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76

I'm not sure why no one has said it, but the best answer is right in your question: I may have inherited a heart condition from my biological father. I have a situation similar to the one you describe, and my whole life this phrase has never failed to convey the meaning of the genetic-only relationship.


33

If you're looking to emphasize his lack of involvement, a common description for a father-by-biology-only is: "sperm-donor". (US) Note that this term is often used outside the context of a formal sperm donation arrangement, usually pejoratively, emphasising that biological father did not provide a parenting role.


22

Try birth father also called a biological parent. It means a biological mother (birth mother) or biological father(birth father). Here is a definition from another site. This site defines it as the man who was someone’s father when they were born rather than the man who has adopted them. It is closer in meaning to what the op asked.


17

Instrumentals — TFD plural noun of instrumental It's very commonly used to refer to music (minus the lyrics) noun Music A composition for one or more instruments, usually without vocal accompaniment. "the opening tune is an instrumental" adjective Music Performed on or written for an instrument. "They played instrumental music at the ...


16

Perhaps you mean the process of attaching suffixes and/or prefixes to a root word to make a whole family of related words, like hand, handy, handiness, unhand, unhanded, and so on. The name for that is agglutination and languages that rely on this kind of word growth for their grammar are called agglutinative. The word itself is an example of Latin ...


14

I've heard "absent father" used in this situation. In fact, parental absence or absenteeism is recognised in psychology.


9

An 1844 translation of Wilhelm Meinhold, Mary Schweidler, The Amber Witch (1838) describes the conclusion of a trial for witchcraft that supposedly occurred in 1630 (the book was a piece of fiction but was presented as an old document discovered by the author, in the manner of James Macpherson's discoveries of the works of Ossian). First the judge pronounces ...


8

Unfortunately, the term Baby Daddy seems to be the term most used in common practice today. This seems to have started with descriptions of celebrities and their children in the tabloids. This term has deplorably now entered the common nomenclature. Baby Daddy - slang: the biological father of a woman's child; especially : one who is not married to or ...


8

From both the legal and writing process standpoints, the components that make up a song (by "song" I mean a musical piece that includes vocals, and may (often) include other musical instruments that accompany the vocals, with the vocals almost always including words in a specific language) are almost universally divided into music and lyrics. When those two ...


8

I'd say that all that he is, is progenitor. A person or thing from which a person, animal, or plant is descended or originates; an ancestor or parent: 'his children were the progenitors of many of Scotland’s noble families' In my mind that properly defines both the role in siring and the lack of any involvement afterwards. Reference: ...


7

If you're able to change the usage a bit, I'd offer sire. Changing the usage to something more like: Having been more sired than fathered, I never knew the man. helps to differentiate between that alternate meaning of sire, which is a title of respect and nobility.


7

You can try: genetic father Which suggests that it is only your father in terms of genetic material... kind of like the sarcastic use of "sperm donor" but without other potential misleading connotations. Or if you like sarcasm and relying on the audience inferring the meaning: invisible father


7

Whenever I've heard the word, it's been in a non-academic context and means either 'category' or 'criteria' - which roughly matches the following definition. M-W: a name or heading under which something is classified an explanation or a set of instructions at the beginning of a book, a test, etc. e.g. "Under this new rubric, all ...


6

I guess you could describe them as your estranged biological father to cause someone to be no longer friendly or close to another person or group Merriam-Webster


6

Yes, the term is mainly used in educational contexts: Rubrics have become popular with teachers as a means of communicating expectations for an assignment, providing focused feedback on works in progress, and grading final products. Although educators tend to define the word “rubric” in slightly different ways, Heidi Andrade’s commonly accepted ...


4

There are several terms, the best one to use depends on nuance. To express the connotation of a parent who should have been there but wasn't, use the (mildly) pejorative term absentee father. absentee: a person who is expected or required to be present at a place or event but is not. Google


4

This boils down to the differences between the suffixes -ity and -(at)ion. From Dictionary.com: -ity: a suffix used to form abstract nouns expressing state or condition: jollity; civility; Latinity. In this case, plurality marks the state of being plural. Its semantic root is "plural". -ation: -a combination of -ate1.and -ion, used to form ...


4

No. A humanitarian is someone who helps others in a practical sense (feeds the poor, cures the sick etc.). I’d just say a liberal arts graduate.


4

The term rubric from the Norman French rubrique simply means something written in red. Of course the way rubric is used today does not literally mean it is in red. This can apply to lots of things, headings, important notes to the text, feedback comments etc. The OED list of definitions, with the examples missing runs as follows: A. n. I. Something ...


3

So many names for this chap. Here's another one: genitor. The word comes up every now and then in Countdown, a letters and numbers quiz in UK, that's how I know it.


3

United Utilities seem to call this a 'branch pipe'.


3

That would be an English rum jar. Often labeled with SRD (Supply Reserve Depot), these jars historically held rum for British soldiers fighting in wars. You can learn more about them here.


3

You might try Partition: a grouping of the set's elements into non-empty subsets, in such a way that every element is included in one and only one of the subsets. It seems a bit awkward, but you might try... In a good multiple-choice survey item, the answer choices should partition the possible answers.


3

When you make up a new word, generally, it's called a "neologism". Does that fit here? Neologism: (noun) a new word, meaning, usage, or phrase. the introduction or use of new words or new senses of existing words. a new doctrine, especially a new interpretation of sacred writings. Psychiatry. a new word, often consisting of a combination of ...


3

Increasement is already a word. https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/increasement http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/increasement http://www.thefreedictionary.com/Increasement But I would offer this Calvin and Hobbes strip: Although in this case I suppose you're nouning a noun. Edit: More seriously, you might consider using the verb suffixing: ...


2

I want to draw the distinction between the tune and the accompaniment. If we take away the lyrics we are definitely left with one thing, the tune (or melody) and may be left with another the accompaniment. I claim that it's not a song unless there is a tune to be sung. There are examples of pieces of music that are called songs by their creators, but ...


2

[instrumental] accompaniment A musical part that supports or partners a solo instrument, voice, or group. Oxford Dictionaries (music) Instrumental part. Gwen sang for us, with Muriel providing accompaniment on the piano. WordReference


2

Stationery might work. It mainly means paper and writing implements, but it can also mean staplers etc.


2

Many words have been used, but I don't think anyone mentioned that different terms are appropriate for different situations. "Biological father", or more unusual "genetic father" just describes the biological situation without any judgement. It will even be used to describe the husband of the wife who raised the child in cases where people doubt it. "My ...



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