Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

advance noun an instance of notable progress in the development of knowledge, technology, or skill Synonyms advancement, breakthrough, enhancement, improvement, refinement The Internet, planes, cars and mobile phones are advances that shaped the 20/21st century. engineering achievement Greatest Engineering Achievements of the 20th ...


0

Is there a more correct term than technologies for grouping items that require knowledge of techniques (technology) to be created? No, in English they're called technologies. Any recent dictionary should make this clear (even if it also shows the original meaning). eg. the free dictionary: n. pl. tech·nol·o·gies a. The application of ...


-3

Let't cut out the bullshit. I heard about that in a movie called GodFather


2

You may consider: ghat noun \ˈgȯt, ˈgät\ also ghaut \ˈgȯt, ˈgät\ plural -s 1 India a : mountain range b : a mountain pass 2 India a : a landing place or platform on the bank of a river b : a passage or flight of steps leading from a landing place or platform to the water's edge (as for the convenience of bathers) — ...


1

I don't think there is a "phrase" as such, you could google to see how many people have used the combination. If your professor is the only hit, I shall not be very surprised. As to what the (bleep) (s)he is talking about, one can't tell without the rest of the passage. YMMV, but I would have stopped reading or left the hall after "abject/ecstatic failure to ...


1

If the new subject is in some small or remote way related to the current subject or to something that was just mentioned, you can say "Not to go on a tangent, but..." to lead into the new subject. Alternate phrases with similar meaning include "By the way:...", "Speaking of which:...", and "That reminds me:...". If you're looking for sarcasm, "Not to go on ...


1

A cute French idiom for this is “sauter/passer du coq à l'âne,” but its literal translation to English: “[Let’s] jump from the cock to the ass” would probably mean something quite different to most Anglophones (but I bet you’d at least get everyone’s attention with it)! "Back" to the subject, although they’re probably not best known for changing the subject ...


1

Incidentally or by the way. Incidentally is a word you use when you've got more to say on a topic or want to transition into a new subject. Think of the word incidentally as a more formal way to say "by the way." Incidentally: introducing a different topic; in point of fact. (vocabulary.com)


4

Aaaanyway... This is quite common in UK English (possibly further afield too) when there is an awkward lull in the conversation, either just due to people running out of things to say (in which case it's said more naturally: "So, anyway...") or when someone has said something awkward, unfunny or inappropriate (in which case it can be more drawn out: ...


2

@Josh61, but I don't think the OP wants to be subtle! I think the goal is to be charming, but not discreet. I've seen some good suggestions here. Here's another: So...how 'bout them Cowboys? Here's a good explanation: http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=So...how+%27bout+them+Cowboys%3F The Cowboys are a sports team. Literally, the question ...


8

Let's move on to the price of eggs... Not actually the price of eggs or anything related to it. Just a sarcastic phrase used in a conversation when one tends to gloat off the subject. Urban Dictionary This seems to coopt the sarcastic 20th century rejoinder, What's that got to do with the -- ?: an idiom denoting an irrelevance or non ...


1

When somebody says something too personal or revealing during a casual conversation among acquaintances or co-workers, I sometimes say "Well, thank you for sharing that." And then I quickly segue to a new topic. Depending on the tone, it could come off as mildly polite or rather sarcastic.


4

A snarky maneuver would be to say "Riiiiiiight...." and then jump into another topic.


6

A very common 1970s British catchphrase was And now for something completely different. It was a phrase used by the Monty Python's Flying Circus actors whenever they needed to make the transition from one oddball comedy sketch to the next. I use this phrase today whenever I want to drastically change the topic, (sometimes out of boredom) it's intended to ...


5


9

"Moving on!" is an idiomatic phrase used (at least here in the US) when a topic gets too touchy or if the conversation bogs down on a particular aspect of the subject and the wish is to keep it moving past that point.


