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Aside from suggest, the salesperson may be trying to market the substitute item...? to do things that cause people to know about and want to buy (something) (From Merriam)


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It falls under zoomorphism. Zoomorphism is a derivative of a Greek word zōon that means animal and morphē means form or shape. It is a literary technique in which the animal attributes are imposed upon non-animal objects, humans, and events and animal features are ascribed to humans, gods and other objects. literarydevices.net


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The nearest that I could think of is personification


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Your teacher was right. Any verb ending in "-ing" means that it is in the present tense, so "I am going to Scarborough" means that you are en route, will arrive and then will no longer be going.The phrase "I am really liking this music" means that you like it at the moment and afterwards won't like it any more. Unless you have the ability to predict the ...


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To answer the actual question, ignoring the alleged grammaticality or ungrammaticality of your examples for a moment, the terms you are looking for are stative vs. dynamic verbs. You can search the site for discussions of particular verbs. We have a dedicated question on the McDonald's slogan, too.


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Very informal response, but, he's wrong :-). He appears to be arguing that words conveying concepts which are based on purely mental constructs are not valid except in simple present tense. Consider: I want a diamond ring / old Teddy Bear / Rocket launcher ... . I want it now and I wanted it each morning when I saw it in a shop window when I got off a ...


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When two words are combined without a conjunction to form a single word, that is a compound, in the way the term "compound" is usually used in grammar. None of your examples is like that, and so I would not call any of them a compound. The Wikipedia article on English compound is pretty good, I think.


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To eliminate the repeated is, which is acceptable even if it is awkward, you can place the parenthetical phrase, as it is, before the noun phrase it modifies: We know that, as it is, Einstein's gravity model is not normalizable at D=4.


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The justification for using a participle with "to" is that "to" here is a preposition which is followed by a noun, namely "getting" or "living". It is not meant as the infinitive "to". And if it were, a different construction would be called for: Discover the secret of how to get through to anyone. Seven steps to help you {live up to/attain} your full ...


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I have never heard nor read the term whisper-shout before today. I checked in Urban Dictionary, there is one definition and that has only eighteen upvotes against four downvotes. This tells me that the expression is not yet established. Chances are it won't be too soon either. The compound “whisper-shouted” on Google Books obtains 839 results While its ...


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There is a verb and it is - ta-da! - whisper-shout. The act of screaming at someone without using any vowel sounds, so as to keep the volume of the scream down to a nominal level. Similar to the well known "SHHHH!" but it is actually a word or a group of words. Often used in classroom or library settings, it can also be useful in churches or as a ...


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The two, “shout” and “whisper,” are pretty much opposites, so finding a single word is going to be tough (too tough for me, at least) and even attempts to modify “shout” (or “whisper”) with a single-word adverb/modifier could produce borderline oxymora. However, if you’re willing to consider a phrase, I’d propose ... shouted as discreetly as possible. ...


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To shout in a subdued voice: reduced in fullness of tone, as a color or sound; muted. (AHD)


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The rule of "Error of Proximity" in Agreement of Subject with the verb applies here. The subject is 'duration' and not 'seconds' although the latter is placed closer to the verb in the sentence. As a singular subject takes a singular verb, 'has' will be a correctly used verb here, for the singular subject 'duration'. In other words, 'duration has' while ...


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Its in the present perfect form to denote an action just completed.


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Are the following two examples grammatical? Write it I have. Wrote it I did. Consider as possible contexts: They said that I have to write it, and write it I have. -- (for #1) They said that I wrote it, and wrote it I did. -- (for #2) ANSWER TO MAIN QUESTION: In the appropriate context, those two expressions (#1 and #2) ...


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illtreat means treating badly, but mistreat means treating wrongly.


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In simple terms: maltreat = ill-treat maltreat is rougher than mistreat Need a proof?:-) Read the entry on "abuse" (as a verb) in: Garner's Dictionary of Legal Usage - Page 10 Bryan A. Garner abuse, vb.; misuse; mistreat; ill-treat; maltreat. These verbs share the sense “to deal with in a harmful or wrongful way.” [Edit] One of Garner's ...


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"Shabby" and "hardy" are already adjectives; they provide a description of a noun. "Shabby" and "hardy" do not have a corresponding noun; they are used with a noun. e.g. A shabby person. The adverb for "shabby" is "shabbily", e.g. He dresses shabbily. There is no adverb for "hardy".


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A verb plus -ing form used in a nominalized sentence is a gerund. It's a verb. A nominalized sentence is a sentence given a form that lets it occupy the position of a NP, e.g. subject, direct object, object of a preposition. So, yes, subject position is okay. A gerund is not a noun. It's a verb which, like other verbs, can take a direct object (provided ...


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Wrote it I did It is wrong to consider this an instance of hyperbaton, because the regular word order is not altered In the first clause there is only the ellipsis of one word: the subject: "[I] wrote it " Hyperbaton Definition: A hyperbaton is a literary device wherein the author plays with the regular positioning of words and phrases and creates ...


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The verb to license (noun licence) means to authorise, or to grant permission. So, after passing a test of competence to drive, one is licensed to drive a motor vehicle and given a printed driving licence. To register means to enter something on an official list. All motor vehicles in the UK have to be registered with the Driver and Vehicle Licensing ...


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A registered entity is someone which is in a list of any registering agency - be it a registrar of companies, stock-exchange etc. The entity may be registered whether or not it is functional or not or doing good or bad. A licence is typically granted to an entity to 'do something' - so a licensed entity is the one which which has permission or is ...


