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Little late for this reply but I noticed no one included that a Run N' Gun is a real training/recreational event in which you carry your firearms/gear over distant areas with cover of varying stances and targets. Its the best training. Second only to live fire exercises (your fellow soldiers fire in preset locations/situations in a controlled setting but you ...


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Mathematically speaking, the metric system uses a fixed (or standard, or ordinary) radix (or base), whereas the imperial system uses a "mixed radix" (or synonyms per the preceding). From Wikipedia's article on mixed radix: Mixed radix numeral systems are non-standard positional numeral systems in which the numerical base varies from position to ...


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Given the orders of magnitude of the numbers, the rate (viz price) is 176, but the other values are all on the order of 4 (100x smaller). In other words, the other values are the bid size and ask (or offer) size (or quantity), possibly qualified with initial, starting, or opening. From Investopedia: Definition of 'Bid Size' The number of shares ...


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The two terms used in US stock exchanges are: Bid (or Offer) Ask See MSFT for an example. "Bid" refers to a price that is being offered by prospective buyers; "ask" to a price that is being asked by stock owners. You'd do well to examine the Wikipedia article (and related articles) on bid-offer spread to get more information.


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The answer is a plesionym. These are near-synonyms but with subtle differences (and the entire semantic range is not necessarily part of another symbol/word, as with hypo/ernymy).


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Whoa whoa ... utopia means "place that doesn't exist." What I mean to say is, that was the point in More's smart-ass, sarcastic, book. When you use Utopia, you use it as a negative. It's just like saying "dreamland" -- "maybe in dreamland," "oh that will work, in dreamland."


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It is called a negative utopia. The excerpt at the back of the novel 1984 uses the term negative utopia also. Below is a passage that explains negative utopia regarding to Orwell's and Huxley's novels and the distinction between dystopia and negative utopia: Here the distinction between a dystopia and a negative utopia is significant. George Orwell's ...


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Since it is not a complete software application, I myself would avoid using "program". The expression that I would use is implement software. This is used in the software engineering industry to describe the act of creating the code that will eventually become the software product. In formal software methodology, this is the step that translates a ...


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Consider “Prepare a program that will ...”. To prepare has senses including “To make ready for a specific future purpose; to set up; to assemble” and “To produce or make by combining elements; to synthesize, compound”. It implies planning, developing, writing, and debugging the program, although it does not narrowly constrain any of those activities. ...


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You might be looking for **develop** a program, or **produce** a program. but it is completely unclear what you are asking. Do they have to produce an entire working app? or desktop app? Include in that do they have to hire the graphics guys, modellers etc? Do they have to, just, write a certain amount of code that performs some purpose (perhaps more ...


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Structured analysis and design of software demands that you first learn and then teach the student these steps Define the use cases of the situation. Define the components required of the situation and design their relationships State which components are existent, which are to be created, and which are to be modified. For each component define their ...


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I hear it is a "santa sede" or two "sancta sedes"


-2

I offer the answer for the name of the first decade as Prenarian


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Grammer Nazi's www.ekast.co has a motto that says "We don't misspell, we just try not to plagiarize."


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This is one behavior commonly associated with a pedant is, per Merriam-Webster: ped·ant noun \ˈpe-dənt\ : a person who annoys other people by correcting small errors and giving too much attention to minor details


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You can call the the grammatical context for that particular sense of open. You'd say that sense X of open is of restricted distribution, and that the use of sense X requires a definite article in the noun phrase containing open. The doesn't have to strictly precede open, though. (You can say 'the great wide open.')


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Merriam-Webster refers to explanatory information that appears within a definition at the level of individual senses of the defined word as "an italicized label or guide phrase." Although the Eleventh Collegiate Dictionary's treatment of the noun open doesn't include "(with the)" or any other guide phrases, its handling of the adjective open includes ...


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Perhaps spellchecker? (Whether we like it or not.) [Oxford Dictionary Online] [Who says computing terms can't be applied to people, as in Thank you, Mr. Spellchecker. Maybe I meant to write check instead of cheque.] And as @DanBron points out, our slightly stuffier crowd might deem him or her autocorrector.


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I don't believe there's an exact word for "someone who corrects others' spelling errors", but there is one for a person who is meticulous in spelling, generally: orthographer (lit. "right writer"): One versed in orthography; one who spells words correctly, according to approved usage. If there is a single word which indicates (as @ermanen puts it) a ...


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There is also spelling nazi as a neologism which is derived from grammar nazi. Urbandictionary and tvtropes have entries for spelling nazi and there are some usages in Google Books. a person who freaks out when a little spelling mistake has occured or has be a constant little a**hole about it. people that care more about the spelling of words and ...


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I think user1598390 got it right. Floor is the closest to what you're looking for. I have also heard the term level used interchangeably with floor. Storey, as defined by Dictionary.com, shows that both words, floor and level, are acceptable. storey /ˈstɔːrɪ/ noun (pl) -reys, -ries 1. a floor or level of a building 2. a set of ...


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How about layer? Or dividing layer Or separating layer — something like that? Stratum is related to layer, but I think layer is less scientific sounding.


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Believe it or not, the word you are looking for is floor. It refers to both the space between and the actual divisions. But the space between can have other names like story ("storey" in British English). If it were a house it would be the roof. I think you could use "floor slab" or deck.


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The actual word for a vertical partition between two stories is called a Party Structure. Wanted to create a different answer because my other answer was related but different. NOTE: This word is used more in the UK than it is in the US. Party Structure Diagram


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You could use the word Partition. It is even more general and doesn't specify vertically or horizontally. It defines an object which separates something into parts. So: For a building, a partition separates the building into floors, stories, rooms, or whatever your preference is. As TheFreeDictionary.com says, partition: a division into parts; ...


