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1

Go here: Gammacism: g -> k, t->d Lalling: "certain consonants" -> l Lamdacism: l -> r,w


0

You might call the substance a conglomerate noun kənˈɡlɒm(ə)rət/ 1. a thing consisting of a number of different and distinct parts or items that are grouped together. (Google) To the best of my knowledge it doesn't have any contradictory meaning in chemistry but it does have a very specific meaning in geology: that might be an issue.


0

Compared to isolated DHA, natural fish oil.... Would work in some cases despite the overuse of natural in the context of nutrition. Otherwise you may need to be more specific: the fish oil, as extracted... (there may be a better word in your context than extracted but it's a good general choice). In a similar vein before purification... is another way to ...


0

I am looking for a word which would mean "not an isolated substance". The obvious answer is "ingredient". Please give more context, thanks.


0

A person from the Eastern part of Asia would be called East Asian. I appreciate that you do not use the word "Asian" to describe Chinese pepole and similar cultures, as Asia has 40+ plus countries, and the way it is used it the US, Canada and other countries in America only describe people from China, Vietnam, Japan etc. People don't know it but it is ...


1

I think the word you are looking for is Exceptional. From Dictionary.com: forming an exception or rare instance; unusual; extraordinary: For example, "You had an exceptional day."


2

These days, the term full stack developer gets thrown around a lot, in an attempt by employers to suggest the programmer should not be siloed into one area of development. eg. In the development of web applications, developers are commonly expected to know multiple languages, such as Javascript, SQL, XML, Java or C#, in order to achieve basic functional ...


1

How about the phrase "no ordinary", to emphasize that it was indeed extra-ordinary. Unbeknownst to Mr. soandso, this was no ordinary day. This was the day that would change his life forever ...


3

If you're not saying anything particularly positive or negative, just that it wasn't a usual day, then how about "an unusual day" ?


-1

"Today, I wandered into The Twilight Zone." (US)


7

A “remarkable” day. Worthy of remark. Worthy of note. Different than the usual, exceptional. I suspect Rodale’s Synonym Finder has good alternatives under “remarkable.” A “standout” day (if you are OK with “standout” as an adjective).


9

You could say: Not a run-of-the-mill day


27

Consider the phrase red-letter day. Merriam Webster says: : of special importance : memorable "This was a red-letter day in my life." It sometimes carries a religious connotation, but this is not necessary. I think Jasmine in the Disney movie "Aladdin" uses it in a song somewhere.


2

The Latin for it is statera which also means a 'weighing balance.' I don't know if the balance pole meaning is classical or medieval. If anyone can reproduce the OED entry they should find something under static and stater. I think it is a "static pole." But that is probably not current among funambulists. This illustration for the beginning of LIBRA is ...


0

I imagine the most likely term is 'pole'. "Hand me my pole". "Where did I leave my pole?" There is no other kind of pole used in wire-walking so I imagine the word 'balancing' would be superfluous.


0

I'm looking for a term (noun) to describe this or a verb to describe the act of doing the deep study on a particular topic How about immersion? From WordNet 3.0: n 3. complete attention; intense mental effort Colloquially, I've also heard deep dive used, in the context of troubleshooting, and especially in root cause analysis, to refer to an ...


1

As someone who received both military and aviation Radio Procedure training I can assure you that they are indeed contradictory, and that real radio operators are trained not to use the phrase. The phrase is a product of Hollywood (and perpetuated by those whose only radio procedure training comes from Hollywood). This fact is usually taught to radio ...


0

It was almost certainly Martin Fowler who coined the term, and other responders have pointed to its first use in publication. The reason for the choice of term appears to be that the concept of 'injection' was relatively new at the time. Other ways of getting a dependency in a class, such as inline instantiation, are essentially 'creation within', rather ...


0

Juste milieu, the golden mean, is the the antonym of what you seek and as such something like ultra-milieu should confer the sense that it is an amount in excess.


0

Many words come to mind while describing your act. Thorough insight. Recursive study. (Recursive insight). Profound research. (abstract research)


2

I might consider dividing out those studies which only took a couple of weeks and those that you spent a few months on and labeling them differently. For the studies that were only a few weeks, maybe something along the lines of "background research," "examination," or "inquiry." For those projects which you spent several months on, you might want something ...


3

This was called a deep dive where I used to work: an in-depth exploration It's mostly used in the noun sense in business. "Tsk. We'll have to perform a deep-dive on this" or "let's do a deep dive on this tomorrow." It can mean exhaustively examining every facet of an issue. It's a good noun to use in conjunction with the verb delve suggested earlier. ...


-2

The could be termed an exposition, especially if it is written. From WordNet 3.0: exposition n 1: a systematic interpretation or explanation (usually written) of a specific topic ... 3: an account that sets forth the meaning or intent of a writing or discourse ...


2

Originally, a perusal would have been exactly this, from the verb peruse which meant to examine or read (something) in a very careful way but has come to mean to look at or read (something) in an informal or relaxed way which is the very opposite. (Both definitions from Merriam-Webster.) To a sufficiently pedantic crowd, however, perusal might ...


6

What first came to mind was: delve: to carry on intensive and thorough research for data, information, or the like; investigate: to delve into the issue of prison reform. Usually used with into, as in the example above. Source: dictionary.com


1

Contemplation or meditation, as in "he meditated on the question for many days". A "brown study" is a moody attitude, whether sad or angry.


