New answers tagged

1

Try macgyver. It means to make, assemble or repair something by ingenious and inventive improvisation. In other simple terms it means to use ingenuity to fix or remedy a problem using only the tools available at hand. Mark watney macgyvered a makeshift roof to make room for his equipment ans supplies.


0

Being unclear what you mean by issue, I nevertheless have the feeling that what you want here is recant - echoing Galileo: I recant, she revolves. Renege is a possibility, but it carries a taint of reprensibility.


1

Acknowledgements can be withdrawn. Withdraw verb 4 Discontinue or no longer provide (something previously supplied or offered) - ODO Here are some usage examples: If you wish to withdraw this Acknowledgement, you must do so within 60 days, ... - Montana Department of Public Health & Human Services If a further acknowledgement of service is ...


0

Acknowledge/Ignore or Acknowledge/Revert is what you are looking for... Acknowledge means accept or admit or recognize In this context you have to revert back the acknowledgement, so Revert can be used. Ignore can even be used.


5

Being a software engineer, I am sure the word you are looking for is Revoke


2

This is called verbing; see extended description at the link or in other answers. Here's the obligatory/famous Calvin & Hobbes on the subject:


0

regression = going back to a previous state from 0 to 5 it goes back to 3. retrogression = going back to a state its never been. From 0 to 5 it goes back to -2. its how I persieve it


1

It's not a ditransitive verb, as that refers to when a verb takes two objects, like *He gave me a sandwich." Instead it could really be doing one of two things: Like others have suggested, crying could be a participle modifying world, making started a transitive verb with the whole world as its object. This is a rather clunky use of a participle, however, ...


0

Your problem is in selecting the correct verb form for to go in the relative clause that [verb form of to go] through Louis's mind This must be compatible with the adverbial clause of time when he discovered his love for Lestat Discovered is a simple past tense indicating a completed act in past time, and has gone (that's is a contraction for ...


3

Crying makes better sense if it is a participle. It behaves like a verb, for instance, when an adverb or an yet another object is added: E.g.(1) He discovered the team sunbathing happily. (2) He got everyone baking cakes. The present participle is generally used when the object is performing the action, the past participle when it happens to ...


4

The phenomenon and label of the change is one thing, and the result is labeled another thing. In the specific community (of aviation; I don't think I've heard this at all before so I'm assuming it is limited to here), it is simply a change in syntax accompanied by semantic drift. The result, where a passive form is interpreted actively, is called a ...


3

It’s an example of zero derivation. This means deriving a new word from another word while bypassing the usual derivation rule that involves adding a prefix or suffix such as ‑ify or ‑ize. To illustrate zero derivation, here is an example from the exploding penguin sketch: (1) Oh, intercourse the penguin. [Emphasis added] Monty Python derive ...


0

I think it is due to the consonant letter (r) which comes at the end of the word occur. Based on what I studied, if the word ends with a consonant letter and before it comes a vowel letter, we should double the end letter in the past tense such as occurred, whereas in the word listen we shoudn't double the last letter because this is an irregular case. If ...


0

NO INTIMATE IS NOT SHORT FOR IMPLY,and infer is short for inferred.Debate word,lawyer lingo.my time on this site is short so forgive me if I got it wrong.


2

No, the third form is the normal one, and does not imply a reference to an earlier time (that would be "I asked him if he had been well"). The other two are both, at best, dubious. "I asked him if he were well" is probably not grammatical in current English, as it is a subjunctive form, which is only used for irrealis (counter-factual) conditions. It may ...


0

Your (1) can work; (2) and (3) don't. Intimate 2 verb [with object] 1 State or make known: Mr Hutchison has intimated his decision to retire verb [with clause] 1.1 Imply or hint: he had already intimated that he might not be able to continue - ODO In usage, intimating is a hint or statement made intentionally. This precludes ...


