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5

It means to hit on a topic that is of importance to person you are speaking to. You can strike a chord either positively or negatively. Positively if you say something that impresses/flatters/connects (positively) with them. Negatively if you speak ill about something that is of importance to them or something that rubs them in the wrong way. To me its ...


5

A standard phrase is grant a wish. In fact, a search of Google reflects that numerous organizations use the phrase as part of their names or slogans. A related phrase is fairy godmother. This is an idiom for a wish grantor. A generous benefactor.


2

-ment is not a free suffix you can add as you like. The nouns ending in -ment are either Latin or French. And the etymology of -ment is not clear. Even the meaning of -men and -mentum is difficult to analysize. If you study the Latin nouns in -men/mentum you find that the nouns are of various types and it is not possible to give a simple idea of the ...


2

I would say it is none of them. In such cases as this (often found in poetry), English has the ability to use the base form as a verb_without_ implying any specific morphological form whatsoever. This is similar to the injunctive found in Vedic Sanskrit and (more limited) Ancient Greek. Basically, it's a verb form that says nothing real about mood, aspect, ...


1

Usage note on Snuck: First recorded in writing near the end of the 19th century in the U.S., snuck has become in recent decades a standard variant past tense and past participle: Bored by the lecture, we snuck out the side door. snuck occurs frequently in fiction, in journalism, and on radio and television, whereas sneaked is more likely in highly formal or ...


1

None of those sound right to me. I would write: I pretended that I understood, lest he think me stupid or deaf. Reference


1

**strike or touch a chord (with somebody) means to say or do something that makes people feel sympathy or enthusiasm. eg. The speaker had obviously struck a chord with his audience.I've heard people saying: "He struck the wrong chord", maybe that's what your friend was referring to, but I don't really know if it's right.



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