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6

I would use "are" in this context, even though the word "family" could go either way. Even so, I think that "are" is more suitable because you are labelling multiple people as biologists. However, the sentence could be worded in a better way, like: 1) Everyone in her family is a biologist. 2) All of her family members are biologists. That way, there ...


3

This one is right: There is 1 apple and 1 orange available This is wrong: There are 1 apple and 1 orange available. I would personally say There is an apple and an orange available. This is now wrong 1 apple and 1 orange is available This is right (almost): 1 apple and 1 orange are available. But again, I would say An ...


3

TL;DR: Usually choose are. The question asks which of these two “is actually correct”: Two is better than one. Two are better than one. Unfortunately, there can be no answer to that question. It’s a leading question. The problem is that the question by its nature forces the answerer to concede that only one of them is “correct”, necessarily ...


2

The correct answer is: The shipped order has been dropped. The other sentence is incorrect because the verb does not agree with the noun. If you wanted the second sentence to be correct, you would need to change the noun from singular to plural. Then the sentence would be: The shipped orders have been dropped.


2

I would only treat a compound subject "X and Y" as singular if it were a compound phrase that very often occurs together and which people conceptualize as a single thing. For example, I might say "this rod and reel is all tangled up", or "that mortar and pestle is for sale", or "my gin and tonic is not strong enough". In the examples you cite here, I would ...


2

In your specific case I would say "are". It is not a property of the family to be biologists, rather you are using the group as a way to designate that all its members have some property. Interestingly, you could confound the issue by saying, colloquially, "Her whole family's biologists". A related question would be whether to use plural or singular when ...


1

"The process creates the prize" is correct, because the verb ("to create") must agree with the subject ("The process"). As the subject is third person singular you should use the proper form of the verb that is 'creates' here. By the way the sentence below is correct: "The process to create the prize...."


1

Many small companies have difficulty growing because the number of orders becomes too large to handle. If you cross out "of orders," which is a prepositional phrase modifying "number," you see that the verb become is referring to number. Number is singular, so you would use becomes. "Of orders" can be safely ignored because it is a modifier: ...


1

Many small companies have difficulty growing because the number of orders becomes too large to handle. In your sentence, you need to see what exactly is becomes describing. Whether you should use "become" or "becomes" depends on what the word intends to describe- number or orders. because the number of orders becomes too large to handle Here, ...


1

Part 1: I've not really ever heard a term used for this other than just gender neutralization. Since that can be done other ways, via he/she or most traditionally just using he, I'd say gender neutralization with singular they. Otherwise, I mean, we could go to the extreme and say gender neutralization via usurpation of the indeterminate/neuter/generic ...


1

Any: Determiner and Pronoun sg. & pl. Although its origins lie as an indeterminate derivative of one, which is of course singular by definition, any can be used both in the singular and the plural. Per the OED, in the singular, any means: A __ no matter which; a __ whichever, of whatever kind, of whatever quantity. And in the plural, any ...



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