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3

Recursive referencing may be confusing and should be avoided. It would be best practice if you say or write: Based on sources from StackExchange and Wikipedia the following code was created: You could further on refer to StackExchange as "initial" and Wikipedia as the "latter": The initial reference points out.... where as the latter argues...


3

In spoken English, this (excuse the pun) should be perfectly fine. Like a salesman showing you a couple of items in answer to your inquiry and saying something like, "you should consider this, and this". I have seen such usage (even more than 2 instances of this) in online content when both/all instances are hyperlinked (to different web pages) ...


7

If I could choose neither, I would, since I'm not sure if the sentence is grammatical. If I had to choose one and I was allowed to choose based on my own preferences, I would choose who since, as many posts on this site explain, "whom" often sounds stuffy or pedantic. But if I had to choose one based on what I think fits best with prescriptive grammar, I ...


3

If one uses the grammatical rule: Rule. Use this he/him method to decide whether who or whom is correct: he = who him = whom Examples: Who/Whom wrote the letter? He wrote the letter. Therefore, who is correct. [For] who/whom should I vote? Should I vote for him? Therefore, whom is correct. (Grammarbook.com) If one then ...


1

I think the problem here is that "concentrate" is a transitive verb and thus needs a direct object. Here, in your examples . . . since our formula is highly concentrated in/with active ingredients. the problem is that whether you consider "concentrated" to be a verb or an adjective, it has a passive meaning. That is, the object of the action needs to ...


0

To elaborate on jejorda2's answer: I don't think both of these are wrong, but they don't exactly roll off the tongue. I believe, in your example, that Only a small amount of product is necessary since our formula is highly concentrated with active ingredients. would be an acceptable use here, although a smoother way to write this sentence could be ...


2

Both of these are wrong. Here are some other ways to phrase your message: The formula has a high concentration of the active ingredients. Our product is a concentrated formula of the active ingredient. The active ingredients have been concentrated in our formula. All of these are based on Oxford's 3rd definition of concentrate, which ...


1

There are all sorts of ways different grammarians use terms like NP and VP. Here's one way of analyzing the sentence. I use VP to mean "a verb with all its internal complements"—that is, all its arguments except the subject. [i] represents an 'index' which associates the three terms (constituents, which, and the 'gap' where constituents has been ...


0

Not sure whether or how this is related, but I've noticed, while watching British TV -- and perhaps it's just a regionalism -- the use of "only" as seemingly an equivalent of "you see," or "it's just that." For example, "Only, I was wondering if you had a spanner I could borrow." Not in the sense of "I need a spanner, and only a spanner."


0

In the example, you is a resumptive pronoun. It should be omitted, since it is coreferential with the relative pronoun who of the relative clause, yet it cannot be omitted because of an island constraint. English speakers produce such constructions frequently, but judge them to be ungrammatical.


4

The word "only" is often used by many Indians as a replacement for a certain kind of emphasis that is found in a lot of Indian languages. Let's say you are describing somebody who's a habitual liar. A lot of Indians might say, "So, he lied to you ? Of course, he is like that only ". Indian languages usually have suffixes or separate words to emphasize this ...


9

To add to the theories in OP and the answer of @Malvolio, there's another interesting clue here. As @NeilW noted in the comments, the British actually used to use the word "only" after the amounts on cheques, receipts, bills, etc. (Apparently to prevent tampering, thanks @MattBishop .) This is still practiced in India today. For example, here's one of my ...



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