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-1

Took the blue canoe - taking valium 10s are blue. It could also mean suicide by valium overdose. This phrase is also found in the Michael Connelly novel- The Last Coyote pg.477.


0

Priest - from the origin section of the linked defintion: Old English prēost, of Germanic origin; related to Dutch priester, German Priester, based on ecclesiastical Latin presbyter 'elder' (see presbyter).


3

For a one-word-request I'd suggest "sanded", "sandblasted", or maybe "acid-dipped".


2

I don't know how the original Italian sentence reads, or who is speaking: the proverbial little old lady who drives her car only to church on Sunday, a collector of rare automobiles, or a street punk who races his hotrod down near the river where the cops don't patrol very often. Bare-metalled might be something a street punk, or someone who restores cars, ...


5

For a single word, one could use denude and it's various forms. [OED] denude. 1. trans. To make naked or bare; to strip of clothing or covering; spec. in Geol. of natural agencies: To lay bare (a rock or formation) by the removal of that which lies above it. However, if you were to take your car into a garage and ask them to denude it, I suspect ...


0

The first thing that came to my mind was Lackey "a servant, especially a liveried footman or manservant." It doesn't exactly match the definition, but I think the "servant" aspect works quite well :P It also has a nice derogatory ring to it!


3

"Company man"/"Company's man" is a term I've heard used dismissively - as in: "Ask a company man a question, get a company answer" or "There's no point asking him, he's the company's man". Basically the meaning is someone who is hopelessly biased and unable to think for themselves.


3

I'm surprised nobody's yet mentioned pen-pusher: (or pencil-pusher in the US) a person who has an office job that is not interesting a person with a clerical job involving a lot of tedious and repetitive paperwork un-needed, bureaucratic employee not making any difference and hampering efficiency


1

Two that I didn't see on here yet: pencil pusher and bean counter. Usually the later referring to someone doing accounting or finance work. But I think both imply tedious underling work. Someone might refer to their CPA as a bean counter, though the position may pay well. But someone from another profession may still look down on the work as being ...


0

Also "cog" as in "a small gear in a large machine".


4

"Paper pusher" would work too. Merriam-Webster defines it as "someone who does boring or unimportant work in an office."


4

I worked for a company once that let me put whatever I wanted on my business card, so I put down as my job title "Replaceable Engineering Unit".


-1

You are referring to ... A suit. http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=suit


2

Does "office plankton" fit your definition? Very common term in Russian, not sure if it exists in English (though UD knows about it): A typical office worker, which usually has certain tasks assigned to them without hopes of getting a promotion or achieving something in his field.


2

In the '90s Dilbert, among others, popularized1 2 the term cow-orker. n. fortuitous typo for co-worker, widely used in Usenet, with perhaps a hint that orking cows is illegal.


7

In programming, we have a specific term for the shmoes who are stuck with the simplistic, repetitive, insignficant and mind-numbing programming work. Code Monkey. There's even a Johnathan Coulton song all about their daily dreary lives.


2

Depending on the way it's going to be used, shill can be useful. This is used in the context of an online forum, for example. If I work for MegaCorp Ltd then I might contribute to a programming forum by saying "solve your problem by installing XYZ product!" but if I don't mention that I work for MegaCorp, then I'm a shill.


2

None of the above are correct for what you'd like. "Become/Get successful together" is the way to go.


8

There are great answers above, but one possible choice that hasn't been mentioned yet is the noun-form idiom working stiff. _ _ _ Macmillan Dictionary defines the term as: an ordinary person who works in order to earn enough money to live, usually at a very boring job — — — Endangered Phrases by Steven D. Price offers: A hardworking employee. ...


3

"Corporate Monkey" is one that I have used/heard used quite a lot. It comes from the term "circus monkey" which (obviously) came from the use of monkeys or chimps in the circus, performing tricks for the masters in order to get treats. It has been adapted into the workplace, generally referring to people who are attempting to climb the corporate ladder, ...


13

Japanese has a great word for this "Sararīman" — salaryman. The media often portray the salaryman in negative fashion for lack of initiative and originality. Because of this portrayal, communities may be less willing to help the salaryman with his emotional problems, which often leads to clinical depression or even suicide. —Wikipedia


2

The terms trog (short for "troglodyte") and pleb (short for "plebeian") can be useful here. They're derogatory terms used by higher-class individuals to refer to those in a lower class. When corporate structure turns into an office's social structure, it's very similar to the class-based systems found in larger-scale society.


-1

In South Africa we would call them a "Brass-knob" or "cracker" btw: A lot of the answers given above arn't answering the original question. The question was for the person at the top or above you as the slave driver. Not the 'minion' or 'dogsbody' which refers to the employee being driven. Just a thought.


