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31

A transparent person may be a possible definition. Transparent: easily understood; manifest; obvious. candid; frank; open. Being transparent: Like a looking glass into our soul. Often it is something that isn’t done. It is a way to keep our true self from being seen by others. Being transparent and showing your inner light to others is ...


30

A genuine person fits also. free from pretense, affectation, or hypocrisy; sincere: a genuine person. It can also be applied to personal attributes like feelings, sympathy etc.


27

Someone who does not hide their feelings is said to "Wear their heart on their sleeve", or for a single-word description, the person can be said to be "guileless", meaning there is no insincerity or pretense to them. As defined in the Google Dictionary: Guileless: "devoid of guile; innocent and without deception."


18

The words like that will try to follow the current word-form rules in similar words. (to trap - trapping). The word "grep" is already in some dictionaries and it follows this theory: verb (greps, grepping, grepped) [with object]: Search for (a string of characters) using grep.


16

I would call that cerebral humor. Dennis Miller is fairly cerebral. Merriam Webster (above link) even uses that as an example usage of the word. He's a very cerebral comedian.


14

I would say you answered your own question in the title: the word I would use is sincere.


12

I was taught in elementary school that if a syllable ends with a vowel, the vowel is normally long, while if it ends with a consonant, the vowel is short. Also that if there is a vowel followed by one consonant in the middle of a word, the consonant is part of the next syllable, while if a vowel is followed by two consonants (that do not work together to ...


10

Consider highbrow humor. Oxford Online defines highbrow as Scholarly or rarefied in taste


10

an open book although to me this implies the negative aspects like naivety


9

Wit a natural aptitude for using words and ideas in a quick and inventive way to create humour: -ODE Witty jokes usually need some intelligence to get (and make for that matter).


8

This isn't a very technical answer, but googling "grepping" returns 354,000 results. Googling "greping" only returns 47,300 results and suggests that you meant "grepping" instead. It seems that "grepping" is the correct usage.


6

It is just poorly translated from the Chinese term for Hard Disk. In Simplified Chinese, Yìngpán means hard disk. Using Google translation, disk box literally translates to Yìngpán hé. In short, the instruction just means that your device does not contain a hard disk. The original instruction was probably in Chinese and then localized to English.


5

Is there a specific, single word in English that means precisely that? No.


5

This sounds like a Review A formal assessment or examination of something with the possibility or intention of instituting change if necessary It is not a Walkthrough. For example, when used in Software Engineering, a Walkthrough is a specific IEEE standard process, that differs from software technical reviews in its openness of structure and its ...


5

While its antonym, disingenuous is much more commonly heard, you might consider ingenuous candid; frank; straightforward


4

Hyphenated suffixes are usually an idiosyncratic choice that mainly serves stylistic purposes; as far as grammar is concerned, hyphens are normally reserved for words where the suffix is a proper noun or itself a large word (three or more syllables), although there is no consensus and there are exceptions to the rule.[1] For me there is no need to put quote ...


4

“Sunshine filtering through leaves” is perfectly good English, and seems to be the only exact English equivalent for the phrase you quote.


4

The prayer is addressed to the the Lord, so the second person "Thy" refers to the Lord. (That is most likely why the pronoun is capitalized.) The prayer expresses the idea that the Lord is responsible for all joy and pain, and that the prayer is offered in the shadow of the Lord's love. Thanks to Jasper Locke for pointing out that "thine" is a form of ...


4

Unfiltered is another way to express this. It expresses no connotations about the morality or sentiment expressed, it only expresses that the person shows precisely what is on the inside, whatever it is.


3

You can call it a cascade of thunderbolts/lightning. Merriam-Webster defines the noun form of cascade as: a large amount of something that flows or hangs down a large number of things that happen quickly in a series You can also use cascade as a verb. Merriam-Webster defines the verb form of cascade as: to fall, pour, or rush in or as if in ...


3

When used as a mass noun to indicate a set of symbols relating to a topic, it is used in the singular form. Examples: Algebraic notation, algorithmic notation, set notation, percussion notation, etc. When used as a count noun relating to multiple sets of symbols, it is used in the plural form. Examples: new terminologies and notations Source: ...


3

Thy is an archaic word for Your (see http://www.thefreedictionary.com/thy for example), and it is traditional in written English to capitalise pronouns when they refer to (the Christian) God. In both instances the prayer is referring to God's works. [Sorry, this would have been a comment to the above, better, answer but I haven't yet the reputation to ...


3

Radically honest would seem to describe what you are talking about, although it's not a single word. 1 Some people on the autistic spectrum also display radical honesty without regard to social context or social consequences. 2 [1] Radical Honesty [2] Caetextia


2

I'd probably call them something with "kiosks" involved. Like "automated kiosks," perhaps? That's not really descriptive unless the person actually knows what you're talking about, which isn't super helpful, but I'm not sure there is a generally acceptable term for them. "Grocery store kiosks" might be a good search. That's a serious "might," but it could at ...


2

There's a figure in English, "to damn with faint praise." So you might say, oh, you damned him with faint praise. English speakers tend to be a little excessive; in France for example it's possible to (simply) say "that is good" or "the result is correct." In most English-speaking countries you have to go "overboard"... "That is really good, it worked out ...


2

The term subpar means not up to standard; below par [Collins English Dictionary] This term would indicate that the project was unacceptable, that a better effort was essential. While it does not mandate a redo, that is often implied. If you wanted to give some support to the effort, but indicate more work was needed, you could use the phrase first ...


2

One can use the terms migrate and replicate (as mentioned in a previous answer) but note that the simpler terms move (“...to change place...”) and copy (“To produce an object identical to a given object”) will serve quite as well or better. However, for cloud-to-cloud moves and copies, one might consider the term waft [pronounced /wɒft/ (wŏft)] apropos: ...


2

If the file disappears from the first location and reappears in the new location, the word would be migrate. If it's duplicated instead of moving, the word would be replicate.


2

You can use rumormonger, rumor-monger, or rumor monger to describe such a person, with the assumption that rumors usually are false, or at least unverified. a person given to spreading rumors, often maliciously. rumor: a story or statement in general circulation without confirmation or certainty as to facts If you want a more negative connotation, ...


2

Arguments in other answers for doubling the p are compelling, but also note that Wiktionary (linked to but not quoted in another answer) specifically shows such spelling of grep's present participle, among other forms: grep (third-person singular simple present greps, present participle grepping, simple past and past participle grepped) making it clear ...



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