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20

"Could of" is always wrong. It's just that the contracted "have" in "could've" sounds like "of", so uneducated people started writing it as "of" too. (For the record, "should of", "would of", "might of", and the like are also always wrong.)


3

The sentence He did not study music before he became famous is correct, but it is not written in the past perfect. You used the past simple. You used 'did' because the sentence is a negation. Small guide on the difference between the past simple, present perfect and past perfect: The past simple is used when something is over and done with, i.e. it has ...


3

I don't see a problem. We always speak from our own point of view. For example, "The Mona Lisa is here." means that the portrait is close to our current location. "The Mona Lisa is there." means that it is distant from our current location. In the same way, when we have time travel, we will speak from our present location in time. Examples ...


3

You’ve misunderstood the analysis of both: those are not past tense and present tense at all — neither of them. Past Participle This one: It should make one focused. Is not a verb but a past participle serving as an adjective, as in: It should make one drunk. So focused and drunk are past participles, not past tenses. Infinitive And this ...


2

Technically speaking, the phrase "could of" (in this context) arose from a mishearing of the contraction "could've" (as Hellion points out) and the literal definition of the words does not convey the intended meaning behind the phrase "could have". This is called a malapropism: "the mistaken use of a word in place of a similar-sounding one" (from Wikipedia). ...


2

"to hurt" is an irregular verb and irregular verbs are, well, irregular. There is no rule and the non-native student has to be introduced to them and learn them. Since there are so many of them, it would be sensible to omit those that are very rarely used. Irregular verbs are those that don't form the past simple and past participle by adding "-ed" to the ...


2

Is being crashing is not English. The passive progressive/continuous is is being crashed, the active progressive/continuous is is crashing. You don't want a passive in this case: crash in this sense is an intransitive verb, so it cannot be cast in the passive. But an active progressive/continuous is perfectly acceptable. The main difference between "The ...


2

As Michael Swan suggests, in WHEN sentences the difference between Past Simple and Past Progressive is the usual use of the latter in narrations. Whereas in this very case, Past Simple is more preferred, but generally, if the action denote some past habit, then used to should be used. I used to be a good swimmer.


2

It's because it's hypothetical ("it would help if... "). With hypothetical conditions (or 'unreal') you always use the past tense in the if clause: If I had a million dollars, I would buy you a house. (but I don't have a million dollars and so this situation is unlikely) With ' real' conditions, you use the present tense in the if clause: If I ...


2

"unaware" has no tense. It adopts the past tense of "strolled." See what happens in the present continuous tense: Pikachu is strolling along the street blissfully unaware that the Earth is round. When the verbal phrase is in the past tense, the reported thought becomes past. Pikachu strolled along the street blissfully unaware that the Earth ...


2

"Had" in this instance. He'd already won it and being notified after that fact had occurred made it past-tense.


1

It would be better to say the second one. It can be argued that they both mean the same thing. "The machine is started" describes its current state as being started, implying that someone or something must have started it. "The machine has been started" directly confirms that its current state is the result of having been started. However, as Tim ...


1

The sentence some machine is started can mean a number of things: Consider: some machines (e.g. so-called "simple machines", such as the lever) do not need to be started. More complex machines, like a table saw, must be started. Given that context This machine is started. could mean "This is one of the machines that gets started or that one must start ...


1

Am. English, my opinion: Your funny hybrid sentence is correct, but I can understand if it makes you feel a little queasy, like a sentence that jumps back and forth from one language to another several times.


1

My feeling is that this is a kind of reported speech that requires back shifting or in this case, forward shifting. So I feel that example two is the best; you switch from simple past and past perfect to simple present and simple past. It could be argued that it should be "has been." But it's not clear from your example if this is needed for the meaning.


1

Version 1, if you think this person can handle it. I'm sorry, I don't have a source to back this up, other than my ear, which is quite certain of the answer.


1

The first one, though it sounds good, is ungrammatical because the infinitive perfect is being used next to an already stated past tense. An infinitive perfect should be used with a present tense, to express an infinitive in the past. Otherwise it should just be a normal infinitive. In the example, "He became (simple past tense) the first 16 year old", a ...


1

"to have scored" is an infinitive perfect, not present perfect. Neil Armstrong was the first man to set foot on the moon. The infinitive present is the normal thing after "is/was the first". An infinitive perfect is not necessary.


1

You are entirely correct to say you wrote an email. It tells me that on one specific occasion you wrote an email. If you say you have written an email I might understand the same but could also understand that on some unspecified occasion you wrote an email. Compare "I went to London. I wrote an email" and "I went to London. I have written an email". The ...


1

Yes, they are correct. Grew and walked are in the subjunctive mood. I found a nice explanation of this at http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/subjunctive: Subjunctive: a mood or mode of the verb that may be used for subjective, doubtful, hypothetical, or grammatically subordinate statements. That link has some more helpful information and I ...


1

Rendered in upper- and lowercase letters instead of all caps, the pointy-haired boss's words in the last panel of the Dilbert cartoon that you refer to are as follows: So... I'm going to call you Carlos from now on. And it would help if you grew a beard and walked with a limp. The speech bubble breaks neatly into a first sentence in which the boss ...


1

The tenses of the verbs in the second sentence are conditional. In English there are various types of conditional tenses depending on the nature of the condition. In this case the condition is what http://www.edufind.com/english-grammar/conditional/ calls a Type 2 Conditional: The type 2 conditional is used to refer to a time that is now or any time, ...


1

It's a clunky way of expressing something that could be better said in other ways, but it's still a valid expression. Let's say you're recalling a story about someone asking a question in a lecture you attended 2 years ago. "Having had a similar question myself, I could sympathize." This doesn't make it clear when the past tense that "had" points to was. ...



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