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First, and most important, Why may standing up for a long time cause hypotension? is a rhetorical question. No native English speaker would ever ask it as a real information-seeking question, unless prompted by some prior statement to use that ungrammatical construction with epistemic may. Second, if it's a rhetorical question, then the important ...


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If the sentence is asking for information, I think using "might" or "could" instead of "may" would be more correct. If it is like a blog title or something, and you want it to be a grammatically correct sentence, it should be something like "Learn why standing may..." or "Find out why..." If you don't care about grammar, the trendy "BuzzFeed" way of doing ...


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It is grammatical but, in a medical scenario I would use "how" instead of "why", and "can" instead of "may". It's just that hardly anybody uses "may" in ordinary conversation (or in medical schools) in AmE. Standing up for a long time can cause hypotension. How can standing up for a long time cause hypotension? Some people are prone to ...


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This isn’t the “in anger” that you mean, but I think that anything that we can do can be done “in anger,” even “fall” and weirdly enough, maybe even “love”: “The parachutist, whose one true love was still parachuting in spite of his chute’s failure, quickly understood what it meant to love in anger while falling in anger to his death.” Anyway, here’s a stab ...


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I would prefer, colloquially, "sixteen by nine' (although "sixteen to nine" is also clear, grammatical, and only very briefly likely to be confused with a time of day). Majenko's answer argued that using "by" implies there must be "units", for example "inches" (and that, because there are no units, therefore "by" is incorrect). In response to that I would ...


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Sixteen to nine, since it is a ratio, not an absolute set of dimensions. Sixteen by nine implies a set of exact units that are unmentioned, such as sixteen by nine inches. It can also be said as sixteen in nine, especially when representing a gradient, such as the steepness of a road. A 10:1 rise would be a rise of 1 unit for every 10 units travelled ...


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It depends on the tone, as this can change the meaning of almost anything, any word or expression and certainly "tell me" and "talk to me" change very quickly when playing around with the tone. I`d love to see a study in "use", but my suspicion is that "tell me" is most often used to precede a question with a moderate tone, and "talk to me" is most often ...


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Talk refers to the act of interpersonal communication through speaking. So if you say: Talk to me! This would imply that the person is not speaking or communicating with you to you ( - otherwise you would not need to say it!). Tell me! on the other hand, means tell me the information. With the verb tell, the person you are telling is the indirect ...


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If a person is being uncommunicative, sulky, for example, one might say to him or her: Talk to me! If a person has some news that interests you, which you are eager to know, you might say: Tell me!


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The problem with asking a question such as: Have you been working with this company for a very long time? or Have you been with this company for a very long time? is that you could get an answer such as "Yes" or "No" or "Yes, quite a while actually" that will leave you none the wiser as to how long the person has been associated with the company ...


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Have you been working with this organization for quite a while?


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The two might seem the same, but there is a slight difference in context. In the context of literature, talking can take a long time, and telling most of the time means telling something quickly as information Telling information Talking about a subject So when it is included in a discussion, talk to me means let's take our time and talk about ...


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This ending evolved as a mannered construction in a mannered age, generally used with extreme politesse but particularly useful when grovelling was in order. It could also drip with irony which was very useful at a time or in circumstances when diplomatic or social niceties didn't allow for frank speech. I've always found it to be a delightful turn of ...


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Give it me (Gib es mir) and Give it here (Gib es her) both sound like an Americanized version of how the (correct, I should add) German version is uttered. I am a linguist also, and I would not be surprised if the origin of these two utterance was indeed German (not Germanic, I mean German, literally), spoken somewhere in the northern region of the east ...


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This puzzle has the air of a literary bar bet, where, if I were offering this challenge, I would also tell my marks that expletives are allowed, just to throw them further astray. You can't overlook the fact that some words can be elided, and the conjunction that is one that is often omitted without any loss in meaning. This is referred to as the expletive ...



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