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13

Superstar (similarly structured but more on point -- mass=>super and hero=>star) Megastar Icon Triple Threat (refers to one who is an exceptional singer, dancer, and actor) The term "mass hero" in America and Britain isn't something people say or would readily understand to mean what you say it means.


7

It could be called a synopsis 3 a brief summary of the plot of a novel, motion picture, play, etc.


7

As attested by most sources the origin is probably from a humorous reference to the very popular music hall song, "Archibald, certaily not" which became a cachtphrase in those years: Archibald: masc. proper name, from Old High German Erchanbald, literally "genuine bold," from erchan "genuine" + bald (see bold). Archie, British World War I ...


7

I was going through some online articles and I'd like to thank @Josh61 for the right references. I found this detailed write-up on Word Origins from OED by Richard Holden. (I think I now know the reason why top EL&U users strictly stick to OED definitions) The article: http://public.oed.com/aspects-of-english/word-stories/digital/ What distinguishes ...


6

I am a big fan of baseball and I can't live without it. Chasing team doesn't refer to a home team in baseball which doesn't have anything to chase. Each team has 9 innings and they usually (in Major League) can't score as many runs in baseball as in cricket especially when aces (the best pitchers in each team) pitch the ball. Two advantages for a home ...


6

I think I have heard the term used a few times or read it somewhere, but not very often. The adjective multitalented is broadly used to describe such a person who has multiple talents in various entertainment fields. The below example sentence fits in your context. having several talents or skills: It seems like multitalented entertainer Paul ...


4

This is the blurb. Originally the term used for a brief description of a book printed on its back cover to entice browsers to purchase it. The term is now widely used for short promotional descriptions of films, television programmes and other media.


4

Assuming you are primarily talking about visual arts (drawings/paintings), the most commonly used word is still 'Traditional Art'. In fact, you can see this on sites like deviantArt and Artstation, prominent art websites, that this is the word they use to distinguish between digital and non-digital art. If your demographic is artists who are familiar ...


4

This is called a gating question. Think of the question as a gate to the rest of the test. If you don't get past the gate, the rest of the test doesn't matter. If you do, you still need to get past the rest of the test.


3

The bank would only allow this if it is obeying an order specific to the account; if so, either such order could be described as an injunction, and the first might be a subpoena.


3

I would normally use "the application layer": IDs are explicitly stored in table xyz and their proper incrementation/decrementation is a responsibility of the application layer.


3

You could use 'Client' ... if an office has a server that stores the company's database on it, the other computers in the office that can access the database are "clients" of the server. techterms.com


3

This question brought to mind a toy we had when I was a kid. It was made popular on the TV show "Romper Room" Plastic cylinders (like small coffee cans) with loops of cord attached - and you'd stand on them, hold the cords taut, and clomp around with your arms at your sides. If you called this person a Romper Stomper I'm pretty sure folks of my generation ...


3

Perhaps English-like. From the 1950's, Admiral Grace Hopper promoted the idea that computers should be programmed using English words rather than numerical codes. She is often cited as the inventor of the compiler and credited for the development of the COBOL language, one of the first high-level programming languages. COBOL (/ˈkoʊbɒl/, an acronym for ...


3

We also speak of the plastic arts, i.e. those involving some physical, tangible medium (painting, sculpture, ceramic, etc).


3

It is called a "parenthetical phrase." While you state that is not the name you are looking for, that is the grammatical term for it. More specifically, and within the subset of parenthetical phrases, it is called an "aside." Basically, you are more right than you imagined, more on the right path than you seem to have thought.


3

Every linguist has this problem, especially in talking about syntax to non-linguists. I only use the term phrase to refer to constituents; but there is syntax for non-constituents, too. Conversational Deletion, for instance, chews away at the beginning of a sentence, producing utterrances like these, which lack some initial sequence of predictable words: ...


3

I believe s.o.s. here means "struck off strength" that is, "removed from service" or "posted to another unit". Strength here is headcount, the number of people employed. A member of HM Forces has posted so in the past: SOS is definitely Struck off strength, in other words, posted to another unit. ISRB is a code name for the Special Operations ...


3

Here is what Grammar Girl has to say about it: Numbers in Parentheses "Don't put numbers in parentheses after words." By Mignon Fogarty, Grammar Girl July 23, 2015 Two readers recently asked whether they need to repeat a number in parentheses after they write out the word. Note that I did not write two (2) readers. ...


3

In syntax they're known as bare noun phrases, often referred to as bare NPs. They are the subject of much academic research. Especially interesting are those instances where the noun phrase is singular. There are important subcategories of bare noun phrase, such as bare role NPs. We find these in sentences such as Who'll be maid of honour?.


3

Neither specifically applies to the limited context given that is specific to the performing arts, but Renaissance Man or Polymath are the more general terms used in "Western Culture" for describing one with great versatility. Polymath (Greek: πολυμαθής, polymathēs, "having learned much"): a person whose expertise spans a significant number of different ...


3

You could consider using archaic words which are: These words are no longer in everyday use or have lost a particular meaning in current usage but are sometimes used to impart an old-fashioned flavour to historical novels, for example, or in standard conversation or writing just for a humorous effect. Some, such as hotchpotch, reveal the origin ...


2

While this issue always seems to get mired in arguments about political correctness, I'd offer another perspective. I switched to BCE/CE before I was even aware of the political correctness issue: I had previously found the whole BC/AD confusing, so when I happened upon the new abbreviations in a scholarly source and then looked them up, to me, it made a ...


2

They are known as Heterographs, if they are spelled differently and have different meanings. Heterographs are words that sound the same, but are spelled differently and have different meanings. They are also known as homophonic heterographs. See the below Venn Diagram(From Wikimedia Commons) Source : Wikipedia


2

How about cinematisation? From Wiktionary: cinematisation ‎(countable and uncountable, plural cinematisations): Adaptation for the cinema.


2

In your comment you added that... I'm constrained by the crowd definition of "digital artwork" usually meaning mages made and stored on computer in digital format. With that definition of "digital artwork", I recommend "physical art" as the opposite. However, my answer is not applicable in the broader sense. For example, "digital music" could be used ...


2

The word you want is cry. From Wiktionary, Noun Cry (plural cries) 6. (transitive, intransitive, of an animal) A typical sound made by the species in question. "Woof" is the cry of a dog, while "neigh" is the cry of a horse. More support from Merriam-Webster, Dictionary.com and Oxford Dictionaries.



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