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13

This is often called crab mentality, due to the tendency of crabs in a bucket to pull each other down whenever one tries to escape. The Wikipedia article on crab mentality says it is "best described by the phrase 'If I can't have it, neither can you.'"


12

The more specific term is deixis (the phenomenon) and such words are deictic. From Wikipedia: In linguistics, deixis refers to words and phrases that cannot be fully understood without additional contextual information. Words are deictic if their semantic meaning is fixed but their denotational meaning varies depending on time and/or place. Words ...


9

It probably isn't the word you heard, but the phenomenon is often refered to as the tall poppy syndrome or cutting down the tall poppies. It is probably an allusion to a legend of Lucius Tarquinius Superbus: His son, Sextus, pretending to be ill-treated by his father, and covered with the bloody marks of stripes, fled to Gabii. The infatuated ...


9

People usually: I refuse to kill another person.


8

Wikipedia has a pretty long list of names for words like this: An auto-antonym (sometimes spelled autantonym), or contronym (also spelled contranym), is a word with a homograph (another word of the same spelling) which is also an antonym (a word with the opposite meaning). An auto-antonym is alternatively called an antagonym, Janus word (after the Roman ...


8

These days goon neckties are considered trendy bearing printed slogans similar to those seen on bumper stickers. But when Pnin was teaching at an upstate New York university in the early 1940s the term 'goon' meant 'fighter', 'thug', 'gangster'--characters who wore tasteless neckties (broad and bright colors often with large floral patterns, palm trees, ...


7

What's wrong with just "clergy". This is commonly used. Also, what's the context? For example, if you need to be general because you don't know the particular title in the context of a specific ceremony or event (e.g. a wedding) the commonly used term is "officiant".


7

It is called: Weight stigma, also known as weightism, weight bias, and weight-based discrimination, is discrimination or stereotyping based on one's weight, especially very fat people. [Wikipedia] Weightist is one who exhibits weightism. Fattism is a synonym of weightism also and fattist is one who treats someone unfairly because they are fat. ...


6

Residue is a term for the material left behind when cooking or preparing batches of chemical mixtures. (Yield describes the actual amount produced after residual and other losses.)


5

See if "spiritual leader" fits in. a leader in religious or sacred affairs man of the cloth (TFD)


4

No, it is a well-known kind of watch bracelet: Milanese: is a nickname for a mesh bracelet, from the Italian phrase "tessuto milanese" or "golden hair." In practice, the mesh is super comfortable to wear, due to flexibility and breathability. Just make sure to get the correct length, as removing or adding links is impossible.


4

The story of the real-life moth as a computer "bug" is told at length under the title "First Computer Bug." Even in this case, though, the way the people involved treated the incident suggests that the word bug was already understood metaphorically: On the 9th of September, 1947, when the machine was experiencing problems, an investigation showed that ...


3

I would suggest "evaluation period" or "appraisal stage" appraisal - "the act of judging the value, condition, or importance of something : the act of appraising something" MW evaluation - "the act of determining the importance, effectiveness, or worth of" TFD


3

I believe the term you're looking for is cleric.


3

"Religious Leader" can typically be applied as a tag to any official leader of any group that calls itself a religion and has official leaders. It does seem a little more current and inclusive than "clergy", although either would typically be understood by any American consumers of your data. Google search on this phrase turns up examples from Buddhism, ...


3

You could say the group is trying to enforce conformity, which Wikipedia defines as "the act of matching attitudes, beliefs, and behaviors to group norms." There is apparently a Japanese saying that translates as "the nail that sticks up gets hammered down", and the same article says Australia has a similar proverb about tall poppies.


2

When someone says a bit of chicken breast, am I suppose to think chunk or strip? A bit is a generic reference to size, and has no reference to shape: noun 1 A small piece, part, or quantity of something: The following synonyms for bit have a bit more shape connotation: Chip Chunk Crumb Dollop Droplet Flake Lump ...


2

From The Christian Advocate (August 27, 1903), a publication of the Methodist Church in New York, excerpting an article from the New York Tribune: A Slippery Dick at the Aquarium One of the fish brought up from Bermuda for the Aquarium a couple of weeks ago was a specimen of the slippery dick. It is said that this name originated from the ease with ...


2

You could describe those three traits as imperative, vital, pivotal or essential to football.


2

One area I see non-native speakers have trouble with fairly often is correctly making the count/uncount distinction on nouns. For example, misusing "advice" as a count noun: "Do you have any advices" instead of "do you have any advice?" "Information" is another word like this.


2

Waste is a common term used to indicate unusable residual materials: An unusable or unwanted substance or material, such as a waste product: industrial wastes. (AHD) (The Free Dictionary) also production scraps : Waste that either has no economic value or only the value of its basic material content recoverable through recycling. ...


2

Dog in the manger is an older expression referring metaphorically to a dog who lies down in the feeding trough for animals. The dog isn't interested in the animals' food, but is willfully preventing them from eating. In speech, this describes the action of preventing someone from having what they want, even if there is no benefit to the actor.


2

A "being" also works. It's defined as a conscious, mortal life form.


2

I think that they are generally referred to as war pretext incidents: in July 1917, Duan used the incident as a pretext for declaring war on Germany. The anti-war movement must address the issue of the “pretext” and “justification” to wage war. Regarding the MH17 Malaysian airline crash, is the Obama administration in the process of “creating a ...


2

In speech or writing, a future cliché begins as a turn of phrase, which Merriam-Webster's Eleventh Collegiate Dictionary (2003) defines as a fashioning of language or arrangement of words : manner of expression


1

I would not consider "bug" to be a slang term primarily due to the fact that it has no unambiguous synonym, however I would consider it informal because of its etymology (real bugs getting stuck in vacuum tubes and causing computer errors). For example "defect" is ambiguous: Does it refer to a product or does it refer to a computer programming error? ...


1

That is loss due to non-covalent interactions upon the container. What you are left with are the contaminating remnants: a small remaining quantity of something.


1

Not sure what the name is for the actual material lost, but the word for the allowance made for such anticipated waste/spillage is tret http://www.thefreedictionary.com/tret


1

It's called a comment period. For example, government agencies are usually required to have a comment period when proposing new rules. Public comment. Once a proposed rule is published in the Federal Register, a public comment period begins, allowing the public to submit written comments to the agency. Most agencies are required to respond to every ...



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