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4

"You have better" is not English. "You had better" is normal English, meaning "you ought to"; it is usually reduced in speech to "You'd better". "You better" is a common colloquial form of "You'd better": many people regard it as "wrong", and would not accept it in writing.


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The only circumstances in which you would use is, would be if you were employing what is known as the historical present. It is a literary device in which a series of happenings are stated in the present tense even though the reader is aware that it is taking place in the past - e.g.: There am I, walking down the street, mindin' me own business, and this ...


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Found it - its chutzpahdik! Thanks to John Clifford for pointing me in the right direction. http://jewishquestions.bjpa.org/Questions/details.cfm?QuestionID=11853


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There's a few reasons why "Bruce Wayne meets Clark Kent." is used: Stylistically to the scene, that sentence is much more to the point and of the "short and sweet" variety of sentences. You have people meeting who don't see eye to eye and for those that are aware of what's happening, we know some serious stuff is going to happen. It's snappy and messes ...


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Historically, there were two subjunctives in English, the present and the past. The present subjunctive is in every case identical to the infinitive. It is today used only (by some people) after verbs like "mandate" and "require", and in a few set phrases like "Long live ... "! (In my view, mention of it should be eliminated in discussing the grammar of ...


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Past tense since yesterday is in the past. John was presented...


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As sumelic points out in a comment above, the word acknowledge in the phrase "provided he acknowledge the existence of a Supreme Being" is a subjunctive, and the tense is present. The sense of the phrase is if he satisfies the prerequisite of recognizing and affirming the existence of a Supreme Being. The full provision that the OP quotes from is ...


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Ballsy, in common parlance. While this is of course slang and carries sexist overtones, it captures the subtle connotation of maybe straddling the line between courageous in a good way vs audacious in perhaps an inappropriate or offputting way. http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/ballsy http://www.oed.com/view/Entry/15011?redirectedFrom=ballsy#eid ...


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Let's consider an example of a present-tense, first-person narration that considers a future action*: [1a] I sit in the dark, holding a pistol as I realize that I will kill my wife because she cheated on me with my best friend. [2a] I sit in the dark, holding a pistol as I realize that I shall kill my wife because she cheated on me with my ...


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"Correct/Incorrect", with parenthetical notes showing connotations. Correct: He has already finished his homework (He's quick.) He has finished his work already (He's quicker than expected.) He has been sitting there for two hours already (He's either determined, or very comfortable.) Incorrect: He has been already sitting there for ...


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Okay, this is an interesting one. What the commentator is implying here is that regardless of player X's move player Y's bishop will be lost. The inference is subtle between the two phrases. Using the present progressive form of the verb indicates an ongoing situation, rather than something that is taking place in the future. Which, given this is ...



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