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In that sense, you can use 'by' with any tense. Please note to it's meaning given by the Longman dictionary: Before or not later than a particular time. Examples: The document needs to be ready by next Friday. By the end of the day we had sold over 2000 tickets. By the time we got home we were tired and hungry. I'll be home by 9:30. Please try to ...


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Of course they're possible. As to whether you'd want to use them, that's another question entirely. Each new auxiliary verb you use further narrows the temporal interpretation of the verb. After a certain point, it just doesn't matter 99% of the time. In other cases, it just sounds weird. For the perfect continuous, that's likely because of the double ...


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It's not a time frame you are forced to convey, it's a way that you are viewing the relationship between the event and now. In many cases, both forms are equally valid in referring to one and the same event, but differ in how you are focussing your attention. So unless there is some external context that limits the time, I have posted on SE and I posted on ...


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For the purpose of determining the tense, the is is all that matters. The phrase is in Present Simple. In fact, depending on your definition of tense (which does vary wildly between learners of the language and linguists), English doesn't have terribly many to begin with. As to "to do his own stunts" vs. "to have done", both are equally grammatical. And in ...


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There are two verbs: "is", ordinary present tense, and "to have been", perfect infinitive.


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English has no future in the future because English has no future tense at all. English verbs approach tense from two perspectives: before now (past), now and after now (present/nonpast). As such, we can conjugate the verb to eat as follows: I eat. I ate. But there is no way to conjugate the verb for the future, and so we resort to periphrastic ...


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It would still be "will be burgled." If I say in the future I will be going to the store and then after I will be mugged. There is no need to say "I will be going to be mugged" You are right it is cumbersome and unnecessary.


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It generally means "I did not realize you ever played chess". As 'Since when do you paint?" means that I am dubious that you paint. So it happens, but it is a strange idiom and not normal usage that follows the standard definitions.


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This is a simple case of backshifting, since the past tense of will is would. Normal Present Today he says he will do it now. Today I am going to the bank to make sure I will have enough money for my trip. Backshifted Past Yesterday he said he would do it then. Yesterday I went to the bank to make sure I would have enough money for ...


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John McWhorter in Our Magnificent Bastard Tongue makes a really clear case that the present progressive is the true present tense in English. The simple present is used in poetry, for habitual actions, in some idioms, and in certain other situations. For example, it is often used to describe the content of a written text: "The author argues that..." or ...



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