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20

Slavering - defined as to let saliva run from the mouth source - google's dictionary.


10

analytical: skilled in or using analysis especially in thinking or reasoning deliberate: characterized by or resulting from careful and thorough consideration characterized by awareness of the consequences judicious: having, exercising, or characterized by sound judgment A few more options: rational, prudent, sensible.


9

The results in this Google Books Ngrams chart seem to imply that the terms, the scent and the smell are the most used. In order to ascertain how neutral these terms were I selected the following criteria. smell of * scent of * smell of the * scent of the * smells good smells bad The asterisk represents any word that follows the last term which ...


8

I would suggest meticulous. Meticulous suggests that someone is gathering information to ensure that all details and options are covered. This can be a result of acting methodically or otherwise.


7

The word slobbering comes to mind. More often used to describe the drooling of a dog but is perfectly acceptable for the picture given.


7

As BlessedGeek has noted, OshKosh B'Gosh is an American brand name of children's apparel, as well as its main slogan/tagline. Oshkosh is the city in Wisconsin where the firm was founded. The town in turn was named after a chief of the Mamaceqtaw (Menominee) people, in whose language the name means claw. B'gosh is an abbreviated way of saying by gosh, a ...


7

Why not irresistible not able to be resisted or refused; overpowering [Collins]


7

To surprise someone can also mean to catch them by surprise, usually in some surreptitious (and often improper) act. The professor quips that his wife has surprised him and the housemaid in illicit canoodling. ADDED: Yes, the sense of catch in the course of a (usually) improper act is still current. Here are some recent uses from Google: Police Calls: ...


6

From Wikipedia: Deadheading. In aviation, deadheading is the practice of carrying members of an airline's flight staff free of charge when they are not working.


4

Inextricable comes to mind incapable of being disentangled or untied an inextricable knot Source: Merriam-Webster @Bib suggests inextricably bound


4

Limited is very different to short. Momentary: Lasting for a very short time; brief. 1 Brief == not lasting for long. Temporary: Lasting for only a limited period of time; not permanent. 1 Limited == restricted in... amount (But has no defined amount of time it is limited for). Momentary is a very short period of time. Temporary means it can ...


4

I'd use circumspect. adj. watchful and discreet; cautious; prudent: circumspect behavior. [R H K Webster's]


4

Some variant on counter could work: I believe it to be bad policy for a game to have a move that cannot be countered. Uncounterable moves make for bad games. For any move, there should always exist a countermove.


4

Unstoppable (Dictionary.com) (adjective) that cannot be stopped or surpassed; unbeatable Uncontrollable (Dictionary.com) (adjective) incapable of being controlled or restrained


4

Rigorous - "scrupulously accurate, manifesting rigor, done carefully and with a lot of attention to detail" - Usage:"He is rigorous in his control of expenditure". Painstaking - "expending, showing, or involving diligent care and effort" Usage: "she was always painstaking about her work." Exhaustive- "comprehensive in scope; thorough: an exhaustive ...


4

If the preservation technique involves sugar, you can say conserve to preserve (a foodstuff, esp fruit) with sugar [Collins] The term put up is also used to preserve or can (jam, etc) [Collins] The term canned is also used preserved in airtight cans or jars [Collins] Interestingly, while canning originally referred to storing foods in metal ...


4

I have to say that, in British English, I cannot recall ever having seen 'promptitude' used in any context. In the example situation quoted it would be normal to say 'thank you for your promptness in replying' or, more likely, 'thank you for your prompt reply.'


3

Momentary means "just" touching -- as when a billiard ball bounces off another. {So, depending on the physics of the situation involved, it's "just" touching. So, two billiard balls "momentarily" touching is 0.1 seconds (or whatever that is - ask an engineer). Whereas - for example - imagine describing a naval collision during a battle: the two ships ...


3

Probably your best word is hope: Hope: to wish for something with expectation of its fulfillment; the feeling that what is wanted can be had or that events will turn out well. You can also wish well for someone: Wish: A desire, longing, or strong inclination for a specific thing. From the Free Dictionary.


3

Might I suggest potent as one of your answers to consider?


2

I'm not aware of a word that means exactly what you're looking for. Contrasting focuses on the differences between options A and B, and is often used when one is preferable to the other and you're trying to highlight why. But it's not always so - you can contrast 'night' and 'day' without implying one is better than the other.


2

Without any context, the single word that comes to my mind is follow-up, which means to continue something later that has already been started. I will be sure to follow-up soon. If you want to postpone answering a question until later during a discussion (like in a presentation or a meeting), you can use circle back. That's a good point, but let's ...


2

These are called creamers in restaurants in English Canada, when they are referred to at all (most people would just ask for milk). If you used any of the other terms being bandied about in this thread, e.g. mini tubs, no server would know what you were talking about. No opinion in other contexts, including in French Canada, industrial or other countries, ...


2

consider: moral conflict or ethical dilemma An ethical dilemma is a complex situation that often involves an apparent mental conflict between moral imperatives, in which to obey one would result in transgressing another. wikipedia


2

tchrist's answer says it all about the definitions of these words. On the matter of usage, I'm sorry to see via being used in place of through more and more. I put it down to a desire to appear educated and sophisticated, but it backfires, and comes across as pretentious or betrays a lack of care in using the language. Via has a well established usage ...


2

William Perry, The Synonymous, Etymological, and Pronouncing English Dictionary (1805) offers two synonyms for mirror: "looking-glass" and "speculum." As both Merriam-Webster’s Eleventh Collegiate Dictionary (2003) and John Lawler (above) point out, speculum is Latin for “mirror”; and the word has been in English since the fifteenth century, MW says. Today, ...


2

I think odour ( or scent) is the more general and neutral term, to convey specific olfactory impressions you have to use other definitions such as fragrance, aroma or malodour for instance: is caused by one or more volatilized chemical compounds, generally at a very low concentration, that humans or other animals perceive by the sense of olfaction. ...


2

I think you can express the concept of attributing the characteristics of a machine to a human being as: Human robotization : the process of turning a human being into a robot Source: www.merriam-webster.com


1

The term extraneous actually derives from extra (from Latin extraordinarius). The current meanings of extra are probably a short of extraordinary as suggested by www.etymonline.com Extra: 1650s as a stand-alone adjective; also used as an adverb and noun in 17c. (see extra-); modern usages -- including sense of "minor performer in a play" (1777) ...


1

Consider I want to describe its inner workings. The mechanisms that function internally to a system and are not outwardly visible Nobody really understands the inner workings of politics. [Wiktionary]



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