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If americanate means, "considered typical of Americans," then the American equivalent would be eurocentric: (or the even more derogatory term listed below: eurotrash) focusing on European culture or history to the exclusion of a wider view of the world; implicitly regarding European culture as preeminent[*]. –Google *European exceptionalism is ...


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I think the closest may be kitsch something of tawdry design, appearance, or content created to appeal to popular or undiscriminating taste. things (such as movies or works of art) that are of low quality and that many people find amusing and enjoyable ex: The lava lamp is an example of Sixties kitsch


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The consensus (interesting Italian comments notwithstanding) is "consume" must be a typo of "consummate", which I accept.


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There is no rule in terms of how to call a mountain or lake as they are all proper nouns and the way they are called is different country by country. Only one rule I can think of is you place the definite article before a name of a mountain range as in the Rocky mountains (the Rockies), the Alps (mountains), the Andes (mountains), etc. Usually, you use Mt. ...


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When writing original work, one solution is to use constructions like "my love", "my friend", or dropping the possessive with "the" or "that" (as in "before I called the name"). The problem with this is of course that as you are doing a translation you may not feel you have the latitude to introduce additional meaning. I would probably use "they / them / ...


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This might be regional in application, but consider the invitation, "Cuppa tea?". In times of crisis, there is nothing like a nice soothing cup of tea. - dailymail The findings reveal that even a single cup of tea can significantly reduce anxiety levels after suffering a stressful experience – and in some cases, make people calmer than they were before. - ...


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My German is adequate, although not good enough to know whether this conveys the meaning of the phrase, but what about the simple English "take it with a pinch of salt"? (And it also has a culinary flavour.)


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The original sentence evokes P.T. Barnum's spectacles and exhibitions, or Buffalo Bill Cody's western show, so in America it would specifically be a three-ring circus: a public spectacle, especially one with little substance. "his attempt at a dignified resignation turned into a three-ring circus"



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