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65

The phrase "Believe you me" copies the archaic word order one finds in Early Modern English for a marked imperative. Typical examples are from King James version of the Bible (both testaments). See e.g. Book of Matthew 14:16 They need not depart; give ye them to eat. and in a few common phrases such as "mind you" (but with a slight nuance) for ...


37

This is covered in the Cambridge Grammar of the English Language (CGEL), as it turns out, in Chapter 18, “Inflection Morphology and Related Matters”, section 6, “Phonological reduction and liaison”. The form ’s, representing either has or is, along with ’m (am), ’re (are), ’ve (have), ’ll (will), and ’d (had or would) are called clitics, and they are a ...


35

I've heard the "needs washed" construction so many times that it sounds completely normal to me. Your other three examples, however, don't sound familiar. I'm having a tough time thinking of a set rule for dropping "to be." I think it could work with want in addition to need, e.g. "The baby wants changed." But I can't think of other verbs that it would ...


32

The only interpretation that would make sense at all would be taking the first two parts as an absolute construction, and the the other two as the main clause. With modern punctuation, it would look like this: A well regulated Militia being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear Arms shall not be infringed. ...


23

Wiktionary has references from the 1840s and 1870s so this is old enough to register as a well-established idiom. I had some trouble finding other uses of "[verb] you me" until a blog pointed out the King James Bible: For thus saith the Lord unto the house of Israel, Seek ye me, and ye shall live Using Verb-Subject-Object order is "an archaic form used ...


21

That is called ellipsis, omitting words that can be inferred. Journalists use such strong ellipsis because they want compact headlines. The present tense is used here to make a story seem more "actual", more lively: that is called the historic present. Besides this liveliness, the fact that it is often shorter is practical for journalists. The rules for ...


21

It is grammatical, but it is indeed extremely jarring. It is (to me at least) just as jarring (if not more so) to say *Remember me, who is your friend. A much better way to express the idea is to say Remember me, your friend. On what basis do I say that it is grammatical, if it is so jarring? It is usual, in formal English, to make the verb in ...


20

It's real English. It's based on archaic English grammar, e.g., phrases like "Hear ye me" in the King James Bible.


18

We still haven't got a sponsor although the fact that we've written to dozens of companies is not a sentence. While "We still haven't got a sponsor" is an independent clause, "although the fact that we've written to dozens of companies" is not a clause because "the fact that we've written to dozens of companies" is merely a noun phrase. One could fix ...


16

This is ellipsis, but more importantly, English headlines follow special conventions that are, by and large, consistent across publications. Headlines have evolved to maximize information output and minimize space, because this has been optimal for newspapers (until the Internet age, at least — but now the conventions are ingrained into the world of ...


15

Disclaimer 1: I do morphology, not syntax. Disclaimer 2: The theoretical stuff is Chomskyan syntax, not proven fact. In any case, the need for do in English is commonly known informally as "do-support". In Chomskyan syntax, the need for do arises from the fact that there is no movement from the head of the Verb Phrase (VP) to the Tense or Inflection Phrase ...


15

Noam Chomsky famously used the sentence "Colorless green ideas sleep furiously". The syntax is flawless, but it has no meaning.


14

The sentence you gave does not consist of two subordinate clauses. It contains one independent clause, and one subordinate clause. The internal structure of the sentence goes like this: [He only gave me [what he owed me.]] The outer pair of brackets encloses the entire sentence, which is the independent clause. The inner pair of brackets indicates the ...


14

It's always a mistake to think of grammar as involving commas and words following them. Grammar is clauses and phrases and predicates; there are no commas in language, only in writing. In this case, there are two clauses: ((Eric's) psychology class) was different from the other classes (that) (Eric) had taken (Eric) was unhappy with ((Eric's) psychology ...


13

As in the other responses, this isn't a case of being grammatically wrong, rather it is semantically wrong. Noam Chomsky long ago observed that grammatically valid constructions can still be "wrong" because of the meaning of the particular words used. ("Colorless green ideas sleep furiously.") It would be correct (if odd) to ask someone to "...choose from ...


