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1

It sounds like there is an of too much. I should think it a typo.


1

I suppose that it is a case of leaving out part of a sentence or clause, as in certain relative clauses: Albert Einstein, who is the most famous physicist of the XXth century, was born in Ulm. can be reduced to Albert Einstein, the most famous physicist of the XXth century, was born in Ulm. leaving out 'who was'. Similarly, Toenail growth, ...


1

Summary: X was to be Y is a kind of stylistic 'prediction' made from the perspective of a certain point in the past, predicting that 'X is Y' would happen. John was less than 18 years old already at the time of prediction, and it doesn't really make sense to predict that something will be true that is already the case. That's probably why the sentence is ...


0

In A1, "to be" is being used to fluff out "refused." You can remove fluff and have the sentence still make sense, which you have illustrated well with this example. In A2, "to be" is being used as the infinitive form of "being," with the adverb/conjunction comparison "less than 18," which is the part that may seem off. As seen in Kristina's example, ...


1

This is one of those implied words in English: I don't know anybody who has as much energy as John [does] or as John. Both are correct. This is similar to: Do you want to play tennis today? Yes, I want to [play tennis] but I'm busy all day.


0

The second one. I don't know anybody who has as much energy as John. As John what? It is kind of implied, but it could be: I don't know anybody who has as much energy as John wasted. I don't know anybody who has as much energy as John when he is playing sports. You need to say does.


0

Different kinds of adverbs work differently. "Perfectly" is a manner adverb: "The manner in which this is done should be perfect." According to the classification given in McCawley's The Syntactic Phenomena of English, manner adverbs are verb phrase (or V-bar) modifiers. They can ordinarily come after the verb phrase they modify: This should [VP [VP ...


0

Both versions are correct (and archaic, not in common use) but "This should be perfectly done". sounds much more fluent and poetic. Both sentences have the same meaning though: the doing of this action should be perfect. This is similar to the way we say: "Didn't you eat a banana yesterday?" We know [didn't] = [did not] so if we replace didn't with ...


5

According to Wiktionary, the adjective grammatical means: (linguistics) Acceptable as a correct sentence or clause as determined by the rules and conventions of the grammar, or morpho-syntax of the language. In the linked related question, Can “grammatical” mean “grammatically correct”?, Berrie England wrote: To say that a sentence is ...


2

The grammatical can be defined with reference to a dialect or with reference to a language comprised of one or more dialects. When considered as a whole, the speech acts of a preponderance of native speakers of a given dialect or language reveal a set of inherent rules these speakers are following. Utterances which conform to these rules are said to be ...


1

This "a" is actually not an article, it's an old-fashioned prefix meaning something like "to". It's archaic and only really used in poetry and songs... maids a-milking, lords a-leaping etc. It's possible it was influenced by Old Norse/French in Middle English.



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