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5

As explained in the Oxford English Dictionary entry for the term: The standard spelling is supersede rather than supercede. The word is derived from the Latin verb supersedere but has been influenced by the presence of other words in English spelled with a c, such as intercede and accede. The c spelling is recorded as early as the 16th century; although ...


3

The verb tense is correct. The edit occurred in the past. The phrase "in the future" is shorthand for "with a timestamp that is after the current clock setting".


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Without further context, "I have eaten at 7:30 AM" indicates that at some time in the past, at least once, you have eaten at that time. A statement closer in meaning to your first, and similar in form to your second, would be "I had eaten by 7:30 AM", indicating that you had completed the process of stuffing food into your gullet by that time.


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Pasts I had had An event occurring prior to the jump. I had An event occurring at the moment of the jump. I had will have An event occurring after the jump, before now. Futures I will have had An event occurring prior to the jump, after now. I will have An event occurring at the moment of the jump. I will will have An event occurring after the ...


2

You're using the conditional perfect tense here, so an acceptable form of words is: ... (my fault, [I] didn't really know how time consuming it would be). Note You should leave out the word much. Time consuming is an adjectival phrase describing it; it is not quantifiable, and therefore much is inappropriate. However, you could also write ... (my ...


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As the following Ngram charts indicate, both spellings in each pair have a long history of use, but in each case the supersede version is significantly more common than the supercede version. Here is the chart for supercede (blue line) versus supersede (red line) for the period 1680–2008: Here is the corresponding chart for supercession (blue line) versus ...


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There's nothing inherently wrong with referencing a past event partway through a present-tense narrative, as it clarifies the situation. If I were writing something like this I would probably start a new paragraph when the tense switches to make it more distinct from the rest. So on that note, you're quite right to use the past tense for those verbs; the ...


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"There are" would clearly be correct in that sentence. However, I often hear "There's" in common speech (and have probably said it myself on occasion). P.S. I love Gino's (former Chicagoan).


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One of my dissertation advisees, Geoff Nathan, did his disertation on the acquisition of "there" in English, and found in his research that "there's" with a plural subject has become common (but not the uncontracted version). If you're asking about correctness, I can't help you, since that question is about social prejudice, not about the language.


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In your question you say "I would personally say..." How to answer "How did you spend your day?" is a personal matter and can't be addressed with grammar. What one speaker says is "OK" another will say "That sounds wrong to me." On one level this has to do with the verb "work." In my opinion, this is a verb that has an activity aspect to it. It is not ...


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We can reasonably talk about what "Norway looked like" at a particular point in time. We can reasonably talk about what "Norway looks like" ignoring time. I for instance saw what Norway looked like one year ago. It is reasonable to suppose that this gives me a fair impression of what Norway looks like now, and will look like tomorrow. As such, both ...


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Combining the example in your question with the example in your comment shows a bit of a misunderstanding about the difference between clauses and sentences and therefore the answers to your question. In English, (any variety) each clause with a verb must have a some kind of verbal inflection (there are some counterexamples to this generalization but for ...


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The present perfect covers time from an unspecified past moment up to the present. Thus, "have eaten" clashes with a specific time, which more naturally takes the simple past: Q: Have you eaten? [i.e., During some past time interval] A: I ate at 7:30. The present perfect would work with a habitual activity, something you did at various mornings in ...


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The present perfect designates a present state which has arisen out of the prior action; in the case at hand it's an existential or experiential perfect designating the "state" of the speaker's current experience. So it's fine to say "I have seen Christopher Lee play many roles". What you cannot say is "Christopher Lee has played many roles"—because ...



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