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Poky driver does the trick I believe. 2. American English doing things very slowly, especially in a way that is annoying: I got behind some poky driver on the freeway. Longman Dictionary


2

I'm not sure there are unambiguous, widely used precise terms for this, but this is what I've come up with: autophobia: a fear of being alone or of one's self So this one has two meanings at best, and the fear of loneliness is the better known one. However there are sources that support the second meaning as well: Autophobia may mean one of two ...


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There are two types of mechanically activated switches in the electronic and electrical industry. Type A is where the switch remains stucked indefinitely at a lower position even after releasing your fingers from it and type B is a push( downwards of course)- to -on type where the switch bounces back( upwards of course) to its original position after the ...


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Dale - there is no such common or abbreviated term for this situation. Suggest: Use "from the original" or "verbatim form the original" or "verbatim translation as seen in the original document" or "this section was presented, as seen here, in English, in the original document. All errors and idiocyncracies have been reproduced here verbatim." or "Quoted ...


2

You could say that the translated sections in the original text are pre-translated segments, a term used by many translators (usually when talking about machine translation). If they are poorly translated, you could just make a note and specify that you did not translate them. As for your second question, you could say something like, "given the lack of ...


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I believe the linguistic term the OP is looking for is asymmetries (with minor corrections) Language and Sex Differences Serap Yelkenaç ... Moreover, another lexical fields that are taken into account as errors resulting in discrimination in language are marital status, asymmetries ( in other words, marked and unmarked forms), jobs and ...


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Probably because: All attorneys are lawyers, but it is improper to say that all lawyers are attorneys. Attorneys are also recognized as lawyers. Attorneys graduate from law school and they can also choose to practice law as a profession. However a potential attorney must pass the bar exam to be eligible to practice law within a specific jurisdiction. ...


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If you employ a person and pay them a regular wage or salary, they are an employee. If you negotiate a contract with an individual to provide a service, with that person billing you for services rendered, that person is a contractor. If you hire a company to provide you services, the people working for that company are employees (or sometimes contractors) ...


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I do not believe a single term exists (1) for this construction itself, nor (2) for what is happening in this construction. From all my investigations, there appears to be at least two, possibly more, figures of speech involved. First, Catachresis: figure of speech in which a word or phrase is being applied in a way that significantly departs from ...


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Discussing with @EdwinAshworth (and reading all other comments & references) , I suddenly got a good examples where not dropping the "then" is useful, because of the stress. Consider : Boy : Can I go and play ? Mother : If you have completed your homework, then you may go. Novice Monk : Can I get enlightenment within 1 year ? Master Monk : If you ...


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A "parrot" In short, a "parrot" is someone who tends: To imitate someone or to mimic or repeat their actions or sayings without thinking.


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Each of your examples is a metaphor; death cannot literally have gates nor can despair literally have walls. perhaps you could call it "concrete/abstract metaphor" or "reification metaphor" or "metaphorical reification" (Your cited source mentions that reification is a fallacy in logic, but acceptable in "figures of speech", and metaphors are ...


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I might say these are a form of epithet. Dictionary.com defines epithet as: any word or phrase applied to a person or thing to describe an actual or attributed quality


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In America, the piece of paper that you include when putting cash or checks into your bank account is called a Deposit Slip. I'm not sure if this is the same kind of slip you're talking about, though. In America, our checks and deposit slips have the account and routing numbers printed in MICR code, not barcode.


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An invoice - or purchase order or bill - may have a codebar and a sequence of numbers on it. The codebar system allows you to pay the amount due on the document at a bank where a codebar scanner identifies the payer and all the information concerning your purchase. From wikipedia: a typical invoice contains The word invoice (or Tax ...


5

While this is the "English Language & Usage" part of stackexchange your answer mentions "in linguistics". There is also an internationally recognized legal term that protects these names to indicate authenticity, the French "Appellation d'origine contrôlée". Roquefort cheese, Cognac, Porto, Lambic beers, and others benefit from this protection. In many ...


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I am Japanese and I don't really find the term "Oriental" as offensive but used in the wrong way or said in a rude way can make it pretty mean sounding. However, others may find it offensive when used under any circumstance.


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I think the word you are looking for is toponym. I also think that a list of 'trade products' that includes lesbian needs work (unless your supermarkets are markedly different from ours).


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authentication: noun [MASS NOUN] 1 The process or action of proving or showing something to be true, genuine, or valid: the prints will be stamped with his seal and accompanied by a letter of authentication [AS COUNT NOUN]: the authentications were both carried out by the Investigation Bureau of the Ministry of Justice


0

I would use businessperson (or businessman/businesswoman) for this. businessperson (noun) A man or woman who works in commerce, especially at an executive level Oxford The last part of the definition makes this word questionable for the context, but this is a very general word. It could describe anything from a babysitter to a CEO.


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I guess a generic "service person" should be ok - though often at times you will find term being used for armed forces personnel.


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It's still called a company, even if it's only one person. If you want a more specific word, try "sole proprietorship".


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In general, a person who provides a professional service is called a consultant.


1

If you want to indicate the measures that are aimed to stop counterfeiters, security features is the term you are looking for. It is stretching a bit but possibly hallmark fits the bill.


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My ability to link disparate concepts into a cohesive whole is sometimes impaired by limited working memory. When that happens, it's time to have a cup of coffee, take a nap, or go play pinball for an hour or two. but it's nothing to do with memory It's everything to do with memory, just not the long term storage kind of memory we usually mean when we ...


