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0

I would like to add to this discussion a side note: tl;dr Syndrome. I have encountered an appalling tendency for people to read only the portions that they want to read (cf. "hearing what they want to hear") and discard the rest, even though they avowedly want detailed responses to the questions they have asked. I use the phrase "tl;dr Syndrome" in ...


1

You could call your fire a three-alarmer:- One-alarm, two-alarm, three-alarm fires, or higher, are categories of fires indicating the level of response by local authorities, with an elevated number of alarms indicating increased commitment of resources. This would have the advantage that it has already appeared (or not) in poetry:- The one L ...


0

'Holocaust' also comes to mind although it is a heavily laden term , meaning 'burnt whole' and 'thorough destruction by fire.' From your description it's hard to beat 'conflagration' or 'wildfire'--their only down-side is that they are so familiar.


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I think conflagration would work for this. con·fla·gra·tion noun \ˌkän-flə-ˈgrā-shən\ : a large destructive fire


4

These are stand alone episodes, as they "stand alone" from the main story arc. TV Tropes goes into detail, and provides multiple examples: An episode that can stand alone on its own with a self-contained story that does not need prior viewing of any other episode to understand. It's usually an episode that breaks from the current arc to focus on a ...


0

They are just "episodes". http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/episode If the shows follow on from each other you would probably call them "instalments" rather than episodes. http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/instalment


0

I don't think there's a single word that conveys the whole pose. Hands clasped covers the positioning of the hands relative to each other, either with fingers intertwined, or with one hand covering the other. But hands can also be clasped behind the back, or in prayer, and two people can clasp hands. So "hands clasped in front" is probably as good a phrase ...


0

A complimentary (American) equivalent of "old stiffs" would be "old timers." That is a reference to people who have "been around" and "know the ropes."


2

OED has: b. A mean, disagreeable, or contemptible person (freq. big stiff). Also joc. and loosely, a man, a fellow; working stiff, an ordinary working man. slang (orig. U.S.). 1936 P. G. Wodehouse Laughing Gas viii. 82 He had told me this man was a pretty good sort of old stiff. 1949 Daily Ardmoreite (Ardmore, Okla.) 23 Feb. 18/6 A select group ...


0

Role-based access control system or role-based security system Within an organization, roles are created for various job functions. The permissions to perform certain operations are assigned to specific roles. Members or staff (or other system users) are assigned particular roles, and through those role assignments acquire the computer permissions to ...


2

The sentence "Another cause of drug failure might be incorrect use." should be removed, because it is not in context. There are three criteria that are being discussed, and other causes of drug failure are irrelevant to the three criteria that the paragraph outlines.


0

In AusEng I'd call this a course notes book, reader or workbook, depending on what's inside. It would seem very odd to call these handouts, but maybe I'm not understanding what you were meaning. A handout is something you'd receive at the beginning of a lecture or presentation. Sometimes a single page, but it could be more. Usually it would just be stapled ...


1

Your evaluation of what you saw is correct. The "too long; didn't read" abbreviation is now being used to mean, "Too long? Here's a summary". The irony here is that if the post is too long to read, the reader is likely to miss the "tl;dr" part, because it has now been buried in the prose! It's a symptom of our language being morphed under the weight of ...


2

My favourite pair is "canon" (=rule) and "cannon" (=weapon). Both from the same Greek word (kanna) meaning a reed, probably from a semitic root. I think that is an awesome stretch of meaning.


0

I'm posting images, if anyone knows the correct terminology for these different hand gestures, AND CAN POST THEIR ANSWERS, because I've become curious myself, THAT WOULD HELP THE OP. For image no 1, the person on the right is clasping her hands or clenching her hands. Image No2 I'd say she is holding her own hands. Image No.3 has its own caption. ...


3

No, they are absolutely not synonymous. Material that is copylefted is copyrighted — but instead of using the copyright to prevent others from freely reproducing and modifying the work, it uses the copyright to require any reproducers and modifiers to do so in a way that preserves everyone else's freedom as well. That is: suppose I want to release a ...


3

I would suggest one of the following: native apps indicating that they exist without an intermediary like a browser to run them desktop apps, command-line apps, or mobile apps indicating that they run in the desktop environment, on the command line, or on a mobile device


1

The Jargon File has a good definition of 'handwave': handwave: /hand wayv/ [poss. from gestures characteristic of stage magicians] v. To gloss over a complex point; to distract a listener; to support a (possibly actually valid) point with blatantly faulty logic. n. The act of handwaving. “Boy, what a handwave!” If someone starts a ...


0

If you want a single word, you certainly have a few choices in addition to checker. authorizer controller arbiteur verifier gatekeeper But ultimately, you're probably best to go with access control system as ermanen notes. It's also frequently abbreviated as ACS, which may be useful if you're wanting something short.


2

Standalone would assume that all non-web applications are standalone, or that the world-wide -web is the only way for computers to connect to one-another. A standard client-server application can well be non-web, but is not "standalone". The generic non-web application is very broad. It includes, say, CICS/COBOL applications on an IBM Z/series. So saying ...


52

False friends is the common word for that :) As Wikipedia says: False friends are pairs of words or phrases in two languages or dialects (or letters in two alphabets) that look or sound similar, but differ significantly in meaning. The article goes on to mention one of your actual examples) False cognates, is something different. If we look again at ...


1

Non-web application This term is accepted in the progamming community. World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) However, these options might 'sound' better: 'General programming experience' or 'Standalone software' Credit to @Andrew Leach for standalone and and @Kris for Non-web


1

In technical terminology, this kind of mechanism is called access control and the system is called access control system. It is usually used in computer security and telecommunication. You can also consider access approval to exclude authentication. In computer security, general access control includes authorization, authentication, access approval, and ...


