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79

Consider either misplace or mislay; both have similar meanings: Misplace to put (something) in the wrong place; to lose (something) for a short time by forgetting where you put it Mislay to lose (something) for a short time by forgetting where you put it Misplace can also mean to give something undeserved, such as "misplaced trust" Google ...


14

Software Wizards generally help the user accomplish a relatively complex data entry task by breaking it down into palatable steps, like installing software or creating a new database record, etc. What you're seemingly looking for is a name for a more passive instructional process, which is generally regarded as a Tutorial (M-W) a book, computer program,...


14

Perhaps genie is in keeping with your theme but different enough from wizard. It has been used before in a similar sense and can perhaps be said to be an abbreviation e.g. The term genie is used to refer to a “code generation script”. — www.config4star.org Otherwise guide and all its synonyms....


10

The difference between perdure and endure is that perdure has a connotation of continuing to last forever, or at least until death, while endure has a connotation of only continuing to last until some specified time. For example, in this sentence: "His plays have endured for more than three centuries." You wouldn't use perdured here because it is not ...


9

Try yearning It would fit in a fantasy story in a long-ago setting. Gwyneth had a powerful yearning for Sir Mortimer, a yearning she knew she must keep to herself. (made up) Yearning, from The Free Dictionary A persistent, often melancholy desire; a longing Example, from Henry David Thoreau. I do not know of any poetry to quote which ...


8

Perhaps you could call it a yoda “In a dark place we find ourselves, and a little more knowledge lights our way.” yodaquotes.net


8

"Sherpa" might fulfill that "certain something" you're looking for. I have no software-related reason; but, a "sherpa" holds a special place helping some attain heights (success) otherwise unattainable. I've used it when referring to my function as an active resource or a more "hands-on" consultant than a more passive "guide on the side".


8

Synonymous means equivalent in meaning. The concept can be applied to words, phrases, declarative sentences, imperative sentences (that is, commands), and interrogative sentences (that is, questions). Synonymous questions are thus questions which are equivalent in meaning. This phrase has some currency, as evinced by this Google books search. ...


7

How about a familiar or spirit? In European folklore and folk-belief of the Medieval and Early Modern periods, familiar spirits (sometimes referred to simply as "familiars" or "animal guides") were believed to be supernatural entities that would assist witches and cunning folk in their practice of magic. Wikipedia


7

I once worked for a software company that sold solutions to churches, and many churches objected to the term "wizard" for its relation to occultism. Because of this we used the term "guided experience" in our products instead.


7

"Soldier on": there's a slight implication that you think you're not going to make it but carry on anyway. (idioms.thefreedictionary.com) to continue to do something in a determined way, esp. when you know you may not succeed. She was working with these gorgeous guys, and she managed to soldier on despite being a bit intimidated by them.


6

Guru — ODO noun 2. An influential teacher or popular expert "a management guru" Not really a computing term, but it should be easily understood. "Guru" comes from Sanskrit, and it means "expert, teacher, etc.".


6

loosely OED definition of technically: In the technical use or terminology of a particular field; according to the exact meaning; properly, strictly. Example (made up): Technically speaking, a tomato is a fruit. OED definition of loosely: Without care, strictness, or rigour; not strictly; carelessly, negligently, laxly. Said esp. of thought ...


5

Tour. Provide a tour of the software features. Maybe a tour guide could replace your wizard.


5

A frequently used noun would be "Trailblazer" - owing to the concept of the first person to enter an unknown, potentially risky area. The term is used in nearly any application where innovation, and a fearless disregard for conventional wisdom are involved , i.e. Medicine, Technology, Sports, etc. Example: "Dr. DeBakey was considered by most to be a true ...


5

The difference is largely one of scope. Roaming implies moving aimlessly over a very large area, while rambling is more localized or indefinite regarding the area traversed. The two words are indeed listed as synonyms in Oxford Dictionaries, but are often defined as Roam To move about or travel aimlessly or unsystematically, especially over a ...


5

There is a reference to coal mining: A view from the coalface. Working at the coalface is the hottest, dirtiest and hardest work in a coal mine. The expression emphasizes that situation. It is being used in current debates, for example this one from Cambridge University: What Brexit means for UK science: a view from the coalface and other academic sources....


5

What about averse? adj. Having a feeling of opposition, distaste, or aversion; strongly disinclined For example, you could say "He was averse to new technology, but hand-wrote long letters to all his friends every Sunday." This doesn't mean he was afraid of computers, but just didn't like them. I could swear I've also seen "averse" used similarly to a ...


5

A cavernous carrell A buried bibliotheca A subterranean study Or my fav The sunken stacks stacks (n.) storage space in a library consisting of an extensive arrangement of bookshelves where most of the books are stored Synonyms: depository, storage space, library synonym.com: stacks


4

You could use "helper" helper : noun 1 - a person or thing that helps or gives assistance, support, etc. www.dictionary.com


4

You can actually use details as a verb: "This graph details the relationships between x, y, and z." detail, v Give full information about: the report details proposals to improve public transport [ODO]


4

The literal meaning of hog is "a full-grown pig". Since pigs are typically greedy eaters, the figurative meaning of "hog" is "someone / something that consumes resources in a greedy or inconsiderate manner". Typically a program or process would be described as a memory hog if it was written in such a way that it routinely allocates so much RAM that other ...


4

Generally speaking, "underlying" means it's there, causing an effect on other variables, but you may not be able see it directly, while "latent" usually means that it is present in an inactive form and may become active at some point. However, in the domain of statistical analysis it seems like the two words may be closer in meaning: Latent variable - "....


3

Obscure (adj.) : not well-known : not known to most people b : not prominent or famous Merriam-Webster I knew they were special from their jeans and T-shirts, their knowing, ironic looks when obscure works of literature were referred to. —Julia Alvarez, How the Garcia Girls Lost Their Accents, 1991


3

"John's important contribution to the theory of evolution went mostly unnoticed" Unnoticed — Collins adjective not perceived or observed


3

While not a noun, you could use the verb moon Act in a dreamily infatuated manner: Timothy’s mooning over her like a schoolboy Oxford Dictionaries Online It is often used as a phrasal verb with over and an object, although it can be used without, as in Stop mooning!


3

One possibility is Mentor. A wise and trusted counselor or teacher. Mentor Greek Mythology Odysseus's trusted counselor, in whose guise Athena became the guardian and teacher of Telemachus. It's origin in Greek mythology may improve its suitability for your purpose, as a replacement for "wizard".


3

I would say the difference is more generational than anything else and the changeover from blackboard to chalkboard had nothing at all to do with racial sensibilities or political correctness. When I started school in 1955, they were all black and were called blackboards. In a new school I went to in 1957 the boards were green but since everyone was used to ...


3

Besotted would fit the context besotted completely in love with someone and always thinking of them : He was so completely besotted with her that he couldn't see how badly she treated him http://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/besotted Given the setting, the language and grammar are usually very differently formed from modern ...


3

Wandering around a thesaurus, the best I found was a synonym for beloved, lover, or passion: flame: Informal. an object of one's passionate love; sweetheart: He's taking out his new flame tonight. The problem that I'm seeing is that most of the words for a target of infatuation are lacking the unrequited aspect of crush. You wouldn't take ...



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