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Pets in this case refers to a class of things, not necessarily the number of members of the class. Changing that around a bit, take Studies show pets make you live longer. That doesn't imply that someone with one pet will not reap the same benefit as someone with multiple pets. It isn't specific at all.


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Life is better with a pet and life is better with pets mean very nearly the same thing because it's a general statement. In both cases a pet or pets is understood to refer to pets in general, not a specific pet or a specific number of pets. If you were putting the phrase together with a photo, you might choose the singular or plural version depending on the ...


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Since "swipe" is the established idiom and is briefer than the alternative (which, in addition, doesn't sound immediately English - it is gramatically correct, but the wording isn't habitual, it's not a recognizable idiom), I recommend going with "swiping over it".


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Predicates that describe states (they're not all verbs) are called Stative predicates. Predicates that describe actions are called Active predicates. This sense of "active" does not contrast with the Passive construction; the active/stative distinction is semantic, not grammatical. He is a man - Predicate nouns are stative He is very tired. - Most ...


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If you don't understand the difference between regular and irregular verbs and if you don't understand the use of the three stem forms, eg begin/began/begun you have a long way to go yet. Here's a first website about this topic: Link You should study other websites too. It is absolutely necessary that you understand the conjugation system of English ...


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3rd person singular 's' does not derive as a phonological modification from Early Modern English or Middle English 'eth', but from Old Norse, the dialects spoken by Scandinavian invaders/settlers whose language merged with Old English in the Danelaw and produced major lexical, grammatical and phonological change.* This merging process took place between ...


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The Collins Dictionary for English Learners defines familiarize as: If you familiarize yourself with something, or if someone familiarizes you with it, you learn about it and start to understand it. ■ EG: [V pron-refl + with] ⇒ I was expected to familiarise myself with the keyboard. ■ EG: [V n + with] ⇒ The goal of the experiment was to ...


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If you go out and get a pet and find that's good for you then you might say Life is better with a pet. If you do a study of people with pets and without and their health and well-being, you might say Life is better with pets.



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