1

"I can't see the wood for the trees" would be applicable here, though more colourful than terms such as "cognitive dissonance". The implication being that while focussing on the components (the "trees") you are unable to see the overall or combined pattern ("the wood", i.e. woodland, forest). Perhaps "(Temporary) Cognitive Deficit" is a dryer term for this ...


2

From Wikipedia: "A homophone is a word that is pronounced the same as another word but differs in meaning, and may differ in spelling. The words may be spelled the same, such as rose (flower) and rose (past tense of "rise"), or differently, such as carat, caret, and carrot, or to, two, and too."


2

I'd call this being scatterbrained According to MacMillan: Not able to think clearly:confused, bewildered, perplexed...


1

flabbergasted, astounded or nonplussed maybe? although these a reactions mostly, or confounded with ideas


1

What about "on the brink"? As in "I am right on the brink of a breakthrough."


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"Cognitive overload" describes the inability to hold all the necessary information in your head at one time, but it's not specific to being on the cusp of a solution.


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I'm not sure there is a precise answer for this, at least not in the same vein as 'deja vu." There are probably multiple possible examples of phrases that would come close. The phrase "Water, water everywhere, but not a drop to drink" is one metaphorical way to describe what you're referencing. The phrase refers to the idea that there is ample "water" ...


2

Impediment. a defect in a person's speech, such as a lisp or stammer. noun: speech impediment; plural noun: speech impediments


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Liquid vocalization is a general term encompassing vocalization of both /l/ and /r/ sounds. This is the term used in Lisa J. Green's African American English: A Linguistic Introduction (2002), among others. It's a simple combination of two linguistics terms: Liquid. This is defined in David Crystal's Dictionary of Linguistics and Phonetics (2008) ...


1

I think you can get your intention across by combining the terms rhotacism and lambdacism into lambdarhotacism. I see there is highly related word, although it does not have any W connotation: lallation: A lallation (also called cambia-letras or troca-letra, "letter changer", in Latin American countries) is an imperfect enunciation of the letter "L", in ...


1

L-vocalization is the term that would be used by linguists. In addition to British English, you can see the change in Polish and Brazilian Portuguese as well (a dark L is pronounced as a vowel or glide instead of as a lateral). Shakespeare himself made a little joke of this in Hamlet: Gravedigger: It must be se offendendo. It cannot be else. For here ...


1

From the wikipedia article you linked: This understanding sees predicates as relations or functions over arguments. The predicate serves either to assign a property to a single argument or to relate two or more arguments to each other. Sentences consist of predicates and their arguments (and adjuncts) and are thus predicate-argument structures, whereby a ...


1

Here's a good term for that synchronicity noun: 1. the simultaneous occurrence of events that appear significantly related but have no discernible causal connection. "such synchronicity is quite staggering" see Google Synchronicity is the occurrence of two or more events that appear to be meaningfully related but not causally related. ...


1

I think unintended use conveys the idea in general. The phrase is used both informally and formally. For example, it is used in International Product Liability as a formal phrase. There is also a website called Museum of unintended uses and the motto is the art of using things differently. Here are some clever examples from the same site: Ipad Stand: ...


5

"Off-label use", per Wikipedia: "is the use of pharmaceutical drugs for an unapproved indication or in an unapproved age group, unapproved dosage, or unapproved form of administration." I think it would be understood if use of the other items in your posting (massager, cough medicine) were referred to as "off-label" also. I'm not sure there is one ...


5

When a court orders for taking control of a property or real estate by the government in exchange of money, what is the best word for the court action? I'm assuming you are looking for the term that describes the action of the government. The action of a court would be to "order" in the case of property taken to resolve a debt, or "find", "review" ...


0

If your court case is in Scotland, the estate might be poinded:- poind (Law) to take (property of a debtor) in execution or by way of distress; distrain (Law) to impound (stray cattle, etc) [Collins English Dictionary via the Free Dictionary]


5

Expropriate is also used, especially if the property is taken for public use: (Law) to deprive (an owner) of (property), esp by taking it for public use. The Free Dictionary


3

If the property is being seized in order to pay a debt, then the property is sequestrated. Sequestration is the placing of property into the control of a trustee who will distribute it amongst creditors.


1

The term, in the UK at least, is Compulsory Purchase noun 1. purchase of a house or other property by a local authority or government department for public use or to make way for development, regardless of whether or not the owner wishes to sell www.dictionary.com This leads to the somewhat clumsy-sounding, but accurate: The court ...


1

Confiscate take or seize (someone's property) with authority. Oxford Dictionaries


1

A web crawler is an autonomous computer program that does just what you describe: it aimlessly follows links from one website to another, crawling the web to form a map which search engines and the like can use to analyze the structure of the internet. To be clear: I'm suggesting the term crawling the web as an answer to this question.


4

Tab Explosion Two of the most common places to get lost on the internet are Wikipedia and TV Tropes. The latter (of course) has page dedicated to just this sort of thing, and they call it Tab Explosion after the fact that some sites can lead you to open interesting links in a new tab... if you find only 2 or 3 interesting links on every page you'll still ...


5

The phrase "yak shaving" fits this very well ... see here embodied as a gif: Story of my life yak shaving: 2.(idiomatic) A less useful activity done to consciously or unconsciously procrastinate about a larger but more useful task. I looked at a reference manual for my car just to answer one question, but I spent the whole afternoon with my nose ...


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It's sometimes called falling down a rabbit hole. A rabbit hole is presumed to be a meandering subterranean tunnel with many forks that branch off to unknown locations. The metaphor was used (well before the World Wide Web was conceived) in Lewis Carroll's Alice's Adventures in Wonderland, in which Alice falls through a rabbit hole into a strange and ...



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