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I would use the word utilitarianism. Altruism may be also another good fit. The person who behaves in such way is called either an utilitarian or an altruist. According to Collins (http://www.collinsdictionary.com/dictionary/english/utilitarianism#utilitarianism_1) utilitarianism noun (ethics): 1) the doctrine that the morally correct course ...


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I think you're talking about "picking" stock. I can't find a good reference for this sense of the verb "to pick" yet, but will keep looking. Where I work, if stock has been "picked" for one order, it is no longer available for another order, even though it is still sitting on the shelf. It is not necessarily a physical movement of stock, but a matter of ...


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If you mean to say it will no longer be available in the future (permanently), I'd use to discontinue It expresses lack of availability, rather than the actual removal of the product from an inventory list. discontinue dɪskənˈtɪnjuː/ verb cease from doing or providing (something), especially something that has been provided on a regular ...


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-nym Suffix Used to form nouns describing types of word or name Toponymy Toponymy is the study of place names (toponyms), their origins, meanings, use, and typology. Etymology The word "toponymy" is derived from the Greek words tópos (τόπος) ("place") and ónoma (ὄνομα) ("name"). Toponymy is itself a branch of onomastics, the study of ...


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Perhaps: Speechwise A Pun My Word: A Humorously Enlightened Path to English Usage Robert Oliver Shipman - 1991 - ‎Preview - ‎More editions "Speechwise (concerning speech) Orr A. Torr is brilliant."


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Sometimes a language has a specific name for each variety of a certain species, but usually it does not. And there is a good reason for that: it's easier and more practical. There are more than twenty varieties of apples in the Plant Kingdom and it would certainly be clumsy to have a different name for each one of them. When you go to a grocery store you ...


2

This this and this are all "bears". This is a European robin and this is an American one There is not a unique English word for every animal in the world. And (as with "robin") it was common for English-speaking Americans to assign existing animal names to new, unfamiliar animals that they encountered in the New World, rather than invent new ...


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1) Why is there only one term in English for these two different species? Technically, there are more than two terms (see below). But lobster is probably not common enough a meal for the average person to warrant making any difference. For comparison, there are many breeds of ponies but I'd gather the typical person on a street will only have ever ...


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The first two could be called truisms: "an undoubted or self-evident truth; especially one too obvious for mention" However, "because" has taken on a new life on the Internet lately, as a "prepositional-because." Because Internet slang.


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Salutation A gesture or utterance made as a greeting or acknowledgment of another’s arrival or departure


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I'd say that line was witty, or the perfect quip. witty adj. 1. possessing wit in speech or writing; amusingly clever in perception and expression: a witty writer. 2. characterized by wit : a witty remark. quip noun 1.a clever or witty remark or comment. 2.a sharp, sarcastic remark; a cutting jest.


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I think you made a humorous/ironic comment: Humour : [U] the ability to find things funny, the way in which people see that some things are funny, or the quality of being funny: He's got a great sense of humour (= he is very able to see things as funny). Irony: a situation that is strange or funny because things happen in a way that ...


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How about calling it an "insert". (shim wasn't bad either)


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If the OP wants a noun, I think it should be "condensation" (of an academic theory into a snappy maxim)


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I don't think this is an abbreviation. It's more: [/to put/to sum up/] in a nutshell You may consider the above idiom. More on it: 99 Essential Business Idioms and Phrasal Verbs: Succeed in an English ... Zhanna Hamilton Business Idiom: In a Nutshell Meaning: To summarize Examples: In a nutshell, I am the furthest thing from a ...


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I don't think you'll find a single word, at best I can only reword your sentence: Resource depletion sponsored by corporate imperialism (backed by a stamp that says, US Gov't). This would be a right-wing government. As those of a left-wing government "believe we should regulate big businesses so they serve people’s interests" and that "country-wide ...


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You must be talking about "bone cement". Bone cements have been used very successfully to anchor artificial joints (hip joints, knee joints, shoulder and elbow joints) for more than half a century. Artificial joints (referred to as prostheses) are anchored with bone cement. The bone cement fills the free space between the prosthesis and the bone and ...


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implant, wedge-implant assembly, prosthesis, graft Biocompatibility of implant metals in bone tissue culture - Page v Ljilja Golijanin - 1988 The second was to grow bone on three implant metals (pure titanium, titanium alloy, and cobalt- chromium alloy) to see whether the metals were biocompatible and therefore would support the growth of ...


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There's probably a very precise medical term for this but, until that is found, you could use support (definition from the Free Online Dictionary): something that serves as a foundation, prop, brace, or stay.


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Pallet refers to the constructed device to put goods on for transport. A skid pallet is a particular dimension of pallet. Here in Australia a conventional pallet is 1200mm X 1200mm A "Skid Pallet" is 600mm X 1200 (so half)


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If you are looking to coin a new word, may I suggest "eco-hostile", by contrast with "eco-friendly".


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I think you may describe it as an irresponsible environmental policy for the clear negative consequences from an ecological perspective.


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The possibilities run the gamut from mild, diplomatic terms such as "short-sighted," to strongly condemnatory terms like, "ecocidal."


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Conservationist would describe a policy that conserves natural resources, so you could call it an anti-conservationist policy.


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It seems you are most concerned with the lack of thought paid to the environment. environmentally negligent


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Habitat is the word you are missing from your vocabulary.


