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3

I've amended the focus of the question to the auxiliary verb because it's not hurt which is being asked about: it's whether to use Are you or Did you get (or maybe its near-relative, Were you). If someone is hurt at some indeterminate point in the past, then the question you ask says something about their present state. It doesn't matter how far in the past ...


3

Farlex gives this (common) usage for headed; though this is the adjectival usage, the participle usage corresponds: headed - having a heading or course in a certain direction; "westward headed wagons". The present participle is certainly not a wrong alternative (as an adjective or participle), and is, as you imply, at least as logical. The fact that ...


2

John McWhorter in Our Magnificent Bastard Tongue makes a really clear case that the present progressive is the true present tense in English. The simple present is used in poetry, for habitual actions, in some idioms, and in certain other situations. For example, it is often used to describe the content of a written text: "The author argues that..." or ...


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According to English Grammar Online 4U, would can be used in a future tense as a Conditional I Progressive tense. The conditional I progressive puts emphasis on the course of an action that might take place. The phrasing might blurs the line, as in your example, September 5, 2015 almost certainly will take place and it is a documented fact that Freddie ...


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I don't think it matters whether or not the date being referred to is in the future. You would say "Sept. 5th was his birthday", but, "If X were still alive, Oct. 1st would have been his 50th birthday".


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This is a conditional tense. I am not a grammar expert but I have seen this particular example called "present unreal conditional". However to understand why you have to realise that the condition is implied and is not actually present in the text: "[If I had married one of them] I'd know my life before I had even lived it"


2

There is a context in which the sentence would be correct, but it's a relatively contrived one: "I heard you were planning to go to Chernobyl in late 1986 to participate in the creation of the sarcophagus around the destroyed reactor. I don't know if you actually did it. If you went you will die." Normally the assumption is that if you went is either in ...


2

This is what the ESL people call the second conditional. The first conditional is used for something which we expect will happen, though it might not. The verb in the conditional is in the present, and the main verb is often future, but it can be present: If you go, you will/may/can see him The second conditional is for things that didn't happen, or ...


2

Of course they're possible. As to whether you'd want to use them, that's another question entirely. Each new auxiliary verb you use further narrows the temporal interpretation of the verb. After a certain point, it just doesn't matter 99% of the time. In other cases, it just sounds weird. For the perfect continuous, that's likely because of the double ...


2

In that sense, you can use 'by' with any tense. Please note to it's meaning given by the Longman dictionary: Before or not later than a particular time. Examples: The document needs to be ready by next Friday. By the end of the day we had sold over 2000 tickets. By the time we got home we were tired and hungry. I'll be home by 9:30. Please try to ...


1

Picked up directly from a reference book, one of the rules: Present Perfect: An action that happened before now. For your specific conundrum, since you've already received the letter and are thanking the person after the fact, the correct sentence is: "I am glad to have received your letter."


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It generally means "I did not realize you ever played chess". As 'Since when do you paint?" means that I am dubious that you paint. So it happens, but it is a strange idiom and not normal usage that follows the standard definitions.


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It is incorrect. If you went you would die would be correct and subjunctive because it is a possibility If you go, you will die would also be correct but not subjunctive just present tense because it is a certainty


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To me, "highlighted" says that something has been accentuated so that it stands out from a background or the crowd rather than having been ignited so that it sheds light on everything else around it. There is a distinct difference in meaning. And since "highlighted" has been verbed from the noun "highlight" by present-day users, it is unlikely that they ...


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English has a mix of origins such as Germanic and Latin languages and when it comes to conjugating verbs you cannot rely on rules as easily as you can on purely Latin languages. I would consider your example as an irregular conjugation. You are right - it makes no sense, but it's English and you just have to learn it - sorry. There are plenty of other ...


1

My work has done does not really make sense grammatically, at least not as a complete sentence. It would need an ending to that- what has my work done? My work has been done, however, is a complete sentence. It means that someone has done my work (probably me) as opposed to my work doing something (which is what "my work has done" means).



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