New answers tagged

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Life is better with a pet and life is better with pets mean very nearly the same thing because it's a general statement. In both cases a pet or pets is understood to refer to pets in general, not a specific pet or a specific number of pets. If you were putting the phrase together with a photo, you might choose the singular or plural version depending on the ...


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The key point here has two parts: the focus of the sentence, and the audience. Life is better with a pet This statement focusses on life, not pet. So, it is talking about life being better - not about the amount of pets. This is a good generic statement, and could be used like this: Selena was so much happier. She wrote in her diary: "Life is better ...


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If you go out and get a pet and find that's good for you then you might say Life is better with a pet. If you do a study of people with pets and without and their health and well-being, you might say Life is better with pets.


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Pets in this case refers to a class of things, not necessarily the number of members of the class. Changing that around a bit, take Studies show pets make you live longer. That doesn't imply that someone with one pet will not reap the same benefit as someone with multiple pets. It isn't specific at all.


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3rd person singular 's' does not derive as a phonological modification from Early Modern English or Middle English 'eth', but from Old Norse, the dialects spoken by Scandinavian invaders/settlers whose language merged with Old English in the Danelaw and produced major lexical, grammatical and phonological change.* This merging process took place between ...


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There are certain uses of the word "get" ,but when we talk about get to do something,it means that you "start doing something,or start to do something",now for instance ,(URDU):ma achanak sa hasna laga,(ENGLISH):I suddenly got to laugh,yet another example is ,I start speaking english is equivalent to "I get to speak English",If we come towards Future ...


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There are certain uses of the word "get" ,but when we talk about get to do something,it means that you "start doing something,or start to do something",now for instance ,(URDU):ma achanak sa hasna laga,(ENGLISH):I suddenly got to laugh,yet another example is ,I start speaking english is equivalent to "I get to speak English",If we come towards Future ...


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If you don't understand the difference between regular and irregular verbs and if you don't understand the use of the three stem forms, eg begin/began/begun you have a long way to go yet. Here's a first website about this topic: Link You should study other websites too. It is absolutely necessary that you understand the conjugation system of English ...


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The Collins Dictionary for English Learners defines familiarize as: If you familiarize yourself with something, or if someone familiarizes you with it, you learn about it and start to understand it. ■ EG: [V pron-refl + with] ⇒ I was expected to familiarise myself with the keyboard. ■ EG: [V n + with] ⇒ The goal of the experiment was to ...


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I'd suggest you phrase it more simply: we sent 4 packages today... The 'had outbound' formulation needlessly complicates matters - and sounds overly bureaucratic.


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The adjective outbound has already the form of a past participle. "Outbound" is a derivation from bind/bound/bound. We have the expression "the ship is bound for Rio" with the idea that the captain is bound to the order to head for Rio.


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They are 'Phrasal Verb'. Verb + preposition (prepositional phrasal verbs) Verb + particle (particle phrasal verbs) Verb + particle + preposition (particle-prepositional phrasal verbs)


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The difference is that the first uses "wanted", which takes a to-infinitive, not a bare infinitive. The second uses "did", which takes a bare infinitive. Having said that, "to" is possible in the second example, and I'm not sure why.


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I think it's easier if we assume that this sentence is "cut down" versions of the [hypothetical]... 1a: All I have to do is I have to finish it soon. Sometimes native speakers will delete the repeatation, it's not a big problem.


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Predicates that describe states (they're not all verbs) are called Stative predicates. Predicates that describe actions are called Active predicates. This sense of "active" does not contrast with the Passive construction; the active/stative distinction is semantic, not grammatical. He is a man - Predicate nouns are stative He is very tired. - Most ...


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Since "swipe" is the established idiom and is briefer than the alternative (which, in addition, doesn't sound immediately English - it is gramatically correct, but the wording isn't habitual, it's not a recognizable idiom), I recommend going with "swiping over it".


