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1

The Latin for it is statera which also means a 'weighing balance.' I don't know if the balance pole meaning is classical or medieval. If anyone can reproduce the OED entry they should find something under static and stater. I think it is a "static pole." But that is probably not current among funambulists. This illustration for the beginning of LIBRA is ...


0

I imagine the most likely term is 'pole'. "Hand me my pole". "Where did I leave my pole?" There is no other kind of pole used in wire-walking so I imagine the word 'balancing' would be superfluous.


3

One related expression I have heard is: "Trust is gained drop by drop, but lost by the bucketful". It's a strangely asymmetric process, isn't it? Building trust is incremental, but losing it is binary.


1

...it becomes one of those new internet words that no Chinese reader truly understands but they sort of get it just because they have seen it many times in the same context of praising an exceptional performance... There is actually nothing "wrong" with this; this is exactly how most people naturally learn the meaning of words. It also means that a ...


0

Possibly what you are looking for are serrated lock washers Reference: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Washer_(hardware)


11

In this context, "short" is an abbreviation of "sell short". Just as one buys a company's stock when one believes the stock price will go up, one short sells or shorts a company's stock when one believes the stock price will go down. From Investopedia: DEFINITION OF 'SHORT SELLING' The sale of a security that is not owned by the seller, or that ...


0

Fine Cut: The fine cut is the phase after the assembly edit and the rough cut [rough organiztion of scenes] stage. In this stage the music is finalised and an EDL is created to log the scenes. Overall, you eliminate any extraneous scenes or lines of dialogue and fix anything else that isn't working.


0

The nearest term I can think for this is "proofreading." For several years I was employed by a small-town newspaper as a proofreader. That is basically the last step in the checks-and-balances before the copy goes to press. I don't know how close "visioneren" for film compares to "proofreader" for printed medium, but it pretty much seems to be the last ...


1

Yes, French and Dutch is correct. The and indicates both are available, or implies you can only select on of the two options.


2

To vet is defined by Merriam-Webster as "to check (something) carefully to make sure it is acceptable".


1

Actually, the meaning is less about 'take' and more about 'task'. According to Online Etymology Dictionary, "task" in this sense is closer to an old meaning of "tax". http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=task So, "take someone to task" is more comparable to the expression: ("If you dance to the music, you have to) 'pay the piper'."


5

In English, to take someone to task means to reprimand them, that is, to criticize their failure of responsibility, which seems fairly close to the German usage, at least in the discomfort to the reprimanded party. But it doesn't necessarily contain the sense of asking for justification. For that you have to demand an explanation. When you want to make ...


2

Yes, "pre-screen." Go here: China's websites must pre-screen all videos under new censorship rules from its broadcasting regulator.


1

If nothing else that's suggested works, you could also use discipline as a verb: verb: to train (someone) to obey rules or a code of behavior, using punishment to correct disobedience. You could discipline a child for their bad behavior, for example.


4

Admonish might be the correct word. See also words like chastise, chide, reprimand, and scold.


3

If you're looking for something non-vulgar that conveys the same meaning, try "Loafing around" or "Goofing off" Other more specific phrases might be "Holding up the wall" or "Keeping the bench warm".


1

The past tense does not sound right to me, but a version of this term was actually used in Canada ca. 1980 and I'm fairly sure it would be understood today. Q: "What are you up to?" A: "Just f*cking the dog." The meaning was that the person was idle or engaged in pointless or useless activities. Source: personal experience


4

Also consider the word sanctimonious, which has the following definition in the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary sanctimonious: adjective derogatory Making a show of being morally superior to other people.


0

Hm, I am a programmer and not sure what that is supposed to be. A common feature of modern IDEs is syntax highlighting. Keywords are colored in order to make the code more readable. For example string literals in green numbers in blue classes and interfaces in a dark blue comments in gray In german there's not really a good translation, I've seen ...


2

I am not certain I agree with your description of the term (as described by you). In my opinion it is usually used for someone who is both concerned with being politically correct so as not to hurt people's feeling and also perceived (usually by conservatives) as dangerous naively. For example, someone who is concerned/angered by the current policy of ...


