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I've always thought the word for this was needy (or neediness). needy 2. Wanting or needing affection, attention, or reassurance, especially to an excessive degree. Note that the verb form (甘える, amaeru) means to behave like a spoiled child.


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Translating cultural phrases always intrigues me. I wonder if there is a systematic approach. So we are looking for a term that would describe a desire to be loved dependence or submission a pleasurable or "sweet" experience some degree of caprice or playfulness all but without negative connotation From ermanen's observation, many English words that ...


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I've never heard of amae before, but from the context that ermanen provides above, it sounds as though any English translation of the word would have to be tailored to the specific context in which the word arises. One aspect of term appears to be a sense of protectedness that might be be well represented by the word coziness. Merriam-Webster's Eleventh ...


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Another term with few negative connotations that stretches to satisfy the categories of familial, romantic, and workplace would be Adulatory, or someone exhibiting Adulation, which is a good term for children looking to please parents, or someone looking to please a romantic interest they see as more than a peer. And Adulation is the best one-word "feeling ...


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Yearning/longing for attention/love and basking in it seems to me a good description.


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To expect indulgence would come fairly close. A banal example: I ask my independent adult son to stop and buy a loaf of fresh bread before coming over to dinner. Due to our close rapport, I don't see this as being an unreasonable request even though I am perfectly capable of going down to the shops and buying the bread myself. It is because I am confident ...


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buffed up: polished, in this case by going at a gym from J. Green Cassell's Slang dictionary The definition gives you its origin too:-)


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Joseph Fitzgerald, Word and Phrase: True and False Use in English (1901) offers an interesting perspective on what Fitzgerald sees as a major change in the understood meaning of vain between 1611 (when translation of the King James version of the Bible was completed) and 1901 (when Fitzgerald was writing). He writes: The King James Bible has "in vain" ...


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There is a difference between read and read. One is present tense the other is past tense. This question has been beaten to death like a horse. Therefore, rather than using all the 'windfoggery,' allow me to simply define one at a time. TRANSLATION: It can be loose or tight, however which way, it must be in context. But even then, there are differing words, ...


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In spite of what is being said, I believe that "Happy Hour," traditionally after high tea (4pm) and before the evening meal (supper/dinner around 7 or 8pm) is a common tradition where not only are drinks cheaper in order for the establishment to attract a larger clientele in this off-hour, but often nibbles or little bite-sized food and appropriately small ...


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The purpose of masking out is explained in the passage, so I presume your query is about which part is masked out—the shape attached, or the remainder. Again, the passage explains that the attached piece "obstucts" the ink; that is, it cannot pass through in that area. This is similar to masking off areas you DON'T want to paint on, e.g., a car or a house. ...


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From (online) Oxford Dictionaries: vain(adjective) Having or showing an excessively high opinion of one's appearance, abilities, or worth. "their flattery made him vain" Synonyms: conceited, narcissistic, self-loving, in love with oneself, self-admiring, self-regarding, wrapped up in oneself, self-absorbed, self-obsessed, self-centred, ...


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Your question is A word or phrase for a person who acts or dresses like the weather is going to change suddenly Then in the content of your question you referred to the person trying to do a rain-dance. Therefore, I am presuming there are two-sides to the coin of your question. You wish to know how to say in English when a person dresses ...


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In American English, we would typically say they were daring the rain to come or daring the cold weather to come. For a slightly less aggressive phrase, you can also use asking for it to rain or asking for the cold weather, which has more of a connotation of ignorant action rather than deliberate provocation. Because of the somewhat whimsical nature of all ...


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That practice is called transcription: 1.2 A form in which a speech sound or a foreign character is represented: ODO Transliteration is not necessarily a phonetic operation: Transliterate: Write or print (a letter or word) using the closest corresponding letters of a different alphabet or language: ODO Because Arabic has a ...


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Nothing weird about it. "Visitor" is being used in a metaphorical sense to denote the next arriving item in the series of dishes that were sampled. The dishes were presumably brought to the table individually, as they were sampled. Yes, you could use "dish" or some other word, but likely this sentence is part of a longer article where "dish", "plate", et ...


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Visitor does sound weird to these English ears. Perhaps "arrival" is closer to the intention of the original author? It is commonly used for inanimate objects. The next arrival at our table was a dish of mackerel...


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Is the original in English? If so, yeah, visitor sounds weird. (Like the mackerel is still alive.) Use "dish," or "selection," or "presentation," or "plate" ("at or, to our table," will sound better in most cases than "of"). "The" before the dish would be used if it is a house special or if the chef or restaurant is known for it. (Otherwise, you don't need ...



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