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2

OED's entry for the specific phrasal verb is definition 1e under plan... verb, intr. colloq. to plan on to intend to carry out (some action); to anticipate or be prepared for. ...for which their first citation is... 1914 E. R. Burroughs Tarzan of Apes xxvii. 370 She is planning on our going up there the first of the week. It's a perfectly ...


1

I'm English and so a native English speaker, and I consider that in 95+% of cases I can pronounce with certainty both on the grammatical and semantic correctness of an English utterance, although I could not with much certainty identify all of the grammatical terms of the utterance. The answers given here are fascinating and eye-opening when I see that ...


0

I believe the construction looks awkward as we, as the reader, do not know who the 'It' refers to. It appears some abstract being, but in reality I suspect it is the speaker. In "It's John that you need to see", we know you are referring to John. When we add in the speaker, the other quotes would be - "It is obvious to me, that you need to listen to your ...


1

There is no consensus among linguists on how the parts of speech issue is best handled for the trickier cases. Bas Aarts, in The Handbook of English Linguistics 2006 (ed Aarts & McMahon): English Word Classes and Phrases (Aarts & Haegeman): 2.3 Word class boundaries and gradience gives the analyses of three opposing schools [the below is modified]. ...


1

I always understood that if the word ends in a "y" the plural is written "ies" as; berry(ies) ferry(ies) controversy(ies) belly"ies" as y is that sometimes vowel pronounced ee.


7

A noun generally takes an article ("the"), can be modified by an adjective, cannot be modified by an adverb, cannot take a direct object. To illustrate, here is a sort of minimal pair between noun and verb: "Eating lobster is forbidden." (This is the first half of the pair.) The subject noun phrase, "eating lobster", has "eating" as its head, so you might ...


4

Note: This post is still being polished! It's also quite long. You may prefer to read the case studies that I'll be posting later. There is no single syntactic or distributional property of nouns which is sufficient to guarantee the inclusion of an item in the word class. For most modern grammarians there is a major subcategory of the noun class, the ...


1

Stead comes from the Germanic root for "place, town," but we usually use it for a person's place, and most frequently when someone is serving as a substitute. If you serve in someone's stead, you're doing their job for them while they're not there. “can you go in my stead?” The adverb instead can also mean rather than, and in this context it's ...


9

One simple feature of a noun is that it can be replaced by "he/she/it" when it is a single noun in singular and by "they" when it is a single noun in plural. I have never tested if this feature really helps in difficult cases, as in English a noun can also be a verb (a cry, to cry), an adjective (the dark, a dark corner) or even an adverb (my home, to go ...


0

I think that the most hard-to-explain idiomatic wording here is "fall in love with." After all, we don't say that we "fall in friendship with," "fall in sorrow with," "fall in appreciation with," "fall in envy with," or "fall in fear with" others, any more than we "fall in anger" with them. And yet we don't seem to view love as existing entirely on a ...


-3

Yes, "in stead" is never correct. "instead" is separable in some circumstances, but when the two parts are separated they have to be separated by something. So "in stead" would close right up again if it ever momentarily existed, notionally like a virtual electron-positron pair. If you are dead set on separating the two parts with something, you can do it ...


20

Stead as a noun exists, but is archaic. If you want to use it, it needs a specifier: his stead as in WS2's answer, or the stead. So you can say in the stead of; but instead of is much more common.


14

Instead is usually written as one word. It does not mean however that in and stead, cannot be separated in some circumstances e.g.: My father is too ill to go to the meeting so I shall go in his stead.


2

Telling the difference between a compound noun and a modified noun is not straightforward, but one way that often works is to consider the stress. A modified noun has primary stress at the end, while a compound noun has stress at the beginning. There are exceptions, but it works for your examples, using 2 to mark secondary stress and 1 for primary stress: ...


3

First, terminology needs to be defined. Here, 'word' (orthographic word) and 'phrase' (meaningfully constructed string not containing finite verb and consisting of two or more words) are used: Giegerich argues extensively that steel bridge and watch-maker are unequivocally phrasal and lexical respectively. [ie a phrase and a (compound) word ...


0

When you use the term compound you refer to word formation. Both "watchmaker" and " "steel bridge" are compound nouns as they consist of two nouns. When you use the term phrase you describe the structure of a sentence. Here phrase is nothing else than a word group that belongs together. The subject can be a single noun such as Peter or a word group ...


0

A means of intensifying what someone says. An intensifying formula. "attestation" does not fit in this situation as it is a law expression for a document that testifies something.


0

Contrastive focus reduplication. " I like you, but I don't (like) like you."


0

In defense of 5arx's initial association of the interjection "not!" with the Bill & Ted comedy franchise, I note this chronological listing in J.E. Lighter, Random House Dictionary of Historical American Slang (1997): 1991 Bill & Ted's Adventures (CBS-TV): Smooth move, dude! Not! 1992 M. Myers et al. Wayne's World (film): Wayne'll understand that ...



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