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11

It seems to me that the most sensible way to head off these problems would be to explain to the class before doing any spoken English work that there is no such concept as "Putonghua" for English. While it may be OK for China, which has traditionally strived to be a rather centralized society, English has its major cultural centers diffused all over the ...


10

OK, there are a couple of things that you need to tackle initially: if students have it into their head that there exists one single accent that is "the correct" one, then you need to start by educating them on that point: explain to them that no two people have a precisely identical accent, that the associations we attach to different accents are purely ...


3

I've had this exact experience teaching students abroad myself. In almost all (if not all) countries, there will be regional variations in accent in the native language. China is no exception. The easiest way would be to point out those parallels. Possibly something like how a Fujian accent is different from Guangzhou is different from Beijing. You're ...


2

Streamer carries the implication that it is long and narrow. Typically, it would be attached to a child's bicycle handle to catch the wind and stream. It is a type of ribbon. But, ribbons can be wide, flat, short, etc. What you are describing being put in your hair is a ribbon. When someone ties something of that nature into their hair, it is described ...


1

You can find many word lists in general internet searches, although as a parent of a young child, I found the following resources useful for the 4-8 year age bracket: If you intend to have this age group read the words, then I hope you will consider including words from the Dolch List. The Oxford wordlist allows you to create customised word lists based on ...


1

The general rule that applies to your examples is that vowels take on their long sound at the end of a word, and their short sound when followed by a single consonent. Hence: he, hen hi, hit go, got Of course, English being English, every "rule" is merely a starting point to work from, with a plethora of exceptions, which is why: ha is not a homonym ...



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