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Proving a negative or negative proof: A negative proof (known classically as appeal to ignorance) is a logical fallacy which takes the structure of: X is true because there is no proof that X is false. Or You do not know what X is. Therefore we do. If the only evidence for something's existence is a lack of evidence for it not existing, ...


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In Old English, the adjective þryscyte 'triangular' (Icelandic þriskeyta n. 'triangle') was used to define triangular shapes. Additionally, gar~gara suggests triangularity but it was only used for land masses and it is not always translated as a triangular land mass. Here is a dictionary entry for þryscyte from An Anglo-Saxon Dictionary by Bosworth and ...


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For the specific case of adoption and foster children, the term is "mixed race". See, for example, http://www.bbc.com/news/education-12513403 or https://adoption.com/forums/thread/363328/torn-about-mixed-race-adoption/ She was very protective of her mixed-race foster children. (Yes, this doesn't necessarily make sense if taken literally. If the parents ...


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Perhaps Conceptual analysis, because it dismisses intuition. Conceptual analysis is one of the main traditional methods of philosophy, arguably dating back to Plato's early dialogues. The basic idea is that questions like 'What is knowledge?', 'What is justice?', or 'What is truth?' can be answered solely from the capacity to understand the relevant ...


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How about "creative dissonance". It's the idea that a clash of ideas leads one to think more about those differences and in doing so come up with new insights.


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Gore was used in OE to convey the idea of a triangle: "triangular piece of ground," Old English gara "corner, point of land, cape, promontory," from Proto-Germanic *gaizon- (cognates: Old Frisian gare "a gore of cloth; a garment," Dutch geer, German gehre "a wedge, a gore"), from PIE *ghaiso- "a stick, spear" (see gar). The connecting sense is ...


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Consider the idiomatic expression "white wedding", that is a traditional, ​mostly Christian, ​marriage in a ​church or a temple (at which the woman who is getting ​married ​wears a ​white ​dress).


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You can use 'Bestowing bride'. We in India use the hindi term 'Kanyadaan' which is also popularly described as 'bestowing bride' or 'gifting the bride to the groom'


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Re-orientation ( Orientation alignment , Orientation fit are two words )


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You could also say the rocket maneuvered [or guided] into a different trajectory, or something like that.


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I would use align; depending on the exact situation, one or the other of these definitions might apply: to arrange things so that they form a line or are in proper position to change (something) so that it agrees with or matches something else (source merriam-webster.com) The rocket might be aligned with some target it is being launched towards, or ...


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Commenting to the attempt to coin (or perhaps resurrect) the terms "allogenate(n.) or possibly allogenous(adj.) or allogeneous(adj.)". In the medical field the word "allogeneic" (or allogenic") is standard terminology for biological material coming from a person who is not genetically identical to the recipient. The antonyms in either direction are ...


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The use of adjectives as nouns is common in Latin, from which some of our vocabulary and forms derive. Ave Imperator, morituri te salutant (Hail Emperor, those who are about to die salute you) Morituri is actually a participle form, used as an adjective, and could be translated literally the about to be dying. Using adjectives as nouns in English has ...


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This is nominalization produced by zero derivation. That happens when a non-noun is used as a noun without requiring a derivational affix. Per Wikipedia: In linguistics, nominalization or nominalisation is the use of a word which is not a noun (e.g. a verb, an adjective or an adverb) as a noun, or as the head of a noun phrase, with or without ...


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The normal term used to describe both the ensemble and the crew would be the company.


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There is a word miscegenate, from the Greek for "mixed race" (misce-, -genus) which would provide a clue. The Greek for other is allos, which provides prefixes allo- (as in allophone) and the Latin al- (as in alibi). So a word one could coin is allogenate or possibly allogenous or allogeneous. In fact, allogenous is mapped on to allogeneous in OED: ...


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I don't think there is an appropriate one-word adjective to use in your sentences. You could consider using racially different to mean that they are of different race. The Racially Different Psychiatrist—Implications for Psychotherapy The race of the therapist can play a significant role in the manifestation of transference and ...


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If the foster mother is white or is herself from an ethnic minority group, the following phrase, ethnic minority group, is probably the best solution, and one least likely to cause offence or misunderstanding. She was deeply protective towards her foster children from ethnic minority groups. ethnic minority a ​group of ​people of a ​particular ...


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I think that the term that fits the context you are describing is patriarchal: Patriarchal Traditional Marriage: The orthodox view of sexual ethics has been in the context of the patriarchal traditional marriage of the past few millennia -- a relationship of ownership and domination of a husband over his wife. Remnants of traditional marriage are ...


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In Computable Numbers (1936), Turing doesn't use the word "digital" at all. He refers to "computing machines" and in particular the "universal computing machine", which is what we now call a Turing machine. In modern terms, we would not usually refer to something as a computer unless it represented a concrete implementation of a Turing machine (except that ...


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Digital computation dates back much further than you think, to the origin of numerals them selves; It is of interest that essentially, digital computation can be assimilated to two counting systems; that of base ten or decimal, in which we can do math whilst counting upon our fingers, using both hands. Secondly, to a base twelve system, the dozen; a method ...


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The ENIAC was the first major electronic general purpose computer of major significance, using valves as its computation and storage devices. That made it orders of magnitude faster than its electromechanical predecessors. It was completed in 1946. An seminal earlier electromechanical computer was the Harvard Mark I, completed in 1944 but started quite ...


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A very long time ago I was an engineer doing time and motion studies in the automotive industry and we used the wink as a defined unit of time. If I remember correctly a Wink is: 1/100 of a minute it is a unit of time used by industrial engineers (before computers and PDTS). Decimal minutes made arithmetic easier. You can still buy decimal minute ...


