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There's another proverbial saying that describes this situation, except that here the fallout often rebounds on the helper rather than on the person helped: "No good deed goes unpunished". Nor should one forget the proverbial law of unintended consequences.


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A "monarchy," by definition, is a "one person" rule. (Mono= one, archy=rule). In English history, there was the joint rule of "William and Mary" cited by others, but that was the exception, not the rule. The confusion may arise from the fact that most "monarchs" have spouses. These spouses are referred to as "consorts" and are often given "equivalent" ...


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I don't think there's a particular term for a monarchy in this situation because there's no difference as to who is ruling. It's just a question of what title is granted to the spouse of the monarch. In the United Kingdom and its predecessors (at least England), the title granted to the husband of a reigning Queen has never been King. King William III was ...


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Monarchy comes from the Greek for 'one ruler'. So all monarchies have either a king or a queen in power; though the ruler's spouse may be called 'queen' or 'prince consort', the title does not grant equality. If it did, the system would no longer be a monarchy: possibly, as mentioned above, a diarchy. (Note for historical pedants: though Philip of Spain ...


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No, "discrete" is not an appropriate description. "Discrete" means: discrete — consisting of or characterized by distinct or individual parts With regards to data, discrete data means data that takes a very specific form: discrete data — Data that can only take certain values. For example: the number of students in a class (you can't ...


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I learned and always thought "hat trick" referred to a ice hockey tradition of fans throwing their hats to the ice when a player got 3 goals. The crowd is "tipping their hats" for the performance.


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While most monarchs have been male, many female monarchs also have reigned in history; the term queen regnant refers to a ruling monarch, while a queen consort refers to the wife of a reigning king. Most states only have a single person acting as monarch at any given time, although two monarchs have ruled simultaneously in some countries, a situation ...


0

These are all present tense relating to a state represented by a perfective passive participle (acting as an adjective in a predicative construction). So the aspect is perfect and the tense is present, and there is some conditioning involved in each case which is not that different from the would case (below). He may be finished. She must be loved. It can ...


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The pronunciation of words that begin with ag- is stranger than I had imagined. According to Merriam-Webster's (which provides what it considers the main U.S. pronunciation for each one), very few such words are pronounced with the g attached to the same syllable as the a. To my surprise, Merriam-Webster's says that the a is pronounced as a stand-alone ...


2

There is really no other way that it should be pronounced. The initial G in Gnostic is silent to avoid pronouncing the word "guh-nostic." But it is not the permanent character of the G to be silent as others have pointed out. When the sound is found mid-word, the G is always voiced as in such words as AGNOSIA, AUTOGNOSIS, COSMOGNOSIS, COGNITION, ...


1

In Greek, the "g" is pronounced in the word "agnosis", so that makes me think that Thomas Henry Huxley, who created the word "agnostic" had knowledge of greek and just pronounced it with the "g" as it should be. The "g" is only not pronounced if not preceeded by a vowel.


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In IT it will often be referred to as just box. The problem with the term computer computer is that it's often used quite generally, and can refer to the whole system. eg. 'There's something wrong with Sue's computer' - could mean that the mouse is faulty. Whereas 'There's something wrong with Sue's box' explicitly tells us that it's something to do with ...


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The pronunctuation (damn I'm good) might be to reduce the confusion between speaking of a gnostic and describing a thing as agnostic.


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I don't know if you can really answer a "why" question and there aren't a lot of "agn-" words to study, but the only other such word that comes readily to mind, "agnate", comes from the same process (ad- + gnātus), and is pronounced the same way.


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In older language there is the term womanizer. But for a young man today I would simply say "a nice guy the girls are fond of".


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Apparently nobody has mentioned it yet, so I’ll put forth stud. The term stud comes from the animal-husbandry world where it refers to a male whose purpose is to mate with females and produce offspring. Likewise, male humans who are perceived to have “game” and be able to “score” easily with women are often dubbed studs.


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What you really want, is a Mack: Or a Playa / Player: They are often used interchangeably nowadays.


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In the situation described by the OP, I'd be inclined to use the adjectival expressions nescient [of X], unexposed [to X], or unfamiliar [with X].


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Urban Dictionary: Don Juan A Great Lover. A Great Friend. A man that gave many women sexual gratification. Sometimes people call friends or people who are smooth with ladies Don Juan. That jon, he's such a don juan. Wiki: Don Juan Don Juan is used synonymously for "womanizer", especially in Spanish slang, and is often used in reference ...


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I'd like to offer chick magnet: a male who seems to attract good looking females easily; someone who has many female admirers. While Casanova, player, and playboy fit, they have a somewhat negative connotation (to me, at least) of having less regard for women; a chick magnet doesn't (to me) have that connotation. A puppy is a chick magnet! In 6 Ways To ...


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A lady-killer or Casanova may also be used to indicate popularity with girls.


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In Britain the older generation would call him a ladies' man. I hope I have punctuated it correctly. Does anyone think it should be a lady's man?


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Well the most common term I have heard without huge sexual connotations is ladies' man. 1) A Man who spends much time with women, or is in the constant company of them 2) A man who is able to pleasure women in most any manner 3) A Man who tends towards female friends, rather then male friends You can also go with playboy, but this hints at wealth ...


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I've always known it as the 'chassis'. The peripherals (mouse, keyboard etc) and display unit/VDU/monitor connect to the chassis which is the 'box' which contains the actual computer hardware (the motherboard upon which the CPU and RAM is connected, storage media such as hard drives are connected etc). I have heard it also called the tower, the desktop ...


0

I would call it either the computer case / chassis or the system unit.


