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2

Traits of the kind that you mention can be classed as demographic characteristics or demographic features. According to the definitions supplied by Oxforddictionaries.com, demography has two denotations: 1 The study of statistics such as births, deaths, income, or the incidence of disease, which illustrate the changing structure of human populations. ...


1

Discriminant is one word that I can think of. Though it has a mathematical meaning, there is also a meaning in the sense of language. http://www.yourdictionary.com/discriminant - which cites 'The definition of a discriminant is some distinguishing characteristic or feature that allows someone or something to be separated from others.'


0

A letter can be notarized, a procedure in which an authorized person certifies the authenticity of a document. The definition at Vocabulary.com explains it well: You usually have someone notarize your contract when you lease a car. In other words, she'll put a special, official stamp next to your signature and her own — certifying that you are in fact ...


0

Non-repudiable exists, in generic/ broader legal usage corresponding to non-repudiation. non-repudiation (Wikipedia) Non-repudiation refers to a state of affairs where the purported maker of a statement will not be able to successfully challenge the validity of the statement or contract. See also: non-repudiable (ContentCreationWiki) ...


2

The correct term for this in Unicodese is grapheme base. Note that characters which are respectively considered diacritic, non-spacing combining mark, and grapheme extend characters are all slightly different. It would take a Venn diagram to show the overlap, though. See this question, its answers, and the standards documents referenced therein.


0

Agreeing with andhrimnir, the fact that we imagine an event, like a random shopper dropping a grocery bag, as more frequent than it really is would be called the frequency illusion: n. The tendency to notice instances of a particular phenomenon once one starts to look for it, and to therefore believe erroneously that the phenomenon occurs frequently. ...


0

Working alone, their friend Adam is researching a similar problem in Boston.


-1

Please consider the following: encounters, experiences, perceptions, visions, memories, images, and hallucinations. "Objects" doesn't include all of the "'things that have been seen'" by James Taylor, i.e. "lonely times." Heinlein's Stranger's word might be grokked as a noun, but then one of your groks includes a bald cat.


8

Janus Bahs Jacquet's answer put me on the right track, and I was able to find the answer I was thinking of: In linguistics, an ergative verb is a verb that can be either transitive or intransitive, and whose subject when intransitive corresponds to its direct object when transitive. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ergative_verb


5

I’m not aware of a single term that describes exactly verbs that display this type of alternation between intransitive subject and transitive direct object, but it is a common feature of many unaccusative verbs in English (in particular anticausative verbs, and if you used unaccusative verb as a term to refer to this ‘group’ of verbs, you would likely be ...


0

I'm a bit astonished about the long discussions in the post How can I prove a word is a noun? I admit that there a certain problems, especially with gerunds. Smoking cigarettes is unhealty. In this example, containing a gerund with an object, it is indeed a bit difficult to say to which word class "smoking" belongs. Is it a noun or a verb? ...


4

Literacy refers to the quality or state of being literate, esp. the ability to read and write. Literacy rate refers to the percentage of people who are able to read and write vs those who are not. Literacy: The condition or quality of being literate, especially the ability to read and write Literacy rate (social studies) the percentage ...


-1

"Hugbox" might be too broad to find a proper synonym for. Without context for why the situation occurred, it's hard to find adjectives that are useful. What you may be able to do is break down the hugbox scenario into things like denial-box (where people deny everything they don't agree with), convenient-isolation-box (where you are estranged from being ...


2

Not a single word, but sometimes I've heard the phrase surrounded by yes-men. From a recent interview: I can tell you these network anchors are surrounded sometimes by what we call yes-men, yes-people who won't tell them the hard truths or raise questions .. Who wants to tell emperor that he's wearing no clothes? and from a blog post entitled Say No ...


4

"Group Think" would describe the action of what you're describing but not the location. Another phrase that may be useful is "to go along with the herd".


8

A common expression I've encountered is "echo chamber", in the sense of a room where your own voice is reflected back at you and you don't hear any new voices or ideas. Here's Wikipedia on the topic: In media, an echo chamber is a situation in which information, ideas, or beliefs are amplified or reinforced by transmission and repetition inside an ...


4

The phenomenon that a person can easily read a text composed of words whose inner letters are rearranged is called jumbled word effect or letter-position coding. There are two mechanisms involved in this: relative-position priming a type of subset priming in which target word recognition is facilitated as a consequence of priming the word with some of ...


1

It is called toilet literature. Urbandictionary has an entry for this term: newspapers, national geographic any magazine is good for toilet literature A: Man it's part of the ritual u gotta read some shit u don't care about to take a good shit B: Word. Goodreads lists some books under toilet literature genre. There is an article titled "Is ...


0

In economics, the term in [sparse] use seems to be inverse rate. Otherwise, it looks like the English language doesn't have an appropriate word. In electrical engineering, a similar concept is conveyed by resistance (the inverse of conductance), which is a measure of how much effort is required to achieve a flow of current. EE's have developed a set of ...


2

As an occupation, the common terms are: fence builder fence erector fence installer They are also mentioned under construction trades in "1990 Census of Population and Housing: Classified Index of Industries and Occupations" by U.S Department of Commerce: Other related occupations that are mentioned: concrete fence builder wire-fence builder ...


2

Outside of the USA, the term Oriental is not offensive at all.


2

Collins has fencer for this meaning but says mainly Australia/New Zealand. I've heard it in the UK as well. While this is a less common use than sword fighting for sport you could use it in a list of building and related trades, for example.


2

Pietism was a word of derision applied to a movement of Lutheran clergy and laity, who insisted that the Lutheran Church must apply its faith in Jesus Christ practically in real life with spiritual discipline and loving acts of kindness: 1690s, from German Pietismus, originally applied in derision to the movement to revive personal piety in the ...


