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109

It means "if you couldn't be bothered to read the preceding material because it looked too long (and possibly boring), here is a summary for you". The meaning is quite close to 'executive summary'. tl;dr is used to call out another user on the length of their post. However, in cases of more courteous exchanges and serious discussions, tl;dr can be ...


53

False friends is the common word for that :) As Wikipedia says: False friends are pairs of words or phrases in two languages or dialects (or letters in two alphabets) that look or sound similar, but differ significantly in meaning. The article goes on to mention one of your actual examples) False cognates, is something different. If we look again at ...


42

For some purposes, I like: indelible: making marks that cannot be removed It makes me thinks of spills, stains, bad tattoos, burns... things that you want to delete, but can't. Though I think @Sven-Yargs hit it on the head with haunting.


23

I don't like querier/queryer/queryist/querist at all. A century or two ago, quesrist was actually quite common - but it's massively declined since then, and sounds seriously "Victorian" to me. I'd go with querent (also sometimes spelled querant) as the more "modern" usage... EDIT: Also note from that chart (click on it to see the complete page which I ...


22

traumatic may fit, even though the word means basically "causing mental or emotional problems, usually for a long time". It was a traumatic experience for all of us. Not all unforgettable events are traumatic but most traumatic events will be unforgettable.


19

The "summary" meaning has already been explained, but in a different usage (perhaps the original), it is meant as an insult. User A: [long impassioned explanation of his views on a particular issue] User B: tl;dr Here User B is saying to User A: "Your post was too long and I didn't read it". At best, this is a suggestion that User A is being too ...


18

You would be able to get away with seared into my memory or similar variations as a phrase to describe such an event. The train crash I saw that afternoon was seared into my memory. The report on teen drug use seared itself into my memory. I cannot think of any adjectives that would suit your purpose, however.


18

If you're looking for adjectives, as opposed to phrases, then I think there are three good candidates: inextirpable: incapable of being destroyed inexpungible: incapable of being obliterated inerasable: incapable of being erased Of course, the implication with these words is that we might, in fact, like to destroy, obliterate, or erase the things they ...


18

"Ramping up" is a driving metaphor for getting up to speed, getting past the initial learning stages, with a task. It is good for a team or new employee. It isn't perfect for a meeting, but has some flavor that might be useful.


15

According to the English Wikipedia, they are called smoke deflectors: Smoke deflectors, sometimes called "blinkers" in the UK because of their strong resemblance to the blinders used on racing horses, are vertical plates attached to the front of a steam locomotive on each side of the smokebox. They are designed to lift smoke away from the locomotive at ...


12

They are known as filler words, and are often grouped into the same category as similarly used sounds such as "um" and "uh". From _Wikipedia: Filler (linguistics) In linguistics, a filler is a sound or word that is spoken in conversation by one participant to signal to others that he/she has paused to think but has not yet finished speaking. [...] ...


11

I’d call this period at the start of a meeting settling time or settling-in time. This time is characterized by people entering the room, finding seats, positioning/connecting devices, arranging papers, etc. I would describe this as “getting settled in”. After this intermission, you might hear someone say “OK, everyone settled? Let’s begin.”


9

Your problem is that you are spelling it wrong. It's querier, not queryer. However, I would say that it's pretty esoteric, and may not be understood in writing as much as it would be in speech. A more appropriate term that would be understood by the masses might be inquirer.


9

I would propose: inquisitor inquirer questioner Depending on the type of query you could be more specific as in auditor if the person is querying as part of an audit or auditing for example.


8

I come from a technology field so perhaps this is somewhat specific to that but I have heard the period of time from when something starts until it is somehow useful of functioning described as the: spin up time I probably would not use this term in a serious report but in casual conversation I would be surprised if people didn't know what you meant in ...


