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11

Defuse the situation is the more sensible of the two: It employs the metaphor that the situation is a bomb, and may explode. Defusing it will render it harmless. Diffusing a situation would mean to spread it out and make it less concentrated. You can make a case that the intensity of the situation needs diffusion to make it less dangerous, but I believe ...


10

I think the usual way of portraying this is with the phrase 'hot air'; they're not so much talking about anything important as they are just breathing at each other. Example: The politicans could talk for hours, but all that ever came out was a lot of hot air. Equal meaning can be derived from the terms idle talk, gas or wind, tall talk or inanity. Of ...


7

The standard phrase is... shop around - to compare the price and quality of the same or a similar object in different shops before you decide which one to buy. This chart shows how the expression has become increasingly common over the past century, and here are thousands of written instances of [you] should shop around (standard consumer advice).


6

My speculation is that "relations" now carries a rather negative connotation. The most common use of "relations" that I can think of is of a sexual nature. Usually, trying to sound more tactful, media and other outlets will basically use this type of terminology over anything more direct. I personally would not feel comfortable using this word for this ...


6

Word starting with T Since you mention t in your comment to Chenmunka... tem·er·ar·i·ous [tem-uh-rair-ee-uhs] adjective reckless; rash. Alternatives saucy adjective ˈsȯ-sē, ˈsa- 2 a : impertinently bold and impudent b : amusingly forward and flippant Usage: "Not today my good man, I'm feeling saucy." Saucy in your example ...


5

pore over "She spends a lot of time poring over the historical records of the church." This idiom means that you're spending a lot of time reading, studying, digging deep into a text. It has more of the idea of looking for details than spending time to comprehend it as a whole, so it may or may not be what you're after.


5

According to OED, the word defuse is coined in 1943, by combining de- and fuse(v.) (which is invented in 1680s as a back-formation from fusion, a noun came from Middle French fusion, from Latin fusionem), while the verb form of diffuse is coined in 1520s from Latin diffusus, past participle of diffundere "to pour out or away". Despite the similarities in ...


5

'Defuse is a verb, which means 'to remove the fuse'. But it is often used figuratively, such as in 'UN forces were sent in to help defuse the tensions between the warring parties'. 'Diffuse, is also a verb, meaning to 'spread over a wide area, or among a larger number of people' such as 'the problem is how to diffuse power without creating anarchy'. But ...


5

Cheap talk and gossip are not close synonyms. Gossip is idle talk about the activities and foibles of others. It consists of specific anecdotes used as a kind of social currency. According to Human Universals by Donald Brown all human cultures engage in gossip. Cheap talk derives from the expression talk is cheap and its corollary actions speak louder ...


4

Hijack (hijacker): to steal (cargo) from a truck or other vehicle after forcing it to stop: (to hijack a load of whiskey.) to rob (a vehicle) after forcing it to stop: (They hijacked the truck before it entered the city.) to seize (a vehicle) by force or threat of force. Just as mutiny doesn't necessarily involve murder, neither does ...


4

In the Law of Wills, "relatives" are legitimate and "relations" are related by blood whether lacking legitimacy or not: Source The popular meaning of the word "relatives" or "relations" is that of all persons within any degree whatever of consanguinity or affinity. But when the word "relations" is used in a will to denote a class of beneficiaries, it ...


3

In the current vernacular, meh! or whatever. The latter should be pronounced "wadever" and accomanied by a shrug or dismissive wave of the hand. More formal words include apathetic, unconcerned, uninterested.


3

Narrative usually refers to the recent history of messages flying around in some society on a given topic, usually with the faint implication that this history ignores, oversimplifies, or otherwise diverges from the objective truth of a situation. But it can also be used to describe one person's involvement: "Mr. X's speech furthered the popular narrative ...


3

"I'm feeling "enterprising" today?" enterprising: ready to embark on new ventures; full of boldness a d initiative. Also, consider "intrepid" and "in a trying mood." intrepid: fearless; daring; bold. I am feeling in a trying mood today, and will go another way." On fairly different levels, how about "frivolous," "frilly," "frothy," and ...


