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0

I have heard this used: Bio-dad. It is often used as pejorative, though much less powerfully than "sperm donar". Most often used to refer to a biological father who is less involved than a step-father, or to a biological father who has little-to-no interaction with the child.


2

I would choose begetter to descibe this situation. I am German and we use the word "Erzeuger" which normally simply means "producer" but in the sense of relationship begetter is more apropriate I guess. (and besides I really don't think it is so wrong to use a special term for this)


0

I work in an Agile Lifecycle Management of a Project. We define every individual's man-hours as their CAPACITY. If an employee can give 50% of his time and is on a leave for one day, we say his capacity is 50% of (40 - 8) = 16 hours So I believe the word you are looking for is CAPACITY


1

The employee was unutilized. It means not used or not used effectively. Or The employee was mismanaged. It means to manage badly or wrongly. The first word doesn't assign blame but the second reeks of the fact that someone was responsible for this bad management.


1

"On-task hours" - The employee's time may be spent outside the system. "Work hours" - As far as the system is concerned, it is work hours. simply: "Hours" - Best not to quibble over details when it comes to systems, let the person analysing the stats do that!


1

First of all, I believe that you’re talking about a desk.  An office would have tables in conference rooms (for meetings) and for food, but these tables generally wouldn’t have pens, paper clips, etc., on them (except, perhaps, during meetings). I can’t think of a good single (collective) word for those items, but office supplies seems to be a very common ...


2

Stationery might work. It mainly means paper and writing implements, but it can also mean staplers etc.


-5

If you consider all of humanity over time, the proper word is "normal". Matrimony is not the only way that children appear. It was only recognized by culture a few thousand years ago. It may well be that people did not even understand that a "father" was necessary for a woman to get pregnant until perhaps 10,000 or 20,000 years ago. In many parts of the ...


3

So many names for this chap. Here's another one: genitor. The word comes up every now and then in Countdown, a letters and numbers quiz in UK, that's how I know it.


5

Unfortunately, the term Baby Daddy seems to be the term most used in common practice today. This seems to have started with descriptions of celebrities and their children in the tabloids. This term has deplorably now entered the common nomenclature. Baby Daddy - slang: the biological father of a woman's child; especially : one who is not married to or ...


5

There are several terms, the best one to use depends on nuance. To express the connotation of a parent who should have been there but wasn't, use the (mildly) pejorative term absentee father. absentee: a person who is expected or required to be present at a place or event but is not. Google


15

I've heard "absent father" used in this situation. In fact, parental absence or absenteeism is recognised in psychology.


52

I'm not sure why no one has said it, but the best answer is right in your question: I may have inherited a heart condition from my biological father. I have a situation similar to the one you describe, and my whole life this phrase has never failed to convey the meaning of the genetic-only relationship.


8

You can try: genetic father Which suggests that it is only your father in terms of genetic material... kind of like the sarcastic use of "sperm donor" but without other potential misleading connotations. Or if you like sarcasm and relying on the audience inferring the meaning: invisible father


1

This may not be what you're looking for, but I thought it would at least be related to the question and interesting for a non-English speaker. There are people that make a strong distinction between "Dad" and "Father". This article was found using a Google search of "father vs dad", and it explains the difference that some people make: A father is ...


4

If you're able to change the usage a bit, I'd offer sire. Changing the usage to something more like: Having been more sired than fathered, I never knew the man. helps to differentiate between that alternate meaning of sire, which is a title of respect and nobility.


-4

Your father is your father, the father you never knew. There is no special word for this all-too-common situation. Don't judge him too harshly until you hear his side of the story. Birth father can't be right, since fathers don't give birth. Birth mother is redundant: mothers give birth, even if maybe some other generous, or merely put-upon, lady brings you ...


23

If you're looking to emphasize his lack of involvement, a common description for a father-by-biology-only is: "sperm-donor". (US)


10

I'd say that all that he is, is progenitor. A person or thing from which a person, animal, or plant is descended or originates; an ancestor or parent: 'his children were the progenitors of many of Scotland’s noble families' In my mind that properly defines both the role in siring and the lack of any involvement afterwards. Reference: ...


6

I guess you could describe them as your estranged biological father to cause someone to be no longer friendly or close to another person or group Merriam-Webster


20

Try birth father also called a biological parent. It means a biological mother (birth mother) or biological father(birth father). Here is a definition from another site. This site defines it as the man who was someone’s father when they were born rather than the man who has adopted them. It is closer in meaning to what the op asked.


8

From both the legal and writing process standpoints, the components that make up a song (by "song" I mean a musical piece that includes vocals, and may (often) include other musical instruments that accompany the vocals, with the vocals almost always including words in a specific language) are almost universally divided into music and lyrics. When those two ...


2

I want to draw the distinction between the tune and the accompaniment. If we take away the lyrics we are definitely left with one thing, the tune (or melody) and may be left with another the accompaniment. I claim that it's not a song unless there is a tune to be sung. There are examples of pieces of music that are called songs by their creators, but ...


-2

As suggested in @NVZ's answer, consider composition Composition consists in two things only. The first is the ordering and disposing of several sounds...in such a manner that their succession pleases the ear. This is what the Ancients called melody. The second is the rendering audible of two or more simultaneous sounds in such a manner that their ...


