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Since "demos" means "people", "demophobia" is a fear of people, also called "ochlophobia", and perhaps is not what you want. So a better word for a fear of democracy would be "democracyphobia" or "democratophobia".


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This issue of compounding inefficiencies seems to be an endemic feature of any hierarchical system because its nature is exponential by definition. That said, several hours of research led to interesting results from various sources and systems that experience the multiplicative deleterious effects resultant from a multi-leveled system. I think some of ...


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The term foreshadowing often is used in this context. From en.wiktionary, it means “A literary device in which an author drops subtle hints about plot developments to come later in the story”. If the hints are less than subtle – as in Genesis 13:10, which parenthetically remarks, “This was before the LORD destroyed Sodom and Gomorrah” – one might refer, ...


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It is called an echo question. There are different types of echo questions and they don't always follow your examples. "We use echo questions either because we did not fully hear or understand what was said, or because its content is too surprising to be believed. For example: (It cost £5,000.) HOW much did it cost? (His son's an osteopath.) ...


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This is how I would put it: Participants are often being implored to finish their tasks by the end of November, as planned, and under no circumstances to let them drag on into December. To underscore the urgency of timely completion of the task, I might also send reminder messages to each participant, specifying a "drop-dead due date" for each task: ...


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Inherent simply means that it is a given that this or that condition exists in this or that situation naturally. Inherent is a concept, like gravity, relativity or the like, and can be use in infinite ways in grammar.


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Inherency in a debate ( often political) refers to the inherent ( characteristic or specific) issues related to the problem whose solution is being discussed: (from www.department.monm.edu) At stake is the adoption of reforms that may change the 'status quo'. The problems cited by the affirmative must be inextricably connected to elements of the ...


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The answer to the question of what is the linguistic term for the difference between concept and conception: Yes, linguistics does have a term for such a thing, in fact, it's one of a handful of major fields of study- morphology. Simply put, it's the study of distinct units of meaning smaller than a word. That extra bit of -ion encodes a subtle difference ...


1

I asked my resident art historian PhD candidate (in the United States). She coincidentally happened to study in Italy. This is what she said: There isn't an exact English term for 'materico'. In art history, we would either use impasto or mixed media (or stick with materico to explain manipulating materials). Sometimes you will even see an art historian ...


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An academic or pseudo-intellectual who uses convoluted phrases in order to intimidate the lay person, ostentate his or her position, and possibly, disguise the fact that they have nothing of any importance to say, is commonly called a windbag. If you are looking for a fancier term for verbosity, I present pressologia Perissology means using more words ...


0

'tight lines' may be an English translation of an old Finnish saying. In Finland you can't never wish a fisherman good luck, good catch or many fish so we just wish 'kireitä siimoja' - 'tight lines' since tight lines may also mean that your lure gets stuck in the weed or get jammed between rocks. That way the gods of fishing can't be sure what exactly you ...


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I would say frugality. If you are a frugal, you don't waste anything that would be useful. Because you know that if you throw away something, you throw away money. But you exactly know when to throw away things, considering donating or giving away first. It has a positive sense and differs from cheapness and hoarding. Frugality is the quality of being ...


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This could be considered an attestation, where to attest means (Dictionary.com) to bear witness to; certify; declare to be correct, true, or genuine; declare the truth of, in words or writing, especially affirm in an official capacity This is different from simply reporting or relating what may be unsubstantiated facts that could be disavowed. ...


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It might be useful to examine Wikipedia's article on the subject of a book where the quote also appeared: Fashionable Nonsense The Wikipedia article in itself is delightful. It cites one philosopher, Bruce Fink, who was incensed by the book and claimed that the authors are 'demanding that "serious writing" do nothing other than "convey clear meanings".' ...


1

I agree with "obfuscate" in situations where there is some information that the writer is trying to hide from the reader. In the example quoted in the question, though, I'm not convinced that there's any actual information underlying this word salad.


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Geography itself can be considered a hypernym but to be more specific you can say planetary geography. While the discipline of geography is normally concerned with the Earth, the term can also be informally used to describe the study of other worlds, such as the planets of the Solar System and even beyond. The study of other planets is usually ...


