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7

This is actually interesting. I started to write a flip comment but then I thought about it a little more. The truth is, it could go either way, depending on what you mean. If you mean the two things are independently satisfying, use satisfy. Using A and B for shorthand, we get: A satisfies me. B satisfies me. But A and B satisfy me. If you mean both ...


1

AS is a subordinating conjuction with the adverbial sense " in the manner": ¶ This is as it should be.(here subordinate clause beginning with "as" is a noun clause functioning as complement to "this" ¶¶ in the given example/As will be discussed.......... next section/it is an adverbial phrase(not a clause) placed before the main clause with a "," as usual ...


2

A day is unit of time: noun 1 A period of twenty-four hours as a unit of time, reckoned from one midnight to the next, corresponding to a rotation of the earth on its axis. ODO We often speak of time metaphorically in terms of spacial movement as in: the time has come take each day as it comes the day is coming The expression the day ...


4

This is a sentence which uses extraposition from noun phrase movement. Often when a noun phrase (NP) has a long relative clause, or other modifier, that modifier gets moved out of the noun phrase and appears at the end of the sentence. This is particularly likely when the verb phrase is very short like this. Here is another example: We fired three people ...


0

At last the day came when... is similar in form and function to At long last..., both conveying a long-awaited eventuality has come to fruition. @mfoy_ isn't incorrect, when reducing it to just Now..., but I find it cleaner to just remove these constructs entirely, as they don't in any way change the meaning of the sentence; they merely set the tone. ...


1

Assuming @webbcode is correct, the following sentence would read: At last the day came when everyone except the Kelveys had seen the doll's house. This means: Now everyone except the Kelveys had seen the doll's house. The reason "At last, the day came when..." is used is for dramatic impact. It creates a sense of importance to the event, whereas ...


0

I am not sure it will help since yours is a matter of rhetorical devices, but have a look at some of the answers I received on a similar issue, especially at the one about conjunction reduction: I <verb> and am <rest of sentence>


0

Thanks a million Slava and Brian, I couldn't have done it without you. Actually I'm non native English learner and want to improve and prctice my daily life English. May I ask auch questions in future also, if you don't mind?


0

Usually, an AmE speaker would say Is it your turn yet? Your other way is not completely wrong; it just asks something slightly different—you might be asking whether it is nearly his turn yet. But you would not say that the turn has "approached" or "reached". For "approached" you might say Isn't it almost time for your turn? Or Seems like it ought ...


0

I would have to say that "Is it your turn yet" is the most valid one. Has your turn approached would not work since approach usually refers to someone/something moving towards you and not an abstract concept of a 'turn'. And as for reaching, it is you making progress towards something. You are not reaching anything, you are just waiting.


1

It's not that you 'can't place pronouns after any phrasal verb'. It only happens with certain ones. There are two types of phrasal verbs: prepositional verbs particle verbs If the construction is verb + preposition, the object, noun or pronoun can't split the phrasal verb: You should stand by your friend¹ You should stand by him But not *You ...


0

When is the definite article the appropriate before an abstract noun? When you are referring to a specific instance of that abstract noun, e.g. a specific idea or theorum, and aren't identifying it by e.g. following the noun with a number specific enough for the reader to know exactly which theorum you're discussing.



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