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The outer box can be called any of the following: computer case computer chassis tower system unit base unit Though most of the times, people would refer it by just chassis or 'CPU' which is technically incorrect but widely accepted.


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I've worked with computers a lot, and it's generally referred to (as @FumbleFingers said) as: system unit system box PC or more colloquially PC box or just simply machine To what @Liamdev361 said: yes sometimes it can be called a tower, but strictly tower is just one form factor a computer can come in, the others being minitower, pizza-box, mini (e.g. ...


0

It exactly what you call it in the question. It is a desktop computer. A computer could reference a desktop computer, laptop, or server so computer used alone is not a full description. Also desktop computers are often referred to as workstations. Still not as good as desktop computer but a close second. If it were empty it would be referred to as a ...


2

It is often referred to as a "tower".


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system box An entire computer ... consists of: a display, either color or monochrome; a system box (processor, memory, disk drives, power supply, and communication interfaces); a keyboard; a pointing device, often a mouse. It may also be called the [computer] base unit.


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People will frequently refer to this as the CPU. While in strict terms, the CPU is the actual central processing unit (the chip that handles all the main functions), the case containing the unit is frequently referred to in the same way.


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That 'part' is the computer. The other devices you describe are peripherals connected to it. If the form factor is a traditional, vertical case, as pictured, 'tower' is often used as well. And of course, if you're looking for a term specifically for the housing, well, that'd be the 'case'.


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Hashtag Wikipedia The use of the hash symbol in IRC inspired Chris Messina to propose a similar system to be used on Twitter to tag topics of interest on the microblogging network. He posted the first hashtag on Twitter: “how do you feel about using # (pound) for groups. As in #barcamp [msg]?" —Chris Messina, ("factoryjoe"), August 23, ...


1

This aggressive and carnivorous fish resides primarily in the shallow coral and rocky reefs along the Gulf of Mexico and throughout the Caribbean. Adults are easily identified by their cigar-shaped bodies, light green to white coloring with two black or dark purple stripes that run from the eye and pectoral fin to the base of the caudal fin. Like all ...


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As others have said the number sign is technically called on octothorpe. Not that anyone would know what you were talking about if you used it. Number sign, pound sign, or hash/hashtag would be more generally understood. Almost all automated phone systems will use the term 'pound' if they want you to press it on your phone. "Sharp" is a completely different ...


0

I am not sure whether I understand your question. The grammar terms you have in your head line are parts of a sentence, with the exception of "verb". Verb is a word class, but it is often also used in analysing the parts of a sentence. You can call these "things" parts of a sentence, elements of a sentence or components of a sentence, it is all the same. ...


1

According to Bablenet, these are called clause elements: These are well worth learning about, as you will certainly want to use them to explain the syntax of language data you are studying in exams or investigations. If you are not able to describe or identify clause types, it is usually acceptable and always helpful to consider how these elements work ...


1

Noun, verb, pronoun, adjective, adverb, etc are parts of speech. Subject, object, complement, adverbial, etc are functions.


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I think that the question contains a faulty premise. There are many types of three-valued logic. Some three-valued systems include: A ternary numeral system, in which each digit is called a "trit" (short for TRinary digIT). Each trit can be 0, 1, or 2. The least-significant trit represents zero, one, or two; the second-least-significant trit represents ...


0

Consider "interstice:" interstice: 2 : a short space of time between events.


2

If something is happening repeatedly, we say the value for rate (or frequency) increases if it starts happening more often in a given time-span. Conversely, if it starts happening less often we say the interval is increasing. interval - a space between things, points, limits, etc.


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Trit for trinary digit. According to Princeton Wikipedia, since the Princeton article was retrieved from Wikipedia: Analogous to a bit, a ternary digit is a trit (trinary digit). One trit contains log23 (about 1.58496) bits of information. Trits and base 3 computing and hardware have been researched and developed in the 50's. The idea was to eliminate ...


0

I don't know of the 'proper' name for it. But it sounds like the system used in college. I was a math major and I took level 100, 200, 300, 400, and 500 as I progressed in my Math studies. However I only took up to 200 level courses in other fields.


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Trit. At least, according to Wikipedia: Analogous to a bit, a ternary digit is a trit (trinary digit)


0

It sounds to me that you are "an American, with English as a mother language". You could therefore say that you "have American English as your mother language" or you could say that your "mother language is American English". Freely substitute "mother" with "native" and substitute "language" with "tongue". Therefore, all the following are valid: "an ...


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Some of the answers to this question are reacting to a value judgement that isn't necessarily present in the term. A 'knowledge worker' is someone who primarily handles information in their work, in contrast to someone who primarily handles physical materials. There's no judgement being made on skill or value, even though the original author's "other" type ...


0

The patronizing "we" is one of the five types of a nosism: ..."we" is sometimes used in addressing instead of "you," suggesting that the addressee is not alone in his situation, that "I am with you, we are in this together." This usage is emotionally non-neutral and usually bears a condescending, ironic, praising, or some other connotation, depending on an ...


1

A questionaire is an instrument for collecting data, and almost always involve asking a given subject to respond to a set of oral or writen quesitons. A survey is a process for gathering data that could involve a wide variety of data collection methods, including a questionaire. It also could involve observing or measuring things that go beyond questions, ...


0

A 'survey' is a much wider term than 'questionnaire'. A 'survey' is defined by Oxford Dictionaries as 'a general view, examination, or description of someone or something'. In order to conduct an examination, a number of techniques may be used, from observation, research, sounding of opinion etc. When researching opinion, one method is to ask contributors ...



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