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-1

The primary meaning of "shame" is a feeling of guilt or disgrace (etymonline). The expression "it's a shame" for "it'a pity" is a later semantic development and a bit difficult to explain. But I think it is absolutely correct to translate Schande with shame. A pity that etymonline does not mention the expression "it's a shame" for "it's a pity" and how this ...


1

verily ADVERB archaic. Truly; certainly example: verily these men are mad


0

Switch plates or cover plates for light switches seem to be the most common definitions: Many people overlook the opportunity to add a decorative flair to any room by switching out old light switch covers. This is a simple trick that turns a utilitarian necessity into a chance to easily inject stylish accents into your home. The selection of switch ...


0

The common usage to refer to the switching device and its surrounding plate is light switch (at least in the US). Note that switches can be used to control other devices, such as outlets (receptacles) or furnaces, etc. In those cases, it is more properly simply called a switch. The cover or surrounding trim by itself (without the switch) is caller a cover ...


-1

That is (in the US) a "3-gang Decora-style switch with brushed stainless cover" :-) It could be running ceiling fans or lights or an electrical window shade, so it isn't necessarily a "light switch" though it could very well be. See this well known supplier's website for examples. P.S. "rocker switch" is generic and would therefore be better than "light ...


1

For your purposes (a somewhat-serious but humorous "translation" of some modern text into Elizabethan English), you'll want to emphasize the phrasing differences between the two forms. So, for times when you need to translate "I think", you would use the well-understood but archaic word methinks, and for times when you need to translate the third person ...


0

"Cover" is a shorter and less formal word than "distraction": Eg: "He made a mess in the kitchen as cover for his lack of culinary activity." Or: "I was keen on the girl, but invited another of my friends along as cover".


0

Doing a "Major Martin"- the man who never was. If you read the background, it was an elaborate and complex ploy to (successfully) trick the Germans into believing something based on disinformation. Another example could be when I like someone and want to invite her out, but I invite her friends as well so that she or anyone else will not suspect ...


4

Red herring is apt. "Camouflage" might apply to both situations. Also, In a sense, you are using a "decoy". Although a hunting decoy, rather than diverting attention, diverts the prey toward you so you can take a shot at close range (this might apply better to the dating situation, especially if you include your friends rather than hers—but that could prove ...


6

We shouldn't we overlook the obvious trick: NOUN 1.0 A cunning act or scheme intended to deceive or outwit someone: 1.1 A mischievous practical joke: 1.2 An illusion: 2.0 A skillful act performed for entertainment or amusement: but for pulling a fast one like that: informal Trick someone: Craft is a relatively ...


2

I would say you are masking or disguising your actions.


10

You are pulling the wool over your parents' eyes.


14

Not light-hearted, but I assume you're looking for sleight-of-hand kind of things more than distractions. "Red Herring" sounds like what you need for the scenarios you mentioned. Or maybe you're just going for general subterfuge or misdirection. Also, 'hoodwink' has a little bit more lightheartedness.


8

I would recommend either 'ruse' or 'ploy'. Out of curiosity, what is the Greek word that you're trying to approximate?


0

What you describe sounds like an hoax: (TFD) a deception, esp a practical joke. or a prank: a mischievous trick or practical joke.


0

Avoid wind at all cost. It's synonymous with gas, as others have pointed out. If you want to stick to a meteorological theme, how about Gastronomy Climes of X, though this might be a little esoteric. Other options: Gastronomy Currents of X Gastronomical Landscape of X


4

You are looking for the word eventually.


2

Typically, if one is seeking to describe the scent of a food being wafted by the breeze, one would look to the word aroma. To wit: a : a distinctive pervasive and usually pleasant or savory smell; broadly : odor Thus "Aromatic breezes from X" would probably be your best translation.


1

Not only is wind an unfortunately compromised word when used in relation to food, but gastronomy is somewhat less lovely in English (where it shares a root with gastrointestinal, and where in any case the first syllable is gas) than its cognate perhaps is in French. You could convey the original wording's intended fanfare regarding the significance of X as ...


3

A direct translation won't have the connotation you want. In general, "food winds" (or similar) creates a connotation of flatus, either out the front or the back. You can use spices to describe the winds, which will not have a connotation of flatus (or, at least not as much). For example, like rajah9 suggested: "the saffron winds" or "the rosemary ...


1

"Take concrete steps to" is certainly used: Also, I get plenty of search results for it that aren't from Turkey. Indeed, the Vatican, US, EU and International politics seems to dominate. Google does gear results toward clients so it likely guessed that you would be more interested in Turkish matters than those elsewhere and skewed the results for that ...


7

This is not just a gender issue. In English, cousin is incredibly non-specific (even when you take into account that first cousin is usually implied). When translating Chinese kinship terms to English, there is no escaping the loss of information without awkwardness — unless you are talking about your father, mother, husband, wife, son, or daughter. ...


6

Spanish also makes this kind of distinction: prima and primo, between a female and male cousin. In English, we do not care about the gender unless it is relevant to the topic. Otherwise, why bother to say it? If I said "My female cousin got a new job today", someone might then expect to find out what my male cousin must be doing. It just sounds odd to a ...


1

In common usage as I know it, a "sub-project" is neither a child project nor a support project. A sub-project is ancillary to the main project- that is, it is related, but it is not subsequent (e.g. following) to the primary project. At the same time, it does not support the main project. To take your question and use it as an example, a main project would ...


1

If I had to create a new word for sub-project in English that for some reason couldn't use sub- I would favour something using the component, element, elementary, part etc. The sub-project is after all a part of the project. (I'd probably end up going for "child project" but that's because it's child is a short word in English and the metaphor is common ...


6

By order of appearance, it's the word "her" that is redundant, but English doesn't have an appropriate gender-neutral alternative. That means that, strictly speaking, "female" provides information that is already available, albeit only later. Whether this should be considered redundant depends on whether that information is important, and whether it's ...


-2

I am not an expert in English, but I do think simply "My cousin sister working for a....", makes it more sensible for reading and hearing. This is a common expression in Indian English dialects.


2

No, it's not. Redundancy is if you're re-iterating a point. "Cousin" is a gender neutral word and therefore clarifying the gender of the subject is not redundant. The gender can be implied by the usage of "her", but that does not make the usage of "female" redundant.


42

This comes up a lot with cousin as many other languages have more words for different types of cousin than English, though not always in the same way as you say for the Chinese languages. Generally, we just say "cousin" unless it's particularly relevant. If it was relevant we might be happy enough that the subsequent her does indicate her being female. We ...


1

'A gentleman of the road.' A bohemian is a good fit.


1

There are several stories, but I don't know if any have been condensed into an aphorism. One involves a driver going on the wrong road; someone points this out to him, and he replies "yes, but I'm making really good time". This seems most comparable to the Chinese story. Another story involves a person (sometimes portrayed as a drunk) who is looking, at ...


0

A more fluid translation would be "Trying to go south by driving the chariot north" (source), however I do not believe there exists an analogous proverb in English. In the sense of misdirected efforts, the phrase "barking up the wrong tree" is somewhat similar. This phrase is used to indicate that someone has pursued a false lead or focused on something ...


1

An IRS tax return is the set of forms you fill out and send to the IRS to calculate and document the tax you owe. If you owe tax, and include the payment when you send in the forms, that's payment with return.



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