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51

So, my question: How did they call these herbal infusions? During the Middle English period, the concoction made from the herb was itself referred to as an herb. They would say "Drink this herb". They didn't bother to say "infusion of this herb". Drinke þis herbe..and it [wol] make al þe body in-to a swat. A Middle English Translation of Macer ...


48

Tisane. an infusion (as of dried herbs) used as a beverage or for medicinal effects Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Latin ptisana, from Greek ptisanē, literally, crushed barley, from ptissein to crush — more at pestle First Known Use: 14th century dictionary.com


39

Inpatient: A patient who is admitted to a hospital or clinic for treatment that requires at least one overnight stay. (AHD)


29

You may be looking for socialite: someone who is well-known in fashionable society and is often seen at parties and other social events for wealthy people (Merriam-Webster)


19

I'm not sure "inmate" - the accepted answer - is the typical English term. At least not for Britsh English. A more typical term, particularly for First World War would be "resident patient". There is even a Sherlock Holmes story titled The Adventure of the Resident Patient.


16

gadabout A habitual pleasure-seeker. I think this is a great, fun word that doesn't get enough play.


16

This is actually an interesting question, since they aren't quite synonyms as one might imagine. Here's what a bit of research produced: The casual difference in definition is as follows (via Wikipedia): Twilight: Twilight is the illumination of the Earth's lower atmosphere when the Sun itself is not directly visible because it is below the horizon. ...


12

inmate: any of a group occupying a single place of residence; especially : a person confined (as in a prison or hospital) (Merriam Webster) In a hospital setting, the word currently has a strong connotation of referring to patients with mental disorders. It might sound strange if most of the people in the hospital are being held there for other ...


11

You may be looking for party animal (informal) someone who ​enjoys ​parties and ​party ​activities very much and goes to as many as ​possible: Sarah's a ​real ​party ​animal - she ​likes to ​dance all ​night. — Cambridge


10

When you boil down the question, the appropriate answer hinges on what would have been meant by "herbal tea" prior to the introduction of the word 'tea' in the sense of 2. a. A drink made by infusing these [Thea (now often included in Camellia)] leaves in hot water, having a somewhat bitter and aromatic flavour, and acting as a moderate stimulant; ...


7

Eventgoer (or event-goer) One who attends an event. This should work just like partygoer: a person who attends a party or who attends parties frequently "chauffeured transportation was provided for those partygoers who had overindulged themselves at the bar" The -goer suffix means: a ​person who goes to the ​stated ​type of ​place ...


7

Common use in our area differentiates between (and provides differently constructed and staffed facilities for) an acute-care patient and a long-term care patient. But the single word really is 'patient' in either case. I suppose you could also use 'resident' for a patient at a long-term care facility.


6

That is the auctions clerk The person employed by the principal auctioneer or auction firm to record what is sold, to whom and for what price. liveauctioneers.com: terminology Here's a more complete job description: 1) Records amounts of final bids for merchandise at auction sales, and receives money from final bidders at auction: ...


6

Man About Town A man who frequently attends fashionable social functions, as in Fred is quite the man about town these days. This expression, first recorded in 1734, uses town in the sense of “a sophisticated place” as opposed to rural settings. The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary


6

'Patient(s)' would probably be the best word - see dictionary.


5

To add to @Nick's answer dusk = evening and twilight = morning or evening although first light and dawn are more often used when referring to the morning.


5

The correct term for this is inpatient. Someone with an acute condition undergoing long-term treatment is not considered an inmate as mentioned above, that's certainly a term that would never be used in a medical environment. inpatient - noun - a patient who lives in hospital while under treatment. 'Patient' is also an acceptable term, because a ...


5

The way I've heard such people described is as "social butterflys"


3

I've seen such things (real time updates) on websites referred to as tickers. i believe this comes from stock tickers, which predate the web, which are so named because they use ticker tape. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ticker_tape I've also seen "scroller", although this, (perhaps like tickers), tend to refer to information which scrolls constantly ...


3

Fellow CS guy here, so I know what you're going for with "online". You need to keep exactly that word so that you're being precise in what you're saying. In cases like that, I just structure the sentence around the word. I'd say something like "Designing an online algorithm was not an objective of this research/project/assignment."


3

Of course that's a question of slang and preference, but I'm partial to code monkey. Mostly because of the Jonathan Coulton song.


2

You could simply say 'isn't it funny?' 'Isn't it funny that the IT expert gets hacked all the time?' 'Funny that when she took her dog home from the groomer, it got skunked immediately' While the second sentence can imply that something potentially dodgy happened, it can just as frequently be something humorous.


2

I'd say that the mirrors are all level. level [lev-uh l] adjective having no part higher than another; having a flat or even surface. being in a plane parallel to the plane of the horizon; horizontal.


2

According to vocabulary.com, aplomb is defined as composure under pressure/stress. They give the following definition Aplomb is the ultimate test for cool: grace under pressure. Use aplomb to show great restraint under even the most trying circumstances. In retail, it's always a good idea to handle the angry customers with aplomb. Also, according ...


2

One of the grim tenets of the stand-up comic's vernacular is that you either kill (reduce the audience to a state of helpless mirth) or die (stand at the microphone surrounded by a crushing silence, your jokes withering and expiring as you bring them out for the cruel audience to inspect). A similar vocabulary rules other forms of popular entertainment, with ...


2

exhibits displays shows fulfills satisfies includes embodies maintains incorporates??? (really starting to get leery now) Honestly, though, none are great. Certainly does get very tiring using the same words when writing scientifically... but I think I'm still with Lawrence. You'll go back later, and it'll just sound so very forced, and like you're ...


2

my millenial daughter uses the term FOMO. It's a person who suffers from a severe Fear Of Missing Out.


2

Perhaps this from the OED Online 'fire' definition: P2. With a verb. .... g. to play (also mess) with fire: to take unnecessary or foolish risks; to invite trouble. Often paired with to get burned, expressing inevitability that trouble will result from a particular action.


2

In the context of programming languages, the term dialect is idiomatic. Ngram confirms that SQL dialect(s) is much more common than SQL variant(s). A dialect of a programming language or a data exchange language is a (relatively small) variation or extension of the language that does not change its intrinsic nature. - wikipedia Here are two examples ...


1

The word closest to an answer is in your question, though erroneous. It is variant



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