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8

Janus Bahs Jacquet's answer put me on the right track, and I was able to find the answer I was thinking of: In linguistics, an ergative verb is a verb that can be either transitive or intransitive, and whose subject when intransitive corresponds to its direct object when transitive. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ergative_verb


5

I’m not aware of a single term that describes exactly verbs that display this type of alternation between intransitive subject and transitive direct object, but it is a common feature of many unaccusative verbs in English (in particular anticausative verbs, and if you used unaccusative verb as a term to refer to this ‘group’ of verbs, you would likely be ...


4

Best is a valid verb. It's usage in the given sentence is also valid. From the google definition verb, informal outwit or get the better of (someone).


3

"give in" does not = "hand in" nor does "give in" = "hand over" HAND IN is what students would do with a completed assignment. Suppose the teacher "handed out" question sheets to all the students. Then when they had filled in answers, they would "hand in" the completed sheets to the teacher. She first spread them "out" (to students), then gathered them ...


3

It means "I obtained [for me] a woman." " Got me a(n) {X}" is indeed idiomatic in some dialects of American English. In particular, that of Southern black people from whom "the blues" originated. It would not be considered proper in "standard" written English, but it is quite understandable (by a native speaker) as a song lyric. So, yes, it is colloquial. ...


2

I will be comfortable using responsive; (adjective): 1. reacting quickly and positively. "a flexible service that is responsive to changing social and economic patterns." Synonyms: quick to react to, reactive to, receptive to, open to suggestions about, amenable to, flexible to, sensitive to, sympathetic to. Aware of, "several consumers said the ...


2

Aside from the rather intricate rules for what to do with the understood subjects of the second verb in these complex sentences, mentioned by Lawler in his comment, there is also a 3 way choice of complement type. What follows "consider" in the illustration you gave is taken to be a sentence, schematically [Lucas consider [Lucas bring back Hamill]], where ...


2

Personally, I do not think I would use ask in 'direct discourse' in either of the examples you quote. In those instances ask is being used as a request, not strictly as a question. Were it a question I would not hesitate to use it directly. For example: 'Where did you go on Sunday?', she asked Or They will justifiably ask 'What do you intend to do ...


2

From Merriam-Webster: shy (intransitive verb) shied shy·ing Definition of SHY: To develop or show a dislike or distaste — usually used with from or away from (An author who shies away from publicity) To start suddenly aside through fright or alarm So for your example, it would be She shies away from new things. In the past tense, ...


2

verb {WITH OBJECT} chiefly Computing Cause a discrete increase in {a numerical quantity} --Oxford Dictionaries verb COMPUTING 1. cause a discrete increase in {a numerical quantity}. --Google Search define operator Verb increment {third-person singular simple present increments, present participle incrementing, simple past and past ...


1

In non-computerese it doesn't need to refer to a single unit, though often it does. Etymonline says it comes from mid-15c., "act or process of increasing," from Latin incrementum "growth, increase; an addition," from stem of increscere "to grow in or upon" (see increase). We often refer to something increasing by a small amount as "increasing only ...


1

The attachment is not "below" anything. There might be an icon embedded in the message that invokes (opens) the attached file. But the file is simply "attached"; it is not part of the message. If there are two or more files attached, you can refer to them as the "first", "second", etc attachments.


1

Blink can also be a noun: 1. An act of shutting and opening the eyes quickly. "he was observing her every blink" 2. A momentary gleam of light. Thus Blink Dog is an acceptable usage.


1

"Doesn't". It's because a future "will" is suppressed after "if". That is, a future event is described, and "will" would be used in an independent sentence, but after "if" there is no "will". For instance, suppose Harry will eat too much tomorrow, and this will make him sick, reporting this with "if", comes out this way: "If Harry eats too much tomorrow, ...



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