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It sounds like you are looking for a word to speak to the technique not just the outcome. I would use either: Jargon-y He was very jargon-y in order to avoid admitting he didn't know what he was talking about or any word ending with -ease based on what terms of art are being used for the effect. He enjoyed how his business-ease prevented anyone ...


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In technology, there's "controller/peripheral".


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If a writer or speaker appears to be making a topic complicated or confusing, obfuscate comes to mind: to make (something) more difficult to understand Politicians keep obfuscating the issues. Their explanations only serve to obfuscate and confuse. Impenetrable could describe an unclear passage with complicated language, structure, and ...


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Obfuscation: To make so confused or opaque as to be difficult to perceive or understand: A great effort was made... to obscure or obfuscate the truth - Robert Conquest. To render indistinct or dim; darken; the process of darkening or obscuring so as to hinder ready analysis. Is it a literary device? I can't find it listed as such. Is it a rhetorical ...


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There was some controversy over this back in 2003 when Los Angeles Country asked manufactures/suppliers to stop using it. This ultimately led different software platforms (like Drupal) to adopt, in 2014, the terms: primary/replica Other possible phrases that I like include: parent/child leader/follower For more information: ...


1

Failing impasto, I feel you will have to make do with a series of words, expressions to convey the materico painting technique or style. One word will not be enough... I would describe materico as being a type of textured mixed media painting. Textured because the paint can be applied so thickly that it appears raised from the surface. I also believe that ...


2

Ciao, I'm pretty sure Impasto is what you're after. It's not REALLY fully what you mean but then, nothing is. Normally we just use Italian words in this sort of situation. :) Conversely ----- by the way it's easy to see examples of materico, "paintings with ridges and bumps..." simply google "Materico" and click "images" for 100s of examples: ...


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Texture painting : (from Wikipedia) in painting is the look and feel of the canvas. It is based on the paint, and its application, or the addition of materials such as ribbon, metal, wood, lace, leather and sand. The concept of 'painterliness' also has bearing on texture. The texture stimulates two different senses; sight and touch. There are four ...


0

'relief' (noun) 4.1 A method of moulding, carving, or stamping in which the design stands out from the surface, to a greater ( high relief) or lesser ( low relief) extent: he cast them in relief from molten metal Intaglio is a type of incised relief in which the design does not project from the surface; rather it is cut into it, sinking below ...


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It seems like the literal translation of materico from Italian is material. However, since you describe its meaning as something that overcomes its two dimensional limitations I think I good English word to describe that would be substance. substance: 2. noun the real physical matter of which a person or thing consists and which has a tangible, solid ...


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One possibility is a metaphorical word that is common, and conveys the the pain of doing so, and that would be the word "bleed". Participants are often being implored to finish their tasks by November, as planned, and in no way bleed into December. Note you would use "into" rather than "to" here.


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Unlike e-mail or U-bahn, iPod and iPad and the like remain proprietary trademarks of Apple, and part of a naming convention that dates to 1998 with the iMac. That name, in turn, is attributed to Ken Segall, at the time working with Apple's advertising agency, according to a 2012 Kansas City Business Journal article: “I am the guy who came up with the ...


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The i in front of Apple products was first used for the iMac. When Steve Jobs introduced the first iMac in 1998 he explained: iMac comes from the marriage of the excitement of the internet with the simplicity of Macintosh. Even though this is a full-blooded Macintosh, we are targeting this for the number one use that consumers tell us they want a ...


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I think 'i' prefix was first introduced with iMac, and it meant internet. But later it just stayed there for other products.


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Personal 'gravity' occurs when people effect history. Affecting anything appears coincidental (lacking the staying power of a real 'purpose'), however attributable :)


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Greatness is the term that comes to my mind. exceptionally high quality <a poet whose work is of enduring greatness> (Source: Merriam-Webster) It is an established term to refer to people that appear to be innately better than everyone else. Greatness is a concept of a state of superiority affecting a person, object. Greatness can also be ...


1

Flair Dicitonary.com: a natural talent, aptitude, or ability; bent; knack smartness of style, manner, etc. keen, intuitive perception or discernment From Valuewalk.com, Apple Inc. CEO: Is Tim Cook Better Than Steve Jobs?, by Aman Jain, August 25, 2014: Cook’s slight under-performance could be attributed to his lacking flair for ...


