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2

Taking this purely as a language question and not a philosophical one, I would say the answer is no, you can certainly have religious nationalism. "Are Hindu nationalists a danger to other Indians?" Zionism (Hebrew: צִיּוֹנוּת Tsiyyonut IPA: [t͡sijo̞ˈnut] after Zion) is a nationalist and political movement of Jews and Jewish culture that supports ...


0

Perhaps by distinguishing between de facto and dejure, you can get a better handle on the difference between “real law” and “theoretical law.” A de facto government, for example, can do virtually everything a legitimate and constitutionally established government can do. The biggest difference between the two is that the former exists in actuality or ...


3

The closest term I can think of is "the letter of the law" (whatever is written literally in law) versus "the spirit of the law" (the intent of what laws actually want people to do). There is also a term "de facto" which might apply here, because it can be used to mean "the way it actually plays out in reality."


0

If you don't mind a somewhat technical term (but maybe not "dictionary" official, social network analysis science being quite new) you can call them Hub Or Connector Example of use from a site on Social Network analysis where you can find these terms and other related: connectors, mavens, leaders, bridges, isolates... "In the kite network (...


7

I think the word you are seeking is sidebar. a typographically distinct section of a page, as in a book or magazine, that amplifies or highlights the main text. Another example: A brief section of text or another feature that appears alongside a more detailed discussion of a subject, often separated graphically in a box.


1

Illustration: something that illustrates, as a picture in a book or magazine. (Dictionary.com) a picture or diagram that helps make something clear or attractive (M-W)


4

It's not very exciting I'm afraid, but I believe this is the term that describes the graphic or text elements in your question. Panels and box copy Boxes are used as news items or as extensions to a long article in which you can place some other facts or data which are relevant to the article. These types of copy are generally shorter in length and ...


1

These sound like footnotes, albeit that they aren't positioned as such. Footnote - A note, reference, or additional piece of information printed at the bottom of a page, used to explain or comment on something in the main body of the text on the same page (OED). They also sound like addenda (albeit they too aren't usually positioned within the text!). ...


3

If the text box is pointing to a specific section of the main text, you might call it a callout: In publishing, a call-out or callout is a short string of text connected by a line, arrow, or similar graphic to a feature of an illustration or technical drawing, and giving information about that feature. The term is also used to describe a short ...


1

In addition to the answer above: stretch myself, learn something new, explore different options, expand myself. I don't know which if any of those would be good for your application, though. Thing is, I'm certain the person reading your application won't believe that's why you did it (to stretch outside your comfort zone). You tried a different career ...


2

I felt I needed to broaden my horizons. broaden/widen somebody's horizons to increase the range of things that someone knows about, has experienced, or is able to do This trip to the Far East has certainly broadened our family's horizons. Cambridge Idioms Dictionary, 2nd ed.


0

"Bench press" as an item (not the exercise) is usually used to refer to a machine for bench pressing. It would include a stack of weights, a bench and a mechanism to transfer your force to the weights. They're less common than they used to be, as chest press machines take up less space. If you bench press with a barbell or dumbbells, what you use is just a ...


0

If the sole purpose of the bench is to do bench presses, and there are other benches in the room, then it seems like the logical alternative would be to refer to it as "the bench press bench". This seems silly, and unecessarily pedantic. If it was the only bench, then you could just call it "the bench" if you want, although some people might not realise ...


2

As the question stands now (DST 16h45 Montreal, Quebec) the four different events indicated in segments of the standing question are defined generically as changes in altitude. The events pictured could also represent acceleration (gain in altitude) and deceleration (loss of altitude) so long as there are no changes to the elevators or ailerons. Changes to ...


1

This Question has three different parts having three different answers. The title asks What is the terminology for the things happening in between airline flights. The answer to such a vague question can be from "a layover" to "not much at all." The question body asks for a generic term that can be equally applied for the four separate "events" as things. ...


0

Maybe you can use transition — M-W noun 1.b. a movement, development, or evolution from one form, stage, or style to another Or translation — ODO noun 3. formal or technical The process of moving something from one place to another


1

There seems to be no single-word that combines "Takeoff" and "Landing". However, there is the short form TOL. From Wikipedia's article, "Takeoff and Landing", we can read about different kinds of TOLs such as VTOL, CTOL, etc.


