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I'm looking for a term (noun) to describe this or a verb to describe the act of doing the deep study on a particular topic How about immersion? From WordNet 3.0: n 3. complete attention; intense mental effort Colloquially, I've also heard deep dive used, in the context of troubleshooting, and especially in root cause analysis, to refer to an ...


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In this case, drive is being used in the sense of "forcing into existence through vigorous effort" (see definition 10 in Am Heritage), a meaning which probably follows from the more common use of drive to mean "force to do something" (e.g. bad luck may drive someone to drink). The usage of hard is meant to indicate the effort involved, and is used in the ...


2

In drive a hard bargain, drive seems to refer to drive a vehicle used metaphorically meaning to conduct a negotiation. Hard refers to the strong, determined way in which the deal is carried out. Origin: Mid-19th Century, American English. Even though “drive” sounds like it could be a 20th Century word having to do with automobiles, the word goes ...


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In theory, the number of a verb can be unknown. But I would rather phrase it thus: in theory, there can be multiple interpretations of the number of a particular verb form. In your example, the number may be open to two interpretations to the audience, but it is probably known to the speaker. She must have had either one or more people in mind, even if she ...


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The first example is correct. You can switch tenses in this case, since the old lady presumably continued being an old lady at the time of writing the paragraph. From the Wikipedia article on relative and absolute tenses: Absolute tense means the grammatical expression of time reference (usually past, present or future) relative to "now" – the moment ...


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Answers from comments that I completely agree with: Refine: To improve in accuracy, delicacy, or excellence. That's pretty much perfect. Tighten: To make tighter. With this definition of 'tight', or a similar one: Tight: Well-rehearsed and accurate in execution. We often say 'fine-tune' when talking about making something even more ...


2

General purpose verbs you could use would be "correct" and "rectify". But we need more context. If you're referring to improving the accuracy of some type of tool or instrument, then 'calibrate' would be the best choice.


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hone - to perfect or make more intense or effective (thefreedictionary.com) From Kiplinger's Personal Finance... To hone the numbers further, figure out how much income you would need to replace each month if you lost your job But in practice most people would probably use... fine-tune - to make fine adjustments to (something) in order ...


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One strange property of the perfect tense is that it refers to two times: the time in the past when the action was performed, and the time indicated by the auxiliary verb (to have). Depending upon usage, a sentence using the perfect tense can be more about present (or the time of the auxiliary verb) than it is about the past: A: Are you hungry? B: I have ...


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Many words come to mind while describing your act. Thorough insight. Recursive study. (Recursive insight). Profound research. (abstract research)


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I might consider dividing out those studies which only took a couple of weeks and those that you spent a few months on and labeling them differently. For the studies that were only a few weeks, maybe something along the lines of "background research," "examination," or "inquiry." For those projects which you spent several months on, you might want something ...


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This was called a deep dive where I used to work: an in-depth exploration It's mostly used in the noun sense in business. "Tsk. We'll have to perform a deep-dive on this" or "let's do a deep dive on this tomorrow." It can mean exhaustively examining every facet of an issue. It's a good noun to use in conjunction with the verb delve suggested earlier. ...


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The could be termed an exposition, especially if it is written. From WordNet 3.0: exposition n 1: a systematic interpretation or explanation (usually written) of a specific topic ... 3: an account that sets forth the meaning or intent of a writing or discourse ...


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Originally, a perusal would have been exactly this, from the verb peruse which meant to examine or read (something) in a very careful way but has come to mean to look at or read (something) in an informal or relaxed way which is the very opposite. (Both definitions from Merriam-Webster.) To a sufficiently pedantic crowd, however, perusal might ...


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What first came to mind was: delve: to carry on intensive and thorough research for data, information, or the like; investigate: to delve into the issue of prison reform. Usually used with into, as in the example above. Source: dictionary.com


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Contemplation or meditation, as in "he meditated on the question for many days". A "brown study" is a moody attitude, whether sad or angry.


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OP could describe these intensive, concentrated studies as, focused research. focused adjective: giving a lot of attention to one particular thing: the need for more focused research (Cambridge Dictionaries online) research 1. careful or diligent search 2. studious inquiry or examination; especially: investigation or experimentation ...


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A verb for this might be to pore over: To examine something closely; in great detail. It can also refer to meditating over something, and to be fully absorbed in a subject. It is, as the answer in the link says, usually associated with "academics who are passionate about their fields, and students who study obsessively before an important exam."


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As stated in the comments, investigation is the word that you are looking for. A formal inquiry or systematic study (OED)


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The only thing I can see to correct is the word they, which is a plural pronoun. The word someone is singular, so I would rewrite it as "To suggest to someone that he or she should do something."


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Any of your suggestions would work. Under something else try states, provides, maintains (with a hint of uncertainty), lays down, etc.


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I would not use mandate to describe something you want to do. A contract is usually written, so it doesn't technically say anything. Dictate usually means one of the preceding options. Stipulate is technically the act of making the agreement, so it'd be more accurate to say something like "Didn't we stipulate that I have x right." if you use that word. The ...


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The New Jersey Estate Law says a divorced spouse is considered predeceased to that of the testor. Therefore it is clear that predeceased can be used in conjunction with an event. In this case, a divorce was the event that regarded the spouse predeceased to that of the testor's death even though the spouse lived on past the testor's death. Alive ...


0

I would take out the preposition "for" and let "a limited time" be a noun phrase as the direct object of provide. As the first infinitive phrase begins w/ to, the others that follow w/the verb + noun phrase don't require "to" in front because they're all listed in a series. For in "apply for" would be considered a particle and in this way the parallel ...


