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84

When contrasting with "necessity", Doug's option is a typical contrast. Maintenance shouldn't be an option, but an all-important necessity. Another contrast tends to be luxury. Maintenance shouldn't be a luxury, but an all-important necessity.


52

Bonus carries the non-essential nature of what you're after. Maybe "bonus feature", or "added bonus".


44

nicety [nahy-si-tee] –dictionary.com Usually, niceties. a refined, elegant, or choice feature, as of manner or living: working hard to acquire the niceties of life. Maintenance is not a nicety, it's an all-important necessity.


24

How about delicate? Mealy-mouthed (from @Josh61 's answer) conveys what you want more precisely, but delicate has that soft negative connotation. fragile; easily damaged; frail. From dictionary.com A alternative if you don't like delicate could be squeamish: easily nauseated or disgusted. From dictionary.com


19

Maintenance shouldn't be an extra. extra n. an additional feature. {R H K Webster's} extra n Something more than is usual or necessary {AHDEL; same link}


14

I think the word "option" fits nicely in place of "nice-to-have". This sense of "option" is defined by Merriam-Webster as "an item that is offered in addition to or in place of standard equipment".


9

The difference between manslaughter and murder is usually a legal one, and depends on which jurisdiction you are in. In everyday lingo, manslaughter is usually seen as the involuntary or unintended ending of a life, whereas murder implies intent: a murderer meant to end a person's life. Also, the word implies that the killing is illegal if we call it ...


9

"tender" has the connotation of being gentle and soft. "Oh, you French people are so tender, just say that you're looking for something to kill the mouse with." tender (adj) marked by, responding to, or expressing the softer emotions, showing care.


9

One of the senses of precious may work: Affectedly dainty or overrefined: precious mannerisms. {AHDEL} though this obviously covers an affected attitude. If the person is genuinely soft, the dialect term nesh would often be used conversationally in the UK: nesh adjective dialect (Especially of a person) weak and delicate; feeble ...


7

I suppose you're trying to give parts of speech to the MosCow categories: Must have, Should have, Could have, Would have. As adjectives, the closest I can think of are: 'a must-have' - adj: necessary/obligatory/requisite, n: necessity/obligation/requisite 'a should-have' - adj: recommended, n:recommendation 'a could-have' or 'a nice-to-have' - ...


7

Having had many conversations like this between business and technical teams, we often use this phrasing: "Maintenance is a need, not a want." It gets the point across in a concise sentence. Another way of saying it: "Maintenance is a hard requirement." I would probably use this form myself actually. This type of phrasing is used extensively in these ...


6

I think mealy-mouthed may fit in your context: Afraid to speak frankly or straightforwardly: mealy-mouthed excuses. (ODO)


6

sentimental: having or arousing feelings of tenderness, sadness or nostalgia, typically in an exaggerated or self-indulgent way (Defn. 1.1) [Source:ODO] weakly emotional; mawkishly susceptible or tender (Defn. 3) [Source: Dictionary.com]


5

Dainty and Prissy come to mind. Weak, Babies, Cowards would also definitely fit. Cowards would have historical context as the general view of the French by Germans of that time period. These of course are more straight insults instead of just implied ones. Pussyfooted would also fit, though I am unsure how insulting this is historically. MW: pussyfoot ...


4

I looked up my favorite canoodling in Ngrams and even though its initial peak was around the 30', when compared to snogging: in the year 1954, canoodling has 0.0000002822% whereas snogging has "only" 0.0000000415% - that is 6.8 times less.


4

time-savers timesaving hints or tips Also, I support the already-suggested hints, because I remember there was an author popular in the sixties, Heloise, who wrote a series of books of hints, handy hints, household hints, etc. I think they were big because more women were joining the work force.


4

Some examples: ...as shown in Fig. X ...as seen in Fig. X (or ...as can be seen in Fig. X) ...which is evident in Fig. X Fig. X shows... The data in Table X indicates that ... If you have some certainty where the figure or table will be relative to the text, you can use phrases such as: ...as seen in the figure to the left... (to the right, on the ...


4

Genocide carries a distinct connotation of being directed towards a particular group of people (or peoples): The systematic and widespread extermination or attempted extermination of a national, racial, religious, or ethnic group. - TFD It comes from the Greek: géno(s), "race" + -cide: "kill" The Holocaust targeted Jews; also persecuted were Romanis, ...


4

The following words might convey a less negative connotation while still implying a sort of elderly snappish temperament: bearish, gruff, determined, fixed, and tough. However, in this case a phrase description might suit better the purpose. The benefit of a description in phrase form is that it allows for far greater opportunity in the specification of ...


4

"Maintenance shouldn’t be a choice, but an all-important necessity." choice (noun) "a range of things that can be chosen" MW Given the choice, I'd rather stay home tonight. They gave me a choice between an automatic or standard transmission. There is a wide range of choices. Other choices on the menu looked equally tempting.


4

Nice-to-have is used to describe things near the end of a list of priorities that would be "nice to have", but are only worth pursuing if you end up having surplus resources after completing all of the higher-priority "need-to-haves". This term only works in a context where you're uncertain about exactly how much of your budgeted resources will be spent on ...


4

If you don't object to a Latin loanword, desideratum may offer what you are looking for. It can be found in virtually any good English dictionary.


4

I think squeamish is the adjective you're looking for, as in: "Oh, you French people are so squeamish, just say that you're looking for something to kill the mouse with." Now whether or not there's a German word for squeamish might create a problem, but if you're writing in English, you'll get your point across appropriately. If it were a loutish ...


3

I believe the word you're looking for is "signature", which Merriam-Webster defines as "one unit of a book comprising a group of printed sheets that are folded and stitched together".


3

It depends on the context and the dialect of English being spoken. They live right down the road and They live right down the way are approximately the same, although "way" in that locution is not used as frequently as "road" is, at least in my neck of the American woods. It was used more often by people in my grandparents' generation. If I saw two street ...


3

Reconsider may fit the context you are describing: to consider (something) again, with a view to changing one's policy or course of action. (AHD)


3

"From this time forward" isn't really used in colloquial English. Even henceforth is somewhat archaic. People frown upon it as American English but "going forward" is becoming popular. "From now on" would probably be the most common phrase used to mean henceforth. Regarding the origin - hence in this context means 'from now' or 'from here' and forth means ...


3

There are times when we both need one another.


3

According to several sources found by googling "transit vs transfer"; Transit means people on the same flight/plane/airline. For example when a plane lands to refuel. Transfer means people switching flight/plane airline. A transit would be cheaper because you, the passenger, don't really need to do anything at the airport like checking out and in. ...


3

Life Hacks are tricks, skills or shortcuts that are meant to increase a person’s productivity or efficiency in their everyday lives. The term “life hack” was coined by tech journalist Danny O’Brien on October 23rd, 2003 on his blog Oblomovka, describing his research for an upcoming talk on the subject, which took place during February 2004’s Emerging ...



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