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38

Synonyms aren't only words that mean the exact same thing. They may be words that mean approximately the same thing. Moreover, many do call their adult dogs their "puppy," just like many call other adults their "baby." Just as "baby" can refer to an adult person, so also can "puppy" refer to an adult dog. Also, you should note that the entry doesn't ...


17

A show trial is one in which the outcome has already been decided, meaning that the trial itself is merely carried out "for show", either to feign legitimacy, or intimidate others, or both. Another phrase that might be relevant in some cases is witch hunt. Originally this literally meant to search for witches, i.e. people who engaged in witchcraft. Those ...


16

We're swimming in [noun] Also, if you wanted to express that you have so much of something that it's causing an issue, you could say: We're up to our ears/eyeballs/chin in [noun] or We can't move for [noun] Here's an example of the last expression's use in literature: Chimera teems with leather driving gloves and woolly jumpers. We can't ...


12

Two similar idiomatic phrases come to mind: from here to the moon; enough X to choke a horse (or choke something else large, with a big mouth). Examples from the wild: Baker and gang are searching for any excuse to blame Israel for world-wide Muslim Terror and particularly in Iraq. Baker is willing to chew noxious bubble-gum and stretch it from here ...


12

There are truckloads of answers to this question: s--tloads. I bet you can find tons if you look around. You can't throw a stone without hitting one. They are a dime a dozen, really.


11

Because it's useful to list them as such. Puppy is a hyponym of dog (a different hyponym in early-modern and contemporary use), not a perfect synonym, but then you already know a perfect word to use when dog matches precisely; dog. A thesaurus is useful precisely because it will be a bit "fuzzy" in the synonyms it lists, and so has a chance of providing a ...


10

Consider, We have more [noun] than we know what to do with Google Books We have [noun] to burn have something to burn: Fig. to have lots of something, such as money, power, food, space, cars, etc.; to have more of something than one needs. Look at the way Tom buys things. You'd think he had money to burn. If I had all that acting talent to burn ...


10

The original kangaroo court was the Star Chamber in particular under the Tudors and Stuarts. In modern usage, legal or administrative bodies with strict, arbitrary rulings and secretive proceedings are sometimes called, metaphorically or poetically, star chambers. This is a pejorative term and intended to cast doubt on the legitimacy of the ...


9

Perhaps: We have [noun] coming out of our ears. From The Free Dictionary: coming out of one's ears Fig. very numerous or abundant. (As if people or things were coming in great numbers from many sources including unlikely ones.) I've got phone and e-mail messages coming out of my ears. We are very busy at the factory. We have orders coming out of ...


7

Maybe try: I'm up to my neck in x The Free Dictionary lists it as: *up to one's neck (in something) and up to one's ears (in something); up to one's eyeballs (in something) having a lot of something; Fig. very much involved in something; immersed in something


7

A couple more general ideas, that meet the single word tag: The trial was a charade noun noun: charade; plural noun: charades an absurd pretense intended to create a pleasant or respectable appearance. "talk of unity was nothing more than a charade" synonyms: farce, pantomime, travesty, mockery, parody, pretense, act, ...


7

If you are asking why the term puppy is used to refer to a small, young dog, the answer is in its etymology, probably from French "puppet" (toy): late 15c., "woman's small pet dog," of uncertain origin but likely from Middle French poupée "doll, toy" (see puppet) . Meaning shifted from "toy dog" to "young dog" (1590s), replacing Middle English ...


6

According to Michael Quinion, Ologies and Isms: Word Beginnings and Endings (2002), -less words fall into two main categories: words where the -less form indicates simply "without" (as, for example, bottomless, childless, defenceless, and lawless), and words where the -less form "indicate[s] something that is unaffected by the action of the verb, or some ...


6

More generally, you might say the trial was a farce or farcical. farce (n) : an empty or patently ridiculous act, proceeding, or situation <the trial became a farce> [Merriam-Webster Online] I believe this emphasizes the pre-determined nature of kangaroo courts, connoting theater, rather than the brutality associated with such proceedings. ...


5

Pool could fit. As a verb, it can be used to mean combining the resources of several people or organizations so they can be used collectively. Definition from the free dictionary: Pool v. pooled, pool·ing, pools v.tr. To put into a pool, as for common use: Let's pool our resources to finish the project quickly. http://www.thefreedictionary.com/pool


5

Anything that is a synonym of faction: band, bloc, bunch, cabal, camp, caucus, cell, circle, clan, clique, club, coalition, combination, combine, combo, concern, conclave, confederacy, conspiracy, contingent, coterie, crew, crowd, design, division, entente, gang, guild, insiders, intrigue, junta, knot, lobby, machine, minority, mob, network, offshoot, ...


5

One traditional term was renaissance man, after the example of Leonardo DaVinci, an expert in many areas --that may be too gender-specific for modern usage. A more recent term is multihyphenate, used often in a showbiz context for an "actor-singer-director" or similar.


5

In the original examples listed, there is not only a difference in the prefixes, but also the suffixes. This goes along with FumbleFingers' comment that "-less normally attaches to nouns, but un- primarily attaches to adjectives/adverbs." And to further complicate the matter, un- can also attach to verbs (usually with a slightly different meaning), and there ...


5

Some options : 1) he lampoons British puritanism and traditionalism. lampoon - publicly criticize (someone or something) by using ridicule, irony, or sarcasm. See http://www.encyclopedia.com/doc/1O999-lampoon.html 2) he sends-up British puritanism and traditionalism. http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/send--up to expose the flaws or ...


4

In the given context I would use 'mocks'. The author satirizes American capitalism and superior complexity and he mocks British puritanism and traditionalism. Although I think it could also use some punctuation and a clarification of what "superior complexity" means (or perhaps it should be "superiority complex"?). Alternatives could be 'scorns', ...


4

You might be looking for ulterior motives, where "ulterior" means "intentionally hidden" (here) and "motives" is broadly synonymous with "intentions".


4

Similar to, but distinct from the original example: You can't swing a stick around here without knocking over a couple of nouns.


3

You could try the phrase to have [something] in spades. https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/in_spades http://idioms.thefreedictionary.com/in+spades


3

Among the other great suggestions, I'll add: We have a cornucopia full of X. From the second definition at Merriam-Webster: a great amount or source of something.


3

Schismatic, as defined here A schismatic is a person who creates or incites schism in an organization or who is a member of a splinter group. schism is defined here as a split or division between strongly opposed sections or parties, caused by differences in opinion or belief For example: A small group split off from the hiking club; these ...


3

While "afford" is usually used with regards to having enough money or other resources to spend on a certain thing, it can also be used to indicate that an object embodies a certain possible use. Typically the word used is "affordance", but the verb afford is sometimes used as well. See the Wikipedia article on affordance for some examples: For example, a ...


3

I don't think your question really has an answer. You seem to be looking for a verb that describes a state of being somewhere else. However, verbs are normally actions. So you need an noun, a state of being. Some possible nouns include gone, missing, elsewhere, and used informally, a no-show, or AWOL.


3

I think to turn a blind eye is what you are looking for. Explanation Turning a blind eye is an idiom describing the ignoring of undesirable information. Source


3

I think the word you're looking for is figuratively. of the nature of or involving a figure of speech, especially a metaphor; metaphorical and not literal: The word “head” has several figurative senses, as in “She's the head of the company.” Synonyms: metaphorical, not literal, symbolic. Dictionary.com


3

Well, my dictionary defines renumeration as "Misspelling of remuneration".



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