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36

"Until the streak is broken"; alternatively (synonymously) run or spell. Or, you could describe it as a "series of events" (or sequence, which has an embedded notion of "consecutivity"), as in "the series was interrupted by...". Finally, you could describe the entire thing as "a continuity", though that tends to deemphasize the discrete events.


19

Believe it or not, the word you are looking for is floor. It refers to both the space between and the actual divisions. But the space between can have other names like story ("storey" in British English). If it were a house it would be the roof. I think you could use "floor slab" or deck.


18

The words like that will try to follow the current word-form rules in similar words. (to trap - trapping). The word "grep" is already in some dictionaries and it follows this theory: verb (greps, grepping, grepped) [with object]: Search for (a string of characters) using grep.


16

I would call that cerebral humor. Dennis Miller is fairly cerebral. Merriam Webster (above link) even uses that as an example usage of the word. He's a very cerebral comedian.


15

I don't believe there's an exact word for "someone who corrects others' spelling errors", but there is one for a person who is meticulous in spelling, generally: orthographer (lit. "right writer"): One versed in orthography; one who spells words correctly, according to approved usage. If there is a single word which indicates (as @ermanen puts it) a ...


12

I was taught in elementary school that if a syllable ends with a vowel, the vowel is normally long, while if it ends with a consonant, the vowel is short. Also that if there is a vowel followed by one consonant in the middle of a word, the consonant is part of the next syllable, while if a vowel is followed by two consonants (that do not work together to ...


11

Perhaps spellchecker? (Whether we like it or not.) [Oxford Dictionary Online] [Who says computing terms can't be applied to people, as in Thank you, Mr. Spellchecker. Maybe I meant to write check instead of cheque.] And as @DanBron points out, our slightly stuffier crowd might deem him or her autocorrector.


10

Consider highbrow humor. Oxford Online defines highbrow as Scholarly or rarefied in taste


10

silhouette n. A drawing consisting of the outline of something, especially a human profile, filled in with a solid color. An outline that appears dark against a light background. See Synonyms at outline. tr.v. silhouetted, silhouetting, silhouettes: To cause to be seen as a silhouette; outline: Figures were silhouetted against the ...


9

Wit a natural aptitude for using words and ideas in a quick and inventive way to create humour: -ODE Witty jokes usually need some intelligence to get (and make for that matter).


8

This isn't a very technical answer, but googling "grepping" returns 354,000 results. Googling "greping" only returns 47,300 results and suggests that you meant "grepping" instead. It seems that "grepping" is the correct usage.


7

This is one behavior commonly associated with a pedant is, per Merriam-Webster: ped·ant noun \ˈpe-dənt\ : a person who annoys other people by correcting small errors and giving too much attention to minor details


5

This type of word is a heteronym, which per Wikipedia is: A heteronym (also known as a heterophone) is a word that is written identically but has a different pronunciation and meaning. In other words, they are homographs that are not homophones. Thus, row (propel with oars) and row (argument) are heteronyms, but mean (intend) and mean (average) are not ...


5

This sounds like a Review A formal assessment or examination of something with the possibility or intention of instituting change if necessary It is not a Walkthrough. For example, when used in Software Engineering, a Walkthrough is a specific IEEE standard process, that differs from software technical reviews in its openness of structure and its ...


5

There is also spelling nazi as a neologism which is derived from grammar nazi. Urbandictionary and tvtropes have entries for spelling nazi and there are some usages in Google Books. a person who freaks out when a little spelling mistake has occured or has be a constant little a**hole about it. people that care more about the spelling of words and ...


4

Hyphenated suffixes are usually an idiosyncratic choice that mainly serves stylistic purposes; as far as grammar is concerned, hyphens are normally reserved for words where the suffix is a proper noun or itself a large word (three or more syllables), although there is no consensus and there are exceptions to the rule.[1] For me there is no need to put quote ...


4

Q1: In the technical language of mathematics, 'soluble' is interchangable with 'solvable', the former is British usage, the latter American. In chemistry, 'soluble' means 'can be dissolved in'. 'exact' is an adverb modifying 'model', 'exactly' is an adverb modifying 'solvable'. So mathematically these are two distinct things (with the assumption that ...


4

Just about every diff (comparison) system I've used has labelled these source and target respectively. Note that this convention does privilege the file named first -- the source -- as the canonical, "normative", reference. For example, if file1 has a line file2 lacks, then tools following this convention will say the line has been deleted (to produce the ...


4

I’d call them snippet views. The Macmillan dictionary gives this definition for snippet: snippet — a small piece of something, especially information or news


4

The prayer is addressed to the the Lord, so the second person "Thy" refers to the Lord. (That is most likely why the pronoun is capitalized.) The prayer expresses the idea that the Lord is responsible for all joy and pain, and that the prayer is offered in the shadow of the Lord's love. Thanks to Jasper Locke for pointing out that "thine" is a form of ...


4

You mention this relates to software, so some other terms came to my mind: pattern: You are describing a behavior that keeps happening, until it doesn't (the pattern is broken). repetition (or loop): Doing the same thing over and over again, until you decide to stop (the repetition stops today; the loop ended). Also in software, I would refer to such a ...


3

A more formal name used for these types of items in the non digital realm is "abstract". It's not wrong in the digital world, but I don't remember seeing it used. I do remember seeing "summary" or "capsule".


3

Thy is an archaic word for Your (see http://www.thefreedictionary.com/thy for example), and it is traditional in written English to capitalise pronouns when they refer to (the Christian) God. In both instances the prayer is referring to God's works. [Sorry, this would have been a comment to the above, better, answer but I haven't yet the reputation to ...


3

It looks like you mean something like until the string is broken. See [Merriam-Webster's definition 5(b)(1): a series of things arranged in or as if in a line : a string of cars : a string of names Thus one could have a string of days, and speak of something happening until the string is broken.


3

Ok, pursuing the anatomical analogy, I found the words you're looking for: "sagittal dimension" (north-south), "coronal dimension" (east-west), and "transversal dimension" (up-down). Source: Wikipedia article on anatomical terms of location


3

The cardinal axes of the Earth, "North-South" and "East-West", are termed "meridional" and "zonal", respectively. This usage is particularly common in the atmospheric and earth sciences, where the words are used as adjectives to, for example, describe flow of climate and weather patterns; see for example the Wikipedia article on these terms. But while ...


3

You could use the word Partition. It is even more general and doesn't specify vertically or horizontally. It defines an object which separates something into parts. So: For a building, a partition separates the building into floors, stories, rooms, or whatever your preference is. "a division into parts; separation" Reference: Partition


2

Arguments in other answers for doubling the p are compelling, but also note that Wiktionary (linked to but not quoted in another answer) specifically shows such spelling of grep's present participle, among other forms: grep (third-person singular simple present greps, present participle grepping, simple past and past participle grepped) making it clear ...


2

Since grep (pronounciation) rhymes with step, I would follow the pattern with stepping and write grepping. (Writing it as greping makes me want to move short e (/ɡɹɛp/) in the first syllable to a long e, /ɡɹip/, rhyming with weeping. Your mileage may vary.) Similarly, while awking seems straightforward, I'd favor sedding over seding.


2

Browsing through WP's entries on RSS and its ontology, what we first find is that the collective term for the kind of information these entries present is (unsurprisingly) "metadata", and that while RSS metadata is well-defined, there is no universally accepted term for a standardized set of specific metadata elements which could be used in a blog index to ...



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