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4

This sense of violate is perhaps best known in the context of the parole system: trans. U.S. slang. To return (a prisoner on parole) to prison for breaking the conditions of his or her parole; to report (a prisoner) for a parole violation. [OED] This (not alas linkable to general public) was the only definition I found for this sense. By ...


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I think it’s an example of zero derivation. This means deriving one word from another while bypassing the usual derivation rule that involves adding a prefix or suffix. To illustrate zero derivation, here is an example from the exploding penguin sketch: Oh, intercourse the penguin. [Emphasis added] Monty Python derive ?intercourse (trans) from ...


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Your two examples each illustrate one of two types of English verbs forms -- finite and non-finite. The former (in your second sentence) is the verb in the predicate of the clause [1a] how people change throughout their lives Finite verbs carry the sense of a verb -- conveying actions, the states of things, feelings, or equivalences. Finite verbs may ...


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"Change" in both examples is a verb. One way to tell that it is a verb rather than a noun is to construct examples where it is modified by an adverb. Verbs can be modified by adverbs, but nouns cannot: Her hair began to change gradually to gray. It’s interesting to think about how people gradually change throughout their lives. In sentences with ...


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Transitive and intransitive are not semantic categories--categories based on a verb's meaning--but syntactic categories: categories based on the syntactic constructions into which a verb may enter. Arrive and laugh are intransitive because neither† takes an object, which is likewise a syntactic semantic category: not a "receiver" (which is a semantic ...


2

The knowledge of one's existence is generally referred to as consciousness or self-awareness, and one of the key symptoms of consciousness is thinking. Therefore, one could loosely use think as a synonym of the word you're looking for - which likely doesn't exist. Of course, we can think about many things other than existence, but, philosophically speaking, ...


2

Sometimes you have to drop a particular style in favour of another. As many users have already mentioned, there is no verb in English which means "knowledge of one's existence". The terms id (the part of the mind in which innate instinctive impulses and primary processes are manifest), ego, and superego are sometimes used in connection with Alzheimer. ...


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The phenomenon and label of the change is one thing, and the result is labeled another thing. In the specific community (of aviation; I don't think I've heard this at all before so I'm assuming it is limited to here), it is simply a change in syntax accompanied by semantic drift. The result, where a passive form is interpreted actively, is called a ...


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Crying makes better sense if it is a participle. It behaves like a verb, for instance, when an adverb or an yet another object is added: E.g.(1) He discovered the team sunbathing happily. (2) He got everyone baking cakes. The present participle is generally used when the object is performing the action, the past participle when it happens to ...


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No, the third form is the normal one, and does not imply a reference to an earlier time (that would be "I asked him if he had been well"). The other two are both, at best, dubious. "I asked him if he were well" is probably not grammatical in current English, as it is a subjunctive form, which is only used for irrealis (counter-factual) conditions. It may ...


1

In the first sentence, "change" is being used as an infinitive. An infinitive is not itself a verb. The verb is this sentence is "began" because that is the action that the subject "hair" is performing. In this case, "to change" is modifying or describing the verb "began," so it is acting as an adverb. And began is the verb in the sentence. (By the way, I ...


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You might go with the hyphenated verb self-cognize, as in "They lose the ability to memorize. To understand. To self-cognize." To cognize means "to perceive; become conscious of; know" (here). Thus, to self-cognize means "to perceive or become conscious of or know one's self." This is tantamount to knowing one exists.


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As sumelic points out in a comment above, the word acknowledge in the phrase "provided he acknowledge the existence of a Supreme Being" is a subjunctive, and the tense is present. The sense of the phrase is if he satisfies the prerequisite of recognizing and affirming the existence of a Supreme Being. The full provision that the OP quotes from is ...


1

I went to http://babynames.net/names and found the following (just for A and B). There is more information there about the names and famous people who had the name. "Blossom", "Bond", "Branch", "Brand", "Bud".



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