instead? "The breeze whiffled the bird's feathers." Merriam's definition: http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/whiffle or if you really wanted to attach the verb to the wing, another suggestion would be quiver. While it is not directly synonymous to "flutter", it ...


1

If it was meant he was socially connected or biologically related to the bears, you must say: He was related to the bears. If it was meant he empathized, or mentally related, to the bears, then this is correct: He related to the bears.


1

What about: regulate the monster's power? (M-W): to set or adjust the amount, degree, or rate of (something)


-1

Fluctuate may be the one you are after.


0

Ferocity. Then put the up and down icons next to that text. That should communicate the control well. Other words that might work: Viciousness or aggressiveness.


0

The first is correct. In general, the second would not be considered correct grammar. But it can be meaningful English, and from that point of view, correct. The second can be correct in that sense, if what is meant by "Mike & Chris" is the couple (pair). The second then has the meaning of asking about the status of that couple, in other words, ...


0

Yes, the first is correct. There are cases where an "X & Y" example would be considered singular, for example when the X & Y construction is the name of a business or product. "Is Crate & Barrel having a sale this week?" "Ben & Jerry's is the best ice-cream." "Black & Decker makes the best automatic bread machine."


0

You could say that he has no filter (as in, there's no filter between his brain and his mouth).


0

The first is correct. The second is improper grammar in that a singular verb is used with a compound subject.


-1

I haven't found any good references, but "been being" is definitely grammatical. It's just enormously awkward; and has been being so for decades. Grammar is not my strong suit, so perhaps I'm wrong in seeing this as a "word-based" problem rather than a "sentence-based" problem. Looking at the phrase "Letters HAVE BEEN BEING SENT." I observe that send is ...


0

Although the poster explicitly asks (twice) for a verb referring "to something 'demanding' which doesn't happen all of a sudden," I don't think that a verb can be expected to carry that much freight. To me, it makes more sense to use a modifier (like time-consuming, mentioned in FumbleFingers's comment above) or a noun (like patience or fortitude, mentioned ...


0

Aside from suggest, the salesperson may be trying to market the substitute item...? to do things that cause people to know about and want to buy (something) (From Merriam)


1

It falls under zoomorphism. Zoomorphism is a derivative of a Greek word zōon that means animal and morphē means form or shape. It is a literary technique in which the animal attributes are imposed upon non-animal objects, humans, and events and animal features are ascribed to humans, gods and other objects. literarydevices.net


0

Your teacher was right. Any verb ending in "-ing" means that it is in the present tense, so "I am going to Scarborough" means that you are en route, will arrive and then will no longer be going.The phrase "I am really liking this music" means that you like it at the moment and afterwards won't like it any more. Unless you have the ability to predict the ...


3

To answer the actual question, ignoring the alleged grammaticality or ungrammaticality of your examples for a moment, the terms you are looking for are stative vs. dynamic verbs. You can search the site for discussions of particular verbs. We have a dedicated question on the McDonald's slogan, too.


0

Very informal response, but, he's wrong :-). He appears to be arguing that words conveying concepts which are based on purely mental constructs are not valid except in simple present tense. Consider: I want a diamond ring / old Teddy Bear / Rocket launcher ... . I want it now and I wanted it each morning when I saw it in a shop window when I got off a ...


1

When two words are combined without a conjunction to form a single word, that is a compound, in the way the term "compound" is usually used in grammar. None of your examples is like that, and so I would not call any of them a compound. The Wikipedia article on English compound is pretty good, I think.


4

To eliminate the repeated is, which is acceptable even if it is awkward, you can place the parenthetical phrase, as it is, before the noun phrase it modifies: We know that, as it is, Einstein's gravity model is not normalizable at D=4.


0

The justification for using a participle with "to" is that "to" here is a preposition which is followed by a noun, namely "getting" or "living". It is not meant as the infinitive "to". And if it were, a different construction would be called for: Discover the secret of how to get through to anyone. Seven steps to help you {live up to/attain} your full ...


1

I have never heard nor read the term whisper-shout before today. I checked in Urban Dictionary, there is one definition and that has only eighteen upvotes against four downvotes. This tells me that the expression is not yet established. Chances are it won't be too soon either. The compound “whisper-shouted” on Google Books obtains 839 results While its ...


3

There is a verb and it is - ta-da! - whisper-shout. The act of screaming at someone without using any vowel sounds, so as to keep the volume of the scream down to a nominal level. Similar to the well known "SHHHH!" but it is actually a word or a group of words. Often used in classroom or library settings, it can also be useful in churches or as a ...


0

The two, “shout” and “whisper,” are pretty much opposites, so finding a single word is going to be tough (too tough for me, at least) and even attempts to modify “shout” (or “whisper”) with a single-word adverb/modifier could produce borderline oxymora. However, if you’re willing to consider a phrase, I’d propose ... shouted as discreetly as possible. ...


1

To shout in a subdued voice: reduced in fullness of tone, as a color or sound; muted. (AHD)


0

The rule of "Error of Proximity" in Agreement of Subject with the verb applies here. The subject is 'duration' and not 'seconds' although the latter is placed closer to the verb in the sentence. As a singular subject takes a singular verb, 'has' will be a correctly used verb here, for the singular subject 'duration'. In other words, 'duration has' while ...


0

Its in the present perfect form to denote an action just completed.


3

Are the following two examples grammatical? Write it I have. Wrote it I did. Consider as possible contexts: They said that I have to write it, and write it I have. -- (for #1) They said that I wrote it, and wrote it I did. -- (for #2) ANSWER TO MAIN QUESTION: In the appropriate context, those two expressions (#1 and #2) ...


2

illtreat means treating badly, but mistreat means treating wrongly.


1

In simple terms: maltreat = ill-treat maltreat is rougher than mistreat Need a proof?:-) Read the entry on "abuse" (as a verb) in: Garner's Dictionary of Legal Usage - Page 10 Bryan A. Garner abuse, vb.; misuse; mistreat; ill-treat; maltreat. These verbs share the sense “to deal with in a harmful or wrongful way.” [Edit] One of Garner's ...


2

"Shabby" and "hardy" are already adjectives; they provide a description of a noun. "Shabby" and "hardy" do not have a corresponding noun; they are used with a noun. e.g. A shabby person. The adverb for "shabby" is "shabbily", e.g. He dresses shabbily. There is no adverb for "hardy".



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