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It looks like this sentence means that the cost of reporting half-yearly is included in overall project management costs. So no report, but the costs for reporting come under overall project management costs.


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I think that any type of product that keeps women's (or men's) hair in place could reasonably be called a "hair restraint." In the United States, however, the food service industry and various state and municipal statutes have adopted "hair restraints" to refer to what we used to call "hair nets," so it may have ruined the more general sense of the term. ...


4

Depends on the audience. For a general audience, it seems shinobi would not be understood. Wikipedia has a list of English words of Japanese origin, and shinobi is not on that list, not that educated native speakers would be expected to know all those words, however. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_English_words_of_Japanese_origin Some native ...


2

I know in this case you're looking to translate a specific Dutch turn of phrase, but in general, I'd say the clause at the end of the sentence isn't needed — Could you give an example? On it's own, the definition of the word example already conveys the intention that you'd like something explained more clearly via reference to a concrete case.


2

In the UK we use the specific phrase 'stop and search' (sometimes hyphenated, 'stop-and-search'; either can be correct) to describe police stopping a person on the street and briefly searching them for illegal materials. In news items and popular discourse the phrase is primarily used in the context (as you described) of people of visible minority ...


3

Could you add an example to illustrate the answer?


0

Eh, I disagree with some of the answers here. See, you can grow up fluent in two languages and still convey the meaning of the words into both. I have an uncle who grew up knowing three: English, Japanese, and Korean. He knew all three since he could talk, and it 100% fluent in all of them. Just because someone else can't translate both the words and the ...


2

Ngram shows that the expression is used in the UK too also in the version 'kiss my arse' since the 40s. Kiss my arse! (British & Australian taboo!) also Kiss my ass! (American & Australian Taboo) something that you say in order to tell someone that you will not do what they want you to. He asked for money, and I told him he could ...


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The soldier is a sniper using a specialized foreign made rifle and insanely took the paddles meaning he paddled like crazy to get away. I interpreted the entire mission from feelings of anticipation and trepidation, stealth.......until the deed is done, "beyond the rifle range". St Peter will I be allowed in to Heaven? As a soldier doing his duty questioning ...


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I use the expression "true friends", but only in texts/discussions that also mention "false friends".


3

Shakespeare could have written this, except that he would have written "am become", not "have become". Shakespeare didn't write in Old English, by the way; he wrote in Early Modern English.



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