1

As sumelic points out in a comment above, the word acknowledge in the phrase "provided he acknowledge the existence of a Supreme Being" is a subjunctive, and the tense is present. The sense of the phrase is if he satisfies the prerequisite of recognizing and affirming the existence of a Supreme Being. The full provision that the OP quotes from is ...


4

This sense of violate is perhaps best known in the context of the parole system: trans. U.S. slang. To return (a prisoner on parole) to prison for breaking the conditions of his or her parole; to report (a prisoner) for a parole violation. [OED] This (not alas linkable to general public) was the only definition I found for this sense. By ...


2

Sometimes you have to drop a particular style in favour of another. As many users have already mentioned, there is no verb in English which means "knowledge of one's existence". The terms id (the part of the mind in which innate instinctive impulses and primary processes are manifest), ego, and superego are sometimes used in connection with Alzheimer. ...


1

You might go with the hyphenated verb self-cognize, as in "They lose the ability to memorize. To understand. To self-cognize." To cognize means "to perceive; become conscious of; know" (here). Thus, to self-cognize means "to perceive or become conscious of or know one's self." This is tantamount to knowing one exists.


2

The knowledge of one's existence is generally referred to as consciousness or self-awareness, and one of the key symptoms of consciousness is thinking. Therefore, one could loosely use think as a synonym of the word you're looking for - which likely doesn't exist. Of course, we can think about many things other than existence, but, philosophically speaking, ...


0

Transitive and intransitive are not semantic categories--categories based on a verb's meaning--but syntactic categories: categories based on the syntactic constructions into which a verb may enter. Arrive and laugh are intransitive because neither† takes an object, which is likewise a syntactic semantic category: not a "receiver" (which is a semantic ...


2

Transitive and intransitive are not semantic categories--categories based on a verb's meaning--but syntactic categories: categories based on the syntactic constructions into which a verb may enter. Arrive and laugh are intransitive because neither† takes an object, which is likewise a syntactic semantic category: not a "receiver" (which is a semantic ...


0

You are confusing adverb(ial phrase)s with objects. In your example sentence [... W]e arrived at the classroom door with only seven seconds to spare. The new arrivals did nothing to the classroom that would make it an object of the action. Both "at the classroom" and "with only seven seconds to spare" are adverbial phrases. They refine the action ...


0

You don't arrive a place or laugh a joke. The preposition 'at' is giving you a reference between the action and the scene of the action, but the 'object' of the preposition is not the 'object' of the verb.


1

I went to http://babynames.net/names and found the following (just for A and B). There is more information there about the names and famous people who had the name. "Blossom", "Bond", "Branch", "Brand", "Bud".


2

"Change" in both examples is a verb. One way to tell that it is a verb rather than a noun is to construct examples where it is modified by an adverb. Verbs can be modified by adverbs, but nouns cannot: Her hair began to change gradually to gray. It’s interesting to think about how people gradually change throughout their lives. In sentences with ...


3

Your two examples each illustrate one of two types of English verbs forms -- finite and non-finite. The former (in your second sentence) is the verb in the predicate of the clause [1a] how people change throughout their lives Finite verbs carry the sense of a verb -- conveying actions, the states of things, feelings, or equivalences. Finite verbs may ...


1

In the first sentence, "change" is being used as an infinitive. An infinitive is not itself a verb. The verb is this sentence is "began" because that is the action that the subject "hair" is performing. In this case, "to change" is modifying or describing the verb "began," so it is acting as an adverb. And began is the verb in the sentence. (By the way, I ...


2

There are no words I'm aware of that fit the bill precisely, but here are a few suggestions: Reflect Bethink Meditate Introspect If these don't satisfy you you can sort of 'cheat' by just plopping the word 'self' in front of a given word (like 'self-reflect' or 'self-study'). Although it isn't technically 'proper', your reader will surely understand what ...


4

"You have better" is not English. "You had better" is normal English, meaning "you ought to"; it is usually reduced in speech to "You'd better". "You better" is a common colloquial form of "You'd better": many people regard it as "wrong", and would not accept it in writing.


