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0

This sounds like the phrase "in hot water" or "getting in hot water. The phrase means getting in trouble or getting someone in trouble depending on how you use it. The definition of in hot water is "In a difficult situation in which you are likely to be punished" Source - thefreedictionary.com


0

I believe goal is desired result that you try to do whereas purpose is refes to reason why u want to achive result or a reason of doing something to achive


0

Conventional silk screening is done by somehow placing a pattern on a piece of silk (or silk-like synthetic cloth) in a rectangular frame, laying the frame over the surface to be printed, and forcing paint through the silk (with a sort of squeegee). The pattern is achieved by making portions of the silk non-porous, so the paint does not pass through. ...


2

Dale - there is no such common or abbreviated term for this situation. Suggest: Use "from the original" or "verbatim form the original" or "verbatim translation as seen in the original document" or "this section was presented, as seen here, in English, in the original document. All errors and idiocyncracies have been reproduced here verbatim." or "Quoted ...


2

BBC Schools programme 00:40 brightly-coloured stalls selling toys, cakes... 01:30 hard and very hairy shells. 02:20 Keep your eyes on your coconut you're aiming at 04:10 lower it towards the duck 05:00 listen to the brass band 06:40 circle your arms round each other 10:08 "Would you like a sticker?" 10:15 "No thank you," ...


2

You could say that the translated sections in the original text are pre-translated segments, a term used by many translators (usually when talking about machine translation). If they are poorly translated, you could just make a note and specify that you did not translate them. As for your second question, you could say something like, "given the lack of ...


-1

I believe the hypernym is languify.


1

OED has frenchize and frenchify; along with englishize and englishify. In the end, -ize and -ify are productive suffixes and you can come up with any verb for any country/language. Of course, some verbs will sound jarring (niueize?!) and some are probably never used before; but it doesn't mean you can't coin that word for your needs. Some verbs are more ...


1

Here're the terms I found: 'Francize'(Canadian), 'Frenchify' and 'Gallicize' (as already mentioned) Being a student of French, I always thought 'Frenchify' was the only term that existed. Now I know two more. I haven't heard of any generic term for such adoption or "conversions" from one language to another.


11

Gallicize is the direct analogue for anglicize. M-W further certifies germanize for German. No such luck for my conjecture hispanicize, and of course italicize means something quite different. As for the relevant hypernym, I am at a loss.


1

Apparently, it looks like an incident of poor translation. "Quando penso a Modena..." = When I think of (or about) Modena I'm a fluent French speaker and I find the above Spanish phrase very close to the French equivalent: "Quand je pense à Modena", which can only translated as: When I think of Modena


1

To add to the other answers giving the sports analogy where one "walks off" an injury (which incidentally is also used to show the officials that one will shortly be able to resume play), this could be a fan shout out. Death in the comics is something that you might just "walk off". I can't find the issue right now, but when Rick Jones was trying to bring ...


0

If you have ever been slammed around whether in a fight or something like a car wreck... then you may have been dazed. Walking around is like 'getting some fresh air' in that it can help you feel better. Moving around is better than just crumpling where you are... and may help you 'get it back together'. Of course, this is a joke because if you are killed ...


0

In my bilingual school for my european baccalaureate, and from experience being english and french, I believe that it's a "simple question" "question on the curriculum (content)" "part of the course" "fact of the matter question"... fact of the matter is fairly suitable because, it describes simplicity and is "un faite relatif au sujet" which is a logical ...


4

I wish to re-iterate Jander's comment. "Walking it off" is sometimes actually better advice to an injury that isn't too serious. Sometimes getting up and walking will produce circulation, and keep the injured area warm and limber. If the area of injury is left to stiffen up, then the inflammation may get worse, and the injured party will continue to focus ...


7

The implication of "walk it off" is not just ignore the problem and hope it gets better, but instead that the walking will actually be beneficial. For example, in baseball, if someone is hit in the leg by a pitch is is much more reasonable to say "walk it off" than if they are hit in the arm or head. For an older example, there is the 1736 play Eurydice ...


-3

To "walk it off" is an idiom from American baseball. For instance, a batter fouling a ball of his foot might be told that. Here's an example: https://youtu.be/lkmYjBsjCFs


4

OED says to walk off is to "to get rid of (the effects of liquor, an ailment) by walking exercise."


7

I suppose you could translate into a Chinese sports analogy (as this one is most applicable and familiar in the context of American football). Perhaps "If you get killed, keep swinging the ping-pong paddle!" would suffice.


157

"Walk it off" is a flippant response for when someone is hurt or injured. It generally means that they should continue as if nothing had happened (that is, they should continue walking), and that they'll be back in good health after a while. An example might be if you took a bad step and hurt your ankle slightly; it may well be better to continue walking ...


70

When one is injured, for example in an athletic competition, the advice might be to get up and walk around in pain until the pain subsides and one is again able to participate. This is opposed to one's probable inclination to lie on the ground until one feels able to continue. "Walking it off" is seen as a tougher and perhaps quicker way of dealing with ...


0

You may use a sentence as follows. I applied for admission to a University to study chemistry as well as computer systems, after graduating from X (//X is a high school). In the sentence, as well as instead of and could express both subjects (chemistry and computer systems) are equally important to you. Using a adverbial clause with adverb particle ...


1

Perhaps the best English equivalent is in the famous Welsh poet, Dylan Thomas' "Fern Hill", with the verse 'Down the rivers of the windfall light'.


