New answers tagged

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"Can you help me with that or point me to someone who is able?" would be grammatically better


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These are two different topics: If sustainability is rated high, this means that lots of new oil fields, power sources etc have been opened up and prospects of blackouts are low. The grammar of the first makes 'rated' a copula and 'high' an adjective. It is the same construction as 'is high' 'seems high' 'is perceived to be high.' If sustainability is ...


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That some sentences are syntactically ambiguous is not a fundamental problem of English syntax. Context and intonation are usually enough to guide hearers in constructing the intended phrase structure (that is, non-ambiguous syntactic structure) of the spoken or written utterance. Such a process is called disambiguation, and we do it all the time. ...


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To judge from the comments, it's a calque of the word ही (hee) in Hindi and the other northern languages and of தானே (tāṉē) in Tamil and the other southern languages. It's easy to see how ही (meaning "nothing else") was translated into only (meaning "nothing more"), since only is 25 times more common than a more precise translation like exactly. Given that ...


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Sources of Negativity I've really only dug into one paper on this topic: Explicit and implicit negation, negative polarity, and levels of semantic representation Ming Xiang, Julian Grove, Anastasia Giannakidou Linguistics Department, University of Chicago Moreover, this paper really only discusses the sources of negativity as a prerequisite to ...


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If you're set on keeping the sentence fragment, and do not want to use a complete sentence as @John Lawler mentioned in his comment for brevity or what have you, I'd go with forgot. It reads as more inquisitive ("Forget your password" regardless of punctuation feels like a command) and has the expected past-tense.


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Using the parallel terms "Save Changes" and "Revert Changes" makes it clear that these two actions are opposites. Even if not strictly correct, it's easy to understand. And as Max Williams says, it's shorter and saves space. Plus, users often have short attention spans. The fewer words you can use, the better.


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You're correct - it's the document that is reverted, not the changes. In software design there is often a balance between grammatical correctness and simplicity/space usage. In this case it seems like they could satisfy both these requirements by simply relabelling the button "Undo changes", but if the language of "reverting changes" has been used ...


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This time I have read your post more carefully. I am guessing that the answer is "no". Whether can be used wherever interrogative if can. Conditional if has restricted distribution (lower type-wise frequency), but is more frequent token-wise. You see this a lot when looking at two words with similar meaning. I have plotted below the top 50 hits for verb+if (...


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There are a few verbs where I think "<verb> <interrogative clause>" in general is colloquial-but-acceptable, but where I think *"<verb> whether […]" in particular is ungrammatical; for example, consider "went to look if […]" vs. *"went to look whether […]", or "I can't think if I've […]" vs. *"I can't think whether I've […]". In part this ...


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In short no. There are some cases where the word 'if' is not used as a conditional statement. The word 'if' might be used in an idiom or some other way that doesn't represent a conditional statement. In those cases whether cannot be replaced in its stead. Below is an example of how if is used in each case and shows when it can be replaced with the word '...


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I don't know if this thread is still live but I have encountered "give it me" in literature up until about the second world war in southern English, even though I would say it is almost exclusively a northern construction today. I think perhaps it is an archaic construction, common in early modern Shakespeare, which carried through to what Mitford identifies ...


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I think it will be something like this, putting the "last week" inside the verb phrase spanning "last week won the big race" to indicate the time. Noun phrases indicating time (e.g., "yesterday", "next month") are usually kept as noun phrase, and are just put next to the verb they modify. (image generated from http://ironcreek.net/phpsyntaxtree/ with the ...


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Under the meaning you have chosen, it is part of the verb phrase "last week won the big race". So it goes beneath this; to the left of the verb "won" and the noun phrase "the big race"



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