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Sometimes words are left out when the meaning is clearly understood. This is especially true with some (not all) uncountable nouns—also called mass nouns—and countable ones (count noun). You need to look up the word in a dictionary to check if it can be used either way. "I would like a cup of espresso, please" = "I'd like an espresso, please". He ...


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Noncountable nouns have countable uses, e.g., I'd like to order a beer. Beer, being a liquid, is noncountable; however, "a beer," means a serving of beer, which is countable. But this is independent of whether noncountable nouns take articles. They may do so even when they're used in a noncountable context: The company produces a beer without ...


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This is the entry from Oxford Advanced Learners' Dictionary where it's stated to be both countable and uncountable. There is no any example however. Oxford Advanced Learner’s Dictionary, 8th edition li • quid noun, adjective BrE / lɪkwɪd / NAmE / lɪkwɪd / noun  word origin  thesaurus  example bank [ uncountable ,  countable ] a substance ...


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As Catija mentions in the comments, "liquid" may also be used as an uncountable noun. Many nouns that are otherwise non-count (let's use as an example noun "X") may be used as count nouns with the implication being "a specific type of noncount noun X". This seems to apply to most words for states of matter. We can speak of "liquid," "gas," "fluid" but we ...


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Here's a point (ahem) to consider: A point is not always defined by multiple datum such as the values of two or more axes. "One datum point on the number line had a value of five." "One data point on the graph represented the coordinates [2,4]." Does the point represent one or more datum?


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I expect the second sentence to be right because in the given scenario alarm is an definite noun. Am I right ? Yes, you are correct The second one uses a definite article, so a definite noun is definitely correct to use. There are only two articles. the and a(n). The means your are talking about a specific alarm (one alarm). A(n) means you ...


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Depends on what kind of alarm you're speaking of. If there is some kind of random alarm which nobody much knows about, then its 'an' alarm (that is, an alarm which is not specific). However, if you've established that something is happening, lets say — this boat of ours is sinking — then it would be 'the' alarm, since you have established context for the ...


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No, the second noun may be noncountable -- bear baiting, Bieber fever, computer services.



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