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It boils down to what you mean by "digital" (and, to a degree, "analog"). The best-known dichotomy in the computer universe is between "digital" and "analog". An "analog computer" is one which represents values in a computation as non-discrete voltage or current levels within an electronic circuit. A "digital computer", on the other hand, represents ...


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Eric Partridge, A Dictionary of Slang and Unconventional English, first edition (1937), which is usually very strong on British military slang, seems to favor the Brooklands aerodrome explanation, citing Ernest Weekley, An Etymological Dictionary of Modern English (1921) as his authority, but adding a starting date for this usage of "ca. 1910–1914" (which ...


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Try "Old-Hollywood-Movie Type" wedding.


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Not really a word, a word, but Immolator would be a good one. As in Vlad the Impalor let me introduce you to Steve the Immolator. Related: The Romans had some interesting Latin terms


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This question brought to mind a toy we had when I was a kid. It was made popular on the TV show "Romper Room" Plastic cylinders (like small coffee cans) with loops of cord attached - and you'd stand on them, hold the cords taut, and clomp around with your arms at your sides. If you called this person a Romper Stomper I'm pretty sure folks of my generation ...


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How about 'contrived ignorance'. 'Contrived' - Ingeniously or artfully devised or planned (OED).


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He is perhaps walking with dangling arms. I like to believe that Junho really does harbor otherworldly hypnotic power over the 2PM boys and can "conduct" them in their zombie form at his free will, to cater to his every whim with their limp dangling arms and stumbling zombie feet.


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A tongue-in-cheek expression for the home team (which is really the only term in use) is the good guys, at least to fans of the home team. There is not really a second half of a baseball game. Given that there are nine (or seven) innings, each game develops at its own pace, and it may take one hour to play the first five innings and then another hour to ...


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I am a big fan of baseball and I can't live without it. Chasing team doesn't refer to a home team in baseball which doesn't have anything to chase. Each team has 9 innings and they usually (in Major League) can't score as many runs in baseball as in cricket especially when aces (the best pitchers in each team) pitch the ball. Two advantages for a home ...


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Derivative work appears to be an inclusive hypernym for these kinds of creative work. This is a legal term, pertinent in this case, as the copyright protection of the original (the underlying work, which is the recognized dual term) seems to cover reasonably well the scope of the possible "transformations, modifications, or adaptations". It covers ...


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You could use 'Client' ... if an office has a server that stores the company's database on it, the other computers in the office that can access the database are "clients" of the server. techterms.com


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I would normally use "the application layer": IDs are explicitly stored in table xyz and their proper incrementation/decrementation is a responsibility of the application layer.


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The easiest way to make sure your meaning is properly understood would be to say: Everyone can learn how to program. It is like learning to speak a new language. [...]


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how can I explciitly differentiate from a programming language, or a "speech language", or any kind of different language? Where needed, I would clarify that I'm either talking about a spoken language, a written language, a programming language, a sign language, or a mathematical language etc.


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As I commented above, those actions need proper "execution of a warrant" which is usually issued by a judge (1) to permits an otherwise illegal act that would violate individual rights and (2) affords the person executing the writ protection from damages if the act is performed. If the purpose of the system is to check the balance of any ...


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The bank would only allow this if it is obeying an order specific to the account; if so, either such order could be described as an injunction, and the first might be a subpoena.


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Depening on the jurisdiction you are in and the details of the proceedings, the sherriff, bailiff or process server might seize, impound, poind or sequestrate the bank account. Edit: corrected spelling mistake.


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I think you are referring to a Bank Account Levy: When a bank account is frozen due to a creditor trying to get the debtor to repay its debt. A bank levy can occur due to either unpaid taxes or unpaid debt. The IRS usually uses this method the most, but other creditors can use this method as well. (Investopedia)


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The Latin word for the verbal adjective is GERUND. That word is used less and less in modern English classes.


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The 'opposite' of digital art can only be not digital art. Art is a huge sphere of human endeavour that covers many different philosophies, aesthetics and media. Whether the artistic vision is presented digitally or not is a small part of a much bigger whole.


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Military slang is notoriously hard to pin down ("Tell me, trooper, where exactly did you first hear the opprobrious term 'f***ing spare part'?"), but this seems more elusive than most. I have found a couple of memoirs that say it was 'universal slang' by September 1915, which is pretty soon after the first guns were turned on our brave RFC boys; but how was ...


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Two rather different projects that Alan Turing worked on appear to be involved. Turing was a key person in breaking the German ciphers during WW2. (Many other people/groups were involved also.) To that end, many devices were constructed that mimicked the German ciphering machines, using parts of what the British were able to scrap from German submarines, ...


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I was going through some online articles and I'd like to thank @Josh61 for the right references. I found this detailed write-up on Word Origins from OED by Richard Holden. (I think I now know the reason why top EL&U users strictly stick to OED definitions) The article: http://public.oed.com/aspects-of-english/word-stories/digital/ What distinguishes ...


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As attested by most sources the origin is probably from a humorous reference to the very popular music hall song, "Archibald, certaily not" which became a cachtphrase in those years: Archibald: masc. proper name, from Old High German Erchanbald, literally "genuine bold," from erchan "genuine" + bald (see bold). Archie, British World War I ...


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While this issue always seems to get mired in arguments about political correctness, I'd offer another perspective. I switched to BCE/CE before I was even aware of the political correctness issue: I had previously found the whole BC/AD confusing, so when I happened upon the new abbreviations in a scholarly source and then looked them up, to me, it made a ...



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