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29

The word is "prognosis". (Merriam-Webster dictionary) 1: a doctor's opinion about how someone will recover from an illness or injury 2: a judgment about what is going to happen in the future "It's a very good prognosis. She will recover completely" "He's undergone surgery plus chemotherapy. Still it's a somber prognosis." "What is my prognosis, ...


29

It all starts with a little slang hep: "aware, up-to-date," first recorded 1908 in "Saturday Evening Post," but said to be underworld slang, of unknown origin. Variously said to have been the name of "a fabulous detective who operated in Cincinnati" [Louis E. Jackson and C.R. Hellyer, "A Vocabulary of Criminal Slang," 1914] or a saloonkeeper ...


10

The word immolation has this sense (among others): immolate tr.v. To kill (an animal, for instance) as a religious sacrifice. To kill, especially by fire: "[The soldiers] are crushed under rocks, pierced by bullets, immolated by flamethrowers" (A.O. Scott). immolation n. {AHDEL} [tidied]


9

In addition to the historical threads that ScotM identifies in his excellent answer, several other -pies formations that were current in the 1960s and 1970s may have contributed to the adoption of yuppies as shorthand for members of the sociological category "young urban professionals." To wit: preppies, bippies, blippies, dippies, and trippies. The term ...


8

A common expression I've encountered is "echo chamber", in the sense of a room where your own voice is reflected back at you and you don't hear any new voices or ideas. Here's Wikipedia on the topic: In media, an echo chamber is a situation in which information, ideas, or beliefs are amplified or reinforced by transmission and repetition inside an ...


8

Janus Bahs Jacquet's answer put me on the right track, and I was able to find the answer I was thinking of: In linguistics, an ergative verb is a verb that can be either transitive or intransitive, and whose subject when intransitive corresponds to its direct object when transitive. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ergative_verb


7

It's called right dislocation, and it's covered in CGEL Ch.16, §8.2 (pp. 1411-1412) where the dislocated constituent is said to be subject to two constraints: It must be discourse-old—the entity referred to must have been previously introduced into the discourse. It must be topical—the entity referred to must be the topic of the immediately ...


5

In philosophy the expression would be mutually necessary: Definition: A necessary condition for some state of affairs S is a condition that must be satisfied [in order to obtain] S. Example of mutually necessary conditions: Jack and Jill will go up the hill only if they both go up the hill. Jack will not go up the hill without Jill. ...


5

I’m not aware of a single term that describes exactly verbs that display this type of alternation between intransitive subject and transitive direct object, but it is a common feature of many unaccusative verbs in English (in particular anticausative verbs, and if you used unaccusative verb as a term to refer to this ‘group’ of verbs, you would likely be ...


4

It is probably called a neck brace or cervical collar.


4

Perhaps humph \a snort articulated as a syllabic m or n with a voiceless onset and ending in a nasal h or a glottal stop; often read as ˈhəm(p)f\ Definition of HUMPH —used to express doubt or contempt This nasal interjection is distinct from the throaty interjection, harrumph to clear the throat in a pompous way to comment ...


4

The phenomenon that a person can easily read a text composed of words whose inner letters are rearranged is called jumbled word effect or letter-position coding. There are two mechanisms involved in this: relative-position priming a type of subset priming in which target word recognition is facilitated as a consequence of priming the word with some of ...


4

"Group Think" would describe the action of what you're describing but not the location. Another phrase that may be useful is "to go along with the herd".


4

Literacy refers to the quality or state of being literate, esp. the ability to read and write. Literacy rate refers to the percentage of people who are able to read and write vs those who are not. Literacy: The condition or quality of being literate, especially the ability to read and write Literacy rate (social studies) the percentage ...


3

"Huff" would be the word that I have seen used for this. It was difficult to come up with a list of citations - The surnames Huff and Huffington cluttered up the results. A. A. Milne apparently believes that snails "huffle" when they are in danger. That's a small joke - see his poem "Four Friends".


3

This very last moment near-impossible achievement is called pixel-perfect jump. (credit to "poor kay" for reminding the term pixel-perfect). If the player has found your secret chamber, battled past the extra-tough ninja zombies and made the pixel-perfect jump over a robo-piranha-infested lava lake, then reward him with something worthwhile or he may ...


3

The usual term for this is immolation, derived from the verb immolate: VERB [WITH OBJECT] Kill or offer as a sacrifice, especially by burning EXAMPLE SENTENCES Chinese kings would immolate vast numbers of animals When her father - who did not accept Shiva, ever - publicly humiliated her beloved at the ritual, Sati immolated ...


3

Medicine: prognosis (a prediction of) the likely outcome of a disease in a general or particular case... the alternative word is "prognostication"


3

Unless it's some context which requires great precision, I would say The day after my licence expires


2

"FU" is a fairly common abbreviation for that particular phrase. The "F" standing for the offensive word, and the "U" standing for a phonetic representation of the word "you". There are...a number of other colorful "F"-related acronyms that pertain to this saying, but I don't think a full list of them is necessary here.


2

Definition of Tender (on a bid) (via Investopedia): To invite bids for a project, or to accept a formal offer such as a takeover bid. Tender usually refers to the process whereby governments and financial institutions invite bids for large projects that must be submitted within a finite deadline. The term also refers to the process whereby shareholders ...


2

As with its close cousin like, such as functions as a preposition, showing the relation of the nouns or pronouns that follow it to the phrase that precedes it. The main the difference between like and such as, as summarized by this column, is that like implies comparison, while such as implies inclusion.


2

Outside of the USA, the term Oriental is not offensive at all.


2

I think circumlocution may express what you are referring to : a roundabout or indirect way of speaking; the use of more words than necessary to express an idea. roundabout or evasive expression.


2

it is embarkation (embarcation) port.Embark: to go aboard a vessel or aircraft, as at the start of a journey.


2

The practice itself is called a shibboleth (in one of its senses; 1c.2 below): shibboleth (ˈʃɪbəˌlɛθ) n a belief, principle, or practice which is commonly adhered to but which is thought by some people to be inappropriate or out of date a custom, phrase, or use of language that acts as a test of belonging to, or as a stumbling block to becoming ...


2

Reason does not need to be logical (one can argue that reasoning is): The basis or motive for an action, decision, or conviction; a declaration made to explain or justify action, decision, or conviction; a fact or cause that explains why something exists or has occurred; a premise, usually the minor premise, of an argument. (TFD) Reason is basically ...


2

The two earliest instances of preplan/preplanned/preplanning (with or without a hyphen) that a Google Books search finds are from the pen of Robert Southey, who was Poet Laureate of England for the last thirty years of his life (from 1813 to 1843). The first instance is from a letter by Robert Southey to the Reverend Neville White, dated February 19, 1824, ...


2

My driving licence is invalid from ... I would use such a phrase when describing my vacation: I shall be on vacation and unavailable for queries from


2

Pietism was a word of derision applied to a movement of Lutheran clergy and laity, who insisted that the Lutheran Church must apply its faith in Jesus Christ practically in real life with spiritual discipline and loving acts of kindness: 1690s, from German Pietismus, originally applied in derision to the movement to revive personal piety in the ...



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