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Terms of venery are a linguistic amusement from the Late Middle Ages. The Book of St. Albans, printed 1486, offered names for 165 different animal groups, including a gaggle of women, and a diligence of messengers, and influenced the Standard English Lexicon through Gervase Markham's The Gentleman's Academic in 1595. Modern group names often reflect an ...


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There are numerous examples of adjectives which are sometimes or always placed after the noun they modify (postnominal or postpositive usage). Wikipedia has a useful article, which includes: A postpositive adjective is an attributive adjective that is placed after the noun or pronoun that it modifies. This contrasts with prepositive adjectives, which ...


2

I smell French word order in "inspector general", cf the company Société Général. But you can do either in English. Some phrases are stuck in the one, though, there has never been a general witchfinder.


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I don't think there is an established collective noun for this fictional creature. Unicorns have somewhat an established collective noun because unicorn is a well-known legendary/fictional animal. Blessing can fall under terms of venery and these terms are more prevalent when we are more familiar with the animal and if they are used more frequently in ...


1

Liches, by the nature of the person who usually succeed in becoming them, tend to be smart, cunning, ambitious and treacherous. So, the only time I could see a group of them working together it would really be a sort of "shake your hand while trying to stab you in the back" proposition for all involved. So, a cabal maybe? Alternatively, since there is no ...


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The expression deontic is derived from the Greek deomai (δέομαι), translated request: (1) You can stay as long as you want, implies permission. The expression epistemic is derived from the Greek epistamai (ἐπίσταμαι), translated to know: (2) You may be right, implies supporting knowledge. The expression dynamic is derived from the Greek dunamai ...


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With regard to the question about how cliches are first created, the first thing that popped into my head when I read this question was "Coin a phrase". This article even cites The Bard of Avon in several places. I fully expected someone else had already answered with it. This paragraph seems to capture the idea of newly created phrases or words nicely: ...


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Archetype: 1.1 An original which has been imitated; a prototype: ODO Prototype: 1.1 The first, original, or typical form of something; an archetype: ODO Original!


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The classic exemplar can become trite when familiarity breeds contempt: classic adjective 1 Judged over a period of time to be of the highest quality and outstanding of its kind: exemplar noun A person or thing serving as a typical example or appropriate model: ODO An ideal form captures an archetypical sentiment, but ...


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In speech or writing, a future cliché begins as a turn of phrase, which Merriam-Webster's Eleventh Collegiate Dictionary (2003) defines as a fashioning of language or arrangement of words : manner of expression


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The best I can think of is first use or original use. After all, when an "expression, idea, or element of an artistic work" is first used, it cannot be a cliché. It only gains the description when it becomes so popular as to be overused.


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It is called: Weight stigma, also known as weightism, weight bias, and weight-based discrimination, is discrimination or stereotyping based on one's weight, especially very fat people. [Wikipedia] Weightist is one who exhibits weightism. Fattism is a synonym of weightism also and fattist is one who treats someone unfairly because they are fat. ...


0

There are some words that can be used both as verbs and as nouns, that seem to have the meaning you are looking for. sight: "the look of something", "what something looks like." touch: "the feel of something", "what something feels like." taste: "the taste of something", "what something tastes like." smell: "the smell of something", "what something smells ...


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Shot heard round the world The "shot heard round the world" is a phrase referring to several historical incidents, including the opening of the American Revolutionary War in 1775 and the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria in 1914. The latter refers to the beginning of World War One. WWII was just the the obvious sequel; to be ...


0

Another military possibility is "(initiate)/(initiation of) hostilities", where "hostilities" has the meaning of overt conflict rather than dislikes.


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More like sliding than tipping and (metaphorically) more to do with an objects 'place' in a hierarchy; added to the top (of the pile), it falls to the bottom. Angle of Repose -Wiki the maximum angle at which an object can rest on an inclined plane without sliding down. If you have complaints; get in line, the suggestion box has reached an angle of ...


1

Countries are also said to be on or to go on "a war footing", that is, they are prepared or are preparing, financially, industrially, and socio-psychologically, for the eventuality of war. The very preparedness for war can lead to war : the military industrial complex can make billions from it, and a bellicose people is an impulsive people.


2

I think that they are generally referred to as war pretext incidents: in July 1917, Duan used the incident as a pretext for declaring war on Germany. The anti-war movement must address the issue of the “pretext” and “justification” to wage war. Regarding the MH17 Malaysian airline crash, is the Obama administration in the process of “creating a ...


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If you've already completed the guest's summary biography, excerpted encomiums, etc., etc., there's no reason you can't move on immediately to So now, please welcome ...


-2

disequilibrium ("a loss or lack of balance" -- m-w.com) is the perfect fit I believe.


1

Charcuterie. From French : chair 'flesh' & cuit 'cooked'. Reference : http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charcuterie


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A fulcrum is the pivot point for a lever; but it can also be used as the balancing point of an object. Physics the point on which an object balances or turns [Macmillan] A simple diagram to illustrate: bvg8science.wikispaces.com


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Are you looking for the center of gravity? An object will balance when its center of gravity (the place where all of its mass, on the average, resides) is over the point of support. The larger the base, the more stable the object is. Source - Exploratorium


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Species-centric as it sounds, I think the most common term is "humanoid".



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