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Remember that automation is what robotics does. Materials in the provided context would be synonymous with content (sometimes referred to online as OC for Original Content). Therefore, are you sure you are not re-inventing a Content Management System like Drupal?


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The word material is used here meaning: the things that are used for making or doing something (LDOCE) In this sense, dictionaries list it both as uncountable => material and countable, plural => materials. So, all three examples are grammatically correct. ODO Advanced Learner's dictionary gives examples that are closest to your intended use: ...


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My suggestion: Robotics and programming documents/resource sharing system.


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Study materials and teaching materials are two different things. One uses study materials to study, whereas teaching materials are used to teach.


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'Detritus' is also an acceptable noun. I'm surprised that the pedantry pick that up...


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You're right. Electron is a countable noun, and once it's pluralised to electrons it needs many. Mass/uncountable nouns are always singular: as much furniture as possible; or charge or space or current or gravy. The only countable noun I can think of which might take much is "mushy peas". But again, mushy peas come as an amorphous blob of green stuff. It's ...


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Use a proper dictionary, which indicates whether a noun is countable or uncountable, e.g., http://www.ldoceonline.com/dictionary/business As you can see, some of the meanings there are listed as countable, some as uncountable. Yours is 2: busiā€§ness 2 company [countable] an organization such as a company, shop, or factory that ...


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If condors sound anything like turkey vultures (and I suspect that they do), you'd do better with All night I heard the grunting and snuffling of the condors. (When they roost, turkey vultures sound a lot like foraging bears.) Or you might say All night I heard the croaking and rattling of the ravens. or All night I heard the cawing of the ...


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Business can be an uncountable noun, when referring to the activity in general. But it can also be a countable noun, when referring to a specific instance, like a corporation or a single-proprietorship. "He has/owns many businesses" would be correct if using the second sense.



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