-1

Here are the main steps (not the procedures) in a flight: Plan your flight and reserve an airplane. File a flight plan if you will land at a distant aerodrome. Get enough gas for the flight. Get some extra gas. Contact Ground Control. Taxi to the approach. Contact the tower for permission to Take off. Accelerate. Lift off. Ascend to altitude. Fly to ...


18

Your example is a recursive sentence of, relating to, or constituting a procedure that can repeat itself indefinitely a recursive rule in a grammar (MW) I don't know about the use of recursion in sentences or paragraphs, but there are a number of recursive acronyms used in the IT industry, some notable being PHP (PHP: Hypertext Preprocessor) and ...


8

That is specifically an example of recursion, where something is contained inside itself. It is an foundational concept in the fractal mathematics that form the core of chaos theory, but it would be impossible to ever actually use it in spoken English, at least in the fully expanded form. You could achieve it by reference, as in "This is the sentence I'm ...


1

My understanding is that you only hyphenate two words when you want to make a new single compound word out of them. So, "open source" is a phrase and "open-source" is a word. Using the compound word can make a sentence more clearer, eg "Can you give me the open source software standards" risks being parsed as "Can you give me the source software ...


3

Previous suggestions have been good. I would add (back) apron: "a raised section of ornamental stonework below a window ledge, stone tablet, or monument." "Cornice," "lintel," and "pop-out" are also worth considering. Also, in French, it would be called a "tablette d'appui."


0

You say that "Resources" adequately describes the desired concept to consumers of the "Resources". Perhaps if you call these things "Consumer Resources", consumers will understand this to mean the same thing as "Resources", but makers will understand this term to mean "something that I would regard as a Resource if I were a consumer."


0

I have heard the word "artifacts" used in this context, but that might wind up confusing both groups. The usage I'm talking about comes from software development, and generally refers to the tangible by-products of the software development life cycle, as discussed at the Programmers Stack Exchange site under the question title "What does 'artifact' mean?"


3

This exact concept is from Plato's Republic and is typically called the "Noble Lie" in the philosophical literature (it seems clear from the Republic that Plato invented the myth, it wasn't actually one previously in currency among the ancient Greeks). It's not clear whether Plato himself considered it a lie rather than just a "creative" way of representing ...


1

To my mind, having a "rational fear" means being... circumspect - heedful of potential [undesirable] consequences cf prudent - careful and sensible; marked by sound judgment ...so as a noun, I'd go for circumspection.


5

I doubt there is a single word which labels rational fear, but I would say caution comes close: prudent forethought to minimize risk Prudence implies rationality (one of its synonyms, another being wise) The reason I doubt a specific word for rational fear is that fear (n.) is normal and rational in a great many situations.


1

An oscillation defines a regular, periodic sort of motion. See: http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/oscillation In the case of oscilloscopes, you're monitoring voltage or current as a function of time, which is displayed a result of a well understood mathematical model (e.g. the equation modelling the current through an inductor, L = di/dt). Vibrate ...


0

While not QUITE what you describe, the word policing is often used for similar behavior, albeit reserved for situations where the intervention is believed to be beneficial to the group, or at least to preserve the group's rules/norms. It is used here to describe ants literally holding down another ant trying to rise above them (here, an actual physiological ...


0

In addition to Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), there are several related terms: Complex Trauma or Complex Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (C-PTSD) ... a type of trauma that occurs repeatedly and cumulatively, usually over a period of time and within specific relationships and contexts. Examples include severe child abuse, domestic abuse, or ...


1

In the first sentence undisclosed or concealed costs could work. In the second sentence duped,conned,taken, hoodwinked or taken?


1

wraparound, especially used in the sense of: an object that encircles or especially curves and laps over another It fits pretty well into the sentence: When viewing the month version of the calendar online, users can turn on/off the view of wraparound days from other months.


1

This is not a direct answer to the question as posed, but it does address Op's 'example sentence' if that is really what is required. I suggest that: you do not need a descriptive term at all for such days: you can simply refer to them as "days from other months"; "adjacent months" would be clearer that "other months"; "dates" might be better than "...