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A common English term is stories: "This building is seven stories tall." EDIT#1 and alternative is floor: "All the bedrooms are on the fourth floor." See 3-A


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Consider: We are retiring the cloud-based version of XXX and will only offer a standalone app. This is eighty four characters and the verbiage would be understood by your readers. EDIT#1 based on your comments, consider: We are deferring the development of a cloud-based version of XXX and will offer a standalone app. This communicates your current ...


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Victim: The person whom one is gossipping about can be called as the victim. A victim is a person who is the target of an unpleasant situation. While you gossip about someone, it is an unpleasant situation for that person. Hence you can call that person a victim of your gossip.


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Line of business is also used for organizational break-outs. For example, when I was managing proposals for a corporation we would refer to Line of Business leaders--Head of Sales, VP of Product development, IT Director-it is a broader categorization than department which can be smaller and wouldn't by itself constitute a line of that business. The group ...


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**To Release is to "Let go" "make available" ** To Deploy is to "send forward" or "use" an action Hence, for employment : A number of people were "released" (made redundant), whilst a number were re"deployed" (sent elsewhere for further action In software: the latest "release" ("Available" version) may be deployed ("sent forward" or "actioned") ...


1

I don't really see why you need to say anything. Why not '5 doughnuts to be awarded each consecutive day you visit the shop'. By adding 'until the run is broken' you are effectively saying the same thing over again. You have covered your bases by use of the word 'consecutive'.


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Hey I've thought of something I've seen in computer programming for these issues: post28Days ie, the days bigger than 28. you could also say "super-28 days" or similar. I don't know if it's relevant to your situation.


1

February 29 is called the "leap day" because it's not in every year. See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/February_29 That doesn't answer your question though. Sorry I don't have enough reputation points yet to just post a comment


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I definitely agree with MrHen that discrete is not the right term because it has a very technical meaning that your example does not seem to qualify for. If I had to come up with a title based on your example I would use a term like Specification Data or Specification Information. If you are looking for something shorter maybe the abbreviated Spec Data or ...


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silhouette n. A drawing consisting of the outline of something, especially a human profile, filled in with a solid color. An outline that appears dark against a light background. See Synonyms at outline. tr.v. silhouetted, silhouetting, silhouettes: To cause to be seen as a silhouette; outline: Figures were silhouetted against the ...


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The word that comes closest to describing this sort of behavior(repetition of the same word in a sentence) is: Epizeuxis According to Wikipedia: In rhetoric, an epizeuxis is the repetition of a word or phrase in immediate succession, for vehemence or emphasis. Some examples provided(among others): "Never give in — never, never, never, ...


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Must be a bit late... This thesaurus could be helpful to dig into ideas and vocabulary. An entry for Ten-percenter.


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I suspect this comes from traditional photography where continued magnification of a negative eventually results in the structure of the silver particles suspended in the gelatine becoming visible. Here's a Wikipedia link with more detail. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Film_grain In computing we frequently use the word as a synonym for 'detail'. Typically ...


2

According to Wikipedia in US the 'silly season' is referred to as the 'slow news season' while in Australia and New Zeland it is closely related to the Christmas season: In the United Kingdom, Ireland, Israel, and in some other places, the silly season is the period lasting for a few summer months typified by the emergence of frivolous news stories ...


2

"Colloquial" refers to informal, non-technical usage. This is the opposite of the formal, technical terms utilized in scientific disciplines, such as geology. Full Definition of COLLOQUIAL 1 : of or relating to conversation : conversational 2 a : used in or characteristic of familiar and informal conversation; also : unacceptably informal b : ...


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I would use the word trend to describe this constant recurrence: "...5 doughnuts to be awarded each consecutive day you visit the shop until the trend is broken."


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(With the) simply means that the specified meaning of the noun open applies only when the definite article the is used. For example, the last meaning is used in the sentence the secret was out in the open. You can not use an open here. A specific name for the "with the" construction that this specific dictionary uses, I don't know, but basically, both uses ...


2

Victim You can be the victim of gossip as it is rarely complimentary, often malicious and entails judgement and criticism. Barry was a victim of gossip at work. It went beyond the usual comment and speculation. His mates said Barry was on cocaine and abused his own children. The heavy workplace atmosphere was getting to him. What should he do? ...


0

If gossiper is one who gossips, then you could always use gossipee. While it's not very well attested searching the interwebs (though I did find it in at least one published book on pyschology), its meaning should be quite transparent to any native speaker of English most especially when contrasted with gossiper.


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I would call it a qualifier, as it qualifies the definition to say that it only applies in the specified scope.


0

Subject is the word I would use, in the general meaning of "that which is being talked about." Works for gossip just as well as for other modes of discussion.


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The aeronautical sense of nominal derives from engineering where the nominal value is the specified dimension and the reference point for tolerances. The Free Dictionary offers the following definition (from McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6th edition) for tolerance: (engineering) A permissible deviation from a specified ...


1

In terms of the United States, there is a distinction, at least in my understanding as a former US Marine. The United States Armed Forces are the Navy, Army, Marine Corps, Air Force, and Coast Guard. The Unites States Senate Committee on Armed Services encompasses Legislative oversight of the Department of Defense (which oversees most of the US Armed ...


0

Five donuts to be awarded each day until the condition is broken. That is, the shopkeeper established a condition (daily visits) that must be fulfilled for the donut awards to continue.



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