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3

I'm astonished to see that as I write, the only response is 4 users (one commenter and 3 upvoters) claiming our listeners is singular, and another comment effectively endorsing the singular usage by converting the noun phrase to a group/collection of our listeners. I can only assume this sort of nonsense somehow arises from the AmE tendency to treat ...


2

It is definitely ungrammatical to say "*The management has never and will never closed the door to negotiations." The auxiliary "will" cannot be followed by a past participle; it has to be followed by an infinitive. It is grammatical to use both forms explicitly, as in "has never closed and will never close." A Google Books search reveals that people do ...


2

In the US, one wouldn't say, "The class are all working on a project together." One would say, "The class is all working on a project together." However, in the UK, it's said both ways: 5. Group nouns Some nouns, like army, refer to groups of people, animals or things, and we can use them either as singular nouns or as plural nouns. ...


1

As Choster says in a comment: Organization X, Organization Y, and Organization Z are each but Each of Organization X, Organization Y, and Organization Z is According to the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary, When each is used after a plural subject, it has a plural verb: They each have their own email address. And as you note, the subject of ...


1

Come what come may This could be rephrased in more modern grammar as "Let what may come, come!" Shakespeare's first "come" is a subjunctive form. The way it is used here is similar to how it is used in the phrase "be it enacted" (listed on Wikipedia as an example of an archaic English subjunctive), which has the meaning "Let it be enacted," or the ...


1

"Our listeners are what make our podcast possible" is grammatical. (But it took a little while for me to figure that out; thank you to everyone else who left comments and answers!) Like you, I felt uncomfortable with it after you brought it up, and I'll discuss the reasons for that below, but they are based on semantics rather than purely on the grammatical ...


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"There are" would clearly be correct in that sentence. However, I often hear "There's" in common speech (and have probably said it myself on occasion). P.S. I love Gino's (former Chicagoan).


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One of my dissertation advisees, Geoff Nathan, did his disertation on the acquisition of "there" in English, and found in his research that "there's" with a plural subject has become common (but not the uncontracted version). If you're asking about correctness, I can't help you, since that question is about social prejudice, not about the language.



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