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48

What strikes me is that the -er ones look like they are derived from verbs: a drummer drums, a fiddler fiddles, a whistler whistles. A guitarist plays guitar, a pianist plays piano. So if the instrument is also (used) as a verb, we seem to prefer deriving the name for the musician from that verb, rather than from the instrument.


15

The first word that comes to mind is futile. fu·tile adjective \ˈfyü-təl, ˈfyü-ˌtī(-ə)l\ : having no result or effect : pointless or useless : serving no useful purpose : completely ineffective I've often heard and used phrases like "This was an exercise in futility." You could also say "It is futile to work on that fridge. It will ...


12

It could well be that you're looking for unedifying. From Collins: unedifying adjective not having the result of improving morality, intellect, etc [bolding mine] CDO satisfyingly gives the appropriate sense for the base word here: edify Verb UK (formal US) to improve someone's mind


12

I think 'subject' would work for all your examples.


12

Reference The New Fowler's Modern English Usage. Compare doer and perpetrator. (-or is the Latin agent-noun ending corresponding to English -er) English verbs derived from Latin —such as act, credit, invent, oppress, possess, prosecute, protect—usually prefer this Latin ending to the English one in -er. Some other verbs, e.g. conquer, govern, ...


11

Field of study is the generalized term for the subject of the degree given.


8

Sisyphean. It means to keep doing something but being unable to get anything fruitful. It comes from the story of Sisyphus, who was cursed to eternally roll a boulder up a hill. As soon as the he'd near the top, the boulder would roll down, and he would have to go to the bottom and roll it up again. It is work with no result.


8

The word you are looking for is boathouse (or boat-house). A building at the edge of a river, lake, etc., used to house boats. [OED] A modern one from outside: Source: www.mcmurrayconstruction.ca From inside: Source: earlferguson.ca


6

Proficiency, the degree to which someone is proficient in something.


6

Are you looking for "fruitless"? "unproductive"? fruitless (adj) - useless; unproductive; without results or success Dictionary.com producing no good results : not successful Merriam-Webster They made a fruitless attempt to find a solution. It would be fruitless to continue. another suggestion: uninstructive


5

As a Software Developer myself, I can say that there is no commonly used term to describe a person that knows more than one programming language. It is so common-place that it would be peculiar to specifically point that out. That is not to say that there is no term with the meaning you seek, but it would be an obscure one, not often used. Though I would ...


5

sauté VERB (sautés, sautéing, sautéed or sautéd) [WITH OBJECT] Fry quickly in a little hot fat: > He sautéed the onions in olive oil. NOUN Ballet A jump off both feet, landing in the same position. The professional culinary use of the word is true to the image of the etymology: 1813, from French sauté, literally ...


4

I think you are looking for glamour photography. It is also used as a euphemism for erotic photography and until late 20th century, it was referred to as erotic photography. Glamour photography is a genre of photography in which the subjects, usually female, are portrayed in erotic or exciting ways ranging from fully clothed to nude but in ways that ...


4

Lines ending abruptly may well be (though they are not necessarily) examples of aposiopesis. Wikipedia provides the following definition: "Aposiopesis ... is a figure of speech wherein a sentence is deliberately broken off and left unfinished, the ending to be supplied by the imagination..."


4

This is generally called back-translation, if you are translating the text back into its original language. A "back-translation" is a translation of a translated text back into the language of the original text, made without reference to the original text. Comparison of a back-translation with the original text is sometimes used as a check on the ...


4

As I mentioned in the comments, I truly think Decimal is the word you're looking for. It is used in everyday language to mean precisely what you want it to. Furthermore, if you have a separate category of "integers" or "whole numbers," it would be absolutely clear what a "decimal" category would mean.


4

Mechanistic describes the senseless performance of some activity, perhaps for a reason beyond one's actual comprehension. Imagine your fridge keeps breaking and you keep fixing it, but you never learn anything new about fridges or about fixing them, since the whole fridge fixing process is only a mechanistic exercise.


4

It's called "indentured servitude". The term indentured refers to the contract specifically. Originally, the contract would have two copies, and a chunk of paper would be ripped out of the margin - while the papers were neatly aligned, back-to-front. This way, the originals could be identified - by their corresponding "indenture", or "torn-off part".


3

Although there is no exact fit for this, the term most used by medical officials is 'Snorting'.


3

You are correct - the word for this is phobophobia


3

A possible word for such a programmer is a software generalist. This refers to someone who can solve a number of different kinds of programming problems. One way of growing oneself into a software generalist is to learn multiple languages. This is because different problems will often require using a different language. For example, resolving a database ...


2

This may be specific to the jargon of Critical Theory as inherited by SJWs, but in those contexts I’ve seen the term normative used. For (a contrived) example, a work marking left-handedness but leaving right-handedness as the unmarked default might be said to be “dexter-normative.”


2

Alliteration is the matching of first letters or sounds in closely connected words. NOUN [MASS NOUN] The occurrence of the same letter or sound at the beginning of adjacent or closely connected words: In English verse, the final words of adjacent lines are closely connected by the practice of rhyming. The expression reverse rhyming is quite ...


2

Also, I wonder if there is any single word used in tech jargon. No. As user96258 notes, it is effectively unheard of for a programmer to know only a single language. These days it's very difficult to do anything of note without at least having a working knowledge of some of the more specialized languages (SQL, Javascript, arguably HTML/XML for ...


2

Would "stultifying" fit the bill for you? It means causing you to lose enthusiasm and initiative, often because of tedium or excessive restrictions. If the outcome was not what you desired, or even negative, you could describe the process as "counterproductive."


2

The idiom spinning your wheels is often used to mean Like a car stuck in mud, to spin one's wheels is to try to make progress, but get nowhere. I sat down to write my term paper, but after three hours realized I was just spinning my wheels. Urban Dictionary It also sounds like déjà vu all over again, a redundantly recursive phrase often attributed ...


2

...the whole fridge-fixing process is uninforming.


2

Title card. E.g this listicle and indeed this google image search results (content warning: One of the images that returns is from a horror film and gory, not terribly realistic, but don't say you weren't warned). Title card is also used to refer to the static text that appears in the middle of some films, especially in the silent era, though this is less ...


2

In Australian English, which has a slang meaning of "root" which is best avoided in a professional setting, This is not restricted to Australian English. Root can mean "penis" Irish English, is attested in British English since the 1840s (and as late as the 21st century) and appears in a Canadian play of the 1970s. It can also mean "copulate with" in ...



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