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10

In rhetoric, this is called paralipsis or apophasis. Edit: added link.


2

The word you're looking for is probably misdirection: Misdirection is a form of deception in which the attention of the audience is focused on one thing in order to distract it's attention from another. More broadly, the phenomenon you refer to is a part of Ironic process theory.


3

Innuendo, insinuation, overtone & connotation come close. innuendo: a statement which indirectly suggests that someone has done something immoral, improper, etc insinuation : a usually bad or insulting remark that is said in an indirect way : the act of saying something bad or insulting in an indirect way overtone : an idea or ...


1

A logical fallacy is an error in the logic of an argument that prevents it from being logically valid but does not prevent it from swaying people's minds. http://rationalwiki.org/wiki/Logical_fallacy Your example looks like a case of media manipulation: a series of related techniques in which partisans create an image or argument that favours their ...


-1

Duplicity? I just call it sneaky speech! http://www.thefreedictionary.com/duplicitous http://www.dictionary.com/browse/duplicity


0

I have seen the term "not to scale" used in such instances. Like: That infographic was not to scale. I could not find any proper references except this in Wikipedia: Not To Scale, a disclaimer used in engineering drawings or schematics when the dimensions of the represented elements are not proportionately accurate.


3

People often express their pride and/or current frustration at having enjoyed something before it became popular by saying that they liked it before it was cool. There are many variations on this phrase. Here are some I pulled from a corpus: I supported Bernie Sanders before it was cool I used to eat Peruvian food before it was cool I was tea ...


1

The word 'hipster' comes to mind ;) While 'hipster' embodies richer character than just shirking away from mainstream stuff, that particular character seems to be the strongest evidence of being one. This article highlights that aspect: http://bostinno.streetwise.co/2012/01/17/the-scientific-explanation-of-why-youre-a-hipster-hate-mainstream-music-from-...


2

You like things when they are still cool. Some more ideas in this Stanford article The Tipping Point of "Cool" Research shows that popular products can quickly lose their cache if they become favored by the masses. [...] other words, as soon as chic goes mainstream, [...]. Cool had suddenly become uncool, and when too many others liked an item it ...


0

Just like a person who gives employment is Employer and receiver of Employment is Employee Person who gives recommendation is Recommender and receiver of Recommendation is Recommendee Logic being - Person performing the action is attached - er , or as suffix E.g Painter, actor, doctor, examiner That way you can possibly apply understanding (although ...


4

http://www.dictionary.com/browse/account--for In the sense used in this sentence, "account for" means "to be the determining factor for, or cause of". Therefore Sartre is saying that freedom is the sole factor for determining a person's total genius. How Sartre supports this statement, however, remains a mystery.


2

If you google images of covered courtyard, you get many images like this: Many of these images show an area between two large buildings, with a latticed glass roof. Maybe this is enough to convince you that covered courtyard works as a description. More specifically, such a glass-covered courtyard is called an atrium, which is probably why this word ...


1

Participle form of verbs can be used after the conjunctions if, when to shorten the sentence, but they convey exactly the same meaning as time and conditional clauses. If done correctly = If it is done correctly.


0

In railroading (although this terminology refers to UHF radios) we diferentiate between "mobile" and "handheld." Mobile referring to a unit that is fixed to a vehicle while handheld refers to, as the term suggests, a radio you carry with your person, usually on your belt. Back in the day, late '50s/early 60's, a few people had "mobile phones" in their cars. ...


0

Cofectioning: verb, archaic The act of making confections (separate from the medical term). Out of use in English by 16th century, but now is as good a time as any to bring it back. [Dictionary.com]


0

I am using that macro (or chat wheel command if you will), but it's not specific enough when you wanna let people know which hero is actually missing without having to waste time on typing. –dev.dota2.com I call these chat macros. So you want chat macros? –Reddit Be careful using it by itself out of context though; macro can mean other things as well. ...


1

For programming I would change it to "expected" (future) and "predicted" and "unexpected" (past).


-1

Kindly try to understand that there is a big difference between fear and hate. XENOPHOBIA= a fear of foreigners or strangers Type of: social phobia any phobia (other than agoraphobia) associated with situations in which you are subject to criticism by others (as fear of eating in public or public speaking etc) SEE https://www.vocabulary.com/dictionary/...