1

you can distort practically everything that has a shape .Furthermore, you can distort the truth by mixing it with falsehood.


0

The passive voice here would be: When the sentence is written (present); When the sentence was written (past); When the statement has been written (present perfect); And just for good measure: when a future is meant, the present passive voice would be used. For example: When the statement is written, we will issue it.


0

Without a context it is not possible to determine which sense of the present perfect is meant by the speaker. Add to this the fact that present perfect varies by country and region and it really isn't possible to say anything meaningful. You could just as well say, "I studied English." In fact, a sentence like yours is usually followed by something that ...


0

I always have confusion with perfect tense as non native speaker too.But I think it means here that you have started studying English but not finishing studying it yet.


1

J. Lawler's comment is spot-on. The sentence is ambiguous and you cannot be confident in the hypotheses you've proposed without making some assumptions. However, based on your judgement of the supplied statement, you can tell, but it depends on the risk you are willing to take. There are two types of 'risks': believing a possible lie or not believing a ...


0

Past Perfect Progressive: I had been eating oranges for two hours before I decided to order steak. Future Perfect Progressive: By the time you pick me up tomorrow I will have been eating oranges for two hours.


0

Present Perfect Sophia: "Have you eaten oranges today?" John: "I have eaten oranges for more than two hours now." Past Perfect Sophia: "Had you eaten oranges before you had steak for dinner last night?" John: "I had eaten oranges before I ate the steak at last night's dinner." Future Perfect Sophia: "What will you have eaten before you visit me ...


0

Present perfect: Have you eaten (any) oranges today? Past Perfect: Had you eaten oranges before you ate the steak last night? Future perfect: Will you have eaten before you visit me tomorrow? Past perfect progressive: Had you been eating oranges before you ate the steak...? Yes, I had been eating oranges before... Future Perfect Progressive: Will you ...


0

Do you mean to suggest that Dr. X is still providing data? In that case use the present perfect progressive, to express an action that began in the past and which is still ongoing: He has been singing at church on Sundays for years. In a situation like this, neither the simple present nor the simple past works: He sings at church on Sundays for ...


0

The subject here is "the span of Dr X's service", which is a single thing. If that span includes the present day, then the span is current, ie in the present, and so you should say "spans". Also, i think it's better to say "spans Mission X (2003)... etc" rather than "spans across": both "span" and "across" are to do with covering an area, so to use both ...


0

logged-in would be the perfect term for that.


4

The person was logged in to the website. log in is a phrasal verb so only the first part of the verb changes when you wish to change the tense. It follows the same rule as sit down (She sat down.) or drop out (He dropped out of school.) See also the usage note for log in on dictionary.com.


0

I think the use of 'on' as a preposition here is incorrect. I would write: We will proceed with the project as scheduled. That said, this does change, very slightly, the meaning of the sentence. 'on schedule' as a phrase of schedule is quite specific and the sentence above dilutes it somewhat. Consider: We will proceed with the project according ...


0

All except "C" make sense. "C" would make sense if it was "How about somewhere else," but, "How about meeting again," doesn't make sense in this context.


1

In regular spoken dialogue, both A and B would be standard. Answer A implies that Lucy has agreed to meet at the library, and is now asking if they can meet at 6:30. Answer B is explicitly agreeing to meeting. I see no problem with either answer. Answer C doesn't sound quite right, but truthfully, answer D seems plausible as well.


-2

I would imagine it comes from the use when dogs were used as a security force and there was a command to get them to stop, referred to as 'calling them off' as calling the dogs off their pursuit.


1

In some contexts, such as sport, the verb "call" can be used to mean "declare that something is a" - eg "call foul", meaning "To declare something as being a foul". This probably originated from the referee literally shouting, ie "calling", "Foul!" and so "Call 'Foul!'" becomes "Call foul". Using this meaning, to "call off" means "To declare something as ...



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