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I was once told that nouns are either countable or uncountable. Then I learned that some nouns can be used as both countable or uncountable. Now, I don't think I have encountered a so-called uncountable noun that cannot also be used as a countable noun. Sometimes this involves a change in meaning (the speed of light; the lights on my Christmas tree; Time ...


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The nouns which can be countable or uncountable depending on the context are originally pluralia tantum, i.e. uncountable. But they can be used in singular if there is a portion of the substance referred by the noun. The sun was blazing and there was no pool in view. He was dying for a water. Mother always told her daughter that carbonated ...


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Almost anything normally uncountable - certainly it applies to most food items - can be made countable if one uses a simple plural as an alternative to varieties of. e.g. There are countless cheeses (Varieties of cheese), whiskies, wines, beers, yoghurts, breads, meats, hams, etc. It can also apply as substitute in the case of bottles of, jars of, cups of ...


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Among other things, just about any liquid could be a countable and uncountable (mass) noun in the same word. Take beer, for example. Give me some beer. [mass noun] Give us five beers. [count noun]


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Are you Singaporean or Malaysian? I have spent a lot of time in SE Asia and am familiar with the idioms. Often locals will use 'last time', when they mean 'previously'. e.g. Before you lived in Kuantan, where did you live 'last time'. I have got used to this now, and know what people mean, and have become enchanted by the dialect and way of speaking. But ...


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All the time means constantly, continually. Time in this sense is not countable. Every means each, or all events, (countable); but not always (unless we use an idea like every moment of every day). If I cry every time Mount Vesuvius erupts, (without exception, but never in my lifetime) and you cry all the time (never stopping), you cry a lot more than I ...


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I would say: "The right to freedom of speech" means you are entitled to this right, but may not have it; "The right of freedom of speech" means that it is a right you have and may excercise (it could be enshrined in the constitution). ...but I am a foreigner (from the Netherlands).


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"The right of freedom of speech" suggests an established right among a list of established rights. Which right are we talking about here? Oh, the right of freedom of speech. The to in "the right to freedom of speech" suggests some kind of movement towards that right. It may be that the right is not yet fully recognized us such. Or maybe the status of the ...


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To my American ear, "the right to freedom of speech" and "the right of freedom of speech" are essentially the same thing, although the latter sounds a little awkward because of the repetition of the word "of". As to the second question, unless the right to freedom of speech is the formal name of a section of your constitution (such as the Bill of Rights in ...


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When you say "I like meat" you are speaking about meat in general, that is, all possible kinds of meat. This is, as noted, a non-count noun. When you speak of eating "it" tonight, you are not referring to meat in general, so the pronoun is not appropriate, you are not referring back to "meat " in the sense you used it. You're really talking about a piece of ...



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