Hot answers tagged

13

This question is difficult to answer succinctly because the more desirable wording to use may differ depending on the circumstances surrounding the statement. Case 1: When Maybonne was your girlfriend, she often ate at Red Lobster. Now that she is your ex-girlfriend, she may or may not eat there. If you know that she still does, it makes sense to say "My ex-...


7

This is a use of double negative. Here, it seems like it is just used to emphasize the point. The sentence, with proper grammar, would thus be: And I don't count anybody out of that, not anybody. Which means that there is no exception to the first statement: you can trust no one, with no exception to the rule. You can find more Double negative uses in ...


2

It seems like you understand the different tenses well enough. Just break them down into their individual ideas. "They say" is the first part. It just means that some people today say something about Raphael. "He once sold a painting for a bit of food." During his life, Raphael was hungry, and exchanged a painting for some food. "That painting has since ...


2

Yes, it's mostly rubbish. To start with, the phrase "the three perfect tenses" is already pretty meaningless. I suppose the author is thinking of had done (the "past perfect"), have done (the "present perfect") and will have done (the "future perfect"); but there's nothing really special about those three as opposed to having done, to have done, may have ...


2

Bob's date of death is xxx. The late Bob's date of birth (DOB) or birth date is / was xxx. It just depends on what spin you want to put on it. If you are talking regarding the factual DOB for this guy, feel free to use is, as it still is his DOB. If you are talking more about Bob, or want to recognize that the guy has passed away, feel free to use was. ...


2

The simple past form "wrote" must stand alone. If you combine it with a word like "had" it does need to change to the form "written." https://www.ego4u.com/en/cram-up/grammar/tenses


1

Using the simple past as the past participle is not uncommon in some regional and other vernacular forms of English. It's not generally treated as correct outside those cases, though they're widespread and have a long history. Finding examples is tricky, but they're spread from the Appalachians to various regions of Britain (specific examples in West ...


1

This sounds unnecessarily wordy for the idea it is trying to convey. Try "It's now five years since I (last) played tennis."


1

The tense used when asking such questions is not the simple past tense, rather it is the conditional tense, which is used "to speculate about what could happen, what might have happened, and what we wish would happen." (this is a quote from this website that breaks down the conditional very well http://www.edufind.com/english-grammar/conditional/ ) When ...


1

Simple case of past vs. present tense. If you can be sure the cheapening of transport (at least in part) has already happened, it's fine to say it has become cheaper. Of course, if it's a process that's still ongoing, it's also fine to say 'is becoming'. The line of having become sufficiently 'cheap' so you can use the past tense is of course totally ...


1

Many people would say Paul Roberts is ancient now, but there are things that do not change about people, and "Understanding Grammar" has some good observations. "We shall use the term notional time to mean time as we think of it, perhaps naively, in the physical world. We shall use the term linguistic time to mean the linguistic expression of notional ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible