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In the original poster's list of examples, it seems that the words with Germanic origin (such as "drummer") end with "er", and the words with Latin origin (such as "pianist") end with "ist". Many of music's Latin-origin words are from Italian.


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Reference The New Fowler's Modern English Usage. Compare doer and perpetrator. (-or is the Latin agent-noun ending corresponding to English -er) English verbs derived from Latin —such as act, credit, invent, oppress, possess, prosecute, protect—usually prefer this Latin ending to the English one in -er. Some other verbs, e.g. conquer, govern, ...


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What strikes me is that the -er ones look like they are derived from verbs: a drummer drums, a fiddler fiddles, a whistler whistles. A guitarist plays guitar, a pianist plays piano. So if the instrument is also (used) as a verb, we seem to prefer deriving the name for the musician from that verb, rather than from the instrument.


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Maybe it's just because they end in [e]? "Trombone" is an exception (There's one in every crowd) and "oboe" and seems problematic - but, when in doubt, you can always say, "He's a ____ (name of instrument) player.


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I am tempted to explain the -er musicians' titles as being military-related. Buglers, fifers, drummers...all are associated with military events, ceremonies, or marching. Even penny-whistlers have accompanied marching men...and anyway, "whistlist" would sound like a roster of card-players. ...But there's an exception. The odd-man-out is the fiddler...not ...


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In Parliament there is a session called Question time where members can ask ministers questions relating to anything. Generally these questions are without notice. That is to say the recipient has been asked a question without the benefit of receiving it earlier and being able to research the answer first. If the answer is not known the Minster can answer ...


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I'm not sure how the obvious were left out: perhaps it was respect for the Realm? We really should leave the Brits out of this: Colemanball! “And here’s Moses Kiptanui – the 19-year-old Kenyan who turned 20 a few weeks ago.” Perhaps a sensitive decorum? Bullshit NOUN [MASS NOUN] Stupid or untrue talk or writing; nonsense. Not only ...


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They are both discourse markers. There are almost no specific articles about their use as discourse markers in English, but they are listed often in more generic works on discourse markers. Their function as discourse markers is usually identified as "attention getters". One of the few articles written about "look", is: 'From matrix clause to pragmatic ...


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IMO- If we can have a coffee-table book, why not a potty-seat book.


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That's interesting. I hadn't been aware of "perfect infinitive" or "perfect gerund" monikers. But thanks to your clear examples, I can see that there is no way these could be named in parallel with the former three, because the "tense" of have does not change. It seems as if "have" or "having" have no tense at all (or rather, that they can adapt to any ...


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I would suggest "loo books". See the discussion in the English Spectator here. (If the books are kept in the lavatory because they are obscene, it would be difficult to improve on Rousseau's "books to be read with one hand").


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I think it is generally referred to as: Bedside literature.


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Biome. This is a region that has similar climate, animals and plants. There are "terrestrial" (land-based) as well as "aquatic" biomes. Google "biome" to find maps of currently-defined biomes. However, this is not the zone for just one species, but for all the flora and fauna that coexist in that region. For one species this zone would be called the ...


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After much research it would appear that the best answer is: "Antanaclasis!" There are apparently some rather infamous examples such as: "Buffalo buffalo Buffalo buffalo buffalo buffalo Buffalo buffalo."


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"Field" would be my first choice, as in "field of study" — but "of study" is unnecessary in the context. The term is commonly-enough understood on its own that there's a classic corny joke about it. Another option would be "discipline" (as in, "academic discipline"). (No jokes for that one.)


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I generally hear it called a major. Wikipedia says that's supposed to be for undergraduate degrees (Associate's, Bachelor's), but it should be well understood at any level.


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Field of study is the generalized term for the subject of the degree given.


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The term biosphere is defined by Oxford Dictionaries Online as The regions of the surface, atmosphere, and hydrosphere of the earth (or analogous parts of other planets) occupied by living organisms. While this does not enumerate the various factors or conditions necessary for any particular organism, their existence is presumed if the particular ...


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I would suggest "scope", "field" or maybe, frenchy-fancy, "métier" Though "métier" would normally not be used in the context of an aimed study but more likely in narrative, respectively casual language. E.g.: After trying several careers, she found her true métier in computer science. (merriam-webster) Additionally it is more conventionally used in a ...


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I think 'subject' would work for all your examples.


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This is an example of a compound subject (gills and pectorals) split by the verb phrase (kneading quietly).


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Lines ending abruptly may well be (though they are not necessarily) examples of aposiopesis. Wikipedia provides the following definition: "Aposiopesis ... is a figure of speech wherein a sentence is deliberately broken off and left unfinished, the ending to be supplied by the imagination..."


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By "prefix" I understand mainly the usual prefixes used in Latin such as ab-, ad-, con-, in-, ex-, inter- etc and their variants such as ab+f changed to aff- etc. By "combining form" I understand mainly nouns that are used as a compound elements in compounds such as bookshop, boy-soldier, oil well etc. Of course, there is a grey zone where you will find ...