0

According to the Glosbe.com kör olası enjoys a broad semantic field, but the most popular seems to be: blooming For a specific application to eye, I might have chosen lousy, because it's dual meaning suggests disfunction as well as irritation and contempt: adjective (lousier, lousiest) 1.0 informal Very poor or bad: the service is usually ...


1

I think Rupe is right in that there is no current, specific term for this in English football. However, the most natural phrase would be a defensive arc. The sickle is too associated with agriculture and communism in British English to be merely used as a metaphor describing a shape. A defensive sickle is most likely to be wielded by an angry farmer. ...


10

I don't think "it" refers to anything here. "It's too cute" is an idiomatic expression comparable to "It's raining" or "It's time for dinner"--in both of which the "it" is a nonreferential or dummy pronoun.


2

You don't have a word for "it" in French because the concept of a non-gendered noun does not exist in French (as far as I know). When you use a pronoun in place of a noun in French, the noun it references is gendered. Nouns in English are not gendered, so we don't have distinctly masculine or feminine pronouns. The word "it" is simply a pronoun which refers ...


16

Either. An animal of unknown gender is it. Look at the cat, it's so cute. Look at what the cat does. It's the cutest thing I have seen. Look at the picture, it's cute. The translations would be It is too cute (the cat, any gender) and It is too cute (the situation). You can use This/That is too cute to emphasize the situation though.


1

lead–up noun \ˈlēˌdəp\ : something that leads up to or prepares the way for something else the race will serve as a lead-up to the classic — Sydney (Australia) Bulletin Merriam-Webster Unabridged Dictionary


1

It seems to me that the answer is embedded in your question itself. While there isn't a truly exact equivalent idiom, many have given examples of some that are similar in nature and usage. However, the direct translation itself, honestly, leaves nothing to be desired in way of further translation or extrapolation to a "native idiom." It is very clear in ...


1

Although my main suggestions don’t include references to “butts” or excrement therefrom, they do kind of capture the original proverb’s scheme, i.e., “as beautiful/attractive as [something unexpectedly nasty]": “As attractive as roadkill” and it’s also available as “As beautiful as roadkill.” “Dead toads” and “truck-stuck weasels” have apparently also ...


5

We had a phrase in the army - As beautiful as a can of smashed assholes Which certainly evokes the imagery of your original phrase, and also a dig at canned food, which we so frequently ate.


1

Shakespeare's Sonnet 130 seems to get at the question: My mistress’ eyes are nothing like the sun; Coral is far more red than her lips’ red; If snow be white, why then her breasts are dun; If hairs be wires, black wires grow on her head. I have seen roses damasked, red and white, But no such roses see I in her cheeks; And in some perfumes is there more ...


4

I don't know whether this is strictly relevant; however, an interesting one that I first heard about 30 years ago in grade school is: "If I had a dog that looked like you, I would shave its butt and teach it to walk backwards!"


10

There is the phrase "face for radio". A person who has a face for radio is ugly enough that no television station would ever hire them, because they wouldn't want that person's face to be seen on TV. But a radio station would have no problem hiring them, because you can't see anybody on a radio. Wiktionary also has a definition for "face for radio": ...


0

English has an expression "to the bone" or "to the core", which is a kind of emphasis and us usually in a derogatory context. If you said someone is "ugly to the bone" it means that the persons ugly character is complete it its connection with their nature. There is nothing superficial about it. The same expression is used often with the term "evil" - ...


4

In recent times, the F-word has been used to greatly exemplify another word. In this case there is "Fucking ugly", but the much more fun amalgamation that is common in today's vernacular: Fugly This is not really metaphorical as your example is, but the usage suggests that the purpose is to communicate that this is a special kind of ugly. It's as if to ...


0

If we're just listing insults, then in the UK you might hear: She has a face like a bag of spanners or: He has a face like a bulldog licking piss off a nettle :-)


2

So in English there's this phrase "beat with the ugly stick" to refer to someone who is unattractive. As in Your baby looks like it was beat with the ugly stick. To take that a few steps further and truly underline someone's ugliness, you can say He looks like he fell from the ugly tree and hit every branch on the way down. I hope that confers ...


