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22

draconian: very strict and cruel [Longman] So named for the Greek lawgiver Draco: Athenian lawgiver whose harsh legal code punished both trivial and serious crimes in Athens with death—hence the continued use of the word draconian to describe repressive legal measures. [Britannica]


22

I think "double-checked" or "cross-checked" would be more accurate than "redundant" here. If the intention was that the system was still usable even if one of the computers fails altogether, that would be a redundant system, but (I assume) it isn't; the cross-checking that both operators agree on the numbers is a necessary part of the system if we want to ...


21

Draconian (pertaining to Draco) The laws [Draco] laid down were the first written constitution of Athens. So that no one would be unaware of them, they were posted on wooden tablets... thus made known to all literate citizens. Wikipedia The laws were particularly harsh. The punishment for even minor offenses, e.g. "stealing a cabbage", was death. ...


19

Definition of caramelize That word is caramelize, to cook something until its sugars turn to caramel at around 410° F. Recipes will often call for sautéing onions until they caramelize, for example. The Wikipedia article on caramelization from which the image above was taken says that it is: the browning of sugar, a process used extensively in ...


16

In engineering, we would call it a redundant system. redundancy: (1b) (engineering) The inclusion of extra components that are not strictly necessary to functioning, in case of failure in other components {ODO}


13

Alright, I figured it out by searching for "believable facetious argument." I was a little bit off on my definition of it, and it's more of an internet adage than a part of actual English usage. Poe's law is what I was thinking of. From Wikipedia: Poe's law is an Internet adage which states that, without a clear indicator of the author's intent, ...


7

This sense of resolution is: (6) The clarity or fineness of detail that can be distinguished in an image, often measured as the number or the density of the discrete units, such as pixels or dots, that compose it. {AHDEL} Its use in optical physics easily pre-dates that in referring to numbers of pixels; I remember hearing it in 1967. The Online ...


7

How about a shiny turd, or polished turd ? (I've heard both variants, while living in the UK. First one is more common.) Looks good on the outside, inside is another matter.


6

It comes from Greek, via French. microbe, etymology - late 19th century: from French, from Greek mikros ‘small’ + bios ‘life.’ popular name for a bacterium, 1878, from French microbe, "badly coined ... by Sédillot" [Weekley] in 1878 from Greek mikros "small" (see mica) + bios "life" (see bio-). It is an incorrect use of bios; in Greek the word would ...


6

This kind of entry is called Two Pass Verification or Double Data Entry. Two people key data into a system, and then the differences are displayed at the end for verification. Two-pass verification, also called double data entry, is a data entry quality control method that was originally employed when data records were entered onto sequential 80-column ...


6

cut and shut I suggest you adopt the terminology that is used for cars. This is the term used in the UK. I'm not certain about US terminology. A ‘cut and shut’ car is one of the biggest dangers to a car buyer. A cut and shut consists of two or more cars welded together. Usually, this happens when a car is damaged enough to be written off by ...


6

This sort of hardware hack is known, in British English at least, as a Kludge. The word is used for any system that is built from parts, possibly scrap or obsolete, taken from other machines. The word can also be used for a temporary repair of a similar nature - a lash-up to get you home.


6

"My friend was able to construct two usable laser printers, and one useless Frankenstein - which he sold anyway."


5

Maybe not a perfect fit, but "arcane" comes to mind. This is often used to describe very old laws that are never enforced, but remain on the books, and make no sense in current society. arcane (adj) known or understood by very few; mysterious; secret; obscure; esoteric


5

Incipit: The opening words of a text, especially when used in place of a title to identify an otherwise untitled work. (AHD)


4

If you want to focus more on the "backwards" than the "heavy handed" part of the question, I would recommend using the term "Byzantine". It is often used to refer to layers of bureaucratic red tape and obscure laws.


4

While draconian would have been my 1st choice, Puritanical also comes to mind Puritanical- very strict in moral or religious matters, often excessively so; rigidly austere


4

I think you are looking to categorise or classify: to arrange in categories or classes; classify. to describe by labeling or giving a name to; characterize. The Free Dictionary


4

You can refer to the resulting product as a botch job: An improvised and ultimately dishonest approach to repair so as only to provide a temporal verisimilitude of correct functionality. Urban Dictionary


4

Keeping to the popular use of automobile terminology, a lemon is something (usually a vehicle) the seller knows to be impaired but the buyer believes to be good.


4

When a speaker employs verbal irony, but there are no detectable indications as to whether or not they actually mean what they say, we might call that speaker "straight-faced" or "deadpan". "Straight face" is defined by Merriam-Webster as "a face that shows no emotion and especially no amusement". "Deadpan" is defined by Merriam-Webster as "showing no ...


3

According to several sources found by googling "transit vs transfer"; Transit means people on the same flight/plane/airline. For example when a plane lands to refuel. Transfer means people switching flight/plane airline. A transit would be cheaper because you, the passenger, don't really need to do anything at the airport like checking out and in. ...


3

A post-mortem is the term I'm familiar with: An analysis or discussion of an event held soon after it has occurred, especially in order to determine why it was a failure I've participated in more than a few software post-mortems myself.


3

This is not a recent* (last decade or so) phenomenon. It it is certainly neither a product of, nor restricted to, the emergent church movement (my own experience is of hearing language such as this in Pentecostal and Evangelical circles back in the '80s). Google Ngram results shows us that in terms of published literature, the phrase "Christianity is not a ...


3

I think you want the phrase wholesale acceptance. For example, one might say or write: "The shooter's wholesale acceptance of white supremacy may have made him an easy recruit for neo-Nazi groups like Stormfront." Cambridge Dictionaries Online wholesale adjective involving everyone or everything; complete What the system needs is wholesale reform. ...


3

It's not particularly "elegant" but the term I think of is "bought it" ("buy it"). 3 [transitive] informal to believe something that someone tells you, especially when it is not likely to be true: Note the "informal" on the definition. I told him my name was "The Great and Powerful Oz" and he bought it. Means that the subject believes that my ...


3

I have asked, and answered a similar question on the Information Security SE. I think my own answer probably applies here. Registration is the process of establishing your identity with an institution. For instance accepting your offer of a place. Enrolment is when you provide your details and select your courses. Sometimes this can take place at the same ...


3

Such a road might be called "unmetalled" in Britain, "unpaved" in North America and "unsealed" in Australia and New Zealand. See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Road_surface#Gravel_surface


3

unseasoned (adj.): (of food) not flavoured with salt, pepper or other spices 'The dish is unseasoned, the pepperiness supplied by the rocket and the saltiness by the prosciutto.' Source: ODO


3

In American, it's called jury rigged. That's when you cobble something together in order to make it work. This only applies to the first two laser pointers, more so if you'd used parts from other manufacturers. The third one, as you say, is offered: as is. The technical term is: Broken @$$ piece of $#!^.



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