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7

"Spread" and "get" are infinitives, so not in the present tense, and they should stay that way => to help + inf. Your sentence can indeed be read that way: "who helped spread the word and helped get people to..."


4

Both are correct. The choice is yours: If you want to convey that risking one's life is certain if one volunteered, then "No one dared to volunteer, as that meant risking one's life." is better. If you want to express risking one's life as a hypothetical situation or something that might happen if one volunteered, then "No one dared to volunteer, as that ...


4

This is the historic present, sometimes called the narrative present. To use it correctly, you first have to establish the time frame of the events, because it can be used this way in past, present or future - but in the two latter cases it's used in a different way. Interestingly, some languages actually have a separate tense form for this, so in Swahili ...


3

If Arjun wasn't so greedy he would be alive today is an example of a syntactic construction that is often called the second conditional or conditional 2. The verb in the if-clause (the protasis) is in the simple past tense, while the main clause (the apodosis) contains the modal would plus a bare infinitive (in this case be). One use of the second ...


3

They are all grammatically correct, but have slightly different connotations (in my opinion). The first two mean almost exactly the same thing; the only difference I infer between them is that the second is more likely to be in response to a person saying something like "why haven't you sent me an email yet?", with an emphasis on the word 'have' in the ...


2

These are two different uses of the past perfect tense, and the conditions that apply to one use don't apply to the other use. There is nothing wrong with If Mary had studied English after she moved to New York, she would have passed the exam, and to me it sounds better than either of your alternatives.


2

If you want to say that a sequence {A, B, C} occur in order, you use the same tense. So if the sequence is {shock, kill, enter} then all three should be present tense. However, if one of the items happened at another time, you can introduce new tenses. So if you want to express this sequence of events; Jack loses the ring Jane talks to Jack Jack tells ...


2

The first one is correct. In response to Karma's comment, it's fine to use full stops (periods) because each of those is a complete and functional sentence. Writers sometimes choose to use a series of very short but grammatically complete sentences in a row. It creates an effect in the telling of a story. Ernest Hemingway especially liked to do this.


2

Sentence like “... are already described in section XYZ” are certainly not wrong, and, as already has been said, are not past tense. Although there is nothing wrong either with “... have already been described in section XYZ”, which is in a past tense. Indeed, the past tense indicates that the description you mention precedes the current page in your thesis, ...


2

Get and got both work here but require the sentence to be parsed differently. What your copy-writer apparently intended was for the sentence to be parsed like this: Our small initiative turned into a sizeable movement with the support of influencers, who helped(a) spread the wordand [helped](b) get people to make a pledge by greenifying their Facebook ...


1

In English linguistics, we tend to use "tense" and "aspect" in a way that is not so much oriented to language universals as it is convenient for describing some superficial details of English morphology. Tense is expressed with verb endings or irregular stems; aspect is expressed by choice of auxiliary verb. This follows the description proposed in ...


1

First of all, these are two separate questions. Secondly, they probably belong in English Language Learners. But here are some answers anyway. You would just say "It would make him a good person." I'm not sure what "placement" means in this context, but assuming it makes sense, it should be "It will turn the placements on their heads." (Each has its own ...


1

Since the sentence is in past tense, shouldn't "get" be "got"? The word "got" is indeed the simple past tense of "to get", but you need to analyze the sentence a bit more deeply. How is "get" used there? In fact, it is the bare infinitive, as @MorganFR observed. Infinitives function as nouns, and do not change tense. The verb in the sentence is ...


1

You could use either, but if you are going to use simple past make sure the relative times of events are clear. Also, if this internal monologue is a direct dialogue from the subject (if you're using quotation marks), I'd use the simple past because the past setting that the story's taking place is the present in the subject's mind.


1

'did...have to' is usually used with 'you', 'he', 'she' or 'they'. When he was stopped by a cop, did he have to show ID? For your example, I'd say: Should I have added more data?


1

Let me use two different sentences to explain. 'I decided to get a degree in computer science when I was in university.' 'I have decided to reply to your question.' The first, in the past tense, refers to an act that took place in the past and is not directly relevant to what's going on at this present time. If you were writing a history you would use the ...


1

In Normal Scenario as per the Subject-Verb Agreement Rule Was is used with I. The exception comes to this rule in the case of Imaginary Sentences. Imaginary Sentences- When two imaginations come in a sentence which is either almost impossible or almost possible, the following three rules apply to make the sentence-


1

The former uses the present perfect and very strongly implies that the meeting has not yet taken place, whereas the latter uses the simple past and implies that it is over. As a speaker of British English I would not use the second version unless the meeting had taken place, but I notice on TV etc. that Americans often use the simple past where the action is ...


1

Consider the difference between discussing two people who started dating 11 months ago, (let's call them Couple I) vs people who started dating 12 months ago (Couple II). Couple I will have been dating for a year now once another month passes by (this tense is known as Future Perfect). Couple II has been dating for a year now (this is known as Present ...


1

They're different tenses. sent - past simple tense (for) something that happened once in the past (for) something that happened again and again in the past (for) something that was true for some time in the past have sent - present perfect tense for something that started in the past and continues in the present for something we ...



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