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1

Number of people. If it's a taxi service, you could say Number of passengers. If it's a restaurant, you could say Number of diners. Etc.


0

I believe forced router is a fine translation for this purpose. The term is being used around in the given sense: see here and here, and although the meaning is not immediate to those who are not familiar with the concept, it is quite natural and mirrors the German term well. To compare, consider e.g. the term forced vaccination: the vaccination is being ...


-1

You'd better to use such style : Booked : __ times.


0

Some comments clarified that the context is terrain. In this case, you could say The road (or path, or ground, or whatever) dropped off sharply OR rose sharply. If you google these phrases, you'll see they're extremely common. (Next time, could you provide the context in your question, please?)


0

If the documentation for a project is extensive, then it needs a Table of Contents. The documentation itself might be called the User Manual -- but it depends. If you provide a sentence with a blank where the desired phrase will go, it will be easier to find something that will work well for you.


7

I agree that "gas money" would be how English-speakers would identify the concept. However, in my experience, it wouldn't be referenced directly in your context. I think American English-speakers would generally phrase it something like "How much do I owe you for gas?" It's quite a bit less-awkward than phrasing it, "How much gas money do I owe you?" They ...


13

In British English, "petrol money" would be universally understood and used by native speakers for exactly this situation. An example would be the title of this thread.


20

It's almost a direct translation: "gas money." Here's an example of the usage from the novel WWW.MATE by Tamaya: She wanted to pay me for [the gifts], but I declined. After all, she was a friend, always driving me around when I needed a lift somewhere without taking or asking for gas money.


0

Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it. Originally a quote from George Santayana, it has been paraphrased into multiple idiomatic forms, such as "if you forget your mistakes you are doomed to repeat them."


0

to crash and burn, and similarly, to go down in flames, both can mean to fail spectacularly.


2

If you are specifically referring to a change in height of a person (a human) - then we call that a "spurt", or more specifically a "growth spurt" - when a child grows inches taller, almost overnight.


6

I don't speak German, but looking at this page it seems to me Geländekante can apply to any abrupt change in "level". Those examples range from "height discontinuities" of hundreds/thousands of feet (cliffs, Ayers Rock) to mere inches (kerb between road and pavement, small mismatch in a loading bay area). So I think the short answer is there is no ...


2

There are dozens of words for these things that vary in aspect, specificity, origin, and region. Sometimes they emphasize the vertical aspect; other times the line at the top or bottom. Some are for collections of these things; others for singular instances. cliff bluff breaks palisades scarp escarpment fault face ridge cuesta wall hogback pediment cleaver ...


1

Scarp, or escarpment. Wikipedia: Cliff, a significant vertical, or near vertical, rock exposure Escarpment, a steep slope or long rock that occurs from erosion or faulting and separates two relatively level areas of differing elevations


5

A cliff or precipice is at the boundary to an abrupt change in altitude. Google: cliff a steep rock face, especially at the edge of the sea. synonyms: precipice, rock face, crag, bluff, ridge, escarpment, scar, related: shelf


3

Often the terms calque and loan translation are used. The latter is preferable as there are different types of calques. Please see Wikipedia on these terms.


0

The choice will be affected by how firmly the observer's temper is under control. Misapprehend the situation ( thesaurus.com ) for the 'buttoned up,' synonyms: misconstrue ; misinterpret; get the wrong idea/ wrong impression Get it arseways (thedialectdictionary) for the uninhibited, complete mess.


3

I'd suggest "make a hash of", which is defined by oxforddictionaries.com as "make a mess of; bungle". This phrase seems especially apt as a translation of the original Ukranian idiom because the origin of the verb "to hash" is given by the Online Etymology Dictionary as "from French hacher 'chop up' (14c.), from Old French hache 'ax' (see hatchet)".


0

Do you need an idiom, or would a more plain explanation work? "Yes, on one hand, it may be correct to imprison a bunch of smugglers, but on the other, that doesn't solve the problem." or 'that doesn't get at the root of the problem' if you like your idioms. That seems to be consistent with what the original text is trying to get across.


1

I think the saying throw the baby out with the bathwater can suggest the idea you want to express: to get rid of the good parts as well as the bad parts of something when you are trying to improve it. I don't think we should throw the baby out with the bath water. There are some good features of the present system that I think we should ...


0

I've read the explanations and did a little further research. Here's my take: tripping out on mescaline fits with the Tumblewood Connection theme, since mescaline is a drug derived from a cactus plant. If Bernie Taupin was, in fact, a civil war or WWII buff, then it makes sense that a dying soldier would be on his mind while he's on mescaline. The drug can ...


0

Can you make use of "make a muck of"? (Source) make a muck of › to spoil something or do something very badly: I've made a muck of it - I'll have to do it again. Alternatively, you may also consider "play havoc with" (Source) play havoc with something 1. to cause someone to have trouble doing something Strong winds played havoc with her golf game. 2. ...


0

My first thought was "blunder." I am not sure of the context of your needed phrase, but using "to screw up royally" as a substitute: "He blundered through his introduction" "She blundered through the obstacle course" alternately-- "to mess up" ; "to goof up"


2

@Kristina and Matt: Thanks. "Tutor" is indeed the word: http://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/tutor It does not seem to be specific for one country: https://www.google.nl/webhp?sourceid=chrome-instant&ion=1&espv=2&ie=UTF-8#q=site:linkedin.com+%22tutor+*+mathematics%22+germany


0

"Code outlining" is a concept well-known to the prior generation of programmers (ie, those familiar with "structured programming"). It simply means producing an "outline" of some computer code, conceptually very much similar to an "outline" of ordinary written text (such as you encountered in English composition class). The "outline" may be written in ...



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