1

From my experience in the American metal fabricating industry, I would say that the two terms are often used interchangeably, but not always. A wooden platform for stacking and moving product with a forklift or pallet jack could be called a pallet or a skid. They are equivalent when speaking generally without reference to a specific sub-type: "How many ...


1

In a limited context, statesmanship. In a broader context, wisdom (not the same as brains or intelligence). With regard to bold risk-taking, chutzpah. That "whatever-it-is" may be called spark. You're looking for a word that includes them all, yes?


3

This is not a question of hierarchy. @Moo-Juice gives a good example that contrasts hierarchy with a route, showing that hierarchy is not the question. But neither is routing. Non-North American international telephone numbers have a much easier time routing: 00 + country code + city code + local number When the city grows, the city code may be able ...


0

From etymonline.com (http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=skid&allowed_in_frame=0) skid (n.) c.1600, "beam or plank on which something rests," especially on which something heavy can be rolled from place to place (1782), of uncertain origin, probably from a Scandinavian source akin to Old Norse skið "stick of wood" (see ski (n.)). As ...


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The only single word that comes to mind, "Rainmaker." Do you need to shrink this to one word? If space isn't an issue, I like your comparisons of Jobs and Wozniak, Holmes and Watson.


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Given Dan's request in the comments to provide some kind of justification to the term Route Exhaustion, I'll offer an anecdotal response. Firstly, it's important to distinguish between hierarchies and routes. Hierarchies can be used for parent-child relationships without ever suffering the problem mentioned in the original question. It could be ...


2

The costs of hierarchy is an expression that may suggest the concept of the inefficiencies derived from hierarchical allocations. The following study shows that hierarchical organisations are less inefficient that it is generally expected, but systematic weaknesses and distortions appear to be unavoidable. Some two-fifths of principals did not ...


1

I think that by is used in those situations to signify the denominator. That is, to let you know which number is being used to divide the quantity. It is perfectly in line with the dictionary definition: preposition 1. identifying the agent performing an action. Source (Google)


4

For consistency, the phrase divide X by Y always means to perform the calculation represented by the equation X/Y. This is true regardless of the values of X and Y. So divide X by 0 means X/0. Mathematics says that this is meaningless, so we say in English you can't divide by 0.


2

Je ne sais quoi comes to mind as a loan phrase. It is used as a certain something in English also. [I first didn't realize that you mentioned this French term in the question but I explained, in detail below, why it is a good fit.] Another term that comes to mind is x-factor (also x factor). As you can see in the examples below, there are also terms like ...


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Movers and shakers have extreme effectivity.


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I think influence may suggest what you are referring to: (from TFD) A power affecting a person, thing, or course of events, especially one that operates without any direct or apparent effort: Charisma: a special personal quality or power of an individual making him capable of influencing or inspiring large numbers of people. Probably ...


1

Whether to choose "A" or "An" is an absolutely phonetic relationship. It is not correct to say "A hour" even though its first letter is a consonant. It begins with a vowel sound, so you should say "An hour." The same rule applies to abbreviations. The only case for not using "An" is if the reader is likely to say "Solid State Drive" instead of "Ess Ess Dee" ...


-1

If “What kind of term describes that?” is a question about how to understand indirect speech acts, one may find the following wikipedia articles of use: • Performativity, “...an interdisciplinary term often used to name the capacity of speech and gestures to act or consummate an action...” • Performative utterance, “The uttering of a performative is, or is ...


1

Unfortunately I could not find the graph either in english nor in german that I was looking for. At school we learned, that there are different layers of semantics and we had a nice graph with a rectangle and arrows. Well, I can't find it, so forget about that. The thing I remember is that our teacher came into the classroom that day saying "Oh, it is a ...


0

It's an example of... circumlocution - also called circumduction, circumvolution, periphrasis, or ambage - an ambiguous or roundabout figure of speech All those alternatives are "wordy" words. In common speech we're more likely to call it... beating around/about the bush - if you beat around the bush, or beat about the bush, you don't say ...



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