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62

I think you're looking for the word shavings. Filings would be ok, too.


36

It's a pun on break. The slogan exhorts the reader to "Break the rules," and to make the point it does just that itself, by breaking the rule about how to spell break.


30

If you're looking for a neutral word which doesn't carry value judgements, try "frugal". If you want a word with fairly positive connotations, try "economical" or thrifty (noun: saver; note: spendthrift is a noun, but it has the opposite meaning to thrifty). If you want a word with negative connotations, try "cheap" (nouns: skinflint, miser, cheapo). ...


28

You could generally use Swarf, which also works for other materials too. Swarf generally implies relatively big pieces of waste though, "metal dust" would be acceptable if you really do end up with a very fine powder. Additionally, when grinding something, people tend to refer to the metal that goes flying as sparks


16

That'd be a realist, wouldn't it?


14

In the jewellery trade it is known as lemel or lemels. An alteration of earlier limall, limmell, from Middle English lemaille, limail, from Middle French limaille, from Old French, from limer to file, from Latin limare. (Merriam-Webster Online) Though in all the years of living with my father, a Silversmith, I never heard him use the word. He simply ...


10

I would first submit that "learnings" is highly irregular, and you probably want to avoid its usage. A good word here for you would be "findings" if you want a similar word that seems to suggest a broader scope when compared to conclusions (which is not a synonym at any rate).


9

A person who is always on the lookout for special deals and offers, especially in retail shops but also in supermarkets, can be called a bargain hunter. As more choices turned once-loyal shoppers into savvy bargain hunters, clothing manufacturers responded by shifting production overseas to cut costs.


9

A synonym for this would be findings.


9

The metalwork equivalent of sawdust is "swarf" The OED has this as: Fine chips or filings of stone, metal, or other material produced by a machining operation:


7

I think the phrase "penny pincher" would also work here. In the usage I've observed it is more neutral than some of the other suggestions.


6

You might say it irised shut, using verb iris that means “(of an aperture, lens or door) To open or close in the manner of an iris” [en.wiktionary)] in past tense. Also consider spiraled shut (which I think is a more accurate description of the curved pieces of a camera iris closing) and winked shut or blinked shut, which are less accurate for a camera ...


6

Fimbulwinter. In Norse mythology, it is the mighty winter which precedes Ragnarok - the war that ends the world. It is an image that has been used often in Scandinavian literature since - and some SF and Fantasy English Language writings.


5

To answer your question, both forms are correct. I'm migrating to Australia means you are moving to that country. I'm immigrating to Australia means you are leaving your home country (often your birth-place) for Australia. migrate 2. (Of a person) move to a new area or country in order to find work or better living conditions: e.g: Many villages ...


5

You probably won't find any non-mythological terms in English. The whole idea of Ice Ages having happened in the distant past didn't really get figured out until the late 1800s, so it's pretty unlikely that Shakespeare or his contemporaries would ever have come up with anything to describe them.


5

Polarizing or divisive might be what you're looking for. Polarizing isn't often used this way (in the figurative rather than technical meaning) in my experience, but it should still be a recognizable term. Polarize: II. fig. 4. a. trans. To accentuate a division within (a group, system, etc.); to separate into two (or occas. several) opposing ...


4

Necessarily a neutral point of view? Because Ambivalent is neither optimistic nor pessimistic, but not necessarily neutral. Otherwise Apathetic or Indifferent comes to mind.


4

Master of ceremonies (MC) is actually a good fit here. It's true that MC is a term used in hip-hop, but that's simply borrowed from the more general term. MW notes that the term is from the 1600s... predates hip-hop quite a bit


4

In a research project we have "results" which is a detailed account of what has been found, and "conclusions" where you present a summarized review of the results and add whatever implications they have for practical application, or further studies.


3

I agree the phrase is worth avoiding; but avoiding it does not require any substitute. The sample sentence of which you offer the first part almost certainly deserves to be deleted entirely during revision. Resist temptations to talk about your essay within your essay. (One exception might be a partitio or divisio section offering an advance road-map to a ...


3

I would suggest one of the following: native apps indicating that they exist without an intermediary like a browser to run them desktop apps, command-line apps, or mobile apps indicating that they run in the desktop environment, on the command line, or on a mobile device


3

For the small pieces that come off from a machining process like drilling, milling, or turning on a lathe, these are often called turnings if you are selling them to a scrap hauler. The smallest "dust-sized" pieces that would come from grinding or saw-cutting are sometimes also known as filings or fines. When I learned to program a CNC laser some years ...


2

Standalone would assume that all non-web applications are standalone, or that the world-wide -web is the only way for computers to connect to one-another. A standard client-server application can well be non-web, but is not "standalone". The generic non-web application is very broad. It includes, say, CICS/COBOL applications on an IBM Z/series. So saying ...


2

For the sake of interest, some options that have negative connotations: parsimonious, stingy, tight-fisted. The latter two are somewhat colloquial (and possibly British).


2

Vader and the Emperor both seem to really revel in saying "the Dark Side" with emphasis, as well as doing and inspiring "dark deeds", so I think they would say that in their own histories, too. But let's see... if we assume that not only is there a victor filter, but also an Earth English filter from the writer/inventor Lucas, and we pretend that Lucas is ...


2

They are well-balanced or equanimous.


2

How about draconic? You could also try serpentine (going off another name for / type of dragon). Edit: Sorry, I missed that you had draconic in your list already. I still think that's the best one...


2

Here are some suggestions off the top of my head. I added an asterisk after terms I made up. If you're going for something poetic, I assume you can invent your own term? -The Age of Ice* -The Glacial Period -The Pleistocene Epoch (when the most recent Ice Age occurred) -The Long Winter* -The Cold Age* I could propose some more esoteric terms, but I ...


2

One word I've seen in writing is glaciation. This word implicitly acknowledges that there are multiple incidents of this (which there have been). Climate scientists tend to prefer the term glacial (short for glacial period) to refer to a bad (cold and ice-covered) part of the cycle. The warmer periods are called interglacials, and the entire epoch is of ...



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