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4

Actually, it would be more natural to say "A shipment worth a million dollars...". As to "is missing" vs "has been lost", the former implies that the shipment can't be located but may simply be in transit or whatever and might show up on its own. Since "lost" has two somewhat different meanings in this sort of context, "has been lost" implies either that ...


3

Narrative is most often in the past tense, but it is nevertheless quite common to use the historic (or narrative) present tense. When using the historic present, the viewpoint moves along with the events described, so is is the only choice here. You could say (in a present-tense narrative) He died when he was 102 years old, and that would locate the death ...


3

The mixed tenses are actually correct in this case: I turned to leave, and he didn't try to stop me. This is a complete action that happened in the past. I think I surprised him. I know I surprised myself. This is in the present because you continue to think that you surprised him, you continue to know that you surprised yourself.


2

This sounds much more natural to me than "I thought I surprised him." Both have their place, and mean different things. If the narrating perspective considers after the story (whether from an indistinct "now" of the storytelling, or from a particular framing time frame) that they had surprised "him", then this would be more appropriate. If the ...


2

They are believed to have been there but not done a thing. This parses as: They are believed { to have { { been there } but { not { done a thing } } } } Here the two past participial phrases "been there" and "not done a thing" are joined by "but". The fuller alternative is: They are believed to have been there but not to have done a thing. ...


2

There is no well-known proverb or parable that features a man with no teeth: The counterargument is that the word "proverbial" can refer not only to a proverb, but to something or someone who is well known. Surely all readers have known or met a man with no teeth. There is a sense of proverbial that means "often talked about in a common idiom, saying or ...


2

The awkwardness comes from splitting which/what and on. Try: On which entries did this problem occur? or, if you like the sound of it better: For which entries did this problem happen? "Which" is better than "What" because you are asking about specific individual entries.


1

"Did you remember to sign the letter?". I can ask this question of you today, to check with you that you signed the letter. The question emphasises whether or not you remembered. And there is at least a suggestion that this letter, and its signing, was something we had discussed previously. "Do you remember signing the letter?". This construction ...


1

You might use this , if you were discussing a book in which one of the characters dies, and you are speaking from the perspective that he is not dead yet , but you know he will die ! You would not use this sentence in real-life, unless you were a crazy dictator who had decided to execute at some point in the future (on that persons 102nd birthday) . ...


1

Of most concern to me about the sentence is the opening clause. Use of 'this mystery' as the subject in the passive voice really does not work. You need to say something like If attempts had not been made, since the Gods left the planet, to keep this mystery secret.... And since this is an 'if' clause you need to use the conditional in the main clause - ...


1

If the condition expressed in the that-clause is still true, especially if it is a "general truth", it is okay to retain the present tense. Five years ago he already knew that two plus two equals four As of January 17, 2015, two plus two equals four, so I would see nothing wrong with this sentence. Let me quote from Capital Community College ...


1

They must [do things] before they can understand these concepts. This one is probably that which says precisely what you mean without either excess or ambiguity. They must [do things] before they can begin to understand these concepts. The begin provides emphasis, but seems a bit needless. I'd use it if I meant it literally. Conversely if I really ...


1

It is the simple present (or non-past) tense. There is no progressive aspect. Rather, in each sentence, the verb to be is followed by a subject complement, comprised of an adjective, past participle form, or noun phrase. A subject complement completes the meaning of the subject. 'She is' does not tell us much about the subject. The present tense here is ...


1

IMHO simple past is fine, as you are talking about lessons you learned in the past. But you need to adjust the next verb: use have ( not has), as it refers to "lessons", which is plural.


1

Your brother in law is correct. It am here if you could/can meet me. "Am" is the current tense, "Was" is the past tense. ♥


1

The minutes of the first coordinating and consultative committee meetings have translated into English and then sent back to the manager. This means that the minutes transformed, by themselves, into English. It is unlikely to be what you meant; it probably wasn't the minutes that did the translation. Of the other two options: The minutes of the ...


1

On the find-a-proverb front, here are some candidates that you might consider offering your detractors after the fact. From James Kelley, A Complete Collection of Scottish Proverbs Explained and Made Intelligible to the English (1721), Never shew your teeth when you cannot bite. [Explanation:] Never show your resentment when you cannot do it to ...


1

The sentence is fine (in that regard) if you are talking about "tomorrow" relative to the time of speaking. To fix other issues: I reached London two weeks ago. I was full of fear at the time, just thinking about what will happen tomorrow. (Or perhaps you meant "just" as in "I was thinking only of what will happen tomorrow"). There's no problem mixing ...


1

Lately there have been plenty of new Cyberpunk books being released, that haven't yet managed to garner as broad an audience as the genre classics have over all those years. Many new Cyberpunk books have been released in the past few years, but their audience is not as broad as that garnered by classics of the genre.


1

"Lately" doesn't normally include the future; that's why combining it with the present progessive "being released" seems odd. "Have been" specifically excludes the future, so there's even more of a conflict with the present progressive. I would change "lately there have been" to "these days there are" to convey a sense of current continuation. But it does ...


1

First Question "...so that I can write where I will go and what I will do in my blog" sounds like you want to write about your future plans. Using the present simple tense makes sense as your traveling can be considered regular or habitual (at least in your version of the future). Using the past simple tense would give the impression that at the time ...



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