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You're right. Electron is a countable noun, and once it's pluralised to electrons it needs many. Mass/uncountable nouns are always singular: as much furniture as possible; or charge or space or current or gravy. The only countable noun I can think of which might take much is "mushy peas". But again, mushy peas come as an amorphous blob of green stuff. It's ...


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Use a proper dictionary, which indicates whether a noun is countable or uncountable, e.g., http://www.ldoceonline.com/dictionary/business As you can see, some of the meanings there are listed as countable, some as uncountable. Yours is 2: busi‧ness 2 company [countable] an organization such as a company, shop, or factory that ...


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If condors sound anything like turkey vultures (and I suspect that they do), you'd do better with All night I heard the grunting and snuffling of the condors. (When they roost, turkey vultures sound a lot like foraging bears.) Or you might say All night I heard the croaking and rattling of the ravens. or All night I heard the cawing of the ...


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Business can be an uncountable noun, when referring to the activity in general. But it can also be a countable noun, when referring to a specific instance, like a corporation or a single-proprietorship. "He has/owns many businesses" would be correct if using the second sense.


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X shouldn't be used in code would usually mean any code, ie, this is a general guideline. Conversely X shouldn't be used in the code limits your scope to some specific code already under discussion. Off-topic, I agree with the former statement, but might use the latter to avoid unnecessary arguments about generalities.


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You're right about code being uncountable in that sense. Oxford lists this sense of code as a mass noun. But I believe your question is regarding the sentence you quoted. In that particular case, you are talking about code that is implied to be previously mentioned. You're going to have to include the the. Administrative / system user passwords ...


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Your actual garbage disposing action is picking bags or packs or containers with garbage. Consider these: I picked up two bags of waste yesterday. I picked up two packs of trash yesterday. The only thing I know that can be a countable piece of trash is a disposable. Disposables are diapers, syringes, cartridges, etc.


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Perhaps Rubbish - Things that are no longer useful. http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/rubbish


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It depends on the situation... Usually, they are interchangeable, but there are cases where this is not so. If, for example, you were talking about a murder: "These blood-soaked items of clothing...", would refer to complete garments - while "These blood-soaked pieces of clothing..." would be parts of a garment that were ripped or cut off.


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There is no difference; "piece" and "item" are merely different counters used with clothing. Note that "article" is also used. So the statements . . . three pieces of clothing . . . three items of clothing . . . three articles of clothing are functionally the same.


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I would usually use a phrase like "lots of" or "loads of" instead. You could still say "I've got myriad problems. Some usage examples from major publications- Unlike other Iraqi cities that are more ethnically and religiously uniform, Mosul is home to myriad communities. (Economist Apr 9, 2015) Its title ballad remains Mr. Bennett’s vocal signature ...


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I think it is a fairly common expression in writing, as Ngram shows, and also in common speech. It is also used as an adjective, see usage note below: n. A large, indefinite number: a myriad of microorganisms in the pond; myriads of stars in the galaxy. Archaic: Ten thousand. adj. Constituting a very large, indefinite number; ...



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