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The "under" terms are not natural to me, but that could be a regionalism. The following terms are more common, at least in northeastern US english: On vacation On sick leave On maternity/paternity leave Employed Retired Given these changes, the term "Employment Status" would be preferable to "Employee Status." "Employee status" would be more general, and ...


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Computer nerd here. There is no clear-cut answer here as it would depend on culture and the specific technology. For instance, "Execute" is more a part of the Windows lexicon, though I’m hard pressed to say why. For a general audience, I would go with "Launch", or "upon first use." For hardware, I would say "Boots up" or "starts up".


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Lightning is the generic term for this weather phenomenon. In normal, non-technical English an individual instance is a lightning flash, a bolt of lightning or a lightning strike. There is no collective noun for them. However, you could refer to a set of lightning flashes, bolts or strikes by one of the nouns used to describe a group of objects or ...


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Accusative case, for the most part, is a fancy way of saying objective case. So your example was: a construction in English, especially colloquial English, consisting of a pronoun in the accusative case joined with a predicate that does not include a finite verb and otherwise identical with the nominative absolute (as him being my friend in “him being my ...


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I think delirium can be used to refer to what you are describing: A temporary state of mental confusion and fluctuating consciousness resulting from high fever, intoxication, shock, or other causes. It is characterized by anxiety, disorientation, hallucinations, delusions, and incoherent speech. Source: The American Heritage® Dictionary of the ...


1

co-thinking, collaboration … the “Art of Thinking and Deciding” together is a very rare competency for teams at all levels. … a way to take different perspectives into account and to arrive collaboratively at a suitable solution. It’s time to shift our focus from group votes of “yes” or “no” to co-thinking and collaborative ...


0

facilitator: one that facilitates; especially : one that helps to bring about an outcome (as learning, productivity, or communication) by providing indirect or unobtrusive assistance, guidance, or supervision [M-W] The 'in the right direction but not necessarily all the way' sense is included under the verb: facilitate: to increase the ...


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You're prompting them, in all senses of the word -- you're inspiring them, you're reminding them, you're cueing them toward that next link in their chain of reasoning. (By the way, the term rubber ducking arose from the use of an actual rubber duck. I keep one by my monitor for that purpose. He's also my avatar.)


1

I have had some training in the process of guiding people towards their answer (note, explicitly not the answer I think it should be!) through the use of facilitating discussion, advising on the use of thought techniques etc. In that training this process was called "Coaching".


0

Perhaps something like 'guided analysis' or 'semi-structured analytical dialogue'?


0

How about sparring partner? It's not entirely the same, but it might do the job.


8

Wit a natural aptitude for using words and ideas in a quick and inventive way to create humour: -ODE Witty jokes usually need some intelligence to get (and make for that matter).


9

Consider highbrow humor. Oxford Online defines highbrow as Scholarly or rarefied in taste


15

I would call that cerebral humor. Dennis Miller is fairly cerebral. Merriam Webster (above link) even uses that as an example usage of the word. He's a very cerebral comedian.


1

This is not an English idiom, but a literal translation of a Biblical Hebrew expression. Yamin means, primarily, the right hand in its aspect as the instrument of power and dexterity; the "right hand of God" might be better translated as the "strong arm of God". Attributive use of the word in construct case (= 'of the right hand') to designate direction is ...


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Simply stick "-ing" to a noun to verb it: tool -> tooling shed -> shedding The reason for the extra "d" in "shedding" is that the "shed" part of "sheding" sounds different.


2

Crutch words comes to mind. Although I have difficulty finding any official definition, I have heard it /read it very often ( mostly used by speech trainers ). Here's an example of a text where the expression is used (not to be seen as an official reference, ofcourse): Top Ten Crutch Words


0

The general term 'vocalized pause' is used to describe several words, like 'ok', 'well. 'mmm', etc. which are sub-grouped under headings: turn-taking cues, turn-yielding cues, turn-maintaining cues, etc. The vocalized pause is a subject of extensive study by a chap named Duncan.