2

I would not say lin as in forest, but the word-sign lin means forest, and li-mei means beautiful. This is explaining the meaning of the Chinese word-signs. And I would not use the vague term characters. Character can mean a lot of things. Chinese signs are signs for a whole word, so word-sign would be the clearest designation. Often these word signs are ...


2

This is not transliteration, and I would not use the word spelling to describe this. Do you just want to tell people how it works, or are you trying to do some kind of translation? Here is a general explanation: Chinese writing uses characters, instead of letters, to write names. People will tell you how to write their names by giving other common ...


1

The word is likely transliteration, which is defined as "the conversion of a text from one script to another."


7

Self-righteous as mentioned in Chasly's answer comes very close. (His "prig" is probably a century out of date, CS Lewis was probably writing in the 1930s). Self-righteous does not necessarily follow moral rules : it can be combined with a good dose of hypocrisy to overcome that need. (The outspoken guardian of moral values, found half-naked with his ...


0

This Strippenkaart seems very like a carnet car‧net [countable] 1 British English a small book of tickets that you can use on trains, buses etc - Longman Although identified as BrE, it's French in origin. While the English seems to imply the use of a carnet essentially in travelling, it has a more general use in France. This might mean that the ...


0

Scrip Macmillan: a piece of paper that you use temporarily as money Wikipedia: Scrip (sometimes called chit) is a term for any substitute for legal tender and is often a form of credit. [...] Besides company scrip, other forms of scrip include land scrip, vouchers, token coins such as subway tokens, IOUs, arcade tokens and tickets, and points on some ...


3

A more casual term you might hear in American English is boy scout or girl scout, in reference to members of the Boy Scouts of America or Girl Scouts of the USA organizations, respectively. These organizations are designed to train their child members to grow into honorable, moral, and upstanding citizens, among other things. As a result, boy and girl scouts ...


2

Although this is not a single word, and describes the opinionated behaviour not the person, it does combine egotism, haughtiness, obstinacy and the claim of moral superiority. "get on your high horse" - English Dictionary Cambridge to start talking angrily about something bad that someone else has done as if you feel you are better or more clever ...


15

Moralist reproduces the good denotation of gutmensch with a similar dark connotation: noun 1.0 A person who teaches or promotes morality. 1.1 A person given to moralizing. ODO Almost everyone considers their own morality to be good. Most consider their moral judgments to be superior, or at least on par with the best, but in the modern mind, ...


3

The OP lists as a criterion: "There is this sense of entitlement and an attitude like that of a teacher." This brings to mind schoolmarm, in the derivative, neuter, non-misogynist sense: A person, male or female, who exhibits characteristics attributed to schoolteachers of the old times (as strict adherence to arbitrary rules, is strict on those who ...


16

The commonest expression I can think of to express boredom is "to twiddle one's thumbs". "Screwing the pooch", while an idiom, has an entirely different meaning: to spectacularly mess up, usually in an embarrasingly public way.


7

A brief look at online discussions in English about German and Germans seems to reveal that the word is somewhat politicized and means someone who is a naive moralizer. One post suggested consulting a lexicographic site: "Let's just consult with the Duden :) Gutmensch, der Usage: Mostly derogative or ironical Meaning: [naive] person whose behaviour ...


9

I don't know how commonplace it is, but the phrase jerking around is what I would use in this situation: "Quit jerking around and do something productive!"


5

These aren't nouns, but from your description, the adjectives "holier-than-thou" and "patronizing" come to mind. Also, upon further reflection, I'm adding "condescending" and "zealot" to the list. Merriam-Webster online defines these as follows: holier-than-thou - "having or showing the annoying attitude of people who believe that they are morally better ...


8

prig prig n. A person who demonstrates an exaggerated conformity or propriety, especially in an irritatingly arrogant or smug manner. Google definition. also someone who thinks that they are better than other people because they always obey strict moral rules http://www.macmillandictionary.com/dictionary/american/prig#prig_4 You ...


