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79

Discerning. Having or showing good taste or judgment; discriminating. Collins English Dictionary, as found at thefreedictionary.com The following would work: "We're discerning about the ingredients that we use." However, as pointed out to me in the comments, the more common usage is: "We're discerning in the ingredients that we use."


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Selective We are very selective in choosing our ingredients. tending to choose carefully or characterized by careful choice (Free Dictionary)


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Discriminating : liking only things that are of good quality : able to recognize the difference between things that are of good quality and those that are not In the context of being picky about food ingredients, readers should understand this meaning and its positive connotation. However, I worry that semi-literate readers would confuse it with the ...


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"We're very conscientious about the ingredients we use" conscientious adjective: very careful about doing what you are supposed to do: concerned with doing something correctly. (Merriam-Webster online)


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A word in the same register as picky but without the negative connotations that picky sometimes has, is choosy. We're very choosy about our ingredients.


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Petting The act or practice of amorously embracing, kissing, and caressing one's partner. thefreedictionary.com The Oxford English Dictionary lists this word as having originated in 16th century England, so it would certainly have been around in the fifties. A Google Ngrams search reveals that snogging was very rarely used back then. Interestingly ...


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Meticulous showing great attention to detail; very careful and precise. They are meticulous when selecting ingredients.


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It's quite likely that snogging would actually have been used in Fifties Britain. OED records written usage, which would lag behind spoken use. 1945 C. H. Ward-Jackson Piece of Cake (ed. 2) 56 Snogging, courting, running around with the opposite sex. Comes from India. Thus, ‘On my leave I'm going up to the hills for a bit of snogging.’ Also used as ...


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You'll notice that your quote is about dead birds. That's why the verbal form of "necropsy" was used. An autopsy is performed on human remains; a necropsy, on non-human animal remains. This veterinarian site explains in detail.


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Try scrupulous on for size. It marries Bravo's selective with Eva's conscientious. Scrupulous means very careful to do things properly and correctly (Vocabulary.com) "We're very scrupulous about the ingredients we use"


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Some might call them a glutton for punishment Someone who habitually takes on burdensome or unpleasant tasks or unreasonable amounts of work. For example, Rose agreed to organize the church fair for the third year in a row-she's a glutton for punishment . This expression originated as a glutton for work in the late 1800s, punishment being substituted ...


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I suggest quantify, as defined by Merriam Webster: to find or calculate the quantity or amount of (something) to determine, express, or measure the quantity of


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There are some connotational differences. For example, a mental model of something which commences is a hollow cavity becoming filled up with activity, as opposed to something which starts as a ball which suddenly goes from rest into motion, or something which begins as a thing which slowly speeds up, or initiate, which is more like a pickaxe hitting a ...


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evaluate (noun form: evaluation) Form an idea of the amount, number, or value of; assess: Mathematics Find a numerical expression or equivalent for (an equation, formula, or function) (Oxford) If you evaluate something, you get a result; which is not necessarily measured.


4

Wow! They are expecting a lot in this quiz. It is more like a cryptic crossword clue. emphatic is an adjective, denial is a noun (thus they can't be antonyms) vehement is a near synonym for emphatic - they are not opposites conclusive describes the correctness of a statement, emphatic describes how it was made That only leaves (4). The explanation that ...


4

How about: Annals of Narnia or, more obviously: Tales of Narnia


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I looked up my favorite canoodling in Ngrams and even though its initial peak was around the 30', when compared to snogging: in the year 1954, canoodling has 0.0000002822% whereas snogging has "only" 0.0000000415% - that is 6.8 times less.


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"Policy" is the principles you apply to a situation. A "policy measure" is something you do to implement that policy. For example: It is the policy of StackExchange to make it easy to ask questions. A policy measure is to make the reputation threshold for asking questions zero.


3

You can try 'personage', or 'figure'. If you were to refer to the cast in general, maybe you could use 'dramatis personae', although that seems a bit grand / presumptuous. For example, if you were writing a sordid piece of tabloid gossip, then 'dramatis personae' won't lend you a patina of respectability. Instead it looks overdone, like gaudy cheap ...


3

There're synonyms for verbs, indeed. The choice depends largely on the usage (formal vs informal or written vs verbal) and context. Examples: The New Horizons probe commenced its historic journey on January 19, 2006. Police investigation began soon afterwards. Movie begins at noon. Engine wouldn't start. I started the engine. commence - formal, usually ...


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A word can express many implications, connotations, and attitudes in addition to its basic “dictionary” meaning. A word's near-synonyms differ from it solely in these nuances of meaning. The traditional usage supports the choice of commence in reference to: court proceedings,religious or other ceremonies, or industrial, commercial or military ops. ...


3

Here are some ideas for you. I had to really scratch my head about that one. I was completely lost in that lecture. For the life of me, I could not figure out what the heck the professor was talking about. I had to wrack my brain to solve that riddle.


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Life Hacks are tricks, skills or shortcuts that are meant to increase a person’s productivity or efficiency in their everyday lives. The term “life hack” was coined by tech journalist Danny O’Brien on October 23rd, 2003 on his blog Oblomovka, describing his research for an upcoming talk on the subject, which took place during February 2004’s Emerging ...


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time-savers timesaving hints or tips Also, I support the already-suggested hints, because I remember there was an author popular in the sixties, Heloise, who wrote a series of books of hints, handy hints, household hints, etc. I think they were big because more women were joining the work force.


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Fisher is in the American Dictionary of the English Language and the meaning remains constant across all versions Noah Webster himself worked on: Fisher, n. 1. One who is employed in catching fish. Wait, you want a word with the same connotation of a hobby as a Fisherman does? Well it does in Noah Webster's dictionary because as far as he's ...


2

Picky (Merriam-Webster), as you know, generally has a negative connotation because it is implied that picky individuals are may be generally hard to please, and they may lack static, well-defined standards for being so selective. As Merriam-Webster puts it in their definition for fastidious (another word you might consider, though will likely want to ...


2

Per the OED, "firstly" meaning first is restricted to enumerations, so the initial observation of muons would be the first time.


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Firstly (see what I did there?): No. Firstly can't be used in the same meaning as at first or initially. As @deadrat mentioned, "firstly" meaning first is restricted to enumerations, so the initial observation of muons would be the first time. Secondly, depending on the context of the text, the use of firstly in the excerpt you've given us may be correct ...


2

Most of the answers seem to refer to a play, rather than a book. I shall also, but I offer less formal alternatives: players major players minor players bit players In addition you might, if appropriate, refer to a cameo appearance. https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cameo_appearance (by the way, the above work best for fiction; for non-fiction you ...


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Judicious ju•di•cious (dʒuˈdɪʃ əs) adj. having, exercising, or characterized by good judgment; discreet, prudent, balanced, or wise: judicious use of one's money; a judicious selection. May fit in OP's sentence quite well, since it connotes an active, personal selection. "Selective" can describe any mechanical filtering process; "judicious" is ...



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