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The right hand of God, has symbolic meanings of omnipotence and justice: (dextera Domini "right hand of the Lord" in Latin) or God's right hand may refer to the hand of God often referred to in the Bible and common speech as a metaphor for the omnipotence of God and as a motif in art. The Archangel Michael is also often referred to as "the Right Hand ...


4

Hyphenated suffixes are usually an idiosyncratic choice that mainly serves stylistic purposes; as far as grammar is concerned, hyphens are normally reserved for words where the suffix is a proper noun or itself a large word (three or more syllables), although there is no consensus and there are exceptions to the rule.[1] For me there is no need to put quote ...


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I was taught in elementary school that if a syllable ends with a vowel, the vowel is normally long, while if it ends with a consonant, the vowel is short. Also that if there is a vowel followed by one consonant in the middle of a word, the consonant is part of the next syllable, while if a vowel is followed by two consonants (that do not work together to ...


2

Arguments in other answers for doubling the p are compelling, but also note that Wiktionary (linked to but not quoted in another answer) specifically shows such spelling of grep's present participle, among other forms: grep (third-person singular simple present greps, present participle grepping, simple past and past participle grepped) making it clear ...


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The words like that will try to follow the current word-form rules in similar words. (to trap - trapping). The word "grep" is already in some dictionaries and it follows this theory: verb (greps, grepping, grepped) [with object]: Search for (a string of characters) using grep.


2

Since grep (pronounciation) rhymes with step, I would follow the pattern with stepping and write grepping. (Writing it as greping makes me want to move short e (/ɡɹɛp/) in the first syllable to a long e, /ɡɹip/, rhyming with weeping. Your mileage may vary.) Similarly, while awking seems straightforward, I'd favor sedding over seding.


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This isn't a very technical answer, but googling "grepping" returns 354,000 results. Googling "greping" only returns 47,300 results and suggests that you meant "grepping" instead. It seems that "grepping" is the correct usage.


0

It seems like you could coin your own. Selfie, Groupie, Couplie.... I might even suggest going a step further and adding a recognizable conformity, as with iPad, iPod-- self-e, group-e, couple-e, family-e (in this case you wouldn't actually pronounced the 'E') variations could be selfE, self'e, self'E, self-E, self-e, self^e, self, self/e, selfē <---- ...


1

I came across this on the web, from the facebook page of Herald and New - Klamath Falls, Ore.. A barrage of lightning overnight touched off about 60 small fires in southwest and south-central Oregon, and more are expected to become apparent today. And another, from the National Park Traveller web site Barrage Of Lightning Strikes Spawns Six Fires ...


0

For the title of a section in a paper, the usual word is 'Notation'. A reviewer should correct yours to this. But if for some reason everyone in your particular academic community happens to use 'Notations', then use that.


3

When used as a mass noun to indicate a set of symbols relating to a topic, it is used in the singular form. Examples: Algebraic notation, algorithmic notation, set notation, percussion notation, etc. When used as a count noun relating to multiple sets of symbols, it is used in the plural form. Examples: new terminologies and notations Source: ...


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I think it depends on the meaning. I would write about the notation used in my work, but different papers often use different notations. Hence, the plural "notations" certainly exists. For the section title, the singular "notation" seems more appropriate.


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Here it is reported as an example: http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/notation "notations in the margin" but it may be a slightly different meaning, respect to what you mean specifically in your question (as to the generic title of your question, of course the answer is yes). For a "title of a section of a paper", "Notation" should be fine, I think, ...


0

I am not sure there is a term specific for a fear of not getting a due credit for something (not sure if your question regards "recognition" for something, or actual sums of money due to the person). Probably, it's something that can fall in the broader category of social phobia or anxiety. May try looking in here: ...


2

You can use rumormonger, rumor-monger, or rumor monger to describe such a person, with the assumption that rumors usually are false, or at least unverified. a person given to spreading rumors, often maliciously. rumor: a story or statement in general circulation without confirmation or certainty as to facts If you want a more negative connotation, ...


1

'Calumny' is close, though it's a legal term, and it refers to making statements wreck someone's reputation (which can't be done if it's done in private.) 'Slander' is probably better. 'Libel' is no good, as it happens in a publication.


