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25

The cheapening of psychiatric terms is not restricted to OCD, look at what has happened to "psychopath". (Where I used to live, it has come to be identical with "ex-husband".) As HotLicks says, we can go to its root with "obsessive", or if exercised on language (if the cap fits, wear it) we have "pedantic". In general, "niggly" and "picky". Area51's "fussy" ...


21

Extensive may suggest a wide but not full coverage: having wide or considerable extent, extensive reading. (M-W)


13

It was, and sometimes still is, called a tidal wave, even though it has nothing to do with tides.


12

How about winsome: adj. Attractive or appealing in a fresh, innocent way


9

You can't throw a bunch of adjectives together and expect English to cough up some magic word. It might happen, but then again, it might not. If you want to focus on her beauty, use beautiful, attractive, appealing, charming If you want to focus on her appearance, you could try classy, elegant, sophisticated... or even resplendent (depending on ...


8

Fussy could serve the purpose. too concerned or worried about details or standards, especially unimportant ones [Oxford]


7

This is a turnkey solution. From The Free Dictionary: turn·key adj. Supplied, installed, or purchased in a condition ready for immediate use, occupation, or operation: a turnkey computer system; a turnkey housing project. Of or relating to something supplied, installed, or purchased in this manner: a turnkey agreement. A turnkey ...


7

An angler. Now, technically speaking, angler only describes fishermen who specifically use a rod and line, as opposed to those who use nets, or trawl, or oystermen, etc: angler [Collins]: a person who fishes with a rod and line But in actual, popular use it is considered and used as a perfect synonym for fisherman.


7

I suppose you could use anal, for someone who has an obsessive attention to detail but I'd say that's stronger than just being fussy. Source: The Free Dictionary


7

The areas are known as council estates, and the properties, council housing, as they were built and managed by local government, typically a city or county council. Today, many of the properties are owned by private, non-profit housing associations, but the term council house is still commonly used to describe them. There are a number of names for somebody ...


6

I'd say Revert, as it is clearer that you're returning to a previous state, as opposed to Reverse, which from the formal definition implies an opposite condition, not simply the past condition (but from common usage I'm familiar with, I'd say is nearly interchangeable with revert). (As an aside, see the interesting case of the noun of revert; possibly ...


5

Tsunami: (it is a unique term in its meaning of big wave caused by a catastrophic event as shown below), the common terms used were tidal wave and seismic sea waves. Tsunami is a Japanese word with the English translation, "harbor wave." Represented by two characters, the top character, "tsu," means harbor, while the bottom character, "nami," ...


5

I like chic: adjective (chicer, chicest) Elegantly and stylishly fashionable: The connotation of stylish welcomes a deeper appreciation than most people offer to the elegant woman the OP describes: 1856, as a noun, "style, artistic skill," from French chic, 19c. in "stylishness" sense, originally "subtlety" (16c.), which is of unknown ...


5

I love the word "pernickety" (which is an alternative form of "persnickety"): per(s)nickety overparticular; fussy Source: Dictionary.com Mr. Pernickety from the Mr. Men series


4

The OP suggested an excellent expression: Hang head [in shame] to be ashamed Cambridge Idioms Dictionary, 2nd ed. Today's top image on a Google search of hang your head was suggested as the archetypical facepalm in a comment by Jason C:


4

Each of the three terms employed a different word picture to arrive at the same point of meaning. Supplant reached the meaning take the place of by extension from under foot, trip up and defeat: early 14c., "to trip up, overthrow, defeat, dispossess," from Old French suplanter, sosplanter "to trip up, overthrow, drive out, usurp," or directly ...


4

You may be able to convince the users that the spreadsheet does not need to be altered if you refer to it as preconfigured. preconfigure (v) - Configure in advance Note that this will not stop some users from attempting to alter the spreadsheet anyway, as the word may suggest some degree of reconfigurability, but it should be enough to satisfy the ...


4

A piscator rare A fisherman. A fisher, is also applicable A person who catches fish for a living or for sport: [Oxford]


4

There are three areas covered here. Social housing describes estates and flats built by the local council, or for the local Council by a Housing Trust. (Is that what a 'Project' is?) But most of these estates or blocks of flats are not slums and not inhabited by problem families. If your housing is subsidised you are "On benefits," colloquially, On social. ...


3

Hide one's face is an idiomatic expression which is close in meaning to facepalm: Also, hide one's head. Feel shame or embarrassment. For example, You needn't hide your face-you're not to blame, or Whenever the teacher singled her out for something, shy little Mary hid her head. This idiom alludes to the gesture indicative of these feelings. [Late ...


3

Some literatures (French and Farsi have been instanced on this site) applaud and even demand such employment of synonyms; but in English this is deprecated and mocked as 'elegant variation'. Moreover, in some disciplines it is regarded as a grave vice to stray from the most neutral term available in introducing a quotation. Any more colorful term, such as ...


3

There are two aspects or dimensions when describing how much knowledge or information is present somewhere: breadth and depth. Breadth refers to the extent of the topics covered; depth refers to the thoroughness with which each topic is treated. "Vast", to me, primarily implies breadth, while "comprehensive" implies both. So I would recommend first ...


3

More traditional would be "scoundrel" and "blackguard". (If you want even more of a Bertie Wooster ambience, the man is clearly "a cad and a bounder", what ho.) Specifically for fraud one may think of "cheat", "swindler", "con artist", "scamster" and so forth. Or if he was not stealing the petty cash but merely pretending to be something he was not, perhaps ...


3

In American English, 'mark' is not commonly used to describe anything along these lines. At least, not in the West, Mid-west, or Alaska, where I have been. If someone said, "I got good marks in class," most everyone I know would either not understand the sentence or have to think about it for a moment. This may not hold true for New England, California, or ...


3

Not exactly surprised and amused, but there is a word for puzzled and amused: bemused (M-W) bemuse: to cause (someone) to be confused and often also somewhat amused Does that work for you? If the habit is bad or sad, you could be shocked I suspected Dexter killed people, but I was shocked/appalled/horrified/scandalized when I actually saw it. ...


3

Will neighborhood work well? a district, especially one forming a community within a town or city. [Google]


3

[Note: I probably should have gone more into differences in specific meanings in context, but I feel like that would be too time-consuming. If necessary, I can add something in later.] I started thinking of what might replace the verb phrase in some examples that came to mind, with minimal rewording of everything else. Notice that "fall short of" refers to ...


3

In literal situations (physically failing to reach a mark), I think you could use undershoot As others have pointed out, the metaphoric usages of "fall short of" are quite varied, and there probably is not a one-word synonym that would fit all such cases.


3

Winsome is a good old English word for that: adjective 1. sweetly or innocently charming; winning; engaging: a winsome smile. an elegant demure and a winsome smile describes many a lass in English books.


3

The symptoms associated with the trivial use of "OCD" tend to match the definition of obsessive-compulsive personality disorder (OCPD). Rephrasing the DSM-5 definition of OCPD gives several words for describing aspects of OCPD. Legalistic; preoccupied with rules so as to lose the point of an activity. Perfectionist; letting the perfect be the enemy of the ...



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