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I am not sure because translate and synonym have a different meaning, but maybe the word homologue (http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/homologous) is what you are looking for. The word can be used to describe something that has the same function as something else in an other system. It is mostly used, I think, in biology. In the context of your ...


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The full form of your sentence is: ''I forgive X for everything because of his smile.'' (I removed 'obsolete' because it doesn't affect the answer, and because I'm pretty sure you are using the wrong word here). Here are usage examples. You will find "forgive X of everything" used, but it is used less frequently. 'For' is used in dictionary examples. ...


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As regards grammar, there is nothing wrong in the first translation. We may add "WHO" but in that case we need to remove "that" as used in the sentence. I don't know Russian. Translations never do full justice to a literary piece. It seems to me that the first translation is, perhaps, literal or ad verbum while the latter holds the spirit or Intent. Way of ...


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The term I would use is "subdivided." In political history, an example is dividing the former India into India and Pakistan, then subdividing Pakistan into Pakistan and Bangladesh.


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As is often the case when translating words from one language to another, the literal translation of the words has little to do with the intended meaning. "Gutmenschen" or "good people" is an ironic label used with sarcasm. It has a quite close connotation to the American phrase "Politically Correct" or simply "PC". This phrase would also appear ...


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You can click (British English) or crack (British and American English) various joints in your body including your knuckles, knees and elbows. Clicking knuckles Its owner clicked his knuckles nervously. (Terry Pratchett, Small Gods, 242) Do you click your knuckles? Here is an excerpt from the Wikipedia entry on Cracking Joints: Cracking joints ...


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Maybe something like melancholy, or wistful? It doesn't quite fit the last example of the post office, unless the second person is being very dramatic... but either fits the description from the beginning of your definition fairly well. Alternatively, you might look at the word, "unhappy". It is a little simpler than some of your connotations imply, since ...


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Sabotage Coordinated attack Coordinated strike Covert operations A declassified field manual from Strategic Services (now CIA) notes: Sabotage varies from highly technical coup de main acts that require detailed planning and the use of specially trained operatives, to innumerable simple acts which the ordinary individual citizen-saboteur can perform.



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