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3

Text can be a noun, meaning "SMS message". A statement "I checked my texts" is perfectly fine. Even if you're not talking SMS, a text can be a literary excerpt or a complete volume, and "I checked my texts" means "I checked the reference works I cited". Text can be a verb, meaning "send an SMS message". A statement "I text my friend" is a bit odd as present ...


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Because you’ve specified last Wednesday, you need a completed action: My test result should have been done by last Wednesday. If we’re talking about a future event, you need the other version: My test result should be done by next Wednesday.


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would is a more polite way of framing this, acknowledging that the experts may not be approachable or convinced. But will is also acceptable if you want to push a strong case, not even leaving open the option that the experts wont help.


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For the last 60 years, if you wanted to go to Japan, you would have had to take a plane.


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Just doesn’t “refer to the present”; if your textbook says that, then your textbook is wrong. When used with a verb whose action occurs anterior to the point of reference—i.e., a verb that incorporates some kind of ‘pastness’—it narrows down the scope of this ‘pastness’ to specify that the verb action occurred very shortly before the point of reference. ...


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It is present tense. If you noticed at sometime in the past you would say When I arrived at his house I saw that he had a new car. The only thing is that see when used in this sense is something that has relevance to a moment (in the recent past) which has now gone - the moment when you 'saw'. But because it is relevant to the present time (his having a new ...


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Much better would be I don't want to put myself in a situation where you've placed an order, but I don't have the material. If you want to be slightly more formal, you might say I would prefer not to put myself in a situation where you have placed an order, but I do not have sufficient material. My preferred construction would replace the but for ...


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As Michael Swan suggests, in WHEN sentences the difference between Past Simple and Past Progressive is the usual use of the latter in narrations. Whereas in this very case, Past Simple is more preferred, but generally, if the action denote some past habit, then used to should be used. I used to be a good swimmer.


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In are finished, finished is an 'deverbal' adjective, no longer a verb, so using that would change the meaning slightly. (If are finished were a verb, a passive, it would imply that somebody or something 'finished' you.) Keeping to the active verb sense of finish, you may say either you have finished or you finish; both you finish and you have finished are ...


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Of course you may use multiple interrogative pronouns in a sentence: Who came to the meeting, when and where was the meeting was held, why wasn't I informed, and how did everyone manage to keep me in the dark? But the particular wording, type of parallelism, and emphasis all depend on your particular situation, of which we know nothing.


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I don't see how he can claim that your sentence makes no sense and then give exactly the same sentence but in a different tense as a sentence that does make sense. "Products are already being checked." Present Continuous "Products have already been checked." Past The use of the word already adverb 1. before or by now or the time in question. ...


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"When I was young I used to live in a house" strikes me as a sentence that expresses a deviation from the norm or is indicative of something that makes one stand out from the crowd. Many years ago most people lived in cardboard boxes, but when I was young, I used to live in a house. The next one would perhaps be used in a more sequential way: ...


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It's because it's hypothetical ("it would help if... "). With hypothetical conditions (or 'unreal') you always use the past tense in the if clause: If I had a million dollars, I would buy you a house. (but I don't have a million dollars and so this situation is unlikely) With ' real' conditions, you use the present tense in the if clause: If I ...


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Rendered in upper- and lowercase letters instead of all caps, the pointy-haired boss's words in the last panel of the Dilbert cartoon that you refer to are as follows: So... I'm going to call you Carlos from now on. And it would help if you grew a beard and walked with a limp. The speech bubble breaks neatly into a first sentence in which the boss ...


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The clause is in the present tense. Although got is a past form of get, it is also used for saying "have" in informal speech   What you got there?   You got to be careful what you say to him. --http://www.macmillandictionary.com/dictionary/american/got_1 It means: I have no money.


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"I ain't got no money" means "I don't have any money." It's spoken slang usage. You can check urbandictionary.com for explanation (type in "ain't got no"). Or this link "I ain't got no money" for longer explanation. Also, the verb got here means "have." So the idea is that you don't have money, not that you are not getting money.


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The first example is correct. You can switch tenses in this case, since the old lady presumably continued being an old lady at the time of writing the paragraph. From the Wikipedia article on relative and absolute tenses: Absolute tense means the grammatical expression of time reference (usually past, present or future) relative to "now" – the moment ...


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I believe you are asking about matching tenses. Firstly, notice that both sentences are correct but they have different meanings. 1. Now I feel sick. I wish I didn't eat pork with cheese for dinner. This is an expression of regret for a commonly repeated action. You can replace it with: Now I feel sick. I wish I didn't habitually eat pork with ...


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I think there are lots of acceptable tenses you can use for the last verb in this sentence. But the one in the if clause should be the simple past. For the last 60 years, if you wanted to go to Japan, you had to take a plane. For the last 60 years, if you wanted to go to Japan, you have had to take a plane. For the last 60 years, if you wanted to go ...


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Paco2004, on EnglishForums, in response to I just finished reading the newspaper. I have [/ I've] just finished reading the newspaper. Are [both] grammatically correct? observes: The use of "already" and "just" with the simple past is AmE. In formal BrE, they are used commonly with the present perfect tense. It's probable [that ...


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There is a difference and an error. "The pavement was wet, it had been raining." - There're two independent clauses, which cannot be connected to make one single sentence unless a conjunction is used. Otherwise, a semi-colon should be used to separate them. Let's rewrite the same with as: The pavement was wet as it had been raining. - Here, what's ...


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For the last 60 years, if you have wanted to go to Japan, you have had to take a plane. The above is grammatically correct. It could be improved stylistically but that isn't what you asked.


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You didn't seem too intelligent but you could have seemed so, had you quoted Cioran. (correct) You could've quoted Cioran instead, and seemed well-read. (grammatically correct) You could've quoted Cioran instead, and appeared well-read. (perhaps stylistically better) You could've quoted Cioran instead, and seem well-read. (wrong - mixed tenses)


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It's a clunky way of expressing something that could be better said in other ways, but it's still a valid expression. Let's say you're recalling a story about someone asking a question in a lecture you attended 2 years ago. "Having had a similar question myself, I could sympathize." This doesn't make it clear when the past tense that "had" points to was. ...


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One strange property of the perfect tense is that it refers to two times: the time in the past when the action was performed, and the time indicated by the auxiliary verb (to have). Depending upon usage, a sentence using the perfect tense can be more about present (or the time of the auxiliary verb) than it is about the past: A: Are you hungry? B: I have ...



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