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5

A frequently used noun would be "Trailblazer" - owing to the concept of the first person to enter an unknown, potentially risky area. The term is used in nearly any application where innovation, and a fearless disregard for conventional wisdom are involved , i.e. Medicine, Technology, Sports, etc. Example: "Dr. DeBakey was considered by most to be a true ...


5

cross talk (Merriam-Webster) unwanted signals in a communication channel (as in a telephone, radio, or computer) I feel this is better than noise for OP's exact context, since it carries a much stronger implication that the unwanted signal is a communication intended for some other recipient, not just random static (crackling or hissing noises on a ...


3

I think the best word for this is a montage: see defn four below. http://www.dictionary.com/browse/montage the technique of combining in a single composition pictorial elements from various sources, as parts of different photographs or fragments of printing, either to give the illusion that the elements belonged together originally or to allow each ...


3

As Gandalf states adaptable would fit the bill. So would flexible. (Of a person) ready and able to change so as to adapt to different circumstances: 'you can save money if you’re flexible about where your room is located' References: http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/english/flexible


2

You could describe the lamp as obtrusive. noticeable in an unpleasant or annoying way "The obtrusive lamp blocked his view."


2

I like the phrase "fickle weather" and use it myself for this exact purpose, but it's perhaps a bit more literary than saying "changeable weather", which also works well and will be understood by everyone (whereas 'fickle' is a lower frequency word than 'changeable' and it's not obvious what it means from its root). "Unpredictable weather" also works, but ...


2

gimmick a method or trick that is used to get people's attention or to sell something Here's a good example of the word used in this way: Americans have made it clear: They don’t want a lot of gimmicks in their TVs. In an effort to improve sales, though, television makers have tried gimmicks anyway. They have praised 3-D TVs. They have ...


2

A single word for this escapes me, but there are many options if you simply find synonyms for insignificant and improvement that imply value specifically. trivial (adj.) Of little value or importance "That is a trivial addition." negligible (adj.) So small or unimportant as to be not worth considering; insignificant "That is a negligible add-...


2

First, let me diagnose the error. To say that 'cats' is the opposite of 'dogs' is to confuse antonymy with collocation. Likewise for 'apples' and 'oranges.' Both children and adults commonly make this error. I know of no conventional word for these dubious antonyms (although this page suggests there are terms for different types of antonyms). Pseudoantonym ...


2

Marginal meets the requirements of your original question. Marginal: at the outer or lower limits; minimal for requirements; almost insufficient: marginal subsistence; marginal ability. Usage example: The Marvelous Margin Maker showed marginal improvements in 2016.


1

Regarding the first part of your question: is the usage of 'prevarication' as a synonym for 'vacillation' common, acceptable, and/or preferable? The two words are not synonymous, so to use them as synonyms is very uncommon, generally unacceptable and certainly not preferable. Prevaricate -- ODO Speak or act in an evasive way: *'he seemed to ...


1

Your [title] header says “insignificant,” but your [question’s] body says “no added value.” To the extent that it’s true that “no means no,” I’d go with: “worthless addition.” (seemingly relevant use from gamefaqs[dot]com) If insignificant means insignificant, by using Dictionary[dot]com’s fifth meaning for that adjective (without meaning; meaningless) ...


1

superficial /ˌso͞opərˈfiSHəl/ adjective appearing to be true or real only until examined more closely. not thorough, deep, or complete; cursory. –Google The superficial difference between a Bentley and a Rolls-Royce is the addition of a superfluous nameplate. superfluous /so͞oˈpərflo͞oəs/ adjective unnecessary, especially through being more ...


1

I would suggest (I would also read and immediatly understand the following expressions): Design-specification-dependent Design-specification-independent


1

In my opinion it’s not so much formal or informal, as usage. As an educated native (British) English speaker of a certain age, I would avoid ‘called’ in the first two of your examples because it just doesn’t feel right. Possible ways of rewriting are: I had an opportunity to attend a seminar at an agency — the XYZ Group. . I studied at a type of ...


1

As a native English speaker, I can tell you that craziness is definitely a more common word. You're right that craze can refer to popularity, whereas craziness refers to insanity. Craziness is defined as The state of being broken in mind; imbecility or weakness of intellect; derangement;2 insanity 1. The state of being broken down or weakened; as, ...


1

Consider main and transverse pairs: the 'transverse' pair lying across the diagonal axis described by the 'main' pair. In geometry, 'transverse' seems to apply more to curves and waves than to points on a plane, though, so it may not be fully appropriate.


1

Counterproductive - having the opposite of the desired effect: Oxford Dictionary - thwarting the achievement of an intended goal; tending to defeat one's purpose: Dictionary.com - not helpful : making the thing you want to happen less likely to happen: Merriam-Webster "He has no counterproductive accessories to mar his natural beauty." "US Homeland ...


1

Convient has one meaning of fitting in well with plans. And here's where the missing context is important. Things that mesh with your plans make your life easier, and while it may be odd to consider a life that's too easy, consider this dialogue from Singapore Fling by A Adams: "The flat is convenient when I work late" "If it's so convenient, why ...


1

According to Merriam-Webster, the first two meanings of convenient are : allowing you to do something easily or without trouble : located in a place that is nearby and easy to get to Upon reading the full definition, it becomes clear the convenient is used mostly to mean "close," "accessible," and "comfortably or easily performed." This last ...


1

The difference is entirely a matter of style. Here is what Wikipedia says: "The first recorded use of grey as a color name in the English language was in AD 700. Grey is the dominant spelling in European and Commonwealth English, although gray remained in common usage in the UK until the second half of the 20th century. Gray has been the preferred ...


1

Agile able to move quickly and easily. relating to or denoting a method of project management, used especially for software development, that is characterised by the division of tasks into short phases of work and frequent reassessment and adaptation of plans. As a software developer using agile as a term of personal characteristic may be misleading due ...


1

The two are not the same. Conceptually, a difference is the change caused by the set of differentials. Perhaps an example will help. The difference in gearing between two bicycles is a function of the ring gear differential, the rear cassette differential, and the drive wheel radius differential. Once you talk about the difference due to a single variable, ...


1

Market Leader the interpretation is pretty straightforward: within their market, consulting or software, they are the have the largest market share.


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This admittedly partial answer explains how fully and wholly are sometimes used differently from completely and totally. fully, from The Free Dictionary (TFD) at least: It was fully an hour before she came. Fully half of the volunteers did not appear In these two examples, wholly, completely and totally would not be used. wholly, ...


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Noise — Business Dictionary communication Anything that interferes with, slows down, or reduces the clarity or accuracy of a communication. Thus, superfluous data or words in a message are noise because they detract from its meaning.


1

Maybe prattle? It doesn't imply "not addressed to you" but it does mean inconsequential verbiage. https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/prattle


1

I go for singularity (or singular), meaning The quality or condition of being singular. A trait marking one as distinct from others; a peculiarity. Something uncommon or unusual. The French language has a phrase which summarizes the notion of singularity, and that is je ne sais quoi, which is defined as "an intangible quality that ...


1

Mind meld, group think, 42 heads are better than one, human cloud (or cloud of humanity), hive mind.


1

I realize an answer has already been selected, but consider finalized (TFD) Put into final form; complete as in Finalized Product. This has the connotation that a conscious decision was made to call this iteration the final form.



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