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10

As Greg said in his comment, it is important to remember that they are different words even if they happen to share an English spelling. This should help you to come to the definition of what to call them. These are called homographs that are heterophones. Derived from homo (same) -graph (write) and hetero (different) -phone (sound). A homograph (from ...


8

Janus Bahs Jacquet's answer put me on the right track, and I was able to find the answer I was thinking of: In linguistics, an ergative verb is a verb that can be either transitive or intransitive, and whose subject when intransitive corresponds to its direct object when transitive. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ergative_verb


8

Though I am disgusted at the Greek-Latin lexical miscegenation, a parent of multiple children is polyprogenitive, from the Latin prōgeniēs, 'to beget'. From The Embodied Female: Technically, and although it doesn't fit the poly- mold requested, a person with more than one child would be multiprogenic (or multi-progenic). (The Greek equivalent, as Janus ...


7

Wikipedia has a pretty long list of names for words like this: An auto-antonym (sometimes spelled autantonym), or contronym (also spelled contranym), is a word with a homograph (another word of the same spelling) which is also an antonym (a word with the opposite meaning). An auto-antonym is alternatively called an antagonym, Janus word (after the Roman ...


5

I will not bandy with thee word for word ... this dilemma is often referred to as a "double bind". double bind noun: a situation in which a person is confronted with two irreconcilable demands or a choice between two undesirable courses of action. See, Google.com double bind Do thou but call my resolution wise, And with this knife I’ll help it ...


5

I’m not aware of a single term that describes exactly verbs that display this type of alternation between intransitive subject and transitive direct object, but it is a common feature of many unaccusative verbs in English (in particular anticausative verbs, and if you used unaccusative verb as a term to refer to this ‘group’ of verbs, you would likely be ...


5

According to Wikipedia, astronomers use the term skyglow. Edited to add synonyms In going through the thesaurus, I found the following terms that might be what you're looking for. aureola, cf. areola lambency refulgence


5

You might be looking for loom. Sometimes, this sky glow is called a loom and it is spelled different ways. Some people spell it l-o-o-m and others l-u-m-e. We probably get the word "loom" from looming up in the sky, or we may get the word “lume" from the word "lumen," the unit measure of light. The International Association of Electrical ...


4

You are looking for circumlocution. Circumlocution (also called circumduction, circumvolution, periphrasis, or ambage) is locution that circles around a specific idea with multiple words rather than directly evoking it with fewer and apter words. For example, governmental income support to poor residents might be referred to as "welfare". ...


4

With a single partner, either a man or a woman could be called a polypedonist, or more succinctly, polypedist: From ancient Greek: πολύ (poly) = many παιδίον (paidion) = small child under training -ιστής (-istes) = active agent One with many children. Pedo- is the English root used in pediatrics and and pedophile, from the masculine ...


4

This is called the observer effect. In science, the term observer effect refers to changes that the act of observation will make on a phenomenon being observed. This is often the result of instruments that, by necessity, alter the state of what they measure in some manner. A commonplace example is checking the pressure in an automobile tire; this is ...


4

. In the simple case, a couple stayed married and had lots of kids (back when there was little else to do for fun, and no reliable means of contraception) there was no need to have a word for father or mother of a large family, as it was not unusual. Even now, this is the norm in some areas of society (Catholics and Mormons are stereotypical examples). A ...


3

Since the fear of alcohol is, in fact, methyphobia, the fear of evaporating alcohol would be most precisely: methyexatmiphobia (since η is phonetically related to ἐ, some might prefer methexatmiphobia) or more simply: methyatmiphobia, or simplest of all: methatmiphobia: The Greek word for wine is μέθη, while ἐξάτμιση is the Greek word for ...


3

Semesters, Quadrimesters, Trimesters, and Dimesters When an academic year is divided into two halves, these are properly called semesters. The OED says: A period or term of six months, esp. in German and U.S. universities and colleges, the college half-year. It is a semester not because it is semi-annual but rather because it is six months long. The ...


