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6

Is Did you removed from "Did you sleep well"? Yes, exactly. The speaker's intonation ought to convey the intention that this is a question rather than an imperative. One would also say "Sleep well" before someone goes to sleep, but in that case the intonation would be different.


3

To answer the actual question, ignoring the alleged grammaticality or ungrammaticality of your examples for a moment, the terms you are looking for are stative vs. dynamic verbs. You can search the site for discussions of particular verbs. We have a dedicated question on the McDonald's slogan, too.


2

Both the present and the present perfect may be used in a subordinate clause when the verb in the main clause is in the future tense. So either of your example sentences is permissible. Additionally, the present perfect indicates that the first action will be completed before the next occurs. So it might be stylistically preferable to use "have given" ...


2

Sent is the past participle of send, and that's what you would use regardless of the tense, as long as you're using the passive voice: The invoices were sent to the customers by mail. (This is roughly what your original sentence means.) The invoices will be sent to the customers by mail. The invoices are sent to the customers by mail. However, if you ...


2

Usually when people talk about a "double negative" they mean a construction like I didn't see no-one. where a negative-polarity item like no, none, nothing is in the scope of an explicitly negative verb. They are of note because standard varieties of English don't allow them (and people try to rationalise the objection by the claim that the above ...


2

Yes, the sentences are grammatical. As to the meaning, it depends on the context. I was wondering could refer back to an occasion in the past when you spent time thinking about something. For example, I was wondering this morning what she thinks of me, but now I've decided I don't care one way or the other. However, the I was wondering phrase often has ...


2

Short answer: It is. The OED does have it as a (regional and nonstandard) form since the 1800's, and the earliest citation is 1748 G. G. Beekman Let. 7 June in Beekman Mercantile Papers (1956) I. 47: I have Earnt allmost so much as the amount of the bill. However it is not, and has never been, in popular written use. Using Google Ngram to query the ...


2

If Citibank was in debt at the point the rumor went around, the correct sentence would be There was a rumor that Citibank was in debt. If Citibank was in debt before the actual rumor was started (meaning a prior event to someone making the statement) : There was a rumor that Citibank had been in debt. As far as I'm aware, you'd only use "is" in a ...


1

If the investigations were all in the past, then I think you have to use the past, or distant, tense. But if they are still going on, the present perfect describes the present state of the subject, and that would be fine.


1

Since the main verb of the sentence, "wrote", is past tense, then the English sequence of tenses rule requires the tense of any subordinate clauses to be shifted to the past, unless any subordinate clauses should be interpreted to mean something that would be appropriately expressed as a non-subordinate clause. In your example, if "He wrote a didactic novel ...


1

If i say . "I have been working there since 2011?" I think above mentioned line means that I have been continuously working ... no break or I had not came home. The sentence: "I have been working with XY for 4 years/ since 2011" is perfectly alright and doesn't imply you never went home


1

[does] "would have gone"... imply that he didn't go after all? Basically, yes. It's a double negative, but here the doubled negative does not cancel out, but rather strengthens, It intensifies the negation, meaning it's a negative concord (NC) which was common in Middle English; some scholars say it's gone from the language; others say it's still ...


1

Yes, it's an elision. We could perfectly well ask, "slept well?" instead but don't always.


1

If it was meant he was socially connected or biologically related to the bears, you must say: He was related to the bears. If it was meant he empathized, or mentally related, to the bears, then this is correct: He related to the bears.


1

The coding was done in the past; you're doing the documentation now. Therefore, I would not use the present tense. ... tools that were developed etc. The main part of the library was written in C++.


1

At Google Books: "defined before being used" About 694 results "defined before are used" 8 results The first seems to me more general: as it only uses non-finite verbal forms, it can adapt to any time, from past to present and to future. The 2nd follows the idea of flattening everything to a narrative present tense. The first is clearly more liked ...



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