0

“So-called” is used analogously and is probably more familiar than “nominal.” Both are at core about what something is called, and both can be used (because they focus on name or others’ description rather than underlying reality) to imply that reality differs. This gives rise to a standalone sense of “so-called” that although something is called an X it is ...


2

'Nominal' has long meant 'in name only' - for example: The monarch is the nominal head of the British government. One way this was applied was in the sense of 'a nominal payment', which means a payment that is not really a payment. A particular use is a payment that has to exist to make something legal - for example a person wishing to volunteer their ...


0

The shift in meaning happened in the 17th century, probably underling the nominal aspect vs the real substance of something: Nominal: Meaning "being so in name only" first recorded 1620s. (Etymonline)


2

Note: I am not sure of this answer as it is me vaguely remembering things from highschool. I think a "source population" in this case is alluding to the original population originating from the original local bloodlines eliminating the immigrants and the "impure" inhabitants from the set. Think of it as the descendants of the original settlers of the area, ...


2

Consider classic. Classic adjective 2 Very typical of its kind: Hamlet is the classic example of a tragedy - ODO


1

I think conventional conveys the idea you are referring to: based on or in accordance with what is generally done or believed:. (Of a person) greatly or overly concerned with what is generally held to be socially acceptable. ODO


1

The computer program you are using is buggy, because it doesn't know about English derivational morphology, let alone Latin derivational morphology whence this all originates. We have plenty of pairs that work this way: affiliate, affiliable appreciate, appreciable appropriate, appropriable associate, associable denunciate, denunciable differentiate, ...


1

You should check parallel narrative: https://www.theguardian.com/books/2014/jul/02/philip-hensher-top-10-parallel-narratives-mrs-gaskell-david-mitchell Example usage in academia: Parallel Narrative Structure in Paul Harding’s Tinkers Some more from Wikipedia (interestingly this is a result thrown on search of parallel narrative): Nonlinear ...


0

I don't think there is a technical term that captures what you want, so your best bet is to coin one. The phrase that comes to my mind which denotes what you are describing is "tangentially embedded story-line". That's a bit wordy though, so you might just go with 'embedded narrative' or 'embedded story-line' if you prefer, but those aren't as inclusive of ...


0

Marginalia refers to text in a text which is in the margins of the primary text. As it does not connote any specific kind of text there, narrative in that space would qualify as marginalia. One example of this is in the short novel The Mezzanine by Nicholson Baker, where the narrator occasionally breaks out into full anecdotes in the footnotes which ...


1

The wording that you choose needs to convey two key pieces of information in each instance: (1) the location of the image relative to the column of text (in U.S. publishing terminology, the three usual options are flush left, centered, or flush right, where flush means "aligned with the specified margin"); and (2) whether the text wraps around the image or ...


2

Many of those posting answers have assumed that the person knows he is unqualified to speak on the subject and is trying to tease or deceive. This is quite often not the case. Every one of us at times has a plausible but mistaken belief that he is well informed on a topic. To take striking example, when the Internet first became widely known in 1993, many ...


6

Listicle 'an article structured in the form of a list, typically having some additional content relating to each item' The word is of relatively recent coinage and is a portmanteau from 'list' and 'article'. (In my experience, usage is often slightly derogatory, but I have no cite for that.)


1

All of those. Pick one :) An auto-antonym (sometimes spelled autantonym), or contronym (also spelled contranym), is a word with a homograph (another word of the same spelling) which is also an antonym (a word with the opposite meaning). An auto-antonym is alternatively called an antagonym, Janus word (after the Roman god), enantiodrome, self-antonym, ...


3

Since you want a more 'medium-neutral' term for this, consider these options: story-receiver story-recipient story-experiencer . narrative-receiver narrative-recipient narrative-experiencer "The focus of narrative analyses has been on the story and the teller. More attention needs to be paid to the role of the story receiver in creating ...


3

As far as I could find, we refer to the generic audience as a version of the verb used to receive the story suffixed with -er. Watching the 5 o'clock news makes you a viewer. Reading a dental pamphlet or work of fiction makes you a reader. Listening to a story makes you a listener. See Audience for examples — Dictionary.com (bolding mine) noun 1. ...


