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20

Believe it or not, the word you are looking for is floor. It refers to both the space between and the actual divisions. But the space between can have other names like story ("storey" in British English). If it were a house it would be the roof. I think you could use "floor slab" or deck.


15

This type of argumentation is called "circular reasoning" or "tautological". When the circularity of the argument is less blatant, and the tautology is indirect or merely implied by one of the premises, then the fallacy is known as "begging the question". In recent years, "begging the question" has started to be used as a synonym for "raising the ...


15

I don't believe there's an exact word for "someone who corrects others' spelling errors", but there is one for a person who is meticulous in spelling, generally: orthographer (lit. "right writer"): One versed in orthography; one who spells words correctly, according to approved usage. If there is a single word which indicates (as @ermanen puts it) a ...


11

Perhaps spellchecker? (Whether we like it or not.) [Oxford Dictionary Online] [Who says computing terms can't be applied to people, as in Thank you, Mr. Spellchecker. Maybe I meant to write check instead of cheque.] And as @DanBron points out, our slightly stuffier crowd might deem him or her autocorrector.


7

This is one behavior commonly associated with a pedant is, per Merriam-Webster: ped·ant noun \ˈpe-dənt\ : a person who annoys other people by correcting small errors and giving too much attention to minor details


6

The phrase "inverted score" seems to be used (albeit not very widely). So you could say "In golf, scores are inverted" (or "scoring is inverted"). A couple examples: In triathlon scoring In a research poll or two


5

Mathematically speaking, the metric system uses a fixed (or standard, or ordinary) radix (or base), whereas the imperial system uses a "mixed radix" (or synonyms per the preceding). From Wikipedia's article on mixed radix: Mixed radix numeral systems are non-standard positional numeral systems in which the numerical base varies from position to ...


5

One word is cataphora. Since the noun no longer precedes the pronoun that refers to it, that noun can be called a postcedent. Here's a bit from the wiki article on cataphora: In linguistics, cataphora ... is used to first insert an expression or word that co-refers with a later expression in the discourse.[1] example of strict, sentence-internal ...


5

There is also spelling nazi as a neologism which is derived from grammar nazi. Urbandictionary and tvtropes have entries for spelling nazi and there are some usages in Google Books. a person who freaks out when a little spelling mistake has occured or has be a constant little a**hole about it. people that care more about the spelling of words and ...


4

"Specialization" or "Semantic Narrowing" - "A process of SEMANTIC CHANGE in which narrowing occurs in the meaning of a word..."


4

It is called a negative utopia. The excerpt at the back of the novel 1984 uses the term negative utopia also. Below is a passage that explains negative utopia regarding to Orwell's and Huxley's novels and the distinction between dystopia and negative utopia: Here the distinction between a dystopia and a negative utopia is significant. George Orwell's ...


3

You could use the word Partition. It is even more general and doesn't specify vertically or horizontally. It defines an object which separates something into parts. So: For a building, a partition separates the building into floors, stories, rooms, or whatever your preference is. As TheFreeDictionary.com says, partition: a division into parts; ...


2

The actual word for a vertical partition between two stories is called a Party Structure. Wanted to create a different answer because my other answer was related but different. NOTE: This word is used more in the UK than it is in the US. Party Structure Diagram


2

I might suggest: coopt: to use or take control of (something) for your own purposes Merriam Webster To take or assume for one's own use; appropriate The Free Dictionary or in extreme cases redefine*: to define (as a concept) again, reformulate; had to redefine their terms to reexamine or reevaluate especially with a view to change *From ...


2

In English, your problem is at the intersection of two muddles which makes the answer complex. Firstly, there is a long standing issue with the word Engineer in English. It is the only word available to describe people with a great deal of training, expertise, flair, and responsibility in very complex intellectual matters concerning the manipulation of ...


1

I think "autological" is preferred to "homological". Yes, autological is autological.


1

I have written this before and I shall write it again. Antonyms can only be surmised within a bi-modal phenomenon. This reasoning does not pertain to the English language alone, but to any language in the Universe. It is a basic axiom in perceiving the functioning of the Universe. Let's illustrate with perceptions that are classified with two and only two ...


1

I haven't previously heard of a person "performing capital," whether monetary, cultural, or human. Nor have I previously heard of someone "performing the legitimacy" of something. The quotation appears to have been drawn from an extemporaneous conversation, so the speaker's wording may simply have gotten muddled as she attempted to express her views. In any ...


1

"Tarboosh" seems to be the name for this type of hat that is used by Egyptians, in my experience. I am not sure about other parts of the Arabic-speaking world. "Fez" is the name widely recognised and understood by English speakers. Whether I would refer to it as a Fez or Tarboosh would depend on context - if the hat was being worn in Egypt, or I was talking ...


1

From you link, Engineering Informatics seems to be a very new field of study that requires cross-discipline knowledge. However, it does seem to have a heavy focus on Information Systems. So, it is probably easier to explain yourself as an Information Systems Engineer, which I would describe as someone with knowledge on how to engineer a solution to an ...


1

You are in Information Technology (the IT field) with a specialization in how it applies to Engineering. IT (or Informatics) Specialist [in Engineering] would be appropriate. This would be similar to saying I'm a medical doctor (specialist) specializing in endocrinology. For the most part, most people will stop processing after "medical doctor", but they ...


1

I had a similar problem when writing a list of places/names for one of my books. This is my solution of using columns but I am not sure if it quite answers your question... Term (tab between these headings) Meaning (one one line and then explanation underneath) Challenge (explanation) ...


1

Given the orders of magnitude of the numbers, the rate (viz price) is 176, but the other values are all on the order of 4 (100x smaller). In other words, the other values are the bid size and ask (or offer) size (or quantity), possibly qualified with initial, starting, or opening. From Investopedia: Definition of 'Bid Size' The number of shares ...


1

The two terms used in US stock exchanges are: Bid (or Offer) Ask See MSFT for an example. "Bid" refers to a price that is being offered by prospective buyers; "ask" to a price that is being asked by stock owners. You'd do well to examine the Wikipedia article (and related articles) on bid-offer spread to get more information.


1

The answer is a plesionym. These are near-synonyms but with subtle differences (and the entire semantic range is not necessarily part of another symbol/word, as with hypo/ernymy).


1

Consider “Prepare a program that will ...”. To prepare has senses including “To make ready for a specific future purpose; to set up; to assemble” and “To produce or make by combining elements; to synthesize, compound”. It implies planning, developing, writing, and debugging the program, although it does not narrowly constrain any of those activities. ...


1

You can call the the grammatical context for that particular sense of open. You'd say that sense X of open is of restricted distribution, and that the use of sense X requires a definite article in the noun phrase containing open. The doesn't have to strictly precede open, though. (You can say 'the great wide open.')


1

Merriam-Webster refers to explanatory information that appears within a definition at the level of individual senses of the defined word as "an italicized label or guide phrase." Although the Eleventh Collegiate Dictionary's treatment of the noun open doesn't include "(with the)" or any other guide phrases, its handling of the adjective open includes ...


1

A common English term is stories: "This building is seven stories tall." EDIT#1 and alternative is floor: "All the bedrooms are on the fourth floor." See 3-A


1

Consider: We are retiring the cloud-based version of XXX and will only offer a standalone app. This is eighty four characters and the verbiage would be understood by your readers. EDIT#1 based on your comments, consider: We are deferring the development of a cloud-based version of XXX and will offer a standalone app. This communicates your current ...



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