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Your list is a bit lop-sided as modal verbs have no infinitive, only one form for present tense and one form for past tense, with the exception of must, that normally is not used in past tense. And it is wrong to include to have and to do. These verbs have the same form for the infinitive and for present tense (to have/I have, to do/I do).


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Non-finite verbs and their derivatives in English language (and many languages), include an idea called infinitives. If you are a programmer, and is part of the modular/plug-in movement, you would easier understand the motivation behind non-finite elements found in languages. Non-finite elements are modular grammatical units that you could plug in to any ...


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The answer to the OP's question is: 'yes'. Mostly. The only English verb which differs from its plain form outside of the third person, is the verb BE. The verb BE is usually an auxiliary verb. However, the verb BE can also be regarded as a lexical verb in sentences such as: If you don't be careful ... Notice that the sentence above uses DO as a dummy ...


1

Your first example (with the infinitive) expresses purpose. Whatever "it" is, its intended purpose is to deepen understanding and teach positive values. Your second example (with the finite verb form) make a declaration. Whatever "it" is and whatever purpose anyone had for "it," what happened was a deepening of understanding and a teaching of positive ...


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Answer They are completely different. Explanation 1. A. "It not only deepens students’ understanding of positive values, but also enables them to know how to uphold positive values." Let us extract the bare structure of this sentence: It [not only] deepens [students’] understanding [of positive values], but [also] enables them [to know how to ...


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Well, as Colin said, both are grammatical, however they also change the tense of the statement. "I wish that man stopped making so much noise" is more akin to "I wish that man had stopped making so much noise" as if you are talking about a recently passed event. "I wish that man will stop making so much noise" is a bit of a future tense, and is ...


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A word for 'to exist in the same place as something else': co-located


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Both are grammatical, but uncommon. The normal form is I wish that man would stop making so much noise.


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Suggest is OK here, but the use of to seems clunky: They suggest Mr Black should coach the young boy. or They suggest that Mr Black should coach the young boy.


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The first example is the correct one.


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You are seeing the verb in its past progressive form with the "ing" added which, in my opinion, is causing you to visualize "lean" as a motion. Almost all examples I can think of using "lean" are static. To make this clear think of the sentence, "He was sitting in the chair when I entered the room." This doesn't mean that there was movement...unless you ...


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I can think of a specific name. Basically, Talking too much when making a clause before the verb Heard about something like that in my 6th grade English class. Hope this helps!


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My instinct is telling me that a. is the correct answer because will is interchangeable with shall in this case, right? Well, a. is indeed the right answer but that's not because "will is interchangeable with shall". It is correct in its own right, regardless of any interchangeability. Note that, in spoken English, the sentence would likely be ...


0

In sentence 1, the two actions appear clubbed together in a single unit. Sentence 2 seems to distinguish between them as two distinct actions. Use whichever leads to more clarity.


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1.Lead a team to integrate two systems and increase the accuracy of report. Version 1. is the better option. Version 2. is acceptable but not recommended. Note that adding extra words and clauses can make a difference, so: Lead a team to integrate two systems and also to increase the accuracy of report. This is because the addition of extra words ...


0

We use the past perfect to talk about the order of events in the past. Police, lawyers, doctors, and historians use it frequently. It is common for non native speakers to make pp mistakes because they use the present as a reference point or they use a reference point that is not included in the sentence but which they are thinking of.


0

1, 3, 4, and 5 are all perfectly acceptable forms to substitute, yes. 2 does not work so well. We can wish for someone to do something, but we do not wish someone to do something. Moreover, the second half, “before our houses were ruined” indicates that the flood and the house-ruining has already taken place in the past; but if we wish for someone to do ...


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The answer is No. Firstly I think your surmise is too general. Only sentient beings can have that suffix. We wouldn't say that a nail is a hammeree. The suffix 'ee' comes from French. Initially only adopted French words used it, e.g. fiancée (fr.) becomes fiancee (eng.) The usage has spread but I think there's a limit. For example take the English verb ...


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We are the questionees Yes, but not all verbs can be treated this way. Only transitive verbs But you are correct. If you want to refer to the object of the transitive verb with only one word, then yes, all you need to do is add -ee update and only with living beings Page 381


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The noun and verb for this kind of behaviour is a stampede. Here's the relevant definition for the noun from the Oxford English Dictionary (not ODO): 2. a. A sudden or unreasoning rush or flight of persons in a body or mass; When used in its literal sense, not its figurative one, a stampede tends to imply the injury or death of some people. ...


0

The first choice is the correct one. She was a child for more than ten years, and she lived in Switzerland for ten years within that time frame. The second is incorrect because you would use past perfect to describe an action that was interrupted by another, later action. She had lived in Switzerland for ten years when her parents decided to move the ...


2

The verb relate denotes several types of connection between multiple entities: verb [WITH OBJECT] 1.0 Make or show a connection between: the study examines social change within the city and relates it to developments in the country as a whole a supercomputer could relate all those factors 1.1 (be related) Be causally connected: high ...


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As someone who has read a lot of CVs, I have to say that I would be puzzled by this entry about the oath. Unless you are sure that your audience will understand what an honor this is, I suggest that you say: "Graduated first in my class at X". (I'm not suggesting you say you were the valedictorian, because it seems clear from your post that you did not ...


1

If nothing else that's suggested works, you could also use discipline as a verb: verb: to train (someone) to obey rules or a code of behavior, using punishment to correct disobedience. You could discipline a child for their bad behavior, for example.


4

Admonish might be the correct word. See also words like chastise, chide, reprimand, and scold.


2

My question relates to your earlier work. This usually means that I am asking (you) about your earlier work. My question is related to your earlier work. This usually means that I have formulated a question that addresses a similar subject to the one you addressed in your work. I'm letting you know about it in case you have any thoughts on it or ...



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