3

This might not be in common usage, but consider storygoer, formed on analogy with with theatergoer, moviegoer, filmgoer, and concertgoer. It means: a person who entertains a story. This word is used. For example, it is used in the following passage: Stories always have a situation, however minimal, whether given through description, narration, ...


1

There are many ways to describe this type of direction, and there isn't one correct answer. How do you say if something is in front of me but more like right side. "The thing is in front of you and to your right." "The thing is to your right, in front of you." "The thing is at your 2 o'clock." (refering to clock position) The point is, this isn't ...


3

I would say the difference is more generational than anything else and the changeover from blackboard to chalkboard had nothing at all to do with racial sensibilities or political correctness. When I started school in 1955, they were all black and were called blackboards. In a new school I went to in 1957 the boards were green but since everyone was used to ...


2

There is no term used in English for 'government by comedians' in current usage. Any term would have to be invented.


0

I think you need to get away from words like 'flow' or 'wrap' used by css, and use more everyday words instead, even if they are less precise. For example you could use "surround": Image on left surrounded by text. Image on right surrounded by text. Image without text either side. You could argue that 'surround' implies every side, but the phrases I ...


1

As someone with a Bachelor of Music, I can tell you there is no simple answer--surprisingly, perhaps. The simplest answer would be 'accompaniment', meaning the instrumental parts that accompany the vocal line. But if we were talking about a Wagner opera, for instance, and we just took out the vocal parts, calling what remained the 'accompaniment' would seem ...


0

My suggestions are (in the same order): No text beside the image Text on the right of the image Text on the left of the image I suggest you also include the images provided in your question, if its not too hard. They say a picture is worth a 1000 words.


1

The term parallel to 'doggerel' in the sense you intend, but "general to art", would be an adjective rather than a noun, modifying the noun applied to the particular art form ('music', 'painting', 'sculpture', etc.). inaesthetic, adj. Not æsthetic; void of æsthetic perception or taste. ["inaesthetic, adj.". OED Online. June 2016. Oxford University ...


39

From Wikipedia, emphasis mine: An autological word (also called homological word or autonym) is a word that expresses a property that it also possesses (e.g. the word "short" is short, "noun" is a noun, "English" is English, "pentasyllabic" has five syllables, "word" is a word, "sesquipedalian" is a long word, "adjectival" is adjectival; see Wiktionary ...


2

I suggest amateurish. am·a·teur·ish (ăm′ə-tûr′ĭsh, -cho͝or′-, -tyo͝or′-): adj. characteristic of an amateur; not professional. Some exemplar sentences: The art critics find his paintings amateurish. Very few of Mendelssohn's early compositions could be called amateurish. His sculptures are, at best, totally amateurish. His dance moves, ...


2

While it can be applied to things other than the arts, the term dreck is often used (informal) Rubbish; trash: this so-called art is pure dreck Oxford Dictionaries Online Also derived from Yiddish, the term schlock is found, and can similarly refer to other goods or activities Something, such as merchandise or literature, that is inferior or ...


2

Open-source hardware — Wikipedia Open-source hardware (OSH), consists of physical artifacts of technology designed and offered by the open design movement. Both free and open-source software (FOSS) as well as open-source hardware is created by this open-source culture movement and applies a like concept to a variety of components. It is ...


1

Some countries use inked stamps on the passport page to insert a visa, but the US does not. Nonetheless, there is much material on the internet concerning US visa "stamps," and the "stamping" of US visas (that is, the insertion of a visa foil into a passport). At one time US visa was actual ink stamps, the sticker and the foil are relatively new trend and ...


1

I'm a mobile app developer. Here's the default link to my Chrome browser's add-ons. They call them apps too. This may cause confusion to some users whose only exposure to the word 'app' has been through the use of a mobile device and the 'app stores'. To avoid confusion just say what type of apps they are - Browser apps, Anki apps, Word apps, whenever you'...


0

Linguists often joke that the best definition of a word is something you put spaces around. The essence of what a word is is very debatable, and there are as many definitions as there are grammatical frameworks.


1

This is a deeply philosophical question about the ontology of words. Specifically, it is a question about the individuation conditions of words. This question, sadly, has no answer given that we use the word "word" very inconsistently (see below). Many syntacticians prefer to talk about lexical items rather than words, given the nebulousness of the concept ...



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