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74

How about unresolved? unresolved (ˌʌnrɪˈzɒlvd) adj (of a problem or dispute) not having been solved or concluded


36

Need answer ~ open. I proffer- New Popular Open - The adjective open describes something that's not closed or uncovered or unexplained. (vocabulary.com) IMO- The Open tab will encompass all questions which are without answers/without any good answer.


33

Yes, you can use the word in the way that you have described, but it's considered more harsh than polite, and it has somewhat vulgar overtones. How it's regarded or received might be generational. I typed is suck vulgar? on Google, and found mixed responses. Feel free to do the same if you want diverse opinions on the matter. I thought this excerpt from a ...


32

Gore (road): A gore, gore point, or gore zone is a triangular piece of land found where roads or rivers merge or split. When two roads merge, the area is sometimes referred to as a merge nose. Gores on freeways in the United States and Canada are frequently marked with stripes or chevrons at both entrance and exit ramps. the term is more ...


23

Per Abdur Rahman's request, here's an answer that expands on my brief comment. Folie a plusieurs is also known more prosaically as mass hysteria. From Wikipedia, "Other names include collective hysteria, group hysteria, or collective obsessional behavior — in sociology and psychology refers to collective delusions of threats to society that spread rapidly ...


21

There are a number of terms used within the railway industry to define sections of track infrastructure where conventional signalling is used. Technically, a Track Section (sometimes Track Circuit) is the piece of track between two signals, not between two stations. A Berth is a location within which a single train may be located. This is usually a group ...


15

I nominate ongoing as in Ongoing Questions. Argument There are a few words that communicate that there are no answers or that the answers haven't satisfied the problem. I like open and unresolved, but here is an argument for ongoing. Open seems to be controversial and for good reason: the comparison to closed questions may give the wrong impression. ...


12

Yes, as used in the OP, "sucks" is always slang. SUCKS transitive verb; slang: a. To be highly unpleasant or disagreeable: This job sucks. b. To be of poor or inferior quality: The acting in that movie sucked. c. To be inept: I suck at math. see TFD The fixed-phrase “this/that SUCKS dick/cock” gained currency exclusively among male American ...


11

I absolutely loved this question. Of course, we can all think of a handful of words like thingy, that simply act as a stand-in word for the word we are thinking of but cannot, at present, grasp. The 1960 Dictionary of American slang uses the term kadigin for placeholder words, defining it as a synonym for thingamajig. Dr. Richard Nordquist, Professor ...


10

...where the second word can be formed by removing certain letters from the first word They're called Kangaroo words. The small synonyms are joeys. From wikipedia: A kangaroo word is a word that contains letters of another word, in order, with the same meaning. For example: the word masculine contains the word male, which is a synonym of the first ...


10

That type of design is called "scrollwork" which originally described the patterns created with a scroll saw but now include graphic designs and even cake decorating. Example of simple scrollwork design: The label you used as an example might have originated as a design carved into wood, as an early means of creating a template that could then be ...


9

I think you're taking about folie à plusieurs ("madness of many") a.k.a shared psychotic disorder See the wikipedia article for Folie à deux. Folie à deux (/fɒˈli ə ˈduː/; French pronunciation: ​[fɔli a dø]; French for "a madness shared by two"), or shared psychosis, is a psychiatric syndrome in which symptoms of a delusional belief are transmitted ...


8

Harold Wentworth & Stuart Flexner, Dictionary of American Slang (1960) has some interesting commentary on suck and the seemingly allied phrases suck around, suck [someone] in, suck off, and suck up to [someone]. Of that entire group, only one term, suck off, is characterized as "taboo" across the board: suck off [taboo] 1 To commit cunnilingus or ...


7

It is called an integument. integument, in biology, network of features that forms the covering of an organism. Among unicellular organisms, such as bacteria and protozoans, the integument corresponds to the cell membrane and any secreted coating that the organism produces. In most invertebrate animals a layer (or layers) of surface (epithelial) ...


7

A Forced Rhyme according to wiktionary A rhyme that is produced by changing the normal spelling of a word, or by changing the normal structure of a phrase It covers more than just changing spelling and is generally regarded as bad practice but more so for forcing an inappropriate word than for changing the spelling. Another example from Twice Times ...


6

You seem to be talking about placeholder names Placeholder names are words that can refer to objects or people whose names are temporarily forgotten, irrelevant, or unknown in the context in which they are being discussed. Quoting from the wikipedia article: These placeholders typically function grammatically as nouns and can be used for people ...


6

I think the term you are after is flourish: (Printing, Lithography & Bookbinding) an ornamental embellishment in writing. (Collins Dict.)


6

...something correct, agreeable, or even tautological A thought-terminating cliché, you mean? When a commonly heard and accepted phrase is rhetorically introduced as a substitute for an actual argument. (logfall.wordpress.com) From Wikipedia's List of Fallacies: Thought-terminating cliché – a commonly used phrase, sometimes passing as folk wisdom, ...


5

On the East Coast (US) it is often colloquially referred to as "the zebra stripes": "There is a disabled car on the zebra stripes by Exit 5.


5

nomenclature It describes a set or system of names or terms. As in the particular science or art's correct names.


5

Cross-section (the noun) can be used attributively as an adjective (e.g. "airplane glue"), but since there's already an adjective in use, cross-sectional, using that existing adjective will sound better to many ears. So: the area of a cross-section a cross-sectional area


5

A bit of extra clicking through Wikipedia from the Dancing Plague leads to Mass psychogenic illness which says: "the rapid spread of illness signs and symptoms affecting members of a cohesive group, originating from a nervous system disturbance involving excitation, loss or alteration of function, whereby physical complaints that are exhibited ...


5

Internalized Racism (U.S. Spelling) A form of self-loathing, based on the cognitive and emotional acceptance by individuals of an oppressed group of all, or some aspects, of the negative stereotypes. [Sources]: Oxford Reference; Wiki


5

There are several names for it listed in a page on the subject here, which favors the term comparative correlative, since it asserts correlation by using comparative forms of two adjectives: The comparative correlative is also known as the correlative construction, the conditional comparative, or the “the . . . the” construction. For a a ...


5

It is a red herring. A Red Herring is a fallacy in which an irrelevant topic is presented in order to divert attention from the original issue. The basic idea is to "win" an argument by leading attention away from the argument and to another topic. nizkor.org


4

What about just "Pending?" It seems a bit more positive than "Unanswered"


4

Although I don't think this is a word used in the railroad industry, I'd be tempted to call uninterrupted track between two stations a segment.


4

I would go with unresolved, unsettled, or pending.


4

I would suggest need attention. Yes, it is not a single-word adjective but I have good reasons. (and it is better than need answer or unanswered.) The current "unanswered" section contains questions which need attention more than answers actually. As you mentioned, there are answered questions in that section also. (Thus, calling the tab unanswered doesn't ...


4

It is not exactly foul language, but it is considered vulgar and rather common to use "suck" in this context. There are better words to express discontent or dismay at inefficiency of something. On another note, the term is usually applied to things or situations, not people; it is said that "something sucks" but it's unusual to hear that "someone sucks".



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