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The term appease itself is fairly neutral: appease - verb pacify or placate (someone) by acceding to their demands. assuage or satisfy (a demand or a feeling). It's not defined as being disparaging, and you can use it fairly neutrally. I appeased my growling stomach by eating a sandwich. We appeased the opposing parties, by ...


4

Postponed Tasks Postpone: 1. to put off to a later time; defer: 2. to place after in order of importance or estimation; subordinate (dictionary.com)


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I checked out page 228 of the book (thanks to your precise reference). In the said context, draw will mean attract or bring upon itself. This usage is akin to: This form of felony usually draws (attracts) a year of imprisonment. or: He drew the ire of his peers with his controversial remarks. Also, the word within in this context is not ...


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Envy (as a verb) may not necessarily imply a wish to lose or subsume one’s own identity in favor of another’s, but I think it is as close a word as you will find.


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Full Answer I worked. I did work. The word did in the second sentence is an example of do-support. This occurs because of the special role of auxiliary verbs in English. (I have changed the order of the examples for easier reading.) English auxiliary verbs Most verb phrases in English involve at least one AUXILIARY verb. These verbs appear before the ...


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The It in the sentence here is the dummy subject it inserted by Extraposition. That means the clause in question is a subject complement that's been displaced. Travelling to the US took me five hours. To travel to the US took me five hours. Notice that without extraposition the infinitive subject seems awkward, but the gerund sounds fine. That's why most ...


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Deprioritize/deprioritized and abandoned come to mind when I think of a list of items in this manner. Example would be 'The Deprioritized List of _' or 'The Abandoned _ After seeing your comment I would simply suggest interrupted.


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One person seeks to appease another if the latter has some need and the power to satisfy that need at the former's expense. By appeasing the latter, i.e. satisfying their need, the former can avoid the latter's self-serving behavior and the expense it levies against the former. Appeasement is often considered the "easy way out" as it's typically quicker, ...


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Bob did what he could to appease them. I would consider them to be the insulted party here. Appease is being used in the sense of soothing or pacifying. Adults don't need to be soothed or pacified.


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Appeasement as a national policy got negative connotation during WWII: "The term is most often applied to the foreign policy of the British Prime Minister Neville Chamberlain towards Nazi Germany between 1937 and 1939. His policies of avoiding war with Germany have been the subject of intense debate for seventy years among academics, politicians and ...


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Superseded? In the context of "The superseded"


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"On hold", "Set aside", and "Later" might also be good headings if you're looking for something less formal. All along the same lines as @Chris Sunami's popular "Postponed".


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As this is related to programming workflow, a computer term would probably be in order. From Wikipedia: In computing, preemption is the act of temporarily interrupting a task being carried out by a computer system, without requiring its cooperation, and with the intention of resuming the task at a later time. Such a change is known as a context ...


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"Downgraded Priorities" can describe the now lesser-important tasks and projects.


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I cannot define the rules, but the first statement implies "[doing something] took five hours [whilst you were] travelling to the US". If you want to use "travelling " you should say "Travelling to the US took me five hours". i.e. "It took me five hours to [do something]" or "[doing something] took me five hours".


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"Could" is a modal verb in English that has various meanings in various sentences. This is more of a grammar for usages of modal verbs that you could have found by searching, but anyhow, I always find subscription-only LDOCE pretty helpful, so I'm quoting its definitions here: Past ability: used as the past tense of 'can' to say what someone was able ...


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If they were sick, you could nurse them; if they were children, you could mind or simply watch them. In a bit of a stretch, you might perhaps be able to comfort or guard someone. If you don’t mind phrasal verbs — and you shouldn’t — then you could watch over or look after someone easily enough. But I get the idea that you mean something more like babysit ...


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The answer to the question that I think you're asking is "you wouldn't". You can't just magically figure out the meaning of every word just by using context clues. To "figure out" the definition of the word, you'd look the word up in a dictionary, exactly like you've already done.



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