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19

Merriam-Webster's Learner's Dictionary defines the word charlatanic (alternative form charlatanical) as : of or like a charlatan : marked by or given to pretension and quackery In turn, the same source defines the noun charlatan as : a person who falsely pretends to know or be something in order to deceive people I'd be a little hesitant to use ...


12

[...] the bullshitting salesman claimed [...] . bullshit [...] 4. (intr) to talk in an exaggerated or foolish manner. 5. (tr) to talk bullshit to (a person). Usage: Bullshit was formerly considered to be taboo, and it was labelled as such in older editions of Collins English Dictionary. However, it has now become acceptable in ...


12

When you boil down the question, the appropriate answer hinges on what would have been meant by "herbal tea" prior to the introduction of the word 'tea' in the sense of 2. a. A drink made by infusing these [Thea (now often included in Camellia)] leaves in hot water, having a somewhat bitter and aromatic flavour, and acting as a moderate stimulant; ...


12

Since you're asking for a computing term, I suggest "vulnerability". From a security point of view, this is the main concern. Vulnerability — Wikipedia In computer security, a vulnerability is a weakness which allows an attacker to reduce a system's information assurance. Vulnerability is the intersection of three elements: a system susceptibility ...


10

Try jack of all trades. It means you're good at many things and have a variety of skills. A word would be versatile. Addition - If the above two options don't work for you, try a fancy word that would make you sound smart and good at english, just the way you want them to think of you, good at many things, a protean.


9

Quite avoiding terms like Renaissance Man I'd suggest versatile. 2: embracing a variety of subjects, fields, or skills; also : turning with ease from one thing to another Reference: http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/versatile


7

Keeping it simple: "I have a wide range of interests, including...". But be forewarned, each of your example subjects can be broken up into smaller subjects, some of which you may actually dislike! The more you learn, the more you discover how little you really know!


7

I like the word deceitful in this case: guilty of or involving deceit; deceiving or misleading others. MW In the above definition, they give this example: charged the store owner with such deceitful practices as inflating the list prices for items only so he could put them on sale at drastically reduced prices In your case: Citing ...


7

Consider necessity, from ODO The state or fact of being required the necessity of providing parental guidance: It is a synonym of requiredness, from ODO The fact or quality of being required; necessity, obligatoriness I'm no programmer, but requiredness is okay to be used for this purpose. Here's an example from IBM site. Or simply using ...


7

Inquisitive, defined by Dictionary.com given to inquiry, research, or asking questions; eager for knowledge; intellectually curious: "an inquisitive mind" unduly or inappropriately curious; prying


6

Most of the replies here imply a level of skill. Being interested at something doesn't necessarily mean being good at it. If you're simply looking tor something that means interest in subjects, here are some suggestions: eclectic tastes varied interests diverse hobbies engrossed in many subjects a kaleidoscope of topics (feel free to pick & mix)


5

Perhaps dissembling. Oxford Online defines dissemble as Conceal one’s true motives, feelings, or beliefs: an honest, sincere person with no need to dissemble Or you could just say lying or fraudulent. If you want something a bit more metaphoric, you could use snake oil A product, policy, etc. of little real worth or value that is promoted as the ...


4

Polymath could work: I'm a bit of a polymath: I like maths but also love history and am pretty good at sports. This fits the "not arrogant" part as long as you say it in a self-deprecating way, perhaps with a smile and a slightly sardonic tone. From Wikipedia: A polymath is a person whose expertise spans a significant number of different subject ...


4

A general word for "pretending to know more than one actually does" is "pretentious," which is defined in the New Oxford American Dictionary as: Attempting to impress by affecting greater importance, talent, culture, etc., than is actually possessed. This doesn't connote deliberate, blatant falsehoods; rather it suggests plausible-sounding invention in ...


4

Lacuna — OED noun (plural lacunae /ləˈkjuːniː/ or lacunas) 1 An unfilled space; a gap: 'the journal has filled a lacuna in Middle Eastern studies' 'Thus, divergent growth apparently prompted offsetting, in order for the coral to maintain the lacuna and occupy the space around it.' 'Fill the lacunae in your inspiration by ...


4

Since she stepped out him, his bitterness has turned him into a misogynist mi·sog·y·nist məˈsäjənəst/ noun a person who dislikes, despises, or is strongly prejudiced against women. synonyms: woman-hater; antifeminist, (male) chauvinist, sexist, hater; informal male chauvinist pig "he apparently deserved his ...


3

See also: "The Hedgehog and the Fox". There is some literature that highlights to role of folks who are "interdisciplinary" as key to major innovations. If you want to know more about that looks for scholarly papers and chase the citations. This is sometimes call boundry crossing. This habit, that of being a generalist, is at great enabling the ...


3

You could also consider bluffer or bluffing. "bluff". try to deceive someone as to one's abilities or intentions. In the context of the question it would be the abilities part of the definition that is of relevance (as in the "bluffer's guide" series of books where the title refers to feigning unwarranted expertise).


3

You could use need. After all, require means to need something. Here is a fancy word, desideration, from Wiktionary The act of desiderating. (expressing a need or wish to have or attain) Something desired or required. Also, Try demand - a strong need for something.


2

In the context of programming languages, the term dialect is idiomatic. Ngram confirms that SQL dialect(s) is much more common than SQL variant(s). A dialect of a programming language or a data exchange language is a (relatively small) variation or extension of the language that does not change its intrinsic nature. - wikipedia Here are two examples ...


2

You'd be surprised to know that the female version of "forefathers" is indeed "foremothers". From Merrian-Webster, the definition of "foremother" is a female ancestor However, if one wanted to describe both his/her foremothers and forefathers under the same light, then I suggest you use these gender-neutral synonyms: forerunner, predecessor, ancestor, ...


2

How about "rapporteur?" An old French word for someone who reports. It's a term used at the United Nations and other international organizations. a person who is appointed by an organization to report on the proceedings of its meetings. [Wikipedia]


2

Consider tapped out out of money : broke The term can also mean spent, exhausted: tapped out after months on the road Merriam-Webster


2

I'd suggest, wily wily (and guileful) stress an attempt to ensnare or entrap; they usually imply treacherous astuteness or sagacity and a lack of scruples regarding the means to one's end. M-W's Dictionary of Synonyms wily implies skill and deception in maneuvering. M-W


2

Maybe someone who is "inquisitive"?


2

It is hard to guess what do you mean by "weakness". If you mean performance, then the "weakest" part of your program is called [the] bottleneck: A point of congestion or blockage, in particular.


2

In a bruise, or in clouds at dusk, or in an angry person's face, this process of darkening in color is called purpling. When you make a color darker, artists and designers generally say that they deepen the hue. So you can say: As the intensity increased, so did the hue deepen.


2

Consider refreshments. Refreshments noun 1 A light snack or drink: light refreshments are available - ODO


2

Perhaps addresses? to treat of; deal with: chapter 10 addresses the problem of transitivity Collins So Method X addresses problem Y


2

Well, if you simply Google that symbol, you get that it's commonly called a greater-than sign. So there's your answer: an error is greater than 0.99. Greater in this context refers to quantity, which is appropriate for a number. Higher refers to relative height or altitude (including on a scale, e.g. a higher temperature), and bigger really refers to ...



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