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It actually was more related to his genetics than his behavior. or It was actually more related to his genetics than his behavior. but not It actually related more to his genetics than his behavior. (The verb tense and the word more you use in this sentence makes the verb "relate" take another of its meanings, which is "to understand and like or have ...


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Particularly, in the copular/linking verbs as "appear" & "seem" we often use 'TO BE' for showing a relationship or describing a state. It is better to regard "seem to be" as verb phrase. "A man" is the complement. Otherwise, "seem" may take a clause/ phrase as its complement. ° It seems that it would rain today. °°I seem to have left my book at home. ...


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"It is not possible to keep abreast of the normal tides of acquisition." not [S [NP [S unspecified keep abreast of the normal tides of acquisition ] ] is possible ] That is, it is the negation of a sentence whose predicate is "is possible" and whose subject is the sentence "unspecified keep ...". The sentential subject has the "for-to" ...


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It might by easier to think of "keep abreast of" as a verbal phrase which is syntactically similar to (but not equivalent to) "monitor" "It is not possible to monitor the normal tides of acquisition."


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I did misread the original question -- yes, "the word" and "cancer" are in apposition to each other. But they're embedded in an absolute phrase, just in case you needed to know that. It's actually an absolute phrase, explained in this way: When a participle and the noun that comes before it together forms an independent phrase, the structure is often ...


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This is from the 1957 essay "Good-bye to Forty-eighth Street" by E. B. White. The final phrase is actually ..., the word "cancer" exploding in the living room .... The quotes are there to indicate that the reference is to the word for the disease and not the disease itself. This makes the quoted text an appositive since it identifies or renames the ...


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A coffee to go is like a table to eat. It's a necessary qualifier that indicates purpose, suitability or reason. It's necessary to avoid confusion or a mistake. When I say: We would like that table to eat, it does not mean I want to eat the table. Neither do I wish for the table to start chewing on something. I'm asking for a menu and checking that the ...


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Araucaria is right, the term adverbial is imprecise, i.e. it is used for a word class (an adverb group) and a sentence part. A lot of linguistic terms have come up in order to be more precise. My personal terminology is adverb group if a mean an adverb that consists of several words (word class), e.g. to kill someone in cold blood ("in cold blood" is an ...


4

The term adverbial is a bane to the principled study of language. It is the epitome of the worst problem in the field of language study - a problem which should by now be regarded as a schoolkid problem - the problem of not understanding the difference between syntactic functions (or grammatical relations) and parts of speech or types of phrase. For a few ...


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It is often considered bad form to put yourself first in such a statement, so rather than "me and John" it should be "John and me". In this case the options are "John and me went to the park" or "John and I went to the park", following which the previous reply is still applicable.


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I may be wrong, but I think that the hidden point to the example might be that people accidentally change the meaning of the sentence when they try to "fix" split infinitives. Prof Nikolas Gisborne, from the same department, made the point when he showed how someone at the Guardian, by changing the headline "How to not raise a rapist" to "How not to raise a ...


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"unique time- and labor-saving features" ---> "unique time-saving and labor-saving features" It is quite a common device.


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The use of as well in the middle of sentence is quite fine, it is commonly used after the subject of the sentence. For instance, We liked speaking to people of different cultures. She as well adores it. or Mary as well adores it.


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In this very case the article the is referred to an abstract noun - in this case theorem - which is already known to both speakers, i.e. they already have background knowledge about that very theorem which is determined by the article the.



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