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1

"It is terrible" is a regular subject-verb-predicate clause. "What it is, is terrible" is a wh-cleft, or pseudo-cleft: see Wikipedia's page on clefts. The example you give, with the repeated "it is", is also a kind of pseudo-cleft, though a rather more complex one. Transformational accounts of pseudoclefts certainly exist. Chapter 2 of this 1979 ...


1

It means the woman is spurned, not you. You're just being jeered at. If you were the spurned one, there would have to be a comma in there. I am walking out of a room to the jeers of a woman, spurned. In either case, you are being jeered at.


2

I submit some other examples of headlinese: (1) Dropping of the genitive -'s. Again, this saves space. This practice is also exceedingly common in technical English (I wish I knew why), where the resulting strings of nouns can be almost unintelligible. (2) Use of the name of a country as its adjective: "France PM says ..." (the reason for this completely ...


3

The "rules" of commas are perhaps the vaguest in language, and many of them more guidelines than "rules" even in the minds of those most fond of enforcing rules. And those about whether or not to have them between two clauses the vaguest of the lot. That caveat said, you have perhaps the opposite case. Here you have an adverbial clause when it is complete. ...


1

Can you see any hikers, using binoculars? Can you see any hikers using binoculars? Obviously, the comma is not 'necessary': both are grammatical. But the first sentence would usually be taken to mean Using binoculars, can you see any hikers? Whereas the second can either mean that, or Can you see any hikers who are using binoculars? ...


5

Written English is governed by the principle "Anything which can be misunderstood will be". There is thus no practical difference between a syntactical ambiguity and a semantic one: even if the ambiguity is resolvable with only a little effort, some readers will fail to make the effort and will either misunderstand your meaning or dismiss you as an idiot. ...


0

"Seriously, I left it right there." Same part of speech, but a phrase. No?


1

Your teacher hasn't led you too far astray, because "what proof do we have?" would also be correct, so they wouldn't have led into saying the wrong thing. English does though sometimes use subject-verb inversion. It happens much more with auxiliaries than other verbs, and one use is in questions: We have proof. Have we proof? We couldn't do that ...


0

The quote is correct, but it looks dated or literary. Assuming it appears in dialogue (probably a safe assumption given you found it in a work of fiction), it indicates the speaker is using somewhat older or more formal language. This makes a certain amount of sense since Game of Thrones is (AFAIK) a fantasy series. English usually uses ...


-1

Definitely both are correct, Use of difference is : likely to become shows expectations/predictions. example : Children who get sexually abuses are likely to become frustrated. likely become is surety. example : Broken marriages likely become hell.


3

Both are correct. Become can be used as the primary verb or as an infinitive. Examples of the use of become as a primary verb are He becomes agitated when the music plays. He will become agitated when the music plays. He will likely become agitated when the music plays. In the last two examples, become is the primary verb, and will is an ...


0

They are both correct. When you are talking in a future context about something that you are very sure of you will use likely become: He will likely become a great actor. When you are talking or discussing the possibility of something happening you will use likely to become He is likely to become a great actor.


2

It is a predicate adjective. See wikipedia: Predicative adjectives are linked via a copula or other linking mechanism to the noun or pronoun they modify; for example, happy is a predicate adjective in "they are happy" and in "that made me happy." The term "adjective complement" is also sometimes used to refer to predicate adjectives. See here.



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