3

Both "pupil" and "student" refer to a person who is studying, usually in a school. A pupil is under the close supervision of a teacher, either because of youth or of specialization in some branch of study (a kindergarten pupil; the pupil of a famous musician). A student is a person attending an educational institution or someone who has devoted much ...


2

In my experience, foreshadow is a relatively benign term. I don't expect malevolence to come from its usage. It's a simple forecasting of an event that has not yet occurred. ("In retrospect, Ellen's habit of playing teacher as a young girl foreshadowed her career as an English lit professor.") Omen or portent, for that matter, usually has a connotation of ...


2

Emphasis on the 'that' gives a negative tone, emphasis on the 'so' gives a curious tone. Same for oh really: emphasis on the 'really' is confronting, emphasis on the 'oh' is curious. This is only my experience with the terms in my culture, body language or general melody of the cultural language can change the desired effect of anything you say.


2

The fact is that the term relations is ambiguous in American English. Relations can mean people in your family, it can mean people that you have had relationships with, and it could mean people that you have had sex with. It is often used as an innuendo for sex. Usage: "So what's up with Liz and you? Have you guys had relations?" So that is issue ...


2

You can describe this in multiple ways, which one is coolest is up to you: Core Code of Conduct Core Principles Personal By-laws Way of Life Strict Sense of Self-Discipline Sense of Self Super-ego


2

Perhaps absorb to learn and understand new facts, so that they become part of your knowledge: We had to absorb a lot of new information very quickly. While it is not limited to obtaining information from reading, that is one significant avenue.


2

To pervade (or permeate) oneself with [a text] until it becomes assimilitated. It means to read (a text, etc.) and let it soak in you until it becomes perfectly understood. E.g. *Perdue pervaded himself with advertising, day and night. He devoured great volumes on the subject, and can still drop quotes by people like David Ogilvy and Rosser ...


2

A good word for this is obfuscate: he obfuscated the details. It implies intentionality, as well as hiding "in plain sight". From vocabulary.com: Some people are experts at obfuscating the truth by being evasive, unclear, or obscure in the telling of the facts. The people who are good at obfuscating would include defense lawyers and teenagers ...


2

Something has gone viral Something is spreading fast. Something is gaining prominence. Something is trending. Something is accelerating. Something is gaining wide acceptance. Something is becoming prominent. Something is becoming popular. http://thesaurus.com/browse/Viral


2

The only example I can find where the two are not interchangeable is in the expression no relation". When two people have the same surname but there is no family tie, the words no relation are often inserted e.g. G. Smith, K. Smith (no relation). It is used to negate, to separate, not to link. In French, the word relations exists, but it means contacts in a ...


2

Former and ex- don't work in relation to scientific papers. Previous and earlier are both good; preceding would also work in the narrower context of a study leading up to the one currently being focused on. For example: In 2000, John Masterson showed that rats fed a diet of marijuana consistently preferred to drink single-malt Scotch whisky, whereas his ...


2

Looking at the definitions of the word pride, there is a definite implication that you are somehow responsible for their success. In particular, the fourth definition, Pleasure or satisfaction taken in something done by or belonging to oneself or believed to reflect credit upon oneself fits the worry you described. Indeed, pride is commonly used in the ...


2

A more scientific word would be ambulation. ambulation: the action of walking, moving about. As in: "...has a mechanism which simulates ambulation." If you want to use gait you need to say what kind of gait is simulated: "which simulates a natural gait." or "which simulates a human gait."


2

It depends a lot on which version of the English language you are talking about. The word "pupil" is rarely used in US English, but it the common word for a student in pre-college education in the UK (and I believe AUSNZ, but a speaker from there can correct me if I am wrong.) From a meaning point of view, pupil conotates a ward type relationship, one for ...


2

Assemble (verb) - fit together the separate component parts of (a machine or other object). Alternate forms: assembly (noun), assembling (verb) I like the sound "Code Assembly", "Code Assembler", or "Assembling Code", but you do risk being mistaken for being a blog about Assembly Language.


1

nonachiever (or non-achiever) a student who fares poorly in the classroom or has failing grades. Other than that, "weak student" is correct also and more common. weak: Lacking aptitude or skill: a weak student; weak in math.



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