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I agree with E. Ashworth. "I'll have two waters," sounds like asking for two types of water, although, in context, it could means servings or containers of water.


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I think the rule (or one of the rules) you're looking for here is that some countable nouns in foreign languages are uncountable in English. This is apparent in nouns such as music. However, as far as I know, there is really no solid way to figure out which words these are — you just have to memorize them. Additionally, another rule that pertains to ...


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"a bewildering amount of choice" is a sentence from a dictionary. I think it should be ""a bewildering amount of choices" 'choice' is one of those English words that can be countable or uncountable. We normally use 'amount' with uncountable nouns and 'number' with countable ones. Examples A large amount of sugar. (uncountable) A large amount of ...


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Mostly, age used in characterising individuals is countable. Old age is a set phrase. There are a number of other expressions of the same shape, mostly obsolescent, such as mature age, marriagable age; but these are only used with of: of mature age etc. As for why, that is no more answerable than most questions about why in language.


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So that we can leave poetic usage aside, let's look for some common sense tests: Andrew proposed "too much ______ " I like to ask a student if the thing is like water. This seems to enable them to figure it out quite quickly. How much vs. how many? Can I make a sentence with "one ______"? With "two ______"? Tests 3 and 4, applied to activity, show that ...


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When you see mold growing in your bathroom, it might look like someone just painted a line of black along the edge of the tile. But it is made up of many tiny unicellular organisms. If you study soils, you'll learn that there are three types of mineral particles found in soils -- sand, silt and clay. Sand particles are the largest, clay particles are the ...


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I would say that this is not a good exercise, and you should advise the author not to require the student to distinguish between these two purely conceptual classes. If you two can't agree on it, it seems to me extremely unfair to expect a (possibly non-native) student to correctly guess which one of your opinions ends up being marked as "correct" (because ...


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Most of the nouns referred to can be conceptualised, they elude our sensory organs but that doesn't preclude them to be countable. In other words abstract nouns can be countable. REIGN is a countable noun. It could have been better if you had left ABSTRACT NOUNS out of your category of countable/uncountable, just limiting yourself to words as simple as ...


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"Reign" is an interval of time. There's no reason that you can't consider several of these. Consider the book The History of Scotland During the Reigns of Queen Mary and of King James VI by Robertson and Stewart. You may also discuss a reign of terror in Cambodia under Pol Pot or the Reign of Terror in revolutionary France. All of your examples of ...


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I think reign is a countable noun because when we say "During his reign ..." it means that his reign was not infinite thus it can be counted.


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Perhaps try: In a world of flourishing globalization ...



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