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17

hone - to perfect or make more intense or effective (thefreedictionary.com) From Kiplinger's Personal Finance... To hone the numbers further, figure out how much income you would need to replace each month if you lost your job But in practice most people would probably use... fine-tune - to make fine adjustments to (something) in order ...


6

What first came to mind was: delve: to carry on intensive and thorough research for data, information, or the like; investigate: to delve into the issue of prison reform. Usually used with into, as in the example above. Source: dictionary.com


4

General purpose verbs you could use would be "correct" and "rectify". But we need more context. If you're referring to improving the accuracy of some type of tool or instrument, then 'calibrate' would be the best choice.


4

I think it's a close call. If you leave it out, there can be no ambiguity because 'drawn' is the past participle and therefore can only belong with the previous 'have'. On the other hand the gap is just long enough to give pause when reading. It is grammatically correct with a single 'have' but, on balance I suggest repeating it.


3

This was called a deep dive where I used to work: an in-depth exploration It's mostly used in the noun sense in business. "Tsk. We'll have to perform a deep-dive on this" or "let's do a deep dive on this tomorrow." It can mean exhaustively examining every facet of an issue. It's a good noun to use in conjunction with the verb delve suggested earlier. ...


3

As stated in the comments, investigation is the word that you are looking for. A formal inquiry or systematic study (OED)


2

OP could describe these intensive, concentrated studies as, focused research. focused adjective: giving a lot of attention to one particular thing: the need for more focused research (Cambridge Dictionaries online) research 1. careful or diligent search 2. studious inquiry or examination; especially: investigation or experimentation ...


2

Originally, a perusal would have been exactly this, from the verb peruse which meant to examine or read (something) in a very careful way but has come to mean to look at or read (something) in an informal or relaxed way which is the very opposite. (Both definitions from Merriam-Webster.) To a sufficiently pedantic crowd, however, perusal might ...


2

In drive a hard bargain, drive seems to refer to drive a vehicle used metaphorically meaning to conduct a negotiation. Hard refers to the strong, determined way in which the deal is carried out. Origin: Mid-19th Century, American English. Even though “drive” sounds like it could be a 20th Century word having to do with automobiles, the word goes ...


2

I might consider dividing out those studies which only took a couple of weeks and those that you spent a few months on and labeling them differently. For the studies that were only a few weeks, maybe something along the lines of "background research," "examination," or "inquiry." For those projects which you spent several months on, you might want something ...


1

If you say "saw", it hints that the situation may have changed since then. If you say "see/can see", it indicates that there is no change. Example "I looked at your account yesterday and saw that it was overdrawn. However, I looked again just a moment ago and see that today it is in credit."


1

I suggest that, in cases like this, you use a search facility such as Google ngram: in the case of That way you will find plenty of examples if the idiom exists. Click on the links at the bottom of that page to see how the expression is used. My example Jane is doing well at school but, in the case of John, I think we need to consider finding a private ...


1

They are adjectives in apposition to each other. You will know because you could interchange the two words: "Others say that the students will take ethics seriously only if it is taught as a required, separate course.


1

In theory, the number of a verb can be unknown. But I would rather phrase it thus: in theory, there can be multiple interpretations of the number of a particular verb form. In your example, the number may be open to two interpretations to the audience, but it is probably known to the speaker. She must have had either one or more people in mind, even if she ...


1

The first example is correct. You can switch tenses in this case, since the old lady presumably continued being an old lady at the time of writing the paragraph. From the Wikipedia article on relative and absolute tenses: Absolute tense means the grammatical expression of time reference (usually past, present or future) relative to "now" – the moment ...


1

Answers from comments that I completely agree with: Refine: To improve in accuracy, delicacy, or excellence. That's pretty much perfect. Tighten: To make tighter. With this definition of 'tight', or a similar one: Tight: Well-rehearsed and accurate in execution. We often say 'fine-tune' when talking about making something even more ...


1

Contemplation or meditation, as in "he meditated on the question for many days". A "brown study" is a moody attitude, whether sad or angry.


1

A verb for this might be to pore over: To examine something closely; in great detail. It can also refer to meditating over something, and to be fully absorbed in a subject. It is, as the answer in the link says, usually associated with "academics who are passionate about their fields, and students who study obsessively before an important exam."


1

One strange property of the perfect tense is that it refers to two times: the time in the past when the action was performed, and the time indicated by the auxiliary verb (to have). Depending upon usage, a sentence using the perfect tense can be more about present (or the time of the auxiliary verb) than it is about the past: A: Are you hungry? B: I have ...



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