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To answer your question, both forms are correct. I'm migrating to Australia means you are moving to that country. I'm immigrating to Australia means you are leaving your home country (often your birth-place) for Australia. migrate 2. (Of a person) move to a new area or country in order to find work or better living conditions: e.g: Many villages ...


4

There are lots of ways of talking about starting cars. Except for (1) and (2), these are fine. There is an English grammar rule being violated in (1) and (2). Native speakers know it, because they follow it, but they usually can't state it. Non-native speakers need to be taught the rule, however, because it's not obvious. When a noun modifier consists of ...


2

There are three transitive senses of tamper recorded by the OED, but the sense you use in the first sentence ("To meddle or interfere with (a thing) so as to misuse, alter, corrupt, or pervert it.") has only one closely-related transitive sense ("To put off or do away with by tampering or clandestine dealing."). The OED lists this as "rare" and giving only ...


2

As I parse this, it's option number two. Context dictates the way I fill in the ellipsis. "The more [we are], the merrier [we are]" and "The more [we have], the merrier [we are]" are two obvious possibilities. I perform the same sort of analysis on the ellipsis in your question title: "If [it's] not [that], what [is it]?" The only justification I have ...


1

This seems to be an error in the dictionary's listing. The verb to feel has a transitive sense and a copular sense. When copular, its argument is a subject complement. When transitive, its argument is an object. In the sample sentence for the questionable entry, the verb is copular. However, that verb is seemed. The infinitive to feel in this sentence ...


1

It does mean finance, it does not mean cash. The pair are talking about a case where they were adversaries. Neal's forgeries had already been caught, so whenever they were used the FBI would notice, specifially Peter. In order for Peter to "get a visual on" Neal he needed to allow the forgeries to be accepted as real bonds, so the FBI put up the money that ...


1

The tone of the bolded second sentence is such an obvious (and, I assume, intentional) contrast to the first one (active vs. passive, casual vs. formal, snide vs. polite) that it really doesn't matter what tense or mood you use. As for style, I would set it off as a separate paragraph, and replace "On top of that" with "Also," "Plus," or "Besides," (with ...



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