-2

• Omnispectral Sagacity Or • Divergent Perspicacity Or • Perspicaciousness (*^_^)


-2

A paradox is when two opposites-- contradictions--are in a sentence, but are not side by side. They are statements that may be true, but are self-contradictory and unusual to happen at the same time e.g.You can "save" money by "spending" it. An oxymoron is just like a paradox; however, the two opposites are side by side e.g. This is a "love-hate" ...


3

That's either a sarcastic comment, or a paradox or an absurdity. A form of wit that is marked by the use of sarcastic language and is intended to make its victim the butt of contempt or ridicule. An assertion that is essentially self-contradictory, though based on a valid deduction from acceptable premises. If you read it in reference to ...


18

The "summary" meaning has already been explained, but in a different usage (perhaps the original), it is meant as an insult. User A: [long impassioned explanation of his views on a particular issue] User B: tl;dr Here User B is saying to User A: "Your post was too long and I didn't read it". At best, this is a suggestion that User A is being too ...


4

I have assumed that it now means something like “If you found the above too long and complicated, here is, in a nutshell, what I meant to say.” Your interpretation as just quoted may be what some writers mean tl;dr to stand for, and is in accord with the explanation from knowyourmeme mentioned in a previous answer. But note that the knowyourmeme entry ...


107

It means "if you couldn't be bothered to read the preceding material because it looked too long (and possibly boring), here is a summary for you". The meaning is quite close to 'executive summary'. tl;dr is used to call out another user on the length of their post. However, in cases of more courteous exchanges and serious discussions, tl;dr can be ...


0

Monochrome refers to things, such as drawings, pictures, and photographs, that are in shades of one (or a very limited number) of colors. Monochromatic can also be used to refer to the above, but is used exclusively to describe monochromatic light, which is light of a narrow wavelength band. Ironically, a monochrome drawing would not reflect monochromatic ...


0

How about responder, meaning something that responds to a situation? The most familiar modern use is in the phrase first responders meaning the personnel (police, firemen, coast guard) who respond to emergencies like fires, bombs, hurricanes and so forth, but it could be easily applied to this new context.


0

The word 'heinous' being synonymous with horrible or horrific is certainly 'reprehensible' to the memory of an innocent person who would witness the act.


2

It sounds like a traumatising memory: not merely traumatic, but leaving a permanent mental scar.


4

How about infamous? A la "a day that will live in infamy!"


5

Memory already implies that the thing is being remembered and not forgotten, so I would prefer a word to describe the type of memory being referenced, while also conveying that it is a memory that is constantly being revisited. So things like bedeviling memory tormenting memory the memory of it plagued me accursed memory fiendish memory vexing / vexatious ...


0

How about "Real destinations"? It is an antonym of virtual.


0

If it is the physicality of the entities that you wish to underline, rather than the type of location (i.e. a type of building or place) then you are looking for a word that is the opposite of 'virtual' and synonymous with 'physical'. The only suitable word I can think of is 'Actual', as in "Actual Locations" which could work quite well as a list title if ...


0

From dictionary.com, definition 2b... premises - a building together with its grounds or other appurtenances Some people only use this term (always plural in this sense) for commercial properties, but just as a landlord can evict a tenant from the premises, I see nothing wrong with a tenant or homeowner evicting an uninvited guest from the premises ...


0

I think Notorious would fit perfectly in many contexts. notorious nə(ʊ)ˈtɔːrɪəs/Submit adjective famous or well known, typically for some bad quality or deed.


6

I like an inescapable memory. The escape implies a concerted effort to relieve oneself of the memory. I find it's less passive. Requires the 'memory' after unfortunately. Edit: I realised this was very similar to Rusty Tuba's answer... but I've posted it now.


1

I propose "unignorable" which implies persistence, and suggests undesirability: forgetting can be accidental, but ignoring is deliberate. It's admittedly a somewhat unwieldy word, but I believe it's close to meeting the questioner's need. I also like "indelible": that which we would like to delete but cannot.


2

In addition to the wonderful words suggested so far, also consider ineradicable: not able to be eradicated; of root, too deep to remove From en.wiktionary, eradicate means “(to pull up by the roots): root up, uproot” and “(to completely destroy): annihilate, exterminate, extirpate”. Thus, ineradicable means “not able to be destroyed”. Note, the ...


4

As an adjective, there is never-to-be-forgotten which usually implies that the experience or memory was unpleasant, unlike unforgettable which usually implies a pleasant memory. Note: It is used as unhyphenated too. Examples: Stupid, sometimes tragic, decisions by commanders also impacted the mind with never-to-be-forgotten, nightmarish memories. ...


42

For some purposes, I like: indelible: making marks that cannot be removed It makes me thinks of spills, stains, bad tattoos, burns... things that you want to delete, but can't. Though I think @Sven-Yargs hit it on the head with haunting.


7

"What has been seen cannot be unseen". Slang. For citations see: http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/Citations:what_has_been_seen_cannot_be_unseen e.g. At Dachau he was witness to real rather than abstract suffering; what has been seen cannot be unseen, nor can it be rationalized. Brad Prager, "Suffering and Sympathy in Volker Schlöndorff's Der neunte Tag ...


18

If you're looking for adjectives, as opposed to phrases, then I think there are three good candidates: inextirpable: incapable of being destroyed inexpungible: incapable of being obliterated inerasable: incapable of being erased Of course, the implication with these words is that we might, in fact, like to destroy, obliterate, or erase the things they ...


2

A pest is something that will not let you forget it exists. Edited to add haunting. That memory will haunt me for the rest of my life.


22

traumatic may fit, even though the word means basically "causing mental or emotional problems, usually for a long time". It was a traumatic experience for all of us. Not all unforgettable events are traumatic but most traumatic events will be unforgettable.



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