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39

From Wikipedia, emphasis mine: An autological word (also called homological word or autonym) is a word that expresses a property that it also possesses (e.g. the word "short" is short, "noun" is a noun, "English" is English, "pentasyllabic" has five syllables, "word" is a word, "sesquipedalian" is a long word, "adjectival" is adjectival; see Wiktionary ...


15

In rhetoric, this is called paralipsis or apophasis.


14

Perhaps genie is in keeping with your theme but different enough from wizard. It has been used before in a similar sense and can perhaps be said to be an abbreviation e.g. The term genie is used to refer to a “code generation script”. — www.config4star.org Otherwise guide and all its synonyms....


14

Software Wizards generally help the user accomplish a relatively complex data entry task by breaking it down into palatable steps, like installing software or creating a new database record, etc. What you're seemingly looking for is a name for a more passive instructional process, which is generally regarded as a Tutorial (M-W) a book, computer program,...


8

Perhaps you could call it a yoda “In a dark place we find ourselves, and a little more knowledge lights our way.” yodaquotes.net


8

"Sherpa" might fulfill that "certain something" you're looking for. I have no software-related reason; but, a "sherpa" holds a special place helping some attain heights (success) otherwise unattainable. I've used it when referring to my function as an active resource or a more "hands-on" consultant than a more passive "guide on the side".


7

I once worked for a software company that sold solutions to churches, and many churches objected to the term "wizard" for its relation to occultism. Because of this we used the term "guided experience" in our products instead.


7

How about a familiar or spirit? In European folklore and folk-belief of the Medieval and Early Modern periods, familiar spirits (sometimes referred to simply as "familiars" or "animal guides") were believed to be supernatural entities that would assist witches and cunning folk in their practice of magic. Wikipedia


6

There are 3 origins to choose from. None of the references look very solid. The 5.25-inch disks were dubbed "floppy" because the diskette packaging was a very flexible plastic envelope, unlike the rigid case used to hold today's 3.5-inch diskettes. References: http://www.answers.com/Q/Why_is_a_floppy_disk_called_floppy http://computer.howstuffworks.com/...


6

Guru — ODO noun 2. An influential teacher or popular expert "a management guru" Not really a computing term, but it should be easily understood. "Guru" comes from Sanskrit, and it means "expert, teacher, etc.".


6

Listicle 'an article structured in the form of a list, typically having some additional content relating to each item' The word is of relatively recent coinage and is a portmanteau from 'list' and 'article'. (In my experience, usage is often slightly derogatory, but I have no cite for that.)


5

Tour. Provide a tour of the software features. Maybe a tour guide could replace your wizard.


5

How about a "Pedant" (n.) a person who annoys other people by correcting small errors and giving too much attention to minor details Merriam Webster "All too often, science fiction provokes the pedant in professional scientists, for whom a beautiful story can be ruined by a single petty error." —Jerry A. Coyne, New York Times Book Review, ...


5

The word you're looking for is probably misdirection: Misdirection is a form of deception in which the attention of the audience is focused on one thing in order to distract it's attention from another. More broadly, the phenomenon you refer to is a part of Ironic process theory.


5

This is a good question. What you discribe is a common phaenomenon, at least in Indo-European languages. Consider how the words immoral and amoral have arbitrarily divided the two possible meanings of "not moral" between them. Compare also inordinate and unordered. The issue here is that it is often not unambiguously clear what comprises the negation or ...


4

You could use "helper" helper : noun 1 - a person or thing that helps or gives assistance, support, etc. www.dictionary.com


4

Perhaps a nit: : a minor shortcoming Merriam-Webster This is more often used in this sense in the word nitpick.


4

http://www.dictionary.com/browse/account--for In the sense used in this sentence, "account for" means "to be the determining factor for, or cause of". Therefore Sartre is saying that freedom is the sole factor for determining a person's total genius. How Sartre supports this statement, however, remains a mystery.


4

Innuendo, insinuation, overtone & connotation come close. innuendo: a statement which indirectly suggests that someone has done something immoral, improper, etc insinuation : a usually bad or insulting remark that is said in an indirect way : the act of saying something bad or insulting in an indirect way overtone : an idea or ...


3

One possibility is Mentor. A wise and trusted counselor or teacher. Mentor Greek Mythology Odysseus's trusted counselor, in whose guise Athena became the guardian and teacher of Telemachus. It's origin in Greek mythology may improve its suitability for your purpose, as a replacement for "wizard".


3

I would say the difference is more generational than anything else and the changeover from blackboard to chalkboard had nothing at all to do with racial sensibilities or political correctness. When I started school in 1955, they were all black and were called blackboards. In a new school I went to in 1957 the boards were green but since everyone was used to ...


3

This might not be in common usage, but consider storygoer, formed on analogy with with theatergoer, moviegoer, filmgoer, and concertgoer. It means: a person who entertains a story. This word is used. For example, it is used in the following passage: Stories always have a situation, however minimal, whether given through description, narration, ...


3

As far as I could find, we refer to the generic audience as a version of the verb used to receive the story suffixed with -er. Watching the 5 o'clock news makes you a viewer. Reading a dental pamphlet or work of fiction makes you a reader. Listening to a story makes you a listener. See Audience for examples — Dictionary.com (bolding mine) noun 1. ...


3

Since you want a more 'medium-neutral' term for this, consider these options: story-receiver story-recipient story-experiencer . narrative-receiver narrative-recipient narrative-experiencer "The focus of narrative analyses has been on the story and the teller. More attention needs to be paid to the role of the story receiver in creating ...


3

People often express their pride and/or current frustration at having enjoyed something before it became popular by saying that they liked it before it was cool. There are many variations on this phrase. Here are some I pulled from a corpus: I supported Bernie Sanders before it was cool I used to eat Peruvian food before it was cool I was tea ...


2

As has been established in this related question, "klick" is a slang word for "kilometer" developed by members of the United States Marine Corps. It is technically "correct" to use "klick" in place of "kilometer" in those sentences, depending on your audience. However, it's usually not appropriate to use slang or jargon outside of the field or organization ...


2

Words like "vowel" and "consonant" and "semivowel" properly refer to the sounds of English. Now, the way that English spelling works, there's some correlation between letters and sounds; there are five letters that are usually involved in representing vowel sounds, twenty letters that are usually involved in representing consonant sounds, and one letter ...


2

Many of those posting answers have assumed that the person knows he is unqualified to speak on the subject and is trying to tease or deceive. This is quite often not the case. Every one of us at times has a plausible but mistaken belief that he is well informed on a topic. To take striking example, when the Internet first became widely known in 1993, many ...


2

I suggest amateurish. am·a·teur·ish (ăm′ə-tûr′ĭsh, -cho͝or′-, -tyo͝or′-): adj. characteristic of an amateur; not professional. Some exemplar sentences: The art critics find his paintings amateurish. Very few of Mendelssohn's early compositions could be called amateurish. His sculptures are, at best, totally amateurish. His dance moves, ...


2

While it can be applied to things other than the arts, the term dreck is often used (informal) Rubbish; trash: this so-called art is pure dreck Oxford Dictionaries Online Also derived from Yiddish, the term schlock is found, and can similarly refer to other goods or activities Something, such as merchandise or literature, that is inferior or ...



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