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It's somewhat difficult to find a good antonym verb for procrastinate. Go forth and procrastinate! First thing that came to mind is the traditional idiom carpe diem or seize the day. "Seize" is at least a verb and can be imperative. A good adjective is proactive. But for verbs, I first thought execute as fitting as long as it's clear by context which ...


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Try rally. The full text at the last link captures more of the optimism, enthusiasm and vitality you mention in your question. 2a : to arouse for action - M-W 1 (Of troops) come together again in order to continue fighting after a defeat or dispersion: 'De Montfort’s troops rallied and drove back the king’s infantry' - oxforddictionaries.com ...


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The second option is the more correct structure. To explain it as simply as possible, you have to do in the middle of the sentence already. To do is an infinitive verb because the unsuffixed action word do is preceded by the preposition to (which is actually part of the infinitive verb, not just preceding it). With that, you are now wondering if the verb ...


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The second (without 'to') is more common, but both are grammatical. GloWBe (The Corpus of Global Web-based English) has 210 instances without 'to' and 52 with 'to'.


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Why don't you look up "escape" in a dictionary such as Oald which gives a survey about the possible verb constructions. http://www.oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com/definition/english/escape_1?q=escape


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What you're looking at is the principle of proximity. From the prescriptivist point of view: It's the subject that dictates subject-verb agreement, but there are times when subject-verb agreement isn't so easy and clear. A strict prescriptivist grammarian would tell you that only the following sentence is correct: An exception is situations where you... ...


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Depends on the context. "Our prisoner has escaped" is perfectly fine. "I have escaped from Alcatraz" is, too.


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Exception can be a singular or plural noun as required to match whatever follows it. An exception is a situation where ... Some exceptions are those situations where ... Edit: "An exception are ..." just reads wrong, just as "a dog are ..." does. You could justify "An exception is ..." where what follows is a coherent group of things.


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"A climbing wall" and "running shoes" - Of course, climbing and running are gerunds. A climbing wall is a wall for climbing where beginners can practise climbing a rocķ face. Running shoes are shoes good for running - just as a washing machine is a machine for washing. (If you use a preposition then the ing-form after it is a gerund and no particple.) This ...


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I found the answer within The Cambridge Grammar of the English Language. The Cambridge Grammar of the English Language (on page 1651) calls this grammatical structure a gerund-participle. The text starts with an introduction to compounds of nouns + verbs: A great many lexical bases in English can be either verbs or nouns, and as a result there may be ...


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"to keep doing" is just the shortened form of the older "to keep on doing". There is no difference in meaning. Very often we have the phenomenon that prepositions are dropped in verb constructions. I would guess that the shortened form "to keep doing" is used more frequently today than the longer version. I think it is a general rule that when speakers have ...


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OED meaning 40(b) of the verb to keep has examples from 1800: a. To continue, persevere, go on (in a specified course or action). b. With pres. pple. as compl. Examples: 1800 W. Gifford Baviad (ed. 6) 27 (note) Some contemptible vulgarity, such as ‘That's your sort!’..‘What's to pay?’ ‘Keep moving’, &c. ...


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Firstly, the phrase sounds grammatical, but so does the singular version: "all there is, is idiolect". The word all refers to something different in each case and the sense of the resulting sentence / clause is correspondingly different. It seems that whether all has singular or plural agreement depends on what it references. See this ELL answer, this ...


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The to-infinitive is often used after an object to express a function that the object serves for the subject, as in: I have a dog to protect me. (The object's function is to protect the subject) to express a necessary action that the subject needs from the object: I need you to finish the report by Friday. (The subject needs the object to ...


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Whoever wrote that column: Parameter Measured Refractive index measuring Mass Measuring Optical rotation Measuring probably wishes that they had written: Parameter Measured Refractive index Mass Optical rotation Those instances of "measuring" look like side-effects of inaccurate translation and/or, more likely, remnants from ...


