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16

This question is difficult to answer succinctly because the more desirable wording to use may differ depending on the circumstances surrounding the statement. Case 1: When Maybonne was your girlfriend, she often ate at Red Lobster. Now that she is your ex-girlfriend, she may or may not eat there. If you know that she still does, it makes sense to say "My ex-...


4

who knows what and who knows what else are English idiomatic expressions. (I know them from British English, but the citations below suggest they are also common in American English.) who knows what One or more things described with no detail. Our junk drawer has old remotes, instruction manuals, and who knows what else in it. You're supposed to be ...


3

Modal verb must denotes obligation as its most primary role. You must finish the project till tomorrow. - It is obligatory for you to finish the project till tomorrow. Past obligation is usually denoted by the equivalent modal phrase had to. The task was urgent and I had to finish it as soon as possible. In both examples, the action expressed by modal ...


2

I would use come. You are saying that more millennials come from families where both parents were actively involved. Using came would imply that they don't anymore. You'd be talking about them as if they no longer existed. I would also change 'were' to are. So the final sentence reads, 'More Millennials come from families where both parents are actively ...


2

"… If I had known he gave a lecture" seems wrong to me. I can't imagine a situation where that would be correct. The following, however, are correct: A. "if I had known he was giving a lecture" B. "if I had known he would give a lecture" C. "if I had known he would be giving a lecture" D. "if I had known he was going to give a lecture" E. "if I had known ...


2

It seems incorrect to me. While "I'd" seems to be a contraction for "I had", it's really only valid when "had" is part of a past perfect construction: I'd gone to bed. I'd given him the book. I'd seen enough. It does not seem appropriate to me as a general contraction for "I had" in any other case. For more information, see Past Perfect — ...


2

The simple past form "wrote" must stand alone. If you combine it with a word like "had" it does need to change to the form "written." https://www.ego4u.com/en/cram-up/grammar/tenses


2

I think option 1 and 3 are correct but 2 is definitely wrong. I can feel it when reading aloud due to the use of the present tense and the past tense in the same sentence.


1

The present perfect tense ("have to take") can be used with present tense ("is gone") in the same sentence with no problem, as in #1. The same goes for the past perfect tense ("had to take") and the past tense ("was gone"), as in #3. But you can't use the past perfect with present tense (as in #2) or the present perfect with past tense (e.g. *"I have to take ...


1

In spoken English, there are two interpretations possible: 1) Dissimilar, in that in example 1 Julie has completed her study of French after two years; or 2) Similar, in that Julie has studied and is continuing to study French after two years. Nothing inherent in the two examples, in my experience, enables one to distinguish which the speaker/writer means. ...


1

Both sentences are valid, and each will sometimes be the most appropriate choice. If a Carl will not come to the party, I'll be really upset. This sentence is about what Carl's perceived or expressed intentions are. "will not come" is speaking of the Carl's current plans about the future. Carl may have the plans right now, so the speaker will be upset ...


1

"Simple present" is a reasonably good name for this construction.  There is only one word in the complete verb, so it makes some sense to call it simple.  I prefer to call it "present indefinite".  Many textbooks lump all the properties of a verb construction under the heading "tense".  I find it easier to explain those properties ...


1

This sounds unnecessarily wordy for the idea it is trying to convey. Try "It's now five years since I (last) played tennis."


1

This is called do-support and is required when you have a negative such as never before the subject. Other examples from Wikipedia: Never did he run that fast again. (wrong: *Never he did run that fast again. *Never ran he that fast again.) Only here do I feel at home. (wrong: *Only here feel I at home.)


1

Using the simple past as the past participle is not uncommon in some regional and other vernacular forms of English. It's not generally treated as correct outside those cases, though they're widespread and have a long history. Finding examples is tricky, but they're spread from the Appalachians to various regions of Britain (specific examples in West ...



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