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15

The construction used here is help + object + bare infinitive. Here are two more examples: Can you help me fix my bike? I helped my father cut the grass. An equally grammatical equivalent to the above construction is to include the to before the bare form: Can you help me to fix my bike? I helped my father to cut the grass. It is clear ...


6

The friends went on a walk with a spring in their step. spring in one's step (idiomatic) enthusiasm, energy or a positive outlook or cheerful attitude.


6

Both are examples of hyperbaton. You can read more about it here, hyperbaton. In their current form, both sentences are ungrammatical. Correct them for tense as follows. Write it I have. should be Written it I have. Next, Wrote it I did. should be Write it I did. Once corrected for tense, both sentences can be acceptable English ...


4

Blend, if you are looking for a slightly looser fit: 1.2 Put or combine (abstract things) together: ODO As a practicing psychiatrist, is it possible for me to blend my feminist ideology with my chosen career?


3

I would use swagger. However, I also think stride is a good one, as FumbleFingers say. Strut may also work. You can also say walking with aplomb


3

Saunter does not indicate confidence but does indicate lack of anger/frustration/hurry. (M-W)


3

I have belonged to the tennis club for three years. This is correct. You could also say: I belong to the tennis club and have done so for three years.


2

Fuse, if you really want to communicate them being melted together into one unit: verb 1 [WITH OBJECT] Join or blend to form a single entity: ODO etymonline.com 1680s, "to melt, make liquid by heat" (transitive), back-formation from fusion. Intransitive sense, "to become liquid," attested from 1800. Figurative sense of "blend ...


2

To me, to walk "purposefully" connotes a vision of someone looking straight ahead, in control and with a purpose.


2

Or coalesce in a different construction: verb 1.0 [NO OBJECT] Come together to form one mass or whole: 1.1 [WITH OBJECT] Combine (elements) in a mass or whole: Is it possible for my feminist ideology and my psychiatric practice to coalesce in real life?


2

Here are a few specialized constructions of this sort: We do not think it necessary to go. ("think it A" where "A" is an adjective) Some people do not think it important to be thrifty. (same as above) She did not wish him to think it possible. (same as above) I think it fair that ... (same as above) I thought it over carefully. ...


2

Technically they are incorrect and should have been: Written it I have. = I have written it. Write it I did. = I did write it. = I wrote it. The second one could for even more emphasis or rhetorical effect be phrased: I wrote it, yes I did. ("did" here is a pro-verb, grammatically separate from the earlier phrase.) People often make mistakes ...


2

Come is not a verb here, but a preposition. From oxford: preposition informal When a specified time is reached or event happens: I don’t think that they’ll be far away from honours come the new season


1

Count me another "No" vote. The "had it" definitely implies arranging/paying for someone else to do it. Of course this includes the place where you bought it, so that you should have your iMac repaired at the Apple Shop rather than repairing it!


1

Saunter: walk in a slow, relaxed manner, without hurry or effort. Amble: a walk at a slow, relaxed pace, especially for pleasure Promenade: take a leisurely walk, ride, or drive in public, especially to meet or be seen by others. Amble probably works best of the 3.


1

stroll Merriam-Webster to walk slowly in usually a pleasant and relaxed way


1

Also skip describes the physical movement, but would indicate the mood. Mostly used for children.


1

In the UK, it is often referred to as a "Paddington stare". This refers to the character Paddington Bear who found fame in the books of Michael Bond, which have been adapted for TV and movie. “Paddington had a very persistent stare when he cared to use it. It was a very powerful stare. One which his Aunt Lucy had taught him and which he kept for ...


1

An old saying for a demanding look is, to look at someone with "daggers in your eyes." If you are being patronizing, you would give someone a "withering look". (To cause them to "shrivel up")(US)


1

Since I don't have the rep to comment, and nobody has made it their main answer, let me chime in with Stride. It has more meaning than just long steps. The usage that immediately comes to mind is: in stride 1 without interference with regular activities 2 without emotional reaction also: Stride 1b the most effective natural pace : maximum competence ...


1

With required sentence : As a practicing psychiatrist, is it possible for me to make coexist my feminist ideology with my chosen career? Coming from wordreference: coexist /ˌkəʊɪɡˈzɪst/ vb (intransitive) to exist together at the same time or in the same place to exist together in peace But the sentence is better as follow ...


1

I would normally use: I suggest you do not go there. or: I suggest you don't go there.


1

It is the same. From wiktionary : inquire Alternative forms enquire (chiefly British) enquire is chiefly used by people from Britain while inquire is used by Americans. As a french, I would say that enquire is more like asking with care (from s'enquérir in french) and inquire is like asking in order to make somebody confess (like ...


1

reconcile harmonize compromise (to adjust or settle by partial mutual relinquishment of principles, position, or claims : settle by coming to terms ) should all be possible.


1

While the other answers are good an,d in particular, technically correct, another word you might consider is eclipse. Definition: an obscuring of the light from one celestial body by the passage of another between it and the observer or between it and its source of illumination While your faces may not strictly speaking be celestial bodies, it is ...


1

I would personally use: 'install on' when talking about a machine or device as a whole 'install to' when talking about the storage medium, eg, install to the C drive, or installing 'to' the cloud. 'install in' when talking about the folder or virtual directory. On the opposite side of the coin, when you uninstall, people generally use 'uninstall from' ...



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