2

There's significant difference from a semantic point of view, more than structural/ grammatical. Noun phrases with a verb or any other POS component are more explicit and 'simpler:' lives in New York Verb qualifies noun creating a new noun, 'New Yorker.' On the other hand, nouns/ noun-phrases without this are implicit and 'enriched.' ...


-2

If someone made false statements in a court of law to gets someone an unfair result, such as a wrongful conviction, that person would be a perjurer. That might even be true outside of a court of law.


6

It is just poorly translated from the Chinese term for Hard Disk. In Simplified Chinese, Yìngpán means hard disk. Using Google translation, disk box literally translates to Yìngpán hé. In short, the instruction just means that your device does not contain a hard disk. The original instruction was probably in Chinese and then localized to English.


2

You can call it a cascade of thunderbolts/lightning. Merriam-Webster defines the noun form of cascade as: a large amount of something that flows or hangs down a large number of things that happen quickly in a series You can also use cascade as a verb. Merriam-Webster defines the verb form of cascade as: to fall, pour, or rush in or as if in ...


-1

The term integrate means Combine (one thing) with another so that they become a whole: transportation planning should be integrated with energy policy [ODO] However, it is not limited to experiences or temporally separate events.


1

Grace says, "Let me watch America's Next Top Model. It's an activity," and Mrs. Lancaster says "Television is a passivity." She is parallelling Grace's comment in a direct retort, simply replacing activ(e) with passiv(e). The fact that "passivity" happens to be an actual word doesn't seem to have any bearing on the matter. By my interpretation, Mrs. ...


0

The first word that came to mind was "bottleneck", as it describes some inefficiency in a process that is otherwise stellar. An example that I made up of a boss speaking about the report of an employee would be "A bottleneck in your proposal is the computer algorithm that you used to solve xyz; it works, but is quite slow". Another expression I would use is ...


0

“How these words evolved” is a question about etymology. The noun “silence” comes from Old French, which inherited it from Latin silentium. It is used in English since the Middle English period (the oldest references in the OED are from the early 13th century). The adjective “silent” is a Renaissance borrowing directly from the Latin adjective silens ...


0

It's called nominalisation (more popularly, nounification). From Wikipedia... nominalization or nominalisation is the use of a verb, an adjective, or an adverb as the head of a noun phrase, with or without morphological transformation. OP's isn't a very good example - most of us have no idea which of silent, silence came first in English, so we can't ...


0

They are simply derived versions of the noun. This is quite common: "The strength of steel is without equal." "The bond between them is strong." "I strongly urge you to consider this answer."


1

It's generally called constructive criticism. From Wikipedia... The purpose of constructive criticism is to improve the outcome. From what I can see in OP's text, the supervisor is more concerned with pointing out ways of improving the implementation of the project, rather than simply complaining about shortcomings in the current solution. In my book, ...


0

There are many phrases that a good supervisor might use to both give feedback that the project can be improved and encourage the employee, and the phrases employ certain key words, but the words aren't much use without the proper context. I'd normally say something like: this is a great start - something we can build on it's almost there, but I think we ...


2

There's a figure in English, "to damn with faint praise." So you might say, oh, you damned him with faint praise. English speakers tend to be a little excessive; in France for example it's possible to (simply) say "that is good" or "the result is correct." In most English-speaking countries you have to go "overboard"... "That is really good, it worked out ...


2

The term subpar means not up to standard; below par [Collins English Dictionary] This term would indicate that the project was unacceptable, that a better effort was essential. While it does not mandate a redo, that is often implied. If you wanted to give some support to the effort, but indicate more work was needed, you could use the phrase first ...


0

When reading your Release and Deployment article, it's clear that release is used principally to mean that thing (software, in this case) that is moved to the test or live environment. Deployment is used principally to describe the process of moving that thing to the to the test or live environment. These words obviously have verb counterparts, and they ...


0

There is no single word, but the conjunction of "shafts" and "light" and "trees" is the usual evocative usage. I cannot imagine anyone understanding the use of "sheaf" in this context.



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