0

"as of mm/dd/yy" does not necessarily mean that it will still be true in the distant future. But it does imply it will be true for a short while at least. The fact is that it will not change any sooner than the date the next version is released, whenever that might be. So it is important to emphasize the version number, whether or not you mention the date. ...


0

As long as a statement applies to all versions, no clarification should be necessary. If a statement no longer applies to the current version, you could append "(foo version xy or earlier)" to it to indicate that it applies only to "foo version xy" and all previous versions.


0

I don't think it is the coffee itself, it is what the coffee symbolizes -- her normal life. She is grateful for her life as it is, and realizes -- maybe only unconsciously -- that it could all go to hell in an instant. (I thought opinions were verboten here; but everybody else's post on this one was an opinion.)


0

It is "Calculator and Application". I'm from HK.


4

I'm not sure if she's talking about not knowing the value of it, or if she has no expectation from her coffee, or something else. Without more context it is impossible to know for sure. Strictly, the sentence would be interpreted that she does not take for granted the supply of coffee every day, however that would be somewhat unusual - how hard is it to ...


5

There is no definite answer. For the name of bachelor degree, it is Applied Computer Science. For the name of book, it is Computer Science and its Application.


0

Eat, Sleep and Breathe (Something) “He eats, sleeps and breathes poker, playing it for over nine hours each day.” Definition: If you eat, sleep and breathe something, then that means you are obsessed with it and spend most of your time doing it.


0

The verbs grapple and wrestle are commonly used in this sort of situation; this is metaphorical extension. The 'refusal to let go' implication is clear. grapple v.intr. a. To wrestle with an opponent by clutching or gripping. b. To struggle or work hard to deal with something: grappled with their consciences; grapple with the political ...


0

Dedicate is close to that. If you dedicate yourself to a task, it means you will work until it is complete. http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/dedicate To devote wholly and earnestly, as to some person or purpose: He dedicated his life to fighting corruption.


1

In American English a few common sayings are: "dig in" - which would fit closely with the dutch expression "come hell or high water" - meaning that no obstacle will stop your efforts "In for the long haul" - expressing a commitment to finish what is started Single word options: relentless - literally "does not stop" indefatigable - literally "does not ...


2

Tooth and nail: with all one's resources or energy; fiercely: We fought tooth and nail till the end. The market has changed, but the major players are fighting tooth and nail to keep going the way things have been. (Dictionary.com)


6

"persistent", "dogged", "indefatigable".


4

If you're looking for a single word, as your tag suggests, may I recommend: indefatigable never giving up or getting tired of doing something an indefatigable defender of human rights She was indefatigable in her search for the truth. [From oxford]


5

An almost-literal translation is to get one's teeth into something. Work energetically and productively on (a task): the course gives students something to get their teeth into [ODO] A slightly more prosaic alternative might be persevere; that connotes slightly less enthusiasm for the task at hand.


4

Computer (Theory) and Application. This phrase seems odd because the word 原理 is missing. It should be 计算机原理及应用. It can't be Computer and Application. In this context, 应用 does not mean computer programs but rather its use. When 应用 is used in the context related to computer programs, it means the Apps on cellphones.


1

"How many of us are there here?" -- Emphasizes the connection between speaker and audience". "What is the size of this audience?" -- More impersonal. "How many are we?" -- More poetic, less clear about whether "we" are just the audience or some larger group.


3

You already found the answer. It is scratching (one's head, chin, neck etc.). There isn't a special phrase for that, it is just a gesture and part of body language. Scratching can indicate different emotions or states of mind, depending on where you scratch and other accompanying gestures. For example: Scratching back of your head with a sheepish smile ...


0

As a native speaker of American English, the best equivalent I can think of is people "wearing a sign" to indicate what their qualities are. Not really used as an idiom but definitely a common metaphor. Here's Your Sign is a comedy album by Bill Engvall named after this concept.


2

A phrase that came to mind was Evil doesn't advertise but apparently it isn't widely used, nor is The Devil doesn't advertise, so I don't know if I'm misremembering something there. While we're on Shakespeare however, from Hamlet, the devil hath power to assume a pleasing shape


17

I suggest this old saying by Tucker Max "How were you supposed to know he would stoop so low? After all, the devil....... Tucker Max - an American author and public speaker.


8

Area, the only phrase I can think of that's like this is, you sometimes hear variations on "sign on their head" or "sign hanging over their head" or "sign over their head..." So, "assholes don't go around with signs over their head" or "I wish idiots had a sign over their head alerting me to the fact they were idiots.." sort of thing. As I mention in a ...


1

Why not Shakespeare? In Othello Iago says: But I will wear my heart upon my sleeve that is, he claims to display his emotions openly, but of course he does quite the opposite. If you explicitly want a slang expression (something modern), Shakespeare actually made it to the urban dictionary. Since the Hindi expression also uses a negative construction ...


3

Shakespeare said that someone (Iago, I think) "could smile and smile and be a villain", also that "There's no art to find the mind's construction in the face." (Macbeth) Can you use that? The Hindi expression is a good one, we should steal it.


0

"A wolf in sheep's clothing" comes to mind: a person who hides the fact that they are evil, with a pleasant and friendly appearance. (Cambridge Dictionary) After all, how could you say that he was a wolf in sheep's clothing?


2

I'd go with false friends From wikipedia: False friends are pairs of words or phrases in two languages or dialects (or letters in two alphabets) that look or sound similar, but differ significantly in meaning. The term is a shortened version of the expression "false friend of a translator" The term should be distinguished from "false ...



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