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After some verbs (including "see") followed by an object, we use the "bare infinitive" (without a "to" in front).


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'To rise' is the infinitive form of the word, whereas 'rise' is a conjugated form. The key here is that you conjugate the first infinitive and then leave the second infinitive alone. So, it goes something like this: subject + conjugation We see. subject + conjugation + direct object We see the price subject + conjugation + direct object + ...


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The default grammatical number for Subjects is singular. In order to deviate from this, the Subject must be considered plural in some way. "embracing the variety of human beings" does not have any kind of plural meaning, and so we see singular agreement in the verb form.


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Consider, fair up fair up/fair off: Chiefly Southern U.S. (meteorology) To clear: They said it was going to fair off later on, but it didn't. YourDictionary South Midland and Southern U.S. (of the weather) To clear: It's supposed to fair off toward evening. Random House Southern fair off and fair up, meaning "to become clear," were ...


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Brighten up To become happier; improve one's mood or outlook. "Don't worry, things will brighten up." Here's a quote from The Dark Knight The night is darkest just before the dawn. And I promise you, the dawn is coming. It means the same as things will clear up soon. See definition here.


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If you change the sentence into active you get: They voted Brianna co-captain with the structure verb, direct object, complement to direct object. This is not the structure of a sentence like "My father is a teacher". So I wouldn't say "voted" is a linking verb.


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Consider elucidate: To make clear or plain, especially by explanation; clarify


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Enlightened To give information to; inform or instruct. http://www.thefreedictionary.com/enlightened So in your context The stress management program both decreased additional cardiac events, and enlightened them as to what really causes their stress, and with this, how to cope with their stress.


0

There are very few situations where a fluid pours out in portions, as such, I doubt very much, that there is a single word for this. There just isn't enough reason for such a word to exist alone. The only way to obtain such a word would be to make it. e.g. Make up "partifundam" from the french "partie" and latin "effundam". Then use it. "The doctors ...


4

In general, English does not have a grammatical form for nominalising the recipient of an action. It often has a verbal form, the passive, as you say "be checked"; but there is no regular way of forming a noun meaning "person being checked". I can't think of a more compact form than that which will be clear.


1

I would go for the word DOTE usually followed by the preposition on/upon to mean " shower some one with love and excessive affection." It is the German origin and excessive fondness which go to mean " act in a foolish manner" as King Lear's 'senile dotage'— the other meaning of 'dote'. However the word is often used without the foolish overtone.


1

CERFL, the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages, is a guideline for progress in the learning of languages. It specifies the level of mastery of language in 6 stages, A1, A2, B1, B2, C1, C2 from beginner to mastery. It doesn't specify expected vocabulary numbers for each stage but others have found them experimentally for different ...


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Depending on context, consider: parade An ostentatious show; an exhibition AHD grandstand play noun phrase A play made with special brilliance and brio, esp in order to impress the spectators. Any action, speech, tactic, etc, designed to appeal to spectators; a tour de force : The President's pronouncement's just a grandstand play(1888+ ...


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To "Tout" something ? From Merriam-Webster: to talk about (something or someone) as being very good, effective, skillful, etc. to try to persuade people to buy your goods or services to buy tickets for an event and resell them at a much higher price


1

You could consider: Ostentation: Pretentious display meant to impress others; pretentious showiness. Archaic The act or an instance of showing; an exhibition. Spectacle: A public performance or display, especially one on a large or lavish scale. Bravado: vaunted display of courage or self-confidence; swagger


1

Tour de force A feat or display of strength, skill, or ingenuity per Webster's


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Perhaps, to conquer, to subjugate or to master. A noun - maybe elite? blowhard?


2

You mentioned Asperger's, probably because the obsession you point to is characteristic of or associated with that state, so I think you want something with psychological connotations. Monomaniacal is defined as "pathological obsession with one idea or subject" or "intent concentration on or exaggerated enthusiasm for a single subject or idea" (here). This ...



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