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4

Factory comes from Manufactory - the verb is Manufacture. man·u·fac·to·ry (măn′yə-făk′tə-rē) n. pl. man·u·fac·to·ries A factory or manufacturing plant.


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Those are gapping constructions. Gapping deletes a repeated verb and other repeated constituents, leaving behind two constituents, one of which (in Ross's formulation) must be inside the verb phrase and the other must be outside the verb phrase. A classic of grammatical analysis was Ross's paper Gapping and the order of constituents, which showed that the ...


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The verb should be is. There is no doubt about that, since the subject of the sentence The best form of transportation is singular. However I do not consider the sentence idiomatic (perhaps because a singular subject and a plural object sounds awkward). I would say: The best form of transport in the city is (by) bus. The by is optional. There are ...


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My confusion is that since the verb that follows the relative pronoun must agree in number with the word that comes immediately before the relative pronoun, if "blocks" are plural, then it must use "weigh" which contradicts with "each". In your sentence, "each" is not used as a pronoun, but rather as and adverb meaning the same thing as "apiece". ...


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The closest verb is "to fabricate". Relate to the german words "Fabrik" -> "fabrizieren".


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Ask is a transitive verb: it takes a Direct Object (DO), in its simplest form a noun phrase: Anne asked me [DO a question]. If we want to represent Anne's exact words, we use the question she actually asked, followed by a question mark and enclosed in quotes, in that DO position: Anne asked me "Who is your favorite actor?" The quotes mark this ...


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Affirmative: that man was Negative: that man wasn't Interrogative: Was that man...? Affirmative statement: Tell me who that man was. Interrogative: (only 1 interrogative form at the beginning) Can you tell me who that man was? Interrogative: Who was that man? Affirmative: Anne asked me who my favourite actor was. (There's no question mark.) Question ...


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@G. Tomevi: Taken alone, "So does coffee." is incomplete, yes. But since it follows a sentence which contains THE complete thought, it becomes complete. Sentences of this construction should normally follow a sentence which contains the complete thought, or part of the whole context. In this case, "Tea has caffeine." does the job of providing the complete ...


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As a verb meaning to use someone for their money: Gold digging - this is more seen in noun form as gold digger, a person engaging in such activities as the receiver. As a noun for a person being used in such fashion: Sugar daddy, and the feminine sugar mommy (a lot rarer). This generally implies the person is willing to give away money as "payment" for ...


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Let me use two different sentences to explain. 'I decided to get a degree in computer science when I was in university.' 'I have decided to reply to your question.' The first, in the past tense, refers to an act that took place in the past and is not directly relevant to what's going on at this present time. If you were writing a history you would use the ...


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It's an example of coordination (i.e., two elements linked with "and"). Elements common to the two coordinands can often be omitted in the second one. Eg, coordinated subjects, common predicate: John and Mary went to the shops. Coordinated verbs, common object: John noticed, and bought, a painting. Coordinated objects, common subject and verb: ...


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No, it's correct. It's just old. As @PeterShor and others comment, this is an example of the subjunctive mood, which expresses hypothetical situations and which is no longer commonly used in English. Other, more exlicit, forms of your example include: If a son should strike his father... Should a son strike his father... If a son were to ...



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