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55

I would go so far as to say that unless you are very sure of your audience, you should not use "escamotage" at all, as it is not in broad circulation (0 hits at the Corpus of Contemporary American English(COCA)) . If you don't want to label it a hack, a short descriptive phrase such as "short-term patch" or "temporary workaround" that emphasize that it is ...


39

"Consider magnetic declination". That said, there's an advantage to the more explicit "take into account", though I would phrase it "take magnetic declination into account". It's clearer and as such unless there was a limit on space, I'd favour it.


23

I'd go with "locals": Collins: an inhabitant of a specified locality


19

I' have seen the term quick fix (119 million google hits) used in similar circumstances. It has all the connotation of "not optimal" since that would require time for properly engineering a better solution.


16

If this is a passive label (ie. indicating something to the user) I'd use either Includes magnetic declination [or] Accounts for magnetic declination If it's an active label (as in a trigger, e.g. a user-clickable button) I'd go for Include magnetic declination [or] Add magnetic declination [or even just] Magnetic declination (as ...


15

Expedient: (noun) Something contrived or used to meet an urgent need; a means devised or employed in an exigency: Use any expedients you think necessary to get over the obstacles in your way. (adj) tending to promote some proposed or desired object; fit or suitable for the purpose; proper under the circumstances; (sources: The Free Dictionary, ...


12

You might choose to describe it as a "makeshift solution."


12

Workaround or Kludge. Kludge is a bit negative connotation but fits if it's a temporary hack that will be re-addressed so the negative meaning isn't dwelled upon. Workaround has no real negative connotations and simply implies you had to find a route other than the typical one to get it done.


12

if you have plans on improving the solution later on - you can try using "an interim solution" n. An interval of time between one event, process, or period and another. adj. Belonging to, serving during, or taking place during an intermediate interval of time; temporary: an interim agreement. See Synonyms at temporary.


12

Native A person born in a specified place or associated with a place by birth, whether subsequently resident there or not: a native of Montreal Source: oxforddictionaries.com It depends whether you are referring to the people who live there now, who may not have been born there, or whether you are referring in a more particular way to, for ...


12

Both extend and offer are correct and current usage. "As we were walking I offered her my hand." "I offered my hand and he shook it." "I approached him and extended my hand." "He stared at me for a moment and then reluctantly extended his hand."


10

Denizens. This is the most common term I know for the meaning desired.


9

"Allow for" is about half the length of "take into account".


9

MacGyvered - just kidding. I would say improvise: as in an improvised solution. Improvise has a positive connotation of quick-wittedness about it.


8

When I have need to describe this sort of thing in the past, I've always wanted to stress that, if a future project would expand this part of the system, this hack would probably need to be redone properly. I called it a provisional solution. In my mind it conveys the important things -- yes it is a working solution, no it's not done in the proper way, and ...


8

People or things occurring naturally in a particular place are indigenous. For some readers this word may connote First Nations. If you're fond of big words, autochthonous is a synonym for indigenous. Often for diseases or animals the word used is endemic.


6

I was a prosecutor in the US, which does not mean I am right, but it might affect how you interpret my opinion. First, "plea of insanity" is imprecise. In all US jurisdictions, when the defendant is required to enter a plea, the defendant may plead guilty or not guilty. Some jurisdictions allow a plea of no contest. Insanity is an appendage to the above ...


6

An idiom (as specified in the title) used for this is: 'Can I pick your brains?' pick someone’s brain to ask someone's advice about a subject the person knows a lot about: Can I pick your brain about how you got rid of those weeds? Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press Colloquially, we can pump someone (for information), ...


6

Corrected for / normalized for?


5

One word: -Include/consider/deliberate magnetic declination To deliberate means to carefully think or talk something through Two words: allow for think twice Three words: Bear in mind take into account


4

How about curious? having a desire to learn or know more about something or someone marked by desire to investigate and learn eager to learn or know; inquisitive. Or inquisitive ^


4

Heed would fit the meaning: verb (used with object) 1. to give careful attention to also note: verb (used with object) to observe carefully; give attention or heed to and mind verb (used with object) to pay attention to. I think that please note the magnetic declination would be best in this context


4

I would describe it as a tactical solution (in contrast to a strategic solution) to indicate that the fix isn't necessarily a long-term or clean one, but makes sense given the local/short-term constraints.


4

Depending on the context, you may find refine works, but it's slightly, um, broader than narrow down.


4

How about bamboozle: From The Free Dictionary: To deceive or dupe; hoodwink. See Synonyms at deceive. To confuse; bewilder. And From Wordnet 3.0 (by way of Wordnik): v. conceal one's true motives from especially by elaborately feigning good intentions so as to gain an end from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All ...


3

It's incongruous (out of place, perhaps humorously so) (Google has 'not in harmony or keeping with the surroundings or other aspects of something'). Paradoxes / oxymorons {paradox defined here at AHDEL} paradox n. A statement that seems to contradict itself but may nonetheless be true: the paradox that standing is more tiring than walking. A ...


3

Inconsistency seems like a better description of the relationships between Josh's names: Josh (the informal jocular type) is inconsistent with Earnest (the intensely serious type) Not staying the same throughout: but Josh's names seem to describe his routine performance perfectly: Informal jocularity deflecting serious intensity ...


3

I would say Account for or Consider


3

You might call this a revival of the old value, or a return to form.


3

A dilemma is a choice between several options that are equally unfavourable. A quandary is the state of being uncertain as to what you should do. But dilemma is also used of the state of having a dilemma to solve, while quandary is also used of the cause of the quandary, so there is certainly a large overlap between these two. Dilemma is still used by ...



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