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2

There, shepherds play their pipes Pan pipes, an early flute. (Example) and sigh with longing for flirtatious nymphs and goat-footed nature gods Pan was a nature god. He had goat's feet. play in the fields and woods.


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This use of "or" is essentially shorthand for the phrase "also known as" or "called": Could you keep a different kind of fast such as a fast of silence, or Maun Vrath? Could you keep a different kind of fast such as a fast of silence, also known as a Maun Vrath? Could you keep a different kind of fast such as a fast of silence, called a Maun ...


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I would offer the words clear or empty. My plate is clear/empty. My calendar is clear/empty. You can also say that you have ample spare time. And normally used for machinery but used for humans too, if something is not in use it is idle.


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There are exact opposites but the usage is not common as free and available in this sense. unbusy not busy, idle, unoccupied unbusied Not required to work; unemployed; not busy.


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In a metaphoric sense: Fallow: uncultivated for the current year. More literal: Quiescent: inactive, dormant Furloughed: unoccupied, inactive (usually due to lack of work)


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Free Available Leisurely (courtesy Andrew Leach) Cooling one's heels


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How about Inactive? in·ac·tive [in-ak-tiv] adjective not active: an inactive volcano. sedentary or passive: an inactive life. sluggish; indolent. Military . not on active duty. Chemistry . a. inert; unreactive. b. noting a compound that has no effect on polarized light. Or even quiet? (6, 7, and 13) qui·et1 [kwahy-it] ...


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I don’t know what the Japanese word is, or how it is used in Japanese. Is this “lack of something to do” actually desired by the non-worker, or forced upon him? That is, is this leisure or boredom? If the lack of busyness is leisure, then leisured would fit; if it’s boredom because he would rather be doing something, then bored would fit.


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Translation is meaning of something in language other than the one in which it was said/written. Transliteration gives the word from a different language in letters that you can understand so as to be able to pronounce it .


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We preface stuff like this in our corporate LMS with "in-class" or "instructor led".


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How about "classwork" and "seatwork?"


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One definition of a "workshop" is "a small establishment where manufacturing or handicrafts are carried on". These tend to be smaller than factories, but the real difference is that they don't mass-produce, tending towards high-quality, small-scale production. There is also "studio", but that tends to be for much smaller scale, personal art/design ...


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I have seen Manufaktur translated as Studio. Although more normally a place to produce artworks or designs, it has connotations in English of a place where quality articles are hand-made, or at least hand-finished.


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He has a bee in his bonnet about that lunch meeting. The "bee in his bonnet" idiom implies that he talks about that meeting to everyone, whether or not they are interested in that meeting. It implies that at least some people are not as obsessed with that meeting as he is.


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Are your ears burning? is pretty close. It comes from the old legend that you could tell if someone was discussing you out of earshot by the ears getting warm.


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I do not know of an exact phrase but there are a handful of related or similar sayings in English. The easiest is simply "talking about you": Oh, we weren't talking about you. This is often expressed after a generalizing statement in order to exclude present company: Men are boys. Oh! We weren't talking about you, Bob. This primarily differs from ...


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Polycopié comes from the name of the machine that was (back in the days) used to produce these. That machine was called a polycopieuse and somehow (don't ask me how) transfered ink on multiple pieces of paper via some alcohol based transfer method. Here's a video showing the process : Here's a video showing the process I know this is not an exact answer to ...


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In my experience in the US, this is typically called a handout, or it is referred to informally in class by the name(s) of the author(s) or a short title. Yes, that means that "handout" can be anything from a single, informal sheet passed out occasionally to a bound book (which is typically not available through other channels, etc., it might be written by ...


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A course-pack is a collection of articles or other documents, selected by a professor for use in place of (or sometimes in addition to) a textbook for a course, and usually bound in one of the ways described by ermanen.


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In general, they can be called softbound books. (or booklets) (or copy/copies) softbound (adj.): Not bound between hard covers Note: softbound is used as "soft bound" or "soft-bound" as well. "bound copy" is also used in universities, especially for thesis submissions. It is a more general term that can cover copies bound with different type of soft ...


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If it is bound rather than stapled, chapbook might work. The OED gives its definition as: A modern name applied by book-collectors and others to specimens of the popular literature which was formerly circulated by itinerant dealers or chapmen, consisting chiefly of small pamphlets of popular tales, ballads, tracts, etc. But I have seen it used for ...


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The video name is "Abwehrkette", so this would translate into something like "defense link/chain", wouldn't it? It certainly looks like a chain more than a sickle. But if there exists a move/positioning pattern in the defense that looks like a sickle, I don't see a problem translating it "defense sickle", or simply "sickle" when it's clear we are talking ...


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I would say "There are no buses scheduled for Baggersee at 3:00 AM" And of course, then put in when the next scheduled bus is!



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