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12

I suggest nominal: (from TFD) existing in name only. The position is a serious one, not just nominal. she is the nominal head of our college, the real work is done by her deputy. (from Cambridge Dict,)


12

First of all, frugal is not "mostly about food." Second, the differences between the words should be apparent from dictionary definitions, but in case they're not: Stingy and miserly are both pejorative. Frugal is usually used in a complimentary sense when applied to a person, and is neutral when describing an object (such as a "frugal meal"). Stingy is ...


7

Nearly all of the words can be used interchangeably for the gist of the intended meaning. However, there's a slight implication difference with regard to whether the intent is to be not generous, or not wanting to spend more than one has to. A stingy person is likely not to be considered to spend money to do something "nice" or "go along with the crowd" ...


7

Personally, I would call such an unofficial sexual partner a lover, no matter what the genders of the people involved. The online Merriam-Webster's dictionary's definition of lover includes the following meaning: someone with whom a married person is having a love affair So, while the word does not necessarily imply a man sleeping with a married woman, ...


5

You may be looking for something like gravy train n. Slang An occupation or other source of income that requires little effort while yielding considerable profit. or, stretching a bit further afield, make-work job [T]he phrase "make-work" is . . . used for work that is both of negative financial benefit and also not considered to be of any ...


5

The word 'sated' would be a good fit. It's the past tense of 'sate' which means to satisfy (any appetite or desire) fully. or to fill to excess; surfeit; glut.


5

Respirable is the right word. It is used in medicine and toxicology also. fit for breathing respirable air http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/respirable Though, you can use breathable in the right context too.


4

Figurehead (Collins English Dictionary) a person nominally having a prominent position, but no real authority What you are trying to say is that this was not a figurehead position, but has responsibilities and authority...(which I imagine you will go on to describe).


4

That would definitely be slang (slang that ignores the fact that words ending in -ess usually denote something feminine, for that matter). "Paramour" is more unisex and means something similar, though.


3

Cultivate, with its sense “To nurture; to foster; to tend” can indeed be used as in the question's example sentence, but the usage isn't perfectly natural. One may be said to cultivate friends, if one pays attention to starting and keeping friendships; one may be said to cultivate good habits; but cultivating one's personality seems to me rather more ...


3

Alternatively, you might consider austere, for which one meaning is Having no adornment or ornamentation; bare: an austere style. [TFD] Usually austere is more extreme or severe than drab, but it has an elegance to it. When you want something more militant than understated it can work well.


3

I don't want to mischaracterize rich people, but a common slang phrase for going somewhere of inferior "quality" is slumming it: to endure conditions or accommodations that are worse than what one is accustomed to; to visit or frequent a place, esp. an amusement spot, considered low in social status. - TFD


3

The term cushy is often applied to sinecures (Of a job, task, or situation) undemanding, easy, or secure: cushy jobs that pay you to ski [Oxford Dictionaries Online] It is usually followed by job, post, position or similar reference to an assignment. You are clearly trying to indicate that the job is not like that of Co-ordinator of Inter-relations, ...


3

You are exploring the Cosmological Argument, which hypothesizes a supreme being who is the "uncaused cause". Synonyms included: The "uncaused cause", The "first cause" The "unmoved mover", and The "prime mover" See also Demiurge (which is typically applied to the concept of a supreme being who created the physical universe and set it in motion, but no ...


3

"Eternal" means that He has no beginning and no end.


3

As J.A. said, "paramour" is a gender-neutral equivalent, and a good way to express a "male mistress", so long as there is a some gender-context provided for the reader/listener. But the question specifically asked for a male-equivalent, not a male-acceptable equivalent. Technically, Cicisbeo is the word you are looking for. However, I had not even heard of ...


3

Rate on it's own implies speed, so scanning rate would be how fast the scans are done - scanning success rate would be closer, but I personally don't like the expression "scanning probability" much either. Is it the chance that something got scanned, the chances of a detected error, the chances of an undetected error, etc. Expanded Answer Sorry in advance ...


3

Webster's Dictionary of Synonyms (1942) assigns the two words to different groups of related terms. Anguish falls in the sorrow category (along with woe, heartache, grief, dole, and regret), while distress is the lead term in a group that includes suffering, misery, agony, dolor, and passion. This dictionary has this to say about the special features of the ...


3

As an aside, I would start both sentences with It is so,. Something that is meant to be a certain way certainly indicates a purpose on the side of an agent that supposedly made it so. Something that is supposed to be a certain way indicates a certain expectation from the side of the observer. His artwork is meant to be shocking. The artist has the ...


3

I would suggest one of the following: native apps indicating that they exist without an intermediary like a browser to run them desktop apps, command-line apps, or mobile apps indicating that they run in the desktop environment, on the command line, or on a mobile device


2

For something you can use unintentional. As in "The joke was unintentional". For somebody you can use negligent. As in "Jo is negligent, he never does what he is told". For both you could use mistake. What somebody did was a mistake. What something appears to mean is a mistake. This, for the object, can lead to mean that the person in charge of the object ...


2

Not last is non-terminal. Simple as that. (Sometimes it is called intermediate: an intermediate item in a series is neither the first nor the last.) But I second @Papa Poule's comment that if you are trying to distinguish the most recent but not necessarily the last, then use latest.


2

"on-going" "On-going batch" will indicate that there's more to come. Also, "non-final," but that's too formal here.


2

Two fluids which can't be mixed, where you cannot dissolve one in the other, are termed immiscible. If you pour immiscible fluids in the same container and stir vigorously, they will be together, but stay separate, and create an emulsion. Image credit: Wikipedia Now, "numinous" means "permeated with the presence of divinity", so the situation you're ...


2

If you look up uncreated, it has two meanings: existing, but without having been created, not yet created. If you are talking about God, it should be quite clear that the first meaning is the intended one.


2

Good idea to go with some variety in your resume! A key part of accurately describing your work often stems from identifying what it was that you actually did. Did you assemble things? Did you program for? Design? Oversee the production of? Depending on the nature of your project, some or all of the following may apply: Contributed to Assisted with ...


2

“They are quite different. Being bewildered means you are confused by something — the reason may be quite justified and those around you might very well understand the reason. Being embarrassed means that you feel you have done something that others would disapprove of (or at least find comical, at your expense). It's a (hopefully mild) form of shame.” —Hot ...


2

"Light", as an adjective, can certainly mean having an abundance of light, i.e. not dark. In your context, it is perfectly clear that you mean that turning on the lamp makes the room lighter. To that effect, the following is fine: Having more windows, the kitchen was lighter than the living room. Using the word "brighter" is more obvious without ...


2

S. I. Hayakawa, Choose the Right Word (1968), makes this distinction between stingy and miserly: Stingy emphasizes a lack of generosity, especially the reluctance to spend money. [Example omitted.] Miserly refers more to the hoarding of money or property than either the gluttonous consumption or the stingy use of it. [Example omitted.] James C. ...


2

I would suggest (although this is entirely from my own personal idea of these words rather than from any particularly reputable source) that @robusto is correct. However, while stingy and miserly are both pejorative, they are of different levels. For example, I would only describe someone as miserly if they were actively unkind as a result of their distaste ...



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