7

"What has been seen cannot be unseen". Slang. For citations see: http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/Citations:what_has_been_seen_cannot_be_unseen e.g. At Dachau he was witness to real rather than abstract suffering; what has been seen cannot be unseen, nor can it be rationalized. Brad Prager, "Suffering and Sympathy in Volker Schlöndorff's Der neunte Tag ...


7

I believe the term you're looking for is indirect question. a question that is reported to other people in speech or writing, rather than the exact words of the original question, for example 'He asked me what was wrong.' (Cambridge Dictionary) Various ESL sites specifically cite the "I wonder..." case as an example of an indirect question. ...


7

It happened with omnibus > bus; taximeter cabriolet> taxi; refrigerator > fridge; and other such colloquialisms. The apostrophe was used to indicate the omission of a letter or letters, then eventually dropped when the word came into more colloquial use, probably because it is not verbalized. According to Google ngrams the use of 'phone' overtook* the use ...


7

The particular form of word formation is known as clipping. The Wikipedia article is informative, but I'd say needs refining. It does contain a good sub-classification and quite a few examples. And also the definition: In linguistics, clipping is the word formation process which consists in the reduction of a word to one of its parts (Marchand: 1969) ...


6

I like an inescapable memory. The escape implies a concerted effort to relieve oneself of the memory. I find it's less passive. Requires the 'memory' after unfortunately. Edit: I realised this was very similar to Rusty Tuba's answer... but I've posted it now.


5

Memory already implies that the thing is being remembered and not forgotten, so I would prefer a word to describe the type of memory being referenced, while also conveying that it is a memory that is constantly being revisited. So things like bedeviling memory tormenting memory the memory of it plagued me accursed memory fiendish memory vexing / vexatious ...


5

When we think of "additional" or "extra" parts of the sentence like this we are thinking about functions not parts of speech or types of phrase. The proper terms for this type of function is ADJUNCT. An adjunct is part of a sentence that is not necessary for the grammar. This means it is not necessary for the sentence to be grammatical or make sense. The ...


5

The answer is queryist (which is now rare) or more recently querist (OED see below). ˈqueryist n. rare = querist n. K. Sparck Jones & J. R. Galliers Evaluating Nat. Lang. Processing Systems i. 16 (table) Role & category: queryist, habitual.


4

How about infamous? A la "a day that will live in infamy!"


4

As an adjective, there is never-to-be-forgotten which usually implies that the experience or memory was unpleasant, unlike unforgettable which usually implies a pleasant memory. Note: It is used as unhyphenated too. Examples: Stupid, sometimes tragic, decisions by commanders also impacted the mind with never-to-be-forgotten, nightmarish memories. ...


4

I have assumed that it now means something like “If you found the above too long and complicated, here is, in a nutshell, what I meant to say.” Your interpretation as just quoted may be what some writers mean tl;dr to stand for, and is in accord with the explanation from knowyourmeme mentioned in a previous answer. But note that the knowyourmeme entry ...


4

These are stand alone episodes, as they "stand alone" from the main story arc. TV Tropes goes into detail, and provides multiple examples: An episode that can stand alone on its own with a self-contained story that does not need prior viewing of any other episode to understand. It's usually an episode that breaks from the current arc to focus on a ...


4

A fairly high percentage of early "aircraft" were what we still refer to using the word... airship - a very large aircraft that does not have wings but that has a body filled with gas so that it floats and that is driven through the air by engines It was quite natural to call them airships because (being lighter than air) they "floated". But the 1937 ...


4

The name of the process is lexicalization. From the full OED... lexicalize - to accept into the lexicon, or vocabulary, of a language. As to exactly when the transitions telephone -> 'phone -> phone happened, I think that's a rather pointless/unanswerable question. Some people might have started using the shortened form almost immediately (and in ...


4

When did phone start to replace 'phone? Immediately, if not before. Let's just briefly answer the second question and then come back: Is there a term for the phenomenon of an abbreviation becoming a word in its own right? I know something similar happened with facsimile and fax. Clipping. Words get shortened and lose rough edges like pebbles in a ...



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