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calligraph (verb): Write in calligraphic style (Source: ODO) 'the invitations were meticulously calligraphed in black ink' To write beautifully or ornamentally (Source: OED) Thanks to Ermanen for supplying the OED definition


2

I take it from the title, you want to know why you can use the present tense: "Second is the age of reason that opens in late 1770s and remains until 1800." After all, we're well past 1800, so why don't those verbs have to be in the past tense: "opened in the late 1770s," "remained until 1800"? This use of the present tense is called the "historical ...


2

The most natural way to fill in that blank is: I finally blurted out.


1

Merriam-Webster's Dictionary of Synonyms (1984) includes explicate and expound—together with elucidate, interpret, and construe—in a group under the heading word explain. Here is its treatment of expound and explicate: Expound implies careful, elaborate, often learned setting forth of a subject in order to explain it (as in a lecture, a book, or a ...


1

Though this is used mostly in the context of retirement from the workplace, of being "made redundant," it fits your criteria quite closely: superannuate (v.) To set aside or discard as old-fashioned or obsolete. (AHD, 4th edition) Or a less formal option: phase out (v.) (idiomatic) To remove or relinquish the use of something little by ...


1

I'd call it spluttering. From Oxford Dictionaries Online... Splutter - Make a series of short explosive spitting or choking sounds


1

The copular verb/linking verb is "were" (to be), the linking verb number 1. It is followed by "known", the predicative complement. Here "known" is used as an adjective. "known" is followed by "as brocade pictures". Here I think the terms for this part will diverge. I would say this word group is a complement to the adjective "known". I don't think that ...



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