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18

Years, being plural, takes the plural form have. But the last few years, being a single span of time, takes the singular form, has. That's why they both sound okay to you. The first option is generally preferred in formal writing.


3

The rule I've been taught and apply in such situations is that both are correct but have different meaning. It depends on what you wish to convey to the recipient in regard to the relation between the element in the set (in this case - the years). Consider the following sentences. Big and tall is a concept of a store. Big and tall are words ...


2

Well, I believe the subject agreement in the first sentence is correct. "Is" refers to "Problem" which is singular. If you replaced "is" with "are" the sentence would read: The problem with this plan are..." which would be incorrect because, as I said earlier, problem is a singular word which needs a singular verb to follow. Your construction ...


2

The noun "number" by itself is singular, e.g., The number on his jersey is 88. However, the phrase "a number of" calls for a plural verb, e.g., A number of protesters were arrested. http://www.dailywritingtips.com/is-number-singular-or-plural/


2

Which embodiments the underlined preferred embodiments refer to is/are unclear. Looking at this sentence it might be easy to think that the subject of the verb BE, which heads the predicate is embodiments or perhaps preferred embodiments. However, the sentence has the following structure: X is unclear. We can see straight away from the sentence above ...


1

As the grammatical-number tag you have added implies, this is a matter of the 'number' of the word. As the dictionary definition says, trio is a singular noun, even though a trio is made up of three objects or people. So it is correct (and sounds correct to me) to use "was" with it instead of "were". In general, collective nouns such as "trio" take singular ...


1

If the socks started you wearing shoes, would you have any question about where the preposition went? I think that the reason that "from" is not usually dropped is mental association with "keep". "To keep you doing something" means the opposite of "to keep you from doing something", the preposition is vital, and I think that has carried over to other verbs....



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