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69

novel - of a new kind; different from anything seen or known before (dictionary.com)


54

A defeatist a person who surrenders easily or is subject to defeatism. defeatism: the attitude, policy, or conduct of a person who admits, expects, or no longer resists defeat, as because of a conviction that further struggle or effort is futile; pessimistic resignation. - Dictionary.com


37

I was on the bus today, and envisioned the bus crashing and deciding who to save first. envision: verb [WITH OBJECT] Imagine as a future possibility; visualize:


30

"Visualized is pretty neutral - could have positive or negative connotations.


26

innovative adjective 1.0 (Of a product, idea, etc.) featuring new methods; advanced and original: 1.1 (Of a person) introducing new ideas; original and creative in thinking: ODO Emphasis mine


16

contemplate [TRANSITIVE] to consider doing something in the future a. to consider the possibility of something happening We’re not even contemplating defeat. The alternative is too horrible to contemplate. Synonyms and related words To imagine, or to use your imagination:imagine, suppose, think up... That definition ...


14

"Pessimist" noun a person who habitually sees or anticipates the worst or is disposed to be gloomy. www.dictionary.com


13

This is often called crab mentality, due to the tendency of crabs in a bucket to pull each other down whenever one tries to escape. The Wikipedia article on crab mentality says it is "best described by the phrase 'If I can't have it, neither can you.'"


10

A single, and slightly formal, word which captures "Renaissance man" is "polymath". From Vocabulary.com, for example: A polymath is a person who knows a lot about a lot of subjects. If your friend is not only a brilliant physics student but has also published a poetry collection and won prizes at political debates, you can describe her as a polymath. ...


10

It probably isn't the word you heard, but the phenomenon is often refered to as the tall poppy syndrome or cutting down the tall poppies. It is probably an allusion to a legend of Lucius Tarquinius Superbus: His son, Sextus, pretending to be ill-treated by his father, and covered with the bloody marks of stripes, fled to Gabii. The infatuated ...


7

I think to muse over someone or something can convey the meaning with a neutral connotation: (MW) to reflect or meditate on someone or something. I often muse over the possibility to go and live abroad. She is always musing over the fact she could have stayed single.


7

envisage To envisage is to imagine something that does not yet exist. woolgather form a mental image of something that is not present or that is not the case. (vocabulary.com)


7

Unconfident Not confident; hesitant - Oxford Dictionaries An unconfident person will attempt a task but not in a confident manner, fearing that they will trip up in some way.


6

Panacea: an answer or solution for all problems or difficulties. There is also the connotation that there is no such thing as a panacea, because such an all-encompassing solution would be impossible.


5

Agenda (Latin gerundive - neuter plural of agendum) - things which are to be done.


4

The story of the real-life moth as a computer "bug" is told at length under the title "First Computer Bug." Even in this case, though, the way the people involved treated the incident suggests that the word bug was already understood metaphorically: On the 9th of September, 1947, when the machine was experiencing problems, an investigation showed that ...


4

"Requirements" could be a good substitution.


3

If you are referring to "things to do" without any particular direction, like a list of fun things to do while on vacation in Italy, Activity n. Something done for pleasure or entertainment, especially one involving movement or an excursion. from Wiktionary. You could also be referring to things which require completion. In that case, Task n. 1) ...


3

The items are similar, but the expressions employ a description from distinct frames of reference: The device splits the signal between two (or more) lines. That frame of reference describes the same outcome as: The device multiplies the lines carrying the signal by two (or more). Amazon USA: plug multiplier search. Item at top ...


3

Katherina: It's: into English speakers Your sentence should be something like: The knowledge about primitive people(s) was very (limited, scarce, restricted). "Knowledge" is uncountable and you can use it only in the singular. See at http://www.ldoceonline.com/dictionary/knowledge knowl‧edge [uncountable] Also, at Google books: "knowledge of many ...


3

space out space also space out 2 [intransitive] informal to stop paying attention and just look in front of you without thinking, especially because you are bored or have taken drugs: http://www.ldoceonline.com/dictionary/space_2 zone out N.Amer. informal fall asleep or lose concentration or consciousness


3

You could say the group is trying to enforce conformity, which Wikipedia defines as "the act of matching attitudes, beliefs, and behaviors to group norms." There is apparently a Japanese saying that translates as "the nail that sticks up gets hammered down", and the same article says Australia has a similar proverb about tall poppies.


3

"chagrin" comes to mind. distress of mind caused by humiliation, disappointment, or failure. MW "To my chagrin, the party ended just as I arrived." "She had gained five pounds over the winter, much to her chagrin." "He decided to get a tattoo, to the chagrin of his parents."


2

A technician is someone who has fairly advanced technical skills and techniques, but lacks an in-depth understanding of the background/theoretical knowledge of the field as a whole.


2

You're probably looking for one of reseller, affiliate, or broker. In business parlance, being a reseller implies that you basically own the client. Think of it as white labeling: you sell instead of the original seller under your name. Affiliate, in contrast, means you're pushing leads and picking up a commission on the sale, and putting the company who ...


2

"While" is a good word to indicate a contradiction in thought. While crabs can live in water, they can also live on land.


2

You can call them Nine major branch of knowledge or maybe Nine major disciplines


2

I've got two suggestions: One if you want to get your point across without sounding unusual: I was on the bus today, and I imagined vividly that the bus crashed, and I had to decide who to save first. Then this if you want to be correct, but unusual: I was on the bus today, and I visioned that the bus crashed, and I had to decide who to save first. Oxford ...


2

I don't have a word, just an expression. When a person ceases to look up to you, I would call that as "being taken off the pedestal." The idea is that you used to be regarded like a monument (or a statue) to that person---something to admire---but no longer.



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