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The subject is singular - it's either Tom or Theresa. The verb form usually depends on the principle of proximity: If you or Theresa has time ... If Theresa or you have time ...


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Let's say, I have two friends and each of them has a book. In other words the OP wants to emphasize that both his friends have got a book. Which of the sentences is correct? (1) 'Books of my friends are nice.' (2) 'Book of my friends is nice.' The first sentence proposed by the OP is neither idiomatic nor grammatical. A grammatical sentence ...


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It depends on context. -"What I said was wrong" emphasizes the fact that it was wrong at the moment I spoke. e.g. I said Mary would be waiting for you but what I said was wrong (she wasn't waiting for you) -"What I said is wrong" emphasizes the fact that it is wrong at the present moment and at any time. "I said the square root of 144 is 19. What I ...


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I agree that the option with "is" sounds better. However,it must be noted that a plural verb after "what" is also possible before a plural noun in an informal style.


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This is wrong - nothing to do with British English. 'are' should come in place of 'is'.



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