Hot answers tagged

4

The sentence I have lived my entire life in the United States, and to learn more about the life my parents had lived as children was an incredible experience. is fine. Replacing to learn with learning is OK too. To learn (an infinitive) and learning (a gerund) both work because both function as nouns. An infinitive may function as a subject, ...


2

Yes, the grammar is off for all the sentences. It should say: Metal is used for energy. It represents speed. Metal is used for imaging. It represents recording. Metal is used for protection. It represents security. Metal is used for playing. It represents inspiration. It's good to use periods for every sentence, I think. The first two sentences still ...


1

I believe either one is actually correct, since the thing that determines the verb's case is the noun that comes first in the predicate nominative expression (on the left side of the imaginary equals sign). In this sentence, that first noun is what, which is technically a pronoun, but stands in for the noun that comes later. But of course, at this point in ...


1

I'm a bit out of my comfort zone on this one, but I believe the sample sentence is an example of an inverse copular construction. In the inverse copular constructions, the copula agrees with the singular predicative expression to its left as opposed to with the plural subject to its right. Interestingly, this phenomenon seems to be limited to ...


1

The first is grammatically correct since we'll want are to agree with books: What he is looking for are books written by Jane Austin. And this might be a bit awkward to say, so we can restructure it to something like the below, which makes the verb agreement a bit more obvious, I think: The books, written by Jane Austin, are what he's looking for. ...


1

Sometimes, English doesn't seem to work logically. An indefinite article is supposed to be placed before a singular noun or noun phrase. A month is a long period. *A two months is a long period. (Ungrammatical) But depending on how you perceive two months, you can treat two months as a singular unit (quantity of time) as in: Two months is a long ...


1

I can't help but notice a similarity between sentences containing the construction you've isolated (indefinite + adjective + unit of measurement) and sentences containing collective or group nouns like 'committee'. They both can appear with indefinite articles in singular and plural contexts, for example: It was an amazing two days. [singular] They were an ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible