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38

Putting formal salutations and complimentary closes into an e-mail tends to make them very formal compared to most e-mails. In my experience working in the software industry, people who always put them into ordinary business e-mails come off as unnecessarily formal. Often foreigners have been taught in English class to do this, and the result is that I ...


34

This is called "complimentary close". As reported by Oxford Handbook of Commercial Correspondence: If the letter begins with Dear Sir, Dear Sirs, Dear Madam, or Dear Sir/Madam, the COMPLIMENTARY CLOSE should be "Yours faithfully". If the letter begins with a personal name, e.g. Dear Mr James, Dear Mrs Robinson, or Dear Ms Jasmin, it should be "Yours ...


27

For informal e-mails: Best, or Regards, or Cheers, For formal e-mails: Kind regards, or Respectfully, or Sincerely,


21

The line is from a 50s rock n roll song. You can watch Bill Haley and the Comets performing this little ditty on Youtube See you later, Aligator It was a catchy line and it caught on in popularity, and I'd say it resisted until the late 60s until it gradually declined in usage. Ironically, this form of greeting is seen as being quaint and/or painfully ...


18

Business Email/Letter Closings: Best Regards, Cordially, Good Wishes, Many Thanks, Most Sincerely, Regards, Sincerely, Thank You, With Confidence. Informal Email/Letter Closings: Adios, Blessings, Cheerio, Cheers, God Bless, Gotta Boogie, Grace and Peace, Have Fun, Health and Happiness, Keep the Faith, Later Vader, Later Alligator, Lots of Love, ...


17

"Yours sincerely" and "Yours faithfully" now sound somewhat formal and I'd advise against them unless your email is otherwise official or formal in nature. "Best regards" (or just "Br") is, in my experience, extremely common in business emails, and a safe choice for many situations. "Best wishes," is also a common alternative that falls into this category. ...


13

I'll tend to use "Best regards," for anything even semi-formal, including correspondence with people in a business context whom I don't know very well. When I use to work at NEC, it was considered the way you must sign off your emails when dealing with any of the Tokyo managers or engineers, and so it kind of just stuck. For less formal, it'll be "Thanks" ...


11

I've been taught the following distinction: Use "Yours sincerely" when you know the person you are addressing, i.e. Mr. Smith. Use "Yours faithfully" when you are starting your letter with Dear Sir/Madam, or a similar construction. That being said, it has been my experience that these are used less and less, especially in electronic communications. I ...


10

To me, as an American, it doesn't really get interpreted other than to flag to me that the writer is speaking British English. I have no idea when it is or is not proper to use "cheers" in British English, so it sort of gets ignored as to whether this is a formal or informal way of signing off. Internationally, it's probably best to stick to a more formal ...


10

Yes, many use that way, also in "Best Regards". But, especially if we're talking about some official/formal email, I'd suggest to write according to the normal rules of orthography. In that case, write them like this: "Best regards", "Thanks and regards" or "Yours faithfully", etc.


9

As a contractor I tend to just use: Yours, I like to think it implies their 'ownership' of me for that time. The longer versions do feel too formal for e-mail, or too loaded with meaning. Otherwise I use the ever popular: Regards,


8

There seems to be a great uncertainty among business people on how to close - and address - emails. Looking at my emails, I have found that a lot of people simply have a template, which either has their name and position/contact details, or that preceded by "Regards"/"Kind Regards". I personally dislike "regards", because it is obvious that no-one ever ...


8

John S. Locke states in The Art of Correspondence (1884): In closing a letter never subscribe yourself Yours, &c. &c. is an abbreviation of etc., which is an abbreviation from the Latin words et cetera, meaning and others, or, and so forth; forth means onward or forward. Hence there can be no propriety in saying I am yours and others, or I am ...


8

There's a difference between a complete, grammatically-correct sentence and a greeting. If I was writing a complete sentence, I would write "I wish you a merry Christmas and a happy New Year." But if I was just greeting someone, I'd say, "Merry Christmas!", not "A Merry Christmas". It's like when you write a title or a headline, you often leave out words, ...


8

The comma is the only acceptable punctuation to place after the valediction: Sincerely, John Doe This is because the period is only necessary at the end of a sentence or abbreviation. The comma, on the other hand, usually separates related phrases within a sentence. In this case, the context is not a sentence (Sincerely, John Doe), but convention ...


7

As Martha says, many thanks is perfectly idiomatic. However, it is indeed an oddly isolated idiom: most other constructions which try to treat thanks as a plural noun are ungrammatical (eg *lots of thanks), and there’s certainly no such thing as *a thank. In the sense of “feelings of gratitude” it can be used either as a mass noun (thanks is due to God for ...


7

I think it would be stretching a point to rail against capitalising "Regards" in OP's example, though in most cases people only capitalise the first word. I believe the intention here may be to convey both "single-word sign-off's" in a single phrase, where either on its own would obviously be capitalised. Though as @Alenanno points out, it's not uncommon to ...


7

As far as I know, the expression comes from a song by Bill Haley and the Comets, one of the earliest rock and roll groups, in which the chorus included the words: See you later alligator After 'while crocodile To use it now, as I’m sure some do, seems very dated, unless, of course, it is done in a spirit of irony.


6

As an American English native speaker, I interpret it as "Thanks/Have a great day from someone from England (or possibly Australia)". Not that they were intending the "from England" part - that is just my interpretation. Edit: I do find myself using it sometimes lately :) Also 'no worries', but I have some Australian friends, so I probably picked it up ...


6

Yes, many thanks is perfectly proper, grammatical, standard English. It is appropriate to use wherever "thanks" (as opposed to "thank you") would be acceptable.


6

When I was a kid, my grandfather used to say this to my brother and I when we left his house. He would say, "See you later, alligator" and we would say "After awhile, crocodile!" and then he would come back with "By the light of the moon, racoon!", a phrase he just added on. We were little kids, so that always got us. We could never come up with "Gotta ...


6

"Goodbye" is derived from God be with you, as are many valedictions. "Take care" is sort of threadbare. "Farewell" seems antiquated. "Bon Voyage" is great if you're French. Be well, good fortune, until we meet again I do like the Vulcan Valediction, live long and prosper. Namaste is very respectful. It is spiritual, however; it can be interpreted ...


6

"Greetings", by definition, should only be at the beginning of a letter. "Wishes", on the other hand, can go at the end :-) Something I write often is "best wishes from [wherever I'm currently at, if I'm on vacation]" - and such a structure is definitely appropriate at the end of a letter. That said, Jon is also correct that sometimes mentioning where you ...


5

If rendered this way: "Best Regards," then you have an example of honorific capitals. This is an error committed by those who do not understand the rules of written English. Of course it should be "Best regards," as only the first word of a sentence (and any proper nouns) should be capitalized. But some people don't know that, and instead have internalized ...


5

According to Fowler's Dictionary of Modern English Usage, yours &c was a common letter form that preceded one's signature in a letter. There seems to be no clear answer on what it expands to, but this Google thread offers some direction: I believe this reflects much earlier usage, when in Europe letters were signed under formal expressions or ...


4

It seems to me that emails were originally designed to be written in memo style (hence From, To, Subject, etc.), for which it is standard to have no closing expression. Of course, many emails are written more to resemble a letter, for which other conventions apply.


4

For our corporate emails, amongst different departments, we use the "neutral": Regards,


4

I am an American English native speaker, but I've been exposed to the British usage so much that I've ended a couple of emails with it myself. It always seemed like a fairly reasonable signoff.


4

Do what thou wilt shall be the whole of the Law, In the US military, we use Respectfully and Very Respectfully or even Hooah!. I use Respectfully when I am closing a formal letter to a peer. I also use Respectfully in any letter which might otherwise be considered informal, but in which I append my rank to my name, because the fact that I'm writing in my ...



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