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66

There are various terms for this. Once upon a time, “screen name” would likely have been the most common. However, it seems to me that this convention has been driven by the most pervasive websites. So, with Facebook et al's move toward encouraging the use of real names, “screen name” seems much less common (phrases such as “nickname” appear to be used now ...


23

I guess screen-name is appropriate: Noun, Digital Technology: a unique sequence of characters that a person chooses to use for identification purposes when interacting with others online, as in computer games, instant messaging, or forums. Source:http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/screen+name


19

The one-word option that is the closest match to the French original is "something." She has a certain something about her. This has the same figurative meaning and close to the same literal meaning as the French phrase. There's a Cole Porter song called "She's Got That Thing" that uses "thing" to express the same thing as "je ne sais quoi": She's ...


16

Pathological blue coloration of the skin is known as cyanosis: a bluish or purplish discoloration (as of skin) due to deficient oxygenation of the blood A particularly notorious manifestation of this symptom occurred during the pan-global influenza epidemic of 1918-1919, and was termed heliotrope cyanosis because of the resemblance to the colour of the ...


16

I would call that cerebral humor. Dennis Miller is fairly cerebral. Merriam Webster (above link) even uses that as an example usage of the word. He's a very cerebral comedian.


12

Je ne sais quoi is a loan phrase in English so it is English already. This phrase captures the idea more precisely than any other equivalent and has the sense of that indescribable elegance, so that would be why it is loaned from French. One word equivalent would be something but it is used with the adjective certain and makes sense in a context. An ...


12

Livid or lividity is the correct term. I can assure you that the recently dead are indeed blue. Rather, it depends upon the position, in situ at time of death and in the hours shortly after. Blood pools when there is no heartbeat. Where it pools, there is dark blue discoloration, visible very clearly. See "postmortem lividity" or "cadaveric lividity" ...


11

Nickname is the appropriate word because it is a common synonym of screenname in computing. It is used outside the internet but it became a common word in this context. Nick (short of nickname), on the other hand, is mostly used in technical contexts.


10

Pallor may suggest the idea: a pale condition, esp when unnatural: fear gave his face a deathly pallor. unusual or extreme paleness, as from fear, ill health, or death. Source:Collins English Dictionary Pallor mortis: (Latin: pallor "paleness", mortis "of death") is a post mortem paleness which happens in those with light/white skin ...


10

Consider highbrow humor. Oxford Online defines highbrow as Scholarly or rarefied in taste


10

I suggest 'Internet handle' (but having said that, Fathima's screen name is a well-established term, as a Google search will quickly show).


9

Wit a natural aptitude for using words and ideas in a quick and inventive way to create humour: -ODE Witty jokes usually need some intelligence to get (and make for that matter).


9

I have often seen "alias" used in this way in describing what someone is called on an Internet community.


9

You can introduce the mention of the additional deficit simply with the word worse: Worse, it creates instability issues. Or: {Even worse / Worse still}, it creates instability issues.


8

No. I think you're spot-on correct. At least that's how I see things. A pretentious person is pretending (same etymology) to be something or someone he or she is not. An ostentatious person, on the other hand, delights in flaunting who he or she is and/or what they have. An expression which may reflect the lifestyle of the "rich and famous" is ...


8

Their main difference of 'artificial waterway' vs 'natural waterway' is clear from their etymology. Actually canal comes from Latin "canna" (reed). Canal: early 15c., from French canal, chanel "water channel, tube, pipe, gutter" (12c.), from Latin canalis "water pipe, groove, channel," noun use of adjective from canna "reed" (see cane (n.)). Originally ...


8

A canal is a man-made waterway. You are right in thinking that a canal is not a type of river in English. A river (in this sense) is a natural waterway, and waterway is a useful generic term to use to describe these kind of features, whether they are man-made or not. From the OED, in sense 6a (which I think is most appropriate to the original question): ...


8

Pseudonym has meanings beyond the web, but is just as applicable to usage online as off. It's also generally more appropriate to both formal writing, and writing for non-technical audiences. It's a bit more widely understood than the alternatives, being several hundred years older and more established in the language. (Screen Name and Handle are, as already ...


5

Actually the definition you offer more closely matches Aristotle’s term anagnōrisis (ἀναγνώρισις), recognition, notably the recognition of the truth by the tragic hero: definition in Liddell-Scott-Jones lexicon here; usage in Aristotle’s Poetics 1452a here, where Fyfe translates anagnōrisis as “discovery” and peripeteia as ...


4

In the US Military one common term was FIGMO, politely it meant "Forget It, Got My Orders", I'll leave it to you & Google to figure out what it really meant. Another term was "DEROS" meaning Date Eligible for Return from Overseas, the date when you'd leave to go home. It's worth a Google as well if for nothing else the trench art. You'll find that ...


4

A neutral term--but hardly amusing or unique--is feedback. Personally, I'm not a big fan of the word, implying as it does a machine with a built-in device for detecting an increase or decrease and then responding accordingly by performing an operation. Example: a thermostat that controls the temperature in your home. I prefer the term reaction. A somewhat ...


3

I suggest allure to convey the idea of an undefinable attractiveness about her: high, often subtle attractiveness: charms that still allure. Source: http://www.thefreedictionary.com/Allure


3

Specifically to add a note of discordance to the otherwise useful distinction of river and canal as natural vs manmade waterways, I submit for your perplexity a natural waterway near my place of residence. It is called Hood Canal. It is a fjord that was formed about 13,000 years ago by the Puget lobe of the Cordilleran Ice Sheet. In fact, it is not the ...


3

The term unorthodox is used of things which do not adhere to “orthodoxy” but are not necessarily in opposition to it: “An unorthodox solution to the problem”. But I’ve only ever seen the term heterodox used for matters which oppose orthodoxy: “A heterodox sect”. Also, as indicated by the examples I’ve given, unorthodox is usually contrasted to a figurative ...


3

Publish is a good alternative to post, in your context. It is used frequently by Content Management Systems to describe uploading content to the internet.


3

Anything wrong with "deadline"?


3

I think your analysis of the distinction between the words is pretty good. However, pretentiousness doesn't require naiveté or even deception, (except perhaps self-deception.) One can be both ostentatious and pretentious. In fact, I think that the word ostentatious could nearly always be replaced by pretentious without losing meaning. The difference is that ...


3

The other answers are good, but I think you have a better likelihood of being understood if you use the word ashen instead: ashen (ˈæʃən) adj 1. drained of colour; pallid 2. consisting of or resembling ashes 3. (Colours) of a pale greyish colour Example sentences: The ashen body laid lifeless on the floor. Or His face turned ashen as his ...


3

No, that sounds pretty on-point, what you have. I'd argue that anyone can be pretentious regardless of class, though. In a nutshell, being ostentatious is flaunting what you have in a ridiculous, over-the-top way, be it wealth, knowledge, skills, or whatever, while being pretentious is flaunting what you think you have and what you think you should have. ...


3

Both refer to short-lived things or activities or events. Transient implies some kind of transition between states in which the transient state does not last very long.



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