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0

You can count them, but only if it's logical to do so. And likewise, a 'countable' noun can be used as uncountable: "The cherry tree grows well in this region."


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As Gregory Bateson put it in "Every Schoolboy Knows", The division of the perceived universe into parts and wholes is convenient, and may be necessary, but no necessity determines how it shall be done. It is tricky, and it's not ideal, but there you are. That's language. In English, nouns that normally refer to objects that can be identified as ...


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There are some nouns whose plurality (or singularity) is expressed in an auxiliary fashion (this is, by counting an auxiliary noun). For example if there is corn on the table: There are twenty kernels of corn on the table. There are twelve cobs of corn on the table. There are seven ears of corn on the table. If there is bread on the table: There are ...


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I think in most languages there are nouns that are uncountable when used normally. When you think of water you normally think of the water of rivers or lakes or of the sea and you say a lot of water and you don't count and say "in the bucket there are five waters". The same is true for sand, snow, heat, cold, love etc. Of course, such words can have special ...


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In fact, mass nouns are routinely, and quite acceptably, treated as countable when they are taken to refer to individual items, collections, or quantities that are conceptually separable from one another: Diner: What kinds of water do you have? Server: In addition to tap water, we have three different bottled waters: Perrier, Aquafina, and Dasani. ...


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The term "whitespace" (without a space between "white" and "space") is, I think, borrowed from computing, in which characters that produce no on-screen glyphs, but only serve to separate groups of visible characters, are referred to collectively as "whitespace characters" (e.g. space, tab, new line). Since whitespace can refer to any one, or sequence, of ...


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If you do work on an object in twice the usual time, your power output is? Obviously some amount of work has been done. Let's call that amount n. You are correct that based on the statement given, we cannot say that the value of n is 17, or 23, or any other number. The statement also references "the usual time", which we can call t, and says that ...


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I am just curious if I am missing something in that statement that tells me how much work was done. Based on that statement, you cannot tell how much work was done. But based on the problem it's somewhat implied that the amount of work does not matter, but the rate of work that matters. The change in rate then will produce a proportional change to the ...


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The answer is Yes, experience can be countable or uncountable. Countable: She had several religious experiences in Lourdes. Uncountable: She has more experience with that than I do.


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There is more than one meaning to the word 'experience,' the primary meaning being that of the mass noun. However, there is also the secondary meaning, which is countable: ODO experience 2 An event or occurrence which leaves an impression on someone: audition day is an enjoyable experience for any seven-year old



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