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the act of taking that which is rightly yours...something like secure, capture, or seize At long last he had assumed his birthright, taking responsibility and seizing power! ASSUME verb 2. Take or begin to have (power or responsibility): ‘he assumed full responsibility for all organizational work’ 2.1. Seize (power or control): ‘the rebels ...


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This is, to a degree, technospeak. The term "value" here means "number". The magnitude of the number somehow correlates with the degree of contrast "between bars and spaces" (whatever that is). The sentence you quote is perfectly valid. And I suppose one could argue that, in technospeak, it's fairly common for "indicates" to follow a word or three after ...


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Does the headline make a correct/sensible use of the verb given the assumption mentioned above about the result? Yes, this is a common term for expressing that a previous mark has been passed, or surpassed. Eclipsed, eclipsing, eclipses: 1 a: To cause an eclipse of. b: To obscure; darken. 2 a: To obscure or diminish in importance, fame, or ...


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I think the sentence is fine. I feel that both 2a and 2b meanings apply: eclipse verb transitive verb 1 : to cause the obscuration of : darken by or as if by an eclipse 2 a : to reduce especially in importance or repute : cast down (as into obscurity or disgrace) b : to make insignificant by comparison : throw into ...


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reminisce, reminiscing eg. They were reminiscing the past, oblivious of time and their surroundings.


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Reclaim. Although this is not in the literal sense claiming something which you have never had, in many cases it effectively means so: 'Finally I reclaimed the family heirloom that had been lost for years among the bric-a-brac.'


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I gave this same answer in a somewhat related question: It's definition 2.5 of have from ODO [WITH PAST PARTICIPLE] Cause (something) to be done for one by someone else: it is advisable to have your carpet laid by a professional So it means that they got someone else to repair it for them.


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Declare. As in the Declaration of Independence which asserted rightful possession of things previously asserted to be withheld.


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Redeem Exchange (a coupon, voucher, or trading stamp) for merchandise, a discount, or money. This is what I was looking for.


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Attain: verb (used with object) 1. to reach, achieve, or accomplish; gain; obtain: Dictionary.com Obtain was suggested in the OP, but it is a better choice: early 15c., from Middle French obtenir "acquire, obtain" (14c.), from Latin obtinere "hold, hold fast, take hold of, get possession of, acquire," from ob "to" (though perhaps ...


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Gain: verb [WITH OBJECT] 1 Obtain or secure (something wanted or desirable): ODO


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Achieve: verb [WITH OBJECT] Successfully bring about or reach (a desired objective or result) by effort, skill, or courage: ODO


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Encouraging can be correct, slightly depending one the context. I would've instinctively used "urging", at least in cases where I note the importance (of trying it nonetheless) as opposed to dissuade someone's inhibitions. If you're trying to get them to overcome their doubts and do it of their own free will, I'd use "encouraging". If you're more or less ...


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They were so ecstatic at seeing each other again that they were walking on air. "walking on air" idiom meaning amazingly happy"


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Strictly speaking, your sentence is invalid for a few reasons. Firstly "saying" and "encourage" are mis-matching verb forms. "but" grammatically requires matching forms as in: saying X but then encouraging Y Secondly, an "attitude" can contradict itself but cannot "say" things. Because of this I'm not sure what exactly you mean. A few possibilities ...


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Count me another "No" vote. The "had it" definitely implies arranging/paying for someone else to do it. Of course this includes the place where you bought it, so that you should have your iMac repaired at the Apple Shop rather than repairing it!


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I'd suggest prance: prance prɑːns/Submit verb 1. (of a horse) move with high springy steps. "the pony was prancing around the paddock"


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ebullient (adj) / ebullience (n) / ebulliently (adv) - cheerful and full of energy - may fit your bill He wasn't his normal ebullient self - http://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/british/ebullient The award winner was in an ebullient mood at the dinner in her honor - http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/ebullient If you describe someone as ...


2

Saunter: walk in a slow, relaxed manner, without hurry or effort. Amble: a walk at a slow, relaxed pace, especially for pleasure Promenade: take a leisurely walk, ride, or drive in public, especially to meet or be seen by others. Amble probably works best of the 3.


0

I would submit stalk as a good option. It can have the feeling of confidence, coldness, and calmness, but it can be quite terrifying to those surrounding the person. Jaunt can also convey the confidence and calmness but is not really for a cold demeanor, generally it has a more happy uplifted feel. A spring in the step. Pace could be used with appropriate ...


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authority noun 3.1 The confidence resulting from personal expertise: he hit the ball with authority You could say "she walked across the room with authority." like a boss Like A Boss is a catchphrase often used in image macros or GIFs that feature a person completing an action with authority and finesse. If you are willing to use slang, ...


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stroll Merriam-Webster to walk slowly in usually a pleasant and relaxed way


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Also skip describes the physical movement, but would indicate the mood. Mostly used for children.


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joyous, bouncing walk William Faulkner: The Contemporary Reviews - Page 132 M. Thomas Inge - 1995 Thus, the reporter is known by his flapping coat, Jiggs the mechanic by his bouncing walk, and Laverne by her “savage mealcolored hair.”


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The friends walked in bliss. Bliss Perfect happiness or joy (http://www.google.com/search?q=bliss)


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The friends went on a walk with a spring in their step. spring in one's step (idiomatic) enthusiasm, energy or a positive outlook or cheerful attitude.


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Simple answer: 'In order to help the system make a better guess of the corner locations,' is an adverb telling us why we do something, not a sentence. The actual sentence follows this adverbial phrase. Adverbs do not require finite verbs. In order to help the system make a better guess of the corner locations, we need to improve the 'corner location ...



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