0

I'd suggest variablility or perhaps the phrase "the system's level/degree of variability".


9

In addition to the historical threads that ScotM identifies in his excellent answer, several other -pies formations that were current in the 1960s and 1970s may have contributed to the adoption of yuppies as shorthand for members of the sociological category "young urban professionals." To wit: preppies, bippies, blippies, dippies, and trippies. The term ...


29

It all starts with a little slang hep: "aware, up-to-date," first recorded 1908 in "Saturday Evening Post," but said to be underworld slang, of unknown origin. Variously said to have been the name of "a fabulous detective who operated in Cincinnati" [Louis E. Jackson and C.R. Hellyer, "A Vocabulary of Criminal Slang," 1914] or a saloonkeeper ...


2

The two earliest instances of preplan/preplanned/preplanning (with or without a hyphen) that a Google Books search finds are from the pen of Robert Southey, who was Poet Laureate of England for the last thirty years of his life (from 1813 to 1843). The first instance is from a letter by Robert Southey to the Reverend Neville White, dated February 19, 1824, ...


1

Somebody who understands a situation well and knows all the relevant information like the back of their hand is often described as on top of their brief, particularly if it's in a professional context (I can't find an authoritative source, but I think the phrase originates with the idea of a barrister's brief). He was a minister utterly on top of his ...


3

Unless it's some context which requires great precision, I would say The day after my licence expires


2

My driving licence is invalid from ... I would use such a phrase when describing my vacation: I shall be on vacation and unavailable for queries from


0

The scale is highly contextual. The definition of big and small will depend on what you're measuring. The phrase regime is often used to indicate the context. For example, when measuring the size of people you'd use meters or centimeters but when measuring the size of atoms you'd use angstroms or nanometers. The best way to approach this is to use ...


1

Native App or Native Software The PCMag Encyclopedia defines a Native App as An executable program coded in the machine language of the hardware platform it is running in. A native application has been compiled into the machine language of that CPU. It compares native apps with web apps this way: Native apps are often contrasted with Web-based ...


1

The term 'software' doesn't refer to the internet, so maybe you could just call it software, and say something else (like web applications or internet software) when you're talking about software that uses the internet.


0

Perhaps you might like to consider using the term on-premise. This is normally used in a commercial environment but has no such specific restraints.


1

You could say locally installed software.


0

Very similar to what you already have; non-web based software seems to be used quite widely and somehow sounds less awkward.


1

The term preplan goes back to at least the 19th century in the US. A cursory ngram search reveals several examples from the late 1800s In a decision of the New York State Court of Appeals from 1869, in considering a plot of a son against his mother, the Court used the phrase under preplanned, designed false pretenses? and later Legrand then ...


-1

There are similar words which are often attributed to Indian English (some debate about Occidental English vs Oriental English). Pre-plan, Pre-pone etc are such Indian variants which are often to 'emphasize'. It is to take 'pre' vs 'post' for 'before' and 'after' and use in other English words as a qualifier or 'integrated adjective'. For eg, you should ...


1

I like Photographic memory: noun a memory that is able to retain facts, appearances, etc, in precise detail, often after only a very short view of or exposure to them ⇒ He had a photographic memory for maps. There seems to be some scientific dispute about the value of the descriptive term "photographic memory:" The intuitive notion ...


2

Reason does not need to be logical (one can argue that reasoning is): The basis or motive for an action, decision, or conviction; a declaration made to explain or justify action, decision, or conviction; a fact or cause that explains why something exists or has occurred; a premise, usually the minor premise, of an argument. (TFD) Reason is basically ...


1

It is not only grammatically correct, it is semantically meaningful. It is very common to see "defies all logic and reason" used in various arguments (perhaps a bit dramatically). A Google search on that phrase gives well over 100,000 hits. The simple search "logic and reason" yields over 400,000 hits. Admittedly Google hits are not definitive, but they do ...


0

You haven't specified why the derogatory term(s) would be applicable. Is it because the nobility is a pampered, ineffectual class which gives itself airs? inbred twit, mincing fops, jaded halfwits, privileged ninnies, pampered parasites On the other hand, are they competent rulers who run roughshod over their subjects? callous oppressors, bloody-handed ...


0

how about idiocracy? Or if you will: deep-seated dyed-in-the-wool


-1

It seems to be a form of double entendre (sometimes hyphenated) a word, phrase, etc, that can be interpreted in two ways, esp one having one meaning that is indelicate the type of humour that depends upon such ambiguity Collins There is no real indelicacy in these examples, and they tend to use pairs of words to elicit the double meaning. Perhaps ...


0

Eurotrash derogatory term applicable to rich, decadent Europeans living in New York, Los Angeles and San Francisco. Popular term for these people in the 1980s. See Wikipedia for more on ' Eurotrash' etymology. See also 'International White trash'.


1

A Toff. a derogatory stereotype for someone with an aristocratic background or belonging to the landed gentry, particularly someone who exudes an air of superiority.


1

Yuppies. Especially if they are riding in an open-top carriage.


0

Anachronism? noun a thing belonging or appropriate to a period other than that in which it exists, especially a thing that is conspicuously old-fashioned. "everything was as it would have appeared in centuries past apart from one anachronism, a bright yellow construction crane" an act of attributing a custom, event, or object to a period to ...


0

You might be thinking of vestigial, which refers most often to organs or body parts found in organisms which no longer need them, as "vestigial tails" in developing human embryos, or "vestigial eyes" in blind cave fish. It can be extended to any function which was once useful, but no longer is. Another, unlikely, possibility, is hangover (not the alcoholic ...



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