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21

Use of adjectives rather than adverbs in such constructions is common. The adjective modifies not so much the verb as the verb’s subject. Such adjectival predication is by no means confined to such more or less copulative verbs as be and seem, but works with more active verbs as well. Thus New Hampshire’s license-plate motto, which is ...


11

To rule supreme is something of a "fixed collocation", meaning rule unchallenged... supreme - highest in rank or authority; paramount; sovereign; chief. (Source) To rule supremely (a relatively uncommon usage) would mean rule exceptionally well... supreme - very ​great, or the ​best. (Source)


9

Predicative Complements Many verbs take a Predicative Complement. This is a phrase that fills a special slot set up by the verb, one that portays either the Subject or the Object. Here are some examples: She was elected treasurer. The elephants were ecstatic. The made me furious. She felt warm. In the sentences above, the word treasurer portrays the ...


4

Is there some thing wrong with "You are wrong to equate the two."? equate - Consider (one thing) to be the same as or equivalent to another; Cause (two or more things) to be the same in quantity or value


3

While on cursory reading Centaurus' answer did seem fair to me, on second thoughts I feel you should be able to say "an obligation has been lifted". This is for the following reasons: Centaur pointed out - "lift (verb) To revoke by taking back;" and the correct usage "the Security Council decided to lift all sanctions against Iran". If you consider this ...


3

The answer depends on which tense you use in your narrative. Usually a biography is related from the temporal point of view of the writer's present, so the past events are placed in the past tense: X was born in 1922 and X began school at the age of 3. By the age of 4, X was posing and answering questions that stumped his teachers. Everyone realized ...


2

Take the sentence, Order and method ruled supreme in his life. We would expect, Order and method ruled supremely in his life. Now look at the sentence, Order and method were supreme in his life. That looks correct. I suggest that the original sentence is shorthand for, Order and method ruled[, and were] supreme in his life.


2

One word is engage [with object] Arrange to employ or hire (someone): he was engaged as a trainee copywriter [with infinitive] Pledge or enter into a contract to do something: he engaged to pay them £10,000 against a bond [ODO] You engaged Max to design your logo. Or possibly contract [with object and infinitive] Impose an obligation ...


2

How about enlist? Maybe this sounds better than assign?


1

You can say that "the burden of an obligation has been lifted", just as we say that "the Security Council decided to lift all sanctions against Iran". lift (verb) To revoke by taking back; rescind TFD


1

Maybe reliable or trustworthy?


1

If you want to use the present tense, you could say that the person is a former child prodigy. It sounds clunky, but it's used surprisingly often. There are many "where are they now" articles that use the phrase former child prodigy to refer to an adult who was a prodigy as a child.


1

I disagree with that equivalence.


1

Everywhere except on Google He is a man who has... is all singular. They are men who have (bad hearts). -is all plural. The interesting question is how google rates both your versions the same.


1

No, I don't think so; I've never seen the word used that way in US English. We don't motivate inanimate objects/ ideas; motivation is a purely emotional thing here.



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