34

The most obvious parallel is "butt ugly", common in the US. But, I think that sraka as a term for the buttocks probably is related to srat', срать , some form of which means "to shit" in all Slavic languages, as far as I know. Sraka means magpie (the bird) in some Slavic languages, by the way- there are some funny misunderstandings when speakers of ...


29

A common, humorous way of saying that someone has an ugly face is to say that they have a face only a mother could love. Naturally, a mother will always find her child beautiful—the implication here is that absolutely no one else will. It is relatively offensive, but it doesn’t sound anywhere near as offensive as the Ukrainian version, where you’re ...


2

I have heard many phrases that mean something similar but not exactly. Butterface is used to describe someone who has an attractive body, but an unattractive face: In other words, everything is attractive "but her face," hence butterface. Another expression meaning that she's not attractive unless you're drinking: She looks better after every ...


11

One slang expression is : you are good from afar; far from good : attractive from a distance but unattractive on closer inspection. (onlineslangdictionary.com) also: you have a face fit for radio is another sarcastic way to express the concept of ugliness.


0

I think you could possibly maintain the flag/banner notion by changing "wave" to "plant" (planting his flag): "He has planted his flag in every corner of the world"/ "His flags/banners are [firmly] planted in every corner of the world."/ "Thus he's currently planting his flag/banner around the globe." But for its unfortunate relation with ...


0

The idiom you mentioned exists in several regional variations. Google has more results for Φωνάζει ο κλέφτης για να φοβηθεί ο νοικοκύρης. That's the "nationwide" version, presumably because it was the title of a major Greek film from the 50ies. It's also the version your friend must have had in mind. The difference between variations is the second verb, ...


1

It is quite difficult to find a perfect equivalent of Amae, however I would like to add some information that will help you understand what the key conception of Amae is. In the first place, you need to distinguish Amae proposed by Doi from Amae in usual use. He used the word in the title of his book The Structure of 'Amae.' (The English title: The Anatomy ...


1

I've always thought the word for this was needy (or neediness). needy 2. Wanting or needing affection, attention, or reassurance, especially to an excessive degree. Note that the verb form (甘える, amaeru) means to behave like a spoiled child.


1

Translating cultural phrases always intrigues me. I wonder if there is a systematic approach. So we are looking for a term that would describe a desire to be loved dependence or submission a pleasurable or "sweet" experience some degree of caprice or playfulness all but without negative connotation From ermanen's observation, many English words that ...


1

I've never heard of amae before, but from the context that ermanen provides above, it sounds as though any English translation of the word would have to be tailored to the specific context in which the word arises. One aspect of term appears to be a sense of protectedness that might be be well represented by the word coziness. Merriam-Webster's Eleventh ...


1

Another term with few negative connotations that stretches to satisfy the categories of familial, romantic, and workplace would be Adulatory, or someone exhibiting Adulation, which is a good term for children looking to please parents, or someone looking to please a romantic interest they see as more than a peer. And Adulation is the best one-word "feeling ...


1

Yearning/longing for attention/love and basking in it seems to me a good description.


2

To expect indulgence would come fairly close. A banal example: I ask my independent adult son to stop and buy a loaf of fresh bread before coming over to dinner. Due to our close rapport, I don't see this as being an unreasonable request even though I am perfectly capable of going down to the shops and buying the bread myself. It is because I am confident ...


0

Joseph Fitzgerald, Word and Phrase: True and False Use in English (1901) offers an interesting perspective on what Fitzgerald sees as a major change in the understood meaning of vain between 1611 (when translation of the King James version of the Bible was completed) and 1901 (when Fitzgerald was writing). He writes: The King James Bible has "in vain" ...



Top 50 recent answers are included