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4

That would not be idiomatic English. Efforts can be crippled and a person can be crippled but someone is not crippled to do something unless that person is disabled (too crippled to perform his tasks because of lack of fingers). I suggest I am blocked from completing my tasks or to use your word My ability to complete my tasks is crippled ...


4

The way it is written could be improved. As it stands it does suggest that 'your father' happened upon the discovery by chance. But that is largely due to the circumstances of this particular account. Consider for a moment He looked up to see a dodo flying backwards. It could mean either that he had just been told there was a dodo flying backwards, so he ...


3

It's generally makes more sense to say that clauses and not verbs are transitive or intransitive. However, this won't stop dictionaries or grammar books for language and linguistics students giving lists of verbs that they'll describe as 'transitive' or 'intransitive'. Having said that, it's also true that whether a clause is transitive or not is also ...


3

This one is right: There is 1 apple and 1 orange available This is wrong: There are 1 apple and 1 orange available. I would personally say There is an apple and an orange available. This is now wrong 1 apple and 1 orange is available This is right (almost): 1 apple and 1 orange are available. But again, I would say An ...


3

Not sure how correct it is right now; is it just me or does it need a comma? Like so: "The problem is, he is very stingy with his money." I know for sure that "The problem is that he is very stingy with his money." is correct though.


3

I think that use of the word "swag" in that sentence is a slang abbreviation of the word "swagger" which is itself slang for "show off". So a rough translation would be "if you are going to show off in a post, you should at least attempt to use the right spelling [else it would undermine your swagger]".


3

Yes, you can use crippled as a verb. Per M-W: Cripple transitive verb To deprive of the use of a limb and especially a leg: the accident left him crippled To deprive of capability for service or of strength, efficiency, or wholeness : an economy crippled by inflation Also, from thefreedictionary.com: This measure crippled our efforts ...


2

It's perfectly grammatically correct. The problem is just that: you repeat the word "is". It's that simple. It's a commonplace in English, say speechwriting or advertising writing (I mean say for radio or TV voiceovers), that you don't repeat a word in a sentence or, really, in a passage, and particularly not close. Here you have two "is"s very close, so ...


1

Apparently, you're happy with a multi-word verb. The MWV 'fob off', which is transitive (compulsorily separable with pronouns: fob us off) can take a with- (prepositional) phrase, is perhaps the best choice; I'd say it's informal rather than slang: The sense is spelled out at Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 .2. fob off ...


1

Ummm... I don't think any English words will fit in this situation. I recommend to use "suggest"and describe more in details if you would like to elaborate it. There is a jargon-"bait-and-switch". However, it is a noun and not exactly what you want. I think @EdwinAshworth's word choice is excellent!


1

In standard Modern English, negation is achieved by adding not after an auxiliary verb. If no such verb is present then the dummy auxiliary do (does, did) is introduced. For example: I have gone → I have not gone (have is the auxiliary) He goes → He does not go (no auxiliary in the original sentence) Different rules apply in subjunctive, imperative ...


1

1) Lots of words and metaphors in this example that mean listen, including receive, attend/make one's ear attentive, incline one's heart to understanding ...if you receive my words and treasure up my commandments with you, making your ear attentive to wisdom and inclining your heart to understanding; yes, if you call out for insight and raise your voice for ...


1

You can "accept" someone's answer, just as you can "receive" a package. There are two competing connotations to "accepting" an answer, however: in the first, you simply "take receipt of it", without passing judgement; in the second, you are contrasting what you did to "rejecting" the answer: you both "took receipt" and "approved" of it. For examples of the ...


1

I believe you are looking for pay attention (idiomatic, intransitive) To attend; to be attentive; to focus one's attention. Wiktionary For example when talking to a child who is playing a game while I'm trying to tell them something, I might tell them to Pay attention when I'm talking to you. Or when someone stops talking because it looks ...


1

In this case, if you are speaking to the person from whom you are awaiting an answer, I would say "Yes, I heard you." or "Yes, I understood that.". In cases such as "Did you receive a response from Jane?", you might say "Yes, I did get her response, and it was quite clear."


1

Occurring "That/The lecture is occurring now." Happening "That/The lecture is happening right now." Underway "That/The lecture is already underway." Taking place "That/The lecture is taking place right now." Started "That/The lecture has already started." Begun "That/The lecture has begun." Taking place is probably best. ...


1

"The process creates the prize" is correct, because the verb ("to create") must agree with the subject ("The process"). As the subject is third person singular you should use the proper form of the verb that is 'creates' here. By the way the sentence below is correct: "The process to create the prize...."


1

As far as I understand the original question, you are not asking for the type of grammatical analysis that has so far been offered! It seems to me that your question is not about syntax but about verbs that have a particular purpose, right? The clue is in your guess that "to insult someone" would be categorized as a "method of conversation" and in your other ...


1

The two sentences display the epistemic senses of two modal auxiliary verbs: must and could. Modal auxiliary verbs ("modals") are very irregular and have extremely complex grammar. Every modal has two kinds of meaning: its Epistemic sense and its Deontic sense. Epistemic meanings are abstract and refer to logical predictions and conclusions: This ...


1

I recommend theretofore, being of the same construction as heretofore and meaning before that time.


1

The law embraces any of the verbs* governing any of the DOs; but of course in any specific instance only one of the verb governing only one DO will suffice to call the provision into operation. * I personally cringe at that makes a false entry in acting alongside bare and phrasal verbs; but the Law is not so nice.


1

From the legal perspective is a fundamental OR That is, if you perform any of the verbs on any of the objects, you are in violation and subject to dismemberment.



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