-3

The term yuppie comes to mind: A yuppie (short for "young urban professional" or "young upwardly-mobile professional") is defined by one source as being "a young college-educated adult who has a job that pays a lot of money and who lives and works in or near a large city". This acronym first came into use in the early 1980s.


8

Dogsbody : Chiefly British Slang One who does menial work; a drudge. Slang word for employee from a Bad Boss: peon, slave, worker, inferior, staffer, gimp, blue-collar, laborer, subordinate, hand, wage earner, desk jockey, human resource, personnel, workforce, dogsbody, drudge, drone, foot soldier, plugger, grunt, grub, slogger, toiler, ...


26

As was suggested in a comment by @DevSolar, consider cog A subordinate member of an organization who performs necessary but usually minor or routine functions. American Heritage Oxford Dictionaries Online uses cog with this meaning as part of a phrase a cog in the (or a) machine (or wheel): A small or insignificant member of a larger organization ...


63

As a British native speaker, I would have thought that "suit" or "corporate suit" would be a derogatory term to describe someone who works in a large international business corporation. Emphasizing that the person is instantly replaceable and anonymous, nothing more than the suit they are wearing. Edit: Just thought, in the same vein, I've also heard "empty ...


6

I'd render this with something like: I vouch for it with my reputation or I stand behind my {product / service} or I put my name to my {product / service} with pride or I {stake my reputation / pride myself} on the quality of my {product / service}.


1

Our name is the guarantee ; an example.


1

dirty-white-collar can be used for the same. Refer to http://wordspy.com/index.php?word=dirty-white-collar


56

OP seeks an answer that satisfies the following 4 criteria: 1. a derogatory term or expression 2. for a low-level employee ["insignificance of the person"] 3. of a large international corporation 4. whose work is boring, repetitious and mindless ["following characteristics: boring, repetitious and mindless work"] MINION noun: plural noun: minions: a ...


2

How about a "corpo nobody"? Nobody(noun): a person of no importance, influence, or power.


112

You could try drone:- A person who does tedious or menial work; a drudge: "undervalued drones who labored in obscurity" (Caroline Bates). if you wanted to emphasize the drudgery and hopelessness of the individual, or perhaps a wage-slave A wage earner whose livelihood is completely dependent on the wages earned. to emphasize the helplessness ...


8

You could consider wage slave,perhaps in a slightly less than literal sense.


2

There are 250 Google hits for "vacate its throne", for example If San Diego State's men's basketball team is to surrender, to vacate its throne as defending champion of the Mountain West Conference ... so this version at least is not unknown. I'd say your example, even if tweaked (note the preposition used in 'he will have to vacate his throne for ...


1

The word "very" appears in Shakespeare's works frequently. You can search for occurrences of specific words and phrases in Shakespeare's works using Open Source Shakespeare.


7

This is typically known as a baton in English (we imported the word from French). From Wikipedia's article on the martial baton: The ceremonial baton is a short, thick stick-like object, typically in wood or metal, that is traditionally the sign of a field marshal or a similar very high-ranking military officer, and carried as a piece of their uniform. ...


2

A Parliamentary Select Committee is not the same thing as Commission of Inquiry. A Select Committee (they are not necessarily Parliamentary) is a body set up for the purpose of looking into a particular matter. Like you I have seen your quoted alternatives in various on-line English to French dictionaries. Personally I would use Commité Parlementaire. It ...


2

OED has the following for committee: 3.a. A body of (two or more) persons appointed or elected (by a society, corporation, public meeting, etc.) for some special business or function. (Cf. 1b, which shows that each member was originally called a committee.) Hence, in the usage of Parliament, or other legislative assemblies: Committee of the ...


1

While it appears the idiom does not exist, you could make quite the play on words by describing someone "seeing through half-empty glasses." On a more serious note, most English-speaking people would likely understand if you described someone who "sees the world as half-empty" or "sees (x) as a half-empty glass." I can't say I have ever heard it used ...


1

A better, more idiomatic way to say this would be to drop the positive altogether, as that will be implied in the following: [The thing in question] resonated strongly with [the audience for it].


0

The chef in question is making his presence known by ... waving his flag or his banners [promoting himself or advertising his products] [widely] around the globe or in every corner of the world.


-1

The primary meaning of "shame" is a feeling of guilt or disgrace (etymonline). The expression "it's a shame" for "it'a pity" is a later semantic development and a bit difficult to explain. But I think it is absolutely correct to translate Schande with shame. A pity that etymonline does not mention the expression "it's a shame" for "it's a pity" and how this ...



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