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The word you are looking for is boathouse (or boat-house). A building at the edge of a river, lake, etc., used to house boats. [OED] A modern one from outside: Source: www.mcmurrayconstruction.ca From inside: Source: earlferguson.ca


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A wild-goose chase. I was under the impression that the OP was looking for a noun (phrase).


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A noninteger. Cf. integer at dictionary.com. Ugly word, though, considering 'in-' itself stands for 'non-'.


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In Australian English, which has a slang meaning of "root" which is best avoided in a professional setting, This is not restricted to Australian English. Root can mean "penis" Irish English, is attested in British English since the 1840s (and as late as the 21st century) and appears in a Canadian play of the 1970s. It can also mean "copulate with" in ...


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This is generally called back-translation, if you are translating the text back into its original language. A "back-translation" is a translation of a translated text back into the language of the original text, made without reference to the original text. Comparison of a back-translation with the original text is sometimes used as a check on the ...


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As I mentioned in the comments, I truly think Decimal is the word you're looking for. It is used in everyday language to mean precisely what you want it to. Furthermore, if you have a separate category of "integers" or "whole numbers," it would be absolutely clear what a "decimal" category would mean.


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I doubt there is a specific word for those digits in the same way that "remainder" has a mathematical meaning when performing integer division. Nevertheless, some words can well describe the digits to which you refer. The Wikipedia article on Significant figures implies many options. Overestimated value (in most cases) because a significant figure is a ...


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Never use a big word when a small word will suffice: boring


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work that is futile is also pointless work given to you that serves no purpose but to keep you occupied is busywork (U.S. English speaker)


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jejune early 17th century: from Latin jejunus ‘fasting, barren.’ The original sense was ‘without food,’ hence ‘not intellectually nourishing.’ 1. naive, simplistic, and superficial. "their entirely predictable and usually jejune opinions" 2. (of ideas or writings) dry and uninteresting. "the poem seems to me rather jejune"


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I believe automatous fits. It's the adjective form of "automaton". Basically, you're acting like a machine, a robot. You get the job done, so in one sense you're effective, but you haven't expanded your creative problem-solving abilities. Machines just blindly do exactly what you tell them to do - they have no understanding whatsoever about discovering the ...


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perhaps "uneducational" would fit the bill. However as this is not a "real" word in dictionary sense - uninstructive is an alternative.


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Mechanistic describes the senseless performance of some activity, perhaps for a reason beyond one's actual comprehension. Imagine your fridge keeps breaking and you keep fixing it, but you never learn anything new about fridges or about fixing them, since the whole fridge fixing process is only a mechanistic exercise.


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Could it be "intransferable"? Or possibly, "idiosyncratic"?


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while proficiency is the "correct" term, level is frequently used in these drop-down boxes, too.


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Proficiency, the degree to which someone is proficient in something.


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They are two very close senses of the same word. The second uses part in a countable noun sense that means "an amount, but not all, of a thing or a number of things". The first uses part in an uncountable noun that means "some, a part or some parts [in the previous sense]". Because it is uncountable it is used with singular accord* These two close senses ...


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The first word that comes to mind is futile. fu·tile adjective \ˈfyü-təl, ˈfyü-ˌtī(-ə)l\ : having no result or effect : pointless or useless : serving no useful purpose : completely ineffective I've often heard and used phrases like "This was an exercise in futility." You could also say "It is futile to work on that fridge. It will ...


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Mind-numbing: (adjective) So extreme or intense as to prevent normal thought. Oxford Dictionaries "The process of repairing that refrigerator was so mind-numbing that I gave up and bought an Igloo cooler." Or, "Everybody knows that fixing refrigerators is a mind-numbingly tedious occupation, so I'm looking for career alternatives." And one final example ...


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Sisyphean. It means to keep doing something but being unable to get anything fruitful. It comes from the story of Sisyphus, who was cursed to eternally roll a boulder up a hill. As soon as the he'd near the top, the boulder would roll down, and he would have to go to the bottom and roll it up again. It is work with no result.


2

Would "stultifying" fit the bill for you? It means causing you to lose enthusiasm and initiative, often because of tedium or excessive restrictions. If the outcome was not what you desired, or even negative, you could describe the process as "counterproductive."


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The idiom spinning your wheels is often used to mean Like a car stuck in mud, to spin one's wheels is to try to make progress, but get nowhere. I sat down to write my term paper, but after three hours realized I was just spinning my wheels. Urban Dictionary It also sounds like déjà vu all over again, a redundantly recursive phrase often attributed ...


2

...the whole fridge-fixing process is uninforming.


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It could well be that you're looking for unedifying. From Collins: unedifying adjective not having the result of improving morality, intellect, etc [bolding mine] CDO satisfyingly gives the appropriate sense for the base word here: edify Verb UK (formal US) to improve someone's mind


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Are you looking for "fruitless"? "unproductive"? fruitless (adj) - useless; unproductive; without results or success Dictionary.com producing no good results : not successful Merriam-Webster They made a fruitless attempt to find a solution. It would be fruitless to continue. another suggestion: uninstructive



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