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5

Did you win? is asking about the past. It is the past tense of do. Rearranging the words yields you did win, which is, essentially, you won. There is no need for a double of the past tense (you did won). You just won is the same as the above, with the simple addition of a slight modifier, just. Did you just win a camera? Rearranging the words: You did ...


4

This is a stylistic choice, called the narrative time. In the first two examples, the narrative past is used; it is by far the most common narrative style of recounting history or stories (once upon a time, there lived...). In the second, the narrative present (also called the historical present) is used. It is as an attempt to draw the viewer/reader into ...


4

It's actually trickier than it looks. The word is used as an adjective when describing a condition that already exists, as in When you open the file you get a surprise. The blue page is stapled to the red page. But you might be describing a process: First, the blue page is stapled to the red page, then the yellow page is placed on top... Here, stapled is ...


4

Here is a screenshot of the chapter, as can be seen on Google books here: You may recognize someone or you do not recognize them. But there is no start or end to the process of recognition. With the kitten: you either caught it or you didn't. It's one or the other. But there is no process where you start catching, and then continue catching and then stop ...


2

The blue page is stapled to the red page. In particular, would it be wrong to label "stapled" as past-tense in the above sentence? Well, let's look at this a bit. First of all, your example sentence has only one tensed verb, and that is the verb "is" -- the verb "is" is present tense. There is no verb in your example sentence that is past ...


2

Even though you would not use "They've gone" in your second sentence, note that you could say "They went" in your first sentence: They went away. They'll be back on Friday. and the wording need not change if you are not sure: They went away. I think they'll be back on Friday. ("went" works even though they are still gone because the action can ...


2

No. If you are speaking about the present moment you would need to say 'This is the first time I have watched this film'. However if you saw it a week ago, you could say 'Last Thursday was the first time I watched the film'. Or you could use the pluperfect ' Last Thursday... that I had watched the film'.


2

1.) I'll keep you company while you wait. 2.) I'll keep you company while you are waiting. Both versions are grammatical and standard English. Here's some related info from CGEL, on their subsection on "(d) Duration", pages 165-6: Where two situations are of the same duration and simultaneous, it is possible to use the progressive for either, ...


2

If the exam is in a week, then the following makes sense: You'll pass the exam if you study hard. If a student is voicing his fears to his friend on the morning of the exam, the following makes sense: You'll pass the exam if you studied hard. Tenses don't need to agree if the intent of the speaker is to make a statement based on some event having ...


2

Ah, present perfect versus simple past... the joys one can find in the nuances of verb tenses! Three questions to ask yourself when deciding whether to use the simple past or the present perfect: Has the time period of the action finished? If the time period has completed, the simple past is in order. Otherwise if the time period is still ongoing, then ...


1

Jack and Jill are offering a perspective together, so you would use the plural form of the verb. You would say, "Jack and his partner, Jill, offer a new perspective on child-rearing." Note that the number of nouns doesn't dictate the tense. "Offer" and "offers" are both present tense. The number of nouns dictates the plurality. (See the comments by ...


1

You would usually conclude that "has" is an auxiliary, but that "had" isn't, in this sentence. An auxiliary verb is generally considered to be one that doesn't have its own arguments (or takes on the arguments of the main verb). Or to put things less technically: the "main" verb that you choose in the sentence is generally "compatible" with certain ...


1

She will leave (or already has left) for Jamaica soon. I think the word soon at the end of your sentence makes the parenthetical awkward. One cannot have left already soon. Also, the correct tense should be at least implied. Choices (as you note, with adjustment for tense): She will soon leave (or already has left) for Jamaica. She will soon ...


1

I believe you can use either was or is but I would not use is in the sentence you wrote. This is a stylistic preference. You state "Smith's work is always there and always thinks that the solution is feasible." Then why would you not think Smith et al. are not always present in [1]? In [1], Smith et al. point out that the solution is feasible. If it ...


1

A generalization like one of these doesn't specify when the event occurs: There are a number of features with this event. or There are a number of features associated with this event. or The event is associated with a number of features.


1

Substitute stapled with any similar meaning VERB in the past participle and you get: "The blue page is glued/stuck/fastened/joined/sellotaped/clipped/stapled to the red page" The construction is in the passive voice and the verb be is in the present tense. It is the same as saying: Navel and Valencia oranges are grown in California (plural) and ...


1

"Stapled" in this sentence is not a verb: it is an adjective. The verb in the sentence is "is". Consider this sentence: "I carried the stapled pages to the filing cabinet." Here, I think it is clear that the verb is "carried". "Stapled" is an adjective describing the pages that were carried. When verbs are used as adjectives, we often use the past-tense ...


1

They're all correct, although to my ear 'It was a pleasure to have known' sounds the most refined. As a personal note, however, while I certainly appreciate the earnest sentiment in your saying that a 'headstone is not a place to make a mistake', I'd strongly urge you to select whichever phrase sounds best to you. Grammar and convention be damned, a ...


1

To answer your question, both versions #1 and #2 are acceptable. It's up to you (or your editor) as to which one you want to use. The second version happens to use a backshifted preterite ("was") in the subordinate clause. LONG ANSWER: Your question involves the topic of backshifting. Sometimes backshifting of a subordinate clause is obligatory, sometimes ...


1

The first sentence is grammatically correct, read this: On the test Oscar wrote: 2+2=5. But of course, Oscar knew 2 plus 2 is four. Your choice for 'believed' makes the sentence a bit strange. Here you choose is, because it is stated as a fact. Generally if you combine two events in the past, you use the same tense. For example: When the door opened, ...



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