0

It's a kind of promissory note. In a game of poker, one player may owe another player a sum of money. He doesn't, however, have the money on his person, so he gives the other player a chit which spells out how much he owes. In your case, the railway is the "loser," and you're the "winner," since you won X number of trips fairly and squarely (or simply ...


0

Transpass and metro-card are also common terms for this transportation payment device. They have a magnetic strip or computer chip on which data can be encoded, and can be read by a reader. If you're asking about cards for purposes other than transportation, they're prepaid cards as Josh61 said.


-1

I would translate it as a prepaid ticket strip Explanation Dutch Strippenkaart system: https://books.google.nl/books?id=44t16HqLTjYC&pg=PT27&lpg=PT27&dq=strippenkaart+unique+system+zoning&source=bl&ots=MlFN7UaBh6&sig=93-kej-bW2KzUKvIlLEI6EM-0-c&hl=nl&sa=X&ved=0CCIQ6AEwAWoVChMI9YLLuLLdxgIVydMUCh2Smgkd I hope that the link ...


0

My gas station uses a "punch card" where each punch (hole produced with a hand-held paper puncher) represents a purchased cup of coffee. After 9 "punches", the 10th cup is free. Our train system uses a "10-ride discount card" where a purchase of 10 one-way trips purchased at one time results in an overall discounted price for each ride. The train system ...


0

One alternative that I've heard is jade-colored glasses, playing on a combination of the original glasses and "jaded".


1

If you are referring to a prepaid number of miles you can travel on different means of transportation, it can be an electronic version of a mileage ticket: a book (mileage book) or ticket containing coupons good for a certain number of miles of transportation at a fixed rate per mile. more generally it can be referred to as a prepaid card: ...


26

If you want an idiom that's still mildly vulgar, but still gets used in daily speech: "We are just sitting here with our thumbs in our asses, (waiting for something to do)"


25

"Fuck the dog" (or its milder variant, "screw the pooch") comes from an old joke. There are various versions, but a drunk man ends up shooting the wife and screwing the pooch (instead of the other way around). Reddit It is certainly not about idleness, but epic failure to get a sequence right. Janus Bahs Jacquet's suggestion of using the literal ...


19

If you wanted to capture the spirit of the German, you could say We're just sitting here playing with ourselves while upper management is deciding which approach to take. or I'm not doing much of anything, just sitting here playing with myself. In a workplace context, it would not be taken literally. :) P.S. It's not the sort of thing men would ...


1

A couple of possibilities might be: hooray (interjection): Used to express approval, joy or victory. Lizzie has broken a world record, and is now an Olympic medalist! – Hooray! (Wiktionary) huzzah (interjection) (rare, literary, poetic): Used as a cheer indicating enjoyment or approval. (noun): A cheer often associated with sailors, ...


1

Here's a word that also starts with B and has the same number of letters: bully. However, I don't know how often people use this somewhat archaic word by itself; it's sometimes used in the phrase "bully for you!" However, I'm pretty sure it's used by itself frequently enough to be understood in that context.


1

Well done is a valid, but not the only, alternative. Some philologists suggest that 'bravo', ( not brava or bravi) should be used under all circumstances ( probably because of its specific connotations). As a side note, the exclamation is a very common one in contemporary colloquial Italian. Bravo: as an exclamation, "well done!," 1761, from ...


1

A government-influenced media outlet is often described as a mouthpiece of that government. For example, the channel Russia Today is often accused of being a mouthpiece for the Russian parliament, the Kremlin. As in this Washington Post article: ".... expected it to serve as a Kremlin mouthpiece" EDIT: In researching the above I was reminded of ...


-1

"Propaganda Mill" could be used to describe various media outlets - although, it is most precisely used to refer to the government's own deceptive releases.


-1

Gaged press Not neutral press Influenced press Propadanda rag of a corrupt government Gleichgeschaltete Presse - Forced into line press - synchronized press Regierungs Sprechorgan - Governmental organ of speach Government propaganda machinerie Mrs Merkel's (Obama's etc) handpuppet Politieker Federn in den Arsch und Journalisten Honig um den Mund ...



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