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2

The phenomenon and label of the change is one thing, and the result is labeled another thing. In the specific community (of aviation; I don't think I've heard this at all before so I'm assuming it is limited to here), it is simply a change in syntax accompanied by semantic drift. The result, where a passive form is interpreted actively, is called a ...


3

I think it’s an example of zero derivation. This means deriving one word from another while bypassing the usual derivation rule that involves adding a prefix or suffix. To illustrate zero derivation, here is an example from the exploding penguin sketch: Oh, intercourse the penguin. [Emphasis added] Monty Python derive ?intercourse (trans) from ...


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First, it's an inherently ambiguous sentence: we don't know whether B and C are one client (as in: partners) or two clients. If you wanna stress that B and C are not a unit, then it might be better to rewrite the sentence. His work for both B and C... would be a place to start. As for weaving, it's not necessarily, included at all with the use of like, ...


0

Please, please allow yourself, and all the users of English, the dignity of personal and cultural interpretation and application of any rules associated with proper usage: the RULE is that language reflects the expression of the people who create and use it: language is infinite. Many languages are dissimilar to English in the way that first person ...


1

However, the question is not about formal correctness. The question is whether it's appropriate for me to justify my, ehm, linguistic relationships with "I" with my cultural identity? If you want to use lower-case "i" for cultural reasons, you should come up with a better anecdote than that bit about everyone being a special snowflake. I don't know ...


1

'I' is always capitalized in standard English. In Internet chat, it isn't always capitalized.


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A sentence can be virtually infinite, but should be no longer than it needs to be. The maximum for adjectives and adverbs is limited only by the complexity of the object or topic addressed, and the thoughts expressed. Now divide that by the patience of the audience. There's a profitable corollary question. How short can a sentence be? Or take a ...


0

I may be confused but isn't aspect still being revealed by the participle in that the finite verb states the action then aspect seems to be projected on to the participle, which is the object functionally, in a way that does demonstrate TAM-like information being conveyed by the verb/object pair on how time flew from the speakers perspective? This might be ...


1

Both varieties have the same syntactic structure. The difference is lexical, semantic, and pragmatic. Mental process verbs like believe and think take complements describing the mentation. They don't say much about the truth of that mentation, as you point out. However, a special type of predicate doesn't simply describe a proposition; it presupposes it. A ...


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The meaning of this provision cannot be discerned by treating it as an isolated exercise in punctuation and grammar. The Supreme Court will interpret the clause in light of the rules of statutory construction, which are summed up nicely in the article "Rules and Aids in Statutory Construction" published in the November 1915 issue of the Virginia Law Review. ...


0

An historical argument is more apropos than a grammatical one in this case. Yes, the conventions regrading punctuation have changed since the the 1700's. Was the use of commas a political choice? Could alternative punctuation like the use of parentheses or even a semicolon implied a semantic subordination in the language that could have been exploited by ...


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Joseph Story served on the Supreme Court from 1811 to 1845. In 1833, he explained the meaning: It is indispensable, too, that the president should be a natural born citizen of the United States; or a citizen at the adoption of the constitution, and for fourteen years before his election. This permission of a naturalized citizen to become president ...


1

I think that's exactly what it is saying. As you say, nobody currently alive is therefore eligible. What this demonstrates is that the consititution is not the laws. Instead, the laws are derived from the constitution, in a common-sense way, to attempt to capture the important aspects of the constitution. The finer details of what exactly is meant by ...


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I voted for @Hugh "parataxis" suggestion. But, you may reword the sentence as follow: "My only way to describe it is the fusion of the very essence of the best, medicinal grade cannabis in the world awaking my olfactory receptors via stem cells and ...". You may keep your initial text for the '...' or replace it by "it's how I felt it".


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The sentence [1] Beauty as well as love is redemptive is not the syntactic equivalent of [2] Beauty is redemptive and love is as well. As CGEL points out, sentence 1 is a single clause NP (Subject) + AdvP + Copular V + Adjective (Predicate Comp) Sentence 2 is a doubled compound clause in which the first component is [1a] NP (Subj) + ...


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English frequently tries to go back to its Germanic roots when it comes to word order in subordinate clauses. In German the verb can usually gets shoved all the way to the end of the clause, and in your first sentence this is what is happening. The "that" signals to me that that which follows involves a subordinate clause. I don't know if the second ...



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