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90

There are various terms for this. Once upon a time, “screen name” would likely have been the most common. However, it seems to me that this convention has been driven by the most pervasive websites. So, with Facebook et al's move toward encouraging the use of real names, “screen name” seems much less common (phrases such as “nickname” appear to be used now ...


33

I guess screen-name is appropriate: Noun, Digital Technology: a unique sequence of characters that a person chooses to use for identification purposes when interacting with others online, as in computer games, instant messaging, or forums. Source:http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/screen+name


19

The one-word option that is the closest match to the French original is "something." She has a certain something about her. This has the same figurative meaning and close to the same literal meaning as the French phrase. There's a Cole Porter song called "She's Got That Thing" that uses "thing" to express the same thing as "je ne sais quoi": She's ...


16

I would call that cerebral humor. Dennis Miller is fairly cerebral. Merriam Webster (above link) even uses that as an example usage of the word. He's a very cerebral comedian.


15

Pseudonym has meanings beyond the web, but is just as applicable to usage online as off. It's also generally more appropriate to both formal writing, and writing for non-technical audiences. It's a bit more widely understood than the alternatives, being several hundred years older and more established in the language. (Screen Name and Handle are, as already ...


14

I suggest 'Internet handle' (but having said that, Fathima's screen name is a well-established term, as a Google search will quickly show).


14

Nickname is the appropriate word because it is a common synonym of screenname in computing. It is used outside the internet but it became a common word in this context. Nick (short of nickname), on the other hand, is mostly used in technical contexts.


13

I have often seen "alias" used in this way in describing what someone is called on an Internet community.


12

Je ne sais quoi is a loan phrase in English so it is English already. This phrase captures the idea more precisely than any other equivalent and has the sense of that indescribable elegance, so that would be why it is loaned from French. One word equivalent would be something but it is used with the adjective certain and makes sense in a context. An ...


11

A moniker or handle would be an appropriate word for internet name.


10

Consider highbrow humor. Oxford Online defines highbrow as Scholarly or rarefied in taste


9

Wit a natural aptitude for using words and ideas in a quick and inventive way to create humour: -ODE Witty jokes usually need some intelligence to get (and make for that matter).


8

According to the the canonical reference for all things hackish, it's handle, nick, or screen name. http://www.catb.org/jargon/html/H/handle.html


7

The principal difference will be that they belong to quite different era and etymology. 'Seventh heaven' is the most exalted level of heaven, esp. the highest and most holy or blessed of the hierarchical series of heavens described in Jewish and Islamic theology According to the Talmudic Hagigah 12b, the place where God dwells over the angels, the souls of ...


7

There are many words that have racist connotations in some contexts and not in others. I think you'd be hard pressed to make a case that talking about "exotic cars" or "exotic loans" would be perceived by a reasonable person as racist. Describing a woman as an "exotic beauty," on the other hand, may well give offense. Trying to sort all the nouns in the ...


5

I personally use "Alias" to reference an online user's name. It's similar to nickname, but the context is clearer that it's a false name.


5

Personal experience growing up with the saying is that it originally refers to clean dishes. Think "Fairy" dishwashing liquid advertising. And I am talking circa 1975. The word "squeak" used in the context, is clearly an "onomatopeia". Also, I would usually use this word with the "ea" centre, rather than the double e; "ee". Although, that could be an ...


4

Another discussion is here http://forum.wordreference.com/showthread.php?t=2216027 'username' seems to be acknowledged as indicative without accompanying baggage. https://www.google.com/search?q=define+username


4

A neutral term--but hardly amusing or unique--is feedback. Personally, I'm not a big fan of the word, implying as it does a machine with a built-in device for detecting an increase or decrease and then responding accordingly by performing an operation. Example: a thermostat that controls the temperature in your home. I prefer the term reaction. A somewhat ...


4

Someone who questions is a skeptic. Dictionary.com: 1. a person who questions the validity or authenticity of something purporting to be factual. 2. a person who maintains a doubting attitude, as toward values, plans, statements, or the character of others.


4

Commonly (in the US), people don't distinguish between a mechanical pencil and simply "pencil". The full phrase is usually only used when the speaker needs to unambiguously refer to a mechanical pencil (rather than a wooden one): "Have you seen my mechanical pencil?"


4

I was going to add this as a comment but it turned out to be too large. OED(2) has an entry for squeaky (adjective) and definition c talks about squeaky clean. Here they have a citation of use from 1975, which is the figurative sense of squeaky clean meaning beyond reproach. That seems very odd to me, I'm sure the Fairy adverts were before 75 and the ...


3

I would just use typos. It encapsulates the uniquely digital nature of the mistakes you are making. They are not Misspellings as such because you actually do know how to spell the words in question, so you should use a word which is more about input errors than knowledge gaps. Flubs or goofs might also fit in some other context, but it will make total sense ...


3

I suggest allure to convey the idea of an undefinable attractiveness about her: high, often subtle attractiveness: charms that still allure. Source: http://www.thefreedictionary.com/Allure


3

Publish is a good alternative to post, in your context. It is used frequently by Content Management Systems to describe uploading content to the internet.


3

Anything wrong with "deadline"?


3

You want to veg out. Or you can say you're looking for brain candy.


3

No, not in place of those other two. I'm game expresses willingness, but not yet commitment. I'm in and Count me in are synonymous, expressing commitment.


3

Collins Cobuild, the English Learners dictionary states: adjective Something that is exotic is unusual and interesting, usually because it comes from or is related to a distant country. ⇒ ...brilliantly coloured, exotic flowers. ⇒ She flits from one exotic location to another. This has no warnings. For reference, a swear word would ...


3

I think the largest issue with exotic is it (like the infamous "flesh-colored" crayon or band-aid) presupposes a shared default cultural context, which is increasingly rare in today's globalized society. As such, it's become a much less useful word, and it comes across as tone-deaf when used in any context where a shared cultural context shouldn't be ...



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