12

What would one call the large horizontal structural fixture [...] specifically the component between the two corbels? The most appropriate term I found, and one which matches the description and the image posted by the OP is balconet / balconette If we look at the definition of corbel we find:         &...


7

The building in question is the home of the Lyric Opera of Chicago built in 1929. The Art Institute of Chicago has the clearest photo I have seen of the west exposure, as built.  Identifying the architectural styles employed will allow us to focus the search for the name of the specific decoration. In pursuit of that, I turned to The History of the ...


1

It can also be called a log line. See this Wikipedia entry A log line or logline is a brief (usually one-sentence) summary of a television program, film, or book that states the central conflict of the story, often providing both a synopsis of the story's plot, and an emotional "hook" to stimulate interest. A one-sentence program summary in TV Guide is ...


2

Heritage- a heritage of poverty and suffering; a national heritage of honor, pride, andcourage.


1

The horizontal decorated structure you see on the facade is an architectonic motif. In this specific case it is one of the Art Deco architectonic motifs which are often characterized by emphasised geometric forms as suggested in the following extract: Deco emphasizes geometric forms: spheres, polygons, rectangles, trapezoids, zigzags, chevrons, ...


2

This blog entry has “birth culture” as its title and then once again near the end to describe the culture of the author’s birth. “Cultural roots” is also used with that meaning near the article's top. (from Beyond Two Worlds: Musings of a Taiwanese-American Adoptee) As long as it’s clear that you’re talking/writing about some person’s “native culture” then ...


2

The word 'native' is used to describe anything that applies to you at the time of your birth. So the culture you were born in would be your 'native culture'. People sometimes use 'native' to mean 'the main thing' (as in "since I came to England, English has become my native language") but this is wrong.


1

It's not exactly what you're looking for, but how about 'milieu': A person’s social environment: he grew up in a military milieu Another definition surroundings, especially of a social or cultural nature


5

Although I am probably going to get a lot of flak for this answer, I believe this explanation fits the criteria of your question-specifically going to “complications due to being too close to an explosion”. This type of reaction is not restricted to soldiers on the battlefield. Please read through completely before rejecting it out-of-hand. Concussion is ...


22

The modern name for the condition is Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, and it can apply to civilians as well as soldiers.


5

Combat stress reaction (CSR) is a term used within the military to describe acute behavioural disorganization seen by medical personnel as a direct result of the trauma of war. Also known as "combat fatigue" or "battle neurosis", it has some overlap with the diagnosis of acute stress reaction used in civilian psychiatry. It is historically linked to shell ...


27

It's considered "ill-defined", but the term shell shock is often used for what you're describing. However, I would caution against using this in most situations. Shell shock was a term used in the World War I era, but it was poorly understood at the time. In the World War II era, diagnoses of shell shock were replaced with diagnoses of combat stress ...


0

From context, not-quite-ready systems were being deployed, and so resources were going into fixing things that were wrong with them, and putting logistical systems into place to support them. ...major weapon systems were entered into the fleet and encountered severe readiness and supportability problems... In many cases, the fleet did not receive ...


-1

INDELICACY, INDECORUM There is no cultural code or conduct to impose on preference. Difference in preference is not a faux pas. We'd have hardly anything to talk about, excluding preference. Further, culture does not impose learning innumerable details about interlocutors (if to have difference for a faux pas). Humorously, your thing is a petitio ...


0

I like "empty rhetoric" suggested by @Silenus. My suggestion is not the name of the rhetorical device. But, when a politician speaks about their unrealistic and ideal target to achieve during their political term without giving concrete details such as strategy and proven track records or results, you could consider saying That's politics talking (, ...


1

Platitude 1: the quality or state of being dull or insipid His speech was filled with familiar platitudes about the value of hard work and dedication. "Platitude." Merriam-Webster.com. Merriam-Webster, n.d. Web. 7 June 2016. Bromide a statement that is intended to make people feel happier or calmer but that is not original or effective ...


0

Vague promises would be fine. Vague — Macmillan adjective 1. Not clearly or fully explained. "The politicians made vague promises about independence" Usage example: "Vague Promises of Debt Relief for Greece", The New York Times



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