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"peasant" may come from old French word "païsan", you do not translate it to "paysan". The word that better corresponding to the meaning of "peasant" is "serf" : do not own the land or a very little part have hard work be exploited by the owner of the land or a powerful economic entity While "farmer" matches with the meaning of "paysan" used in French. ...


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My decades-old copy of the Oxford English Dictionary says "peasant" came into English as a word for foreigners of low class. I am not sure this has changed much. So there never really were any British, let alone American, "peasants." One who worked the land but was not a serf might be a "villein" (talk about acquiring negative connotations!). BTW: In my ...


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The OED does have an entry for nicey-nicey It sounds quintessentially late-nineteenth century to me. The Victorians had an obsession with niceness, perhaps following the brutal excesses of the early century, the industrial revolution etc. It was the age of emergence of the bourgeoisie, good manners and politeness. Pronunciation: Brit. /ˈnʌɪsi/ , U.S. ...


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You're right. There are many definitions of rather. used to indicate one's preference in a particular matter. "I'd rather not say"(I'd prefer not to say) to a certain or significant extent or degree. "she's been behaving rather strangely" used to suggest that the opposite of a previous statement is the case; on the contrary. "There is no shortage of ...


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In a socio-scientific paper, I think the phrase "Portuguese identity" would use a more common jargon term from that realm of academia. I think if you look at the literature in English, you'll find identity being employed very often for the concept you are talking about. However, online dictionaries do not seem to list this academic definition, on cursory ...


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The only reference to portugueseness is from Wiktionary as: the quality or state of being Portuguese. but the term can be found in a number of academic papers: Investigating Portugueseness: Reflections on Recent Ethnographic Approaches Sociolinguistic (re)constructions of diaspora portugueseness: Portuguese-Canadian youth in Toronto ...


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According to Collins, Britishness is relating to, denoting, or characteristic of Britain or any of the natives, citizens, or inhabitants of the United Kingdom So I guess Portugueseness would be ok. Alternatively, you can use the "official" latin prefix for things related to Portugual: Luso from the ancient roman province Lusitania. For example, ...


2

Translation is difficult, and translation of slang is even more difficult because of all the non-shared cultural context and nuances involved. So there's usually not a direct translation (one-to-one always) that fits for slang. Often that results in a direct loan word, like 'kow tow' or 'kung fu', or loan translation, like 'brain washing' or 'lose face'. ...


3

It's important to remember that slang changes quickly and thus the dictionaries will have trouble keeping up. There is, however, a sense that we have for our native languages that allows us to be able to construct words that others understand. Comedians are often very good at this. The two words you have offered from Chinese demonstrate this perfectly. As ...


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The BrEng term a swot comes to mind, this is commonly used for students who not only got brilliant grades but studied hard too. Normally, the kids (when I was at school) who said this were envious of the student's almost perfect grades, especially if the student showed a natural flair for the subject and an agile mind. They were the ones who could absorb any ...


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"学霸" (literally meaning "academic overlord") to refer to someone who does very well in his/her study and who always achieve high grades in exams. I believe the equivalent is straight A student. It is used for students who always get high grades (to get straight A's). Derogatory alternatives are grind (US slang) and swot (BR slang). "学婊" ...


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It is looking for some level of similarity as cultural context is very different. So approximations only: 1 Academic prodigy A young person with exceptional qualities or abilities: a Russian pianist who was a child prodigy in his day 2 Unostentatious 1. unostentatious - not ostentatious; "his unostentatious office"; "unostentatious elegance" ...


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I don't think there are widespread English equivalents for those expressions that would be universally recognized, though you may find regional or historical equivalents. I wouldn't be surprised if the British have or once had words for these things, for example. That said, I just wanted to point out that "curve-wrecker" does have a negative connotation in ...


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Open the BBC podcast link, right click and select 'Save as..'. This will enable you to save the audio file as a download having an mp3 format. Once you've saved the podcast to your PC, go to the link that I gave you(transcribe.wreally.com) and sign up for a 7 days free trial. Once you've provided your e-mail ID and signed up, you can use that free trial. You ...


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There is a name for the rays of light falling from the sky, especially with water vapors in the air. The scientific term for those rays of light is called the Tyndall Effect (http://chemwiki.ucdavis.edu/Physical_Chemistry/Physical_Properties_of_Matter/Solutions_and_Mixtures/Colloid/Tyndall_Effect)


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Linguistic analyses of such secret languages have assumed that you start with a phonemic form, then add the disguise. For instance, David Stampe used some facts about Alfalfa, a secret language that Sandy Thompson is fluent in (the infix is "alf") as evidence on some questions about English phonemics. In your example using infix "boo", you seem to have ...



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