2

[instrumental] accompaniment A musical part that supports or partners a solo instrument, voice, or group. Oxford Dictionaries (music) Instrumental part. Gwen sang for us, with Muriel providing accompaniment on the piano. WordReference


16

Instrumentals plural noun of instrumental It's very commonly used to refer to music (minus the lyrics) As a noun Music A composition for one or more instruments, usually without vocal accompaniment. "the opening tune is an instrumental" As an adjective Music Performed on or written for an instrument. "They played instrumental music at the ...


3

Basically, I'd go for 'Music'. But I might be wrong, but I might be right?


0

One widely recognized shared characteristic of walking, bicycling, and using public transportation (in a heavily used public transportation system) is the relative efficiency of the method of transportation for the amount of energy expended and for the amount of carbon (in various forms) emitted as exhaust. So an umbrella term you might use is ...


1

You are asking what people actually call this type of construction. Legal experts have referred to it as a “linguistic aberration” and a “disaster” because of the harm caused when trying to interpret contracts that use it. These terms, in turn, have been criticized as “somewhat disproportionate to the amount of harm it [and/or] causes”. Outside of ...


1

In these cases, the slash is being used to express exclusive disjunction (one or the other, but not both). I know of no conventional term for such phrases, but given the above, you might call them disjunctions, exclusive disjunctions or 'either/or' phrases. You might call the slash itself a disjunctive slash or an exclusive disjunctive slash.


0

Such entities usually fall under the general category of consultant.


0

regression = going back to a previous state from 0 to 5 it goes back to 3. retrogression = going back to a state its never been. From 0 to 5 it goes back to -2. its how I persieve it


0

Nibs us used for the turned up card being a jack. Nobody is a card in your hand or crib that is the right suited jack.


1

The phrase "a bacteria" does not contain a pronoun. The problem is the combination of the indefinite article a (which can only precede a singular noun) with the plural noun bacteria. The standard term for the matching between elements of a sentence is agreement or concord. The Oxford Dictionary of English Grammar (p19) defines agreement as follows: A ...


9

An 1844 translation of Wilhelm Meinhold, Mary Schweidler, The Amber Witch (1838) describes the conclusion of a trial for witchcraft that supposedly occurred in 1630 (the book was a piece of fiction but was presented as an old document discovered by the author, in the manner of James Macpherson's discoveries of the works of Ossian). First the judge pronounces ...


1

This forum has used the term "plurality" to discuss this issue. See Plurality of a group also referenced using we/our/us, so perhaps "plurality mismatch" or "plurality disagreement" would be descriptive. plurality grammar: the state of being plural --Merriam Webster


1

A standard term is 'subject-verb [dis]agreement'. Another term would be '{phrase} parity [error]'. (Agreement is accomplished by adding a plural phoneme to the verb {predicate} when the subject lacks a plural morpheme)


2

I worked in finance for a long time, and the usual word was "booking", or sometimes "entry".


-1

A Klick, which is one kilometer, seems to fit your need. See Wiktionary Though kilometers are not commonly used to measure distance in the USA, klick is commonly used by the US military, which uses the metric system almost exclusively in order to facilitate communication with allied forces. For some opinions on how klick came to be used by the ...


5

Its not an idiom. The "the" here is not synonymous with "any". "The" is the definite article. It refers to a specific military. Which one in particular will have to be determined by context. Generally it would be the military of the country you are in, but it may also be the military of the country you are talking about. For instance Americans in ...


-1

"The military" is synonymous with "any military", or "the armed forces", which when viewed this way, would include all of the world's different armed forces. "Military" can be a plural noun, meaning "all the militaries" ("all the armed forces"), or an adjective, meaning "belonging or relating to an armed force". This isn't an idiom. You would say ...


1

The word I have heard used for someone who works in a Chocolaterie is a Pâtissier, even though title is typically given to pastry chefs, and not artisans working in chocolate in particular.


1

I have to agree that the question could be refined to include whether the person "'working' with chocolate" was 'working' [Manufacturing it from a scratch..coco beans, adding the cream/milk, and so forth] or is 'working' in a sales capacity only of handling the made and ready for public consumption product to be delivered in some fashion from say a ...


0

Nonconformist a person who refuses to conform, as to established customs, attitudes, or ideas. Individualist a person who shows great independence or individuality in thought or action. Divergent diverging from each other "divergent paths" differing from each other or from a standard "the divergent interests of capital and labor" ...


1

I'd suggest, a cloud of dragonflies cloud : a large number of things (such as insects) that move together through the air in a group M-W


0

A person who exhibits those traits might identify themselves as a skeptic. a person who questions the validity or authenticity of something purporting to be factual. dictionary.com/browse/skeptic (1.) Examples of the term skeptic being adopted by groups interested in considering the fringe/uncommon: Reddit: r/skeptic Magazine: The Skeptic Society ...


2

Contrarian is a possibility, although it doesn't imply the aspect of having little evidence for beliefs. Contrarian definitely has a more positive spin.


1

Beauty. Used in the book, The Bees, by Laline Paul, she describes a group of dragonflies as "a beauty of dragonflies."



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