13

"Give me it" sounds very odd in Standard English, but so does "give it me". If you want to be on the safe side, I would go with "give it to me". There are, however, dialects where "give me it" and "give it me" are acceptable or even preferred, see e.g. this BBC article: Lancashire is a rich area in which to study accent, dialect and grammar as Willem ...


13

In context: How happy is the blameless vestal's lot! The world forgetting, by the world forgot. The second line, in more conventional syntax: Forgetting the world, and by the world forgotten. This is a sentence fragment (common in poetry), and the "subject" is only in the previous line. So here, the meaning is that a "blameless vestal" (chaste ...


13

All of these sentences are grammatically valid, but for some of them the intended meaning is not at all clear, and they are not the way that most English speakers would express these ideas. In general, "I feel myself" is generally understood to mean touching yourself for autoerotic pleasure, which is probably not what you mean in any of these examples. "I ...


12

Me neither is idiomatic English. It is a set phrase, as @cindi said. The OED has it as colloquial, originally USA, meaning nor I. Among the many examples from COHA: "Hast thou a wife?" "No." "Me neither." (Hemingway) "I don't understand, Queen," said the Prosecutor finally. "Me neither," groaned Dakin. (Ellery Queen) "I don't want to ever get married," ...


12

Whatever Google may say, the first version — "can't it also be" — sounds more natural to my ear. The fact that the second version has more Google hits may simply mean that other things on the page are what generated the hits. In other words, people link to pages that have information they need, regardless of grammar or writing style. Moreover, in looking ...


12

A rock smelled the color nine The syntax of the sentence works just fine but the sentence has absolutely no meaning because rocks do not smell and, even if they could, they couldn't smell a color that doesn't exist. But the form works with other words: A cat smelled the blue fish Related issues with English (which may or may not be next in your ...


11

Starting a sentence with as is not a problem, and never was. The Corpus of Contemporary American English has 150000+ cites for sentences starting with as, across all registers and contexts, including academic writing. Your boss is completely alone in this. However, what your boss might actually be objecting to is the so-called dangling modifier. ...


11

I think it's more correct to consider "This room needs cleaned" as a variant of "This room needs cleaning", instead of (or at least in addition to) "This room needs to be cleaned". This gives a pretty good guide for when the construction is appropriate: if standard English would use wants|needs|requires + gerund, the Central PA dialect is likely to use ...


11

Positioning adverbs is a complex affair. There are some rules of thumb, but for many adverbs, it is quite acceptable to place it before or after the verb. In this case, I think either way is acceptable, though I would probably find the former more natural, i.e. The word rarely turns up outside of those contexts. but the following is also acceptable, if ...


11

I can only answer the computer question, although it has the exact same meaning for the English language. In short: Syntax is structure, and semantics is meaning. Programming languages are written based on a grammar (just like English.) Grammars might say something like "If statements always have the form: if (condition) then (statement)." If you write ...


11

The sentence is structured like this: Subject clause: a withdrawal of belief in psychoanalysis Verb: is Predicate phrase: observable as a tendency of our culture ("observable" is an adjective modifying the subject, and the rest of the phrase modifies "observable") "We no longer feel that it can solve our emotional problems" is a second, ...


11

To me it looks like a combination of two modifiers: (adj noun) and (noun adj). Sometimes (for poetic reasons) adjectives are placed after the noun (this also happens with certain adjectives, such as elect in president elect). So here we have human face, which is further modified by a post-positioned adjective: ((human face) divine) => "divine human face" ...


11

If the verb to try is being used in the sense of to attempt, then it is generally followed by to + infinitive rather the -ing form of the verb. So, assuming that the trying here is attempting, it should be: I am trying to fix this. If, on the other hand, the verb is being used in the sense of testing something out (e.g. to see if it works or if you like ...


11

You yourself is perfectly grammatical and idiomatic. It is used for additional emphasis. The Corpus of Contemporary American English has 475 cites for it, and the British National Corpus has 137. But since these two naked numbers alone mean little, here's putting them into some perspective: COCA BNC you 3556382 661498 ...


10

The turn belongs to the black side, so the possessive is called for: "It's black's turn."



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