2

OP could describe these intensive, concentrated studies as, focused research. focused adjective: giving a lot of attention to one particular thing: the need for more focused research (Cambridge Dictionaries online) research 1. careful or diligent search 2. studious inquiry or examination; especially: investigation or experimentation ...


1

A verb for this might be to pore over: To examine something closely; in great detail. It can also refer to meditating over something, and to be fully absorbed in a subject. It is, as the answer in the link says, usually associated with "academics who are passionate about their fields, and students who study obsessively before an important exam."


3

As stated in the comments, investigation is the word that you are looking for. A formal inquiry or systematic study (OED)


0

I think you are looking for something like "rebus". It was a type of visual pun. It used to strictly be with icons but it can be done through text. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rebus


-1

syndicate, consortium, conglomerate, enterprise, outfit, league, band, organization, syndicate, class, society, legion, contingency, brigade, regiment, congregation, assembly, convoy, delegation, horde, outfit, party, committee, fraternity, assortment, band, crew, team, archetype, confederation, club, squad, collective, authority, association, affiliation, ...


1

You can call it a contract team or a vendor team. These refer to the site's company's contractual agreement with the embedded team's employer. You can also apply on-site or embedded as adjectives. Contract makes more sense to me, in the contractor sense, but vendor is favored by a certain software behemoth in Redmond, WA, and I suppose I can see the logic ...


-4

Depression: Feelings of sadness, tearfulness, emptiness, or hopelessness.


1

The process is called "lease" and it has become very common. lease (noun) "a contract by which one party conveys land, property, services, etc., to another for a specified time, usually in return for a periodic payment." A lease is a contractual arrangement calling for the lessee (user) to pay the lessor (owner) for use of an asset. Broadly put, ...


2

Malaise ma·laise məˈlāz/ noun noun: malaise; plural noun: malaises a general feeling of discomfort, illness, or uneasiness whose exact cause is difficult to identify.


0

You might consider internalized oppression (def: the process by which a member of an oppressed and usually minority group comes to accept and live out the inaccurate myths and stereotypes applied to the group). One manifestation of this is the belief that one's accent is ugly or otherwise inferior to the "norm," and results in some people taking diction ...


2

How about anhedonia? The Concise Oxford English Dictionary defines this as inability to feel pleasure in normally pleasurable activities.


3

Insouciant is also a great word for this showing a casual lack of concern; indifferent. Sylvia Plath has a poem called Ennui that is littered with all kinds of these words (of course the word ennui itself being the most prominent)


1

These may describe the condition, rather than the person who might feel anxiety that they're being judged; that their accent is seen as a "qualifier" of social status: Sociolinguistic discrimination; Linguistic profiling; Ethnocentrism; Linguicism; Classism; Cultural bias; Socioeconomic stereotyping; Dialectical stigmatism; Patois prejudice; class ...


2

Your accepted answer and nearly all the others are synonyms for boredom. I shall tackle the part everyone missed (jaded comes close): "implying that the state of weariness is a result of too many encounters with others." Not a single word, but I describe this as 'being on' and wish I could 'turn off'. Introverts like myself, might have about two hours ...


0

There is a branch of mathematical optimization problems called packing problems. Your layout would be called a "rectangular packing". In a mathematical algorithm, the empty space between objects would be achieved just by padding the object sizes with a border before running the optimization.


11

Ennui, boredom, tedium, and doldrums- are comparable when they denote a state of dissatisfaction and weariness. doldrums Use this noun to describe a period of time that is boring, depressing, or characterized by inactivity. The noun doldrums is derived from the word dull. If you’ve been vegging out in front of the TV for hours, bored out ...


8

If you're talking about the trend of laying stuff on the ground and taking a picture, you're referring to a flat lay.


7

Are you looking for "apathy"? apathy - (noun) lack of interest, enthusiasm, or concern. Google or "insipidity" (noun) - the state of finding everything uninteresting and dull. boredom, tedium, uninterestedness and unconcern may also apply.


34

A good noun describing such a state is ennui. ennui noun: a feeling of listlessness and dissatisfaction arising from a lack of occupation or excitement. synonyms: boredom, tedium, listlessness, lethargy, lassitude, languor, weariness, enervation (Google)


12

Jaded perhaps adjective bored or lacking enthusiasm, typically after having had too much of something. (Google) or World-Weary adjective feeling or indicating feelings of weariness, boredom, or cynicism as a result of long experience of life. (Google)


3

Blasé may suggest the idea: indifferent to something because of familiarity or surfeit, lacking enthusiasm; bored (Collins)


0

Perhaps the imposed norm hypothesis? Here's a quote: Previous work suggests that standard dialects assume their prestige over other language varieties not because they are linguistically or aesthetically superior, but because of historical, cultural norms. An empirical investigation lends this view support etc. From ...


0

You know the saying: "Birds of a feather flock together." So, if you sing 'different' and are self-conscious about it, you might think of yourself as "a sing-ular bird of a feather"! The phrase does not exist… yet, of course!


0

I came to this because I was reading a script set in the late 1970s in the UK, in which the phone is referred to several times as the 'telephone'. The rest of the script is fairly well researched so I wondered why that word jarred to much in my mind. Having grown up in the UK (I was born in 1971) although I admit there may have been a certain snobbery ...



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