3

Traits of the kind that you mention can be classed as demographic characteristics or demographic features. According to the definitions supplied by Oxforddictionaries.com, demography has two denotations: 1 The study of statistics such as births, deaths, income, or the incidence of disease, which illustrate the changing structure of human populations. ...


2

The correct term for this in Unicodese is grapheme base. Note that characters which are respectively considered diacritic, non-spacing combining mark, and grapheme extend characters are all slightly different. It would take a Venn diagram to show the overlap, though. See this question, its answers, and the standards documents referenced therein.


2

"See also" would probably be better served as a heading for a set of other options after the main article e.g. on Wikipedia on an article about a particular car, you might observe a 'See also:' subheading, followed by a list of similar cars. Given you have multiple fields, if you can change the design, you could add this 'See also' heading (or a 'Read more ...


2

The most common term for these are Semordnilaps which is just the word palindrome backwards. A more understandable, albeit less fun, term is 'reverse anagram.' See, e.g., semordnilap


2

Hydrozones is not a suitable word to your intention because hydrozoning has a different specific meaning; the practice of clustering together plants with similar water requirements in an effort to conserve water. I therefore would suggest hydro-categories (hydrocategories); category: a classificatory division in any field of knowledge, as a phylum or any of ...


2

Normally, such questions are called multiple-choice questions, where the choices are enumerated as A, B, C, etc and addressed in manner such as choice A, choice B answer choice A The action is not called "coding". It is called enumeration. Therefore each index letter, A, B, C, etc can either be called enumerator (enumerator A, enumerator B, etc) ...


2

The closest poly-word that I found which has documented usage is the following: polyphiloprogenitive Meaning: adjective: Extremely prolific. Etymology: From Greek poly- (many) + philo- (loving) + Latin progenitive (producing offspring), from pro- (toward) + past participle of gignere (to beget). Earliest documented use: 1919, in a poem by T.S. ...


2

The three options are not really comparing like to like, as parental leave can refer to leave taken by either parent, and so will appear in different contexts. The most common term for time off taken by a new mother is maternity leave, and so it is unsurprising to see that paternity leave is the more popular counterpart in the Google NGram, though this is ...


2

collage; col·lage \kə-ˈläzh, kȯ-, kō-\ noun -MW 1,b : a creative work that resembles such a composition in incorporating various materials or elements Collage (From the French: coller, to glue, French pronunciation: ​[kɔ.laːʒ]) is a technique of an art production, primarily used in the visual arts, where the artwork is made from an assemblage of ...


2

1. For the first artistic display, I would suggest mass choreography. A mass is a name for a large group of people while choreography means a sequence of steps and movements in a staged dance performance. If you Google mass choreography there's a choreographer called Penny Jones who seems to specialize in this form of dance composition. Watch the Arbank, a ...


2

Halation may be the word you are looking for. Its sound may suggest the 'dirty' fellatio: a bright ring that sometimes surrounds a bright object on a television screen. (TFD) City lights shone in perfect boundaries, illuminating the misty city with the perfect halation, creating a bright wonderous image.


1

If you are talking about the characters themselves, 'sigil', 'motif', or-- as you used yourself-- 'character' will all work. If you are talking about the element of the multiple choice question, 'option', 'response', or 'selection' will work.


1

The two are actually pneumon(o)- and pneumat(o)-. Pneumono- related to the lung, whereas pneumato- relates to the air or gas (usually contained in the lung). Pneumatocele is an air-filled cyst, whereas pneumonocele is a hernia of the lung. If you look up the etymology for all of the suffixes and prefixes on the internet (from Wiktionary, for example), ...


1

The expression water resources comes close to what you are referring to. It is used to indicate water in all its forms ( liquid , solid, vapour) that is or may be available to humankind: Water resources are sources of water that are useful or potentially useful. Uses of water include agricultural, industrial, household, recreational and environmental ...


1

Rambling. I think this may be a valid answer.


1

If you don’t know the word ‘bungalow’, and you say ‘It’s a kind of house’ or ‘It’s a sort of house’ then this is approximation; an approximation is anything that is similar but not exactly equal to something else. The term can be applied to various properties (e.g. value, quantity, image, description) that are nearly but not exactly correct; similar, but ...



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