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11

Apparently, in Latin the names of metals always had the neuter grammatical gender ( Lectures on Syntax: With Special Reference to Greek, Latin, and Germanic, by Jacob Wackernagel, edited by David Langslow). Examples of this are ferrum "iron," aurum "gold," cassiterum "tin" (a loanword from Greek κασσίτερος). Latin neuter nouns of the second declension ...


-2

gormèd, one might rather say?


2

-misia is the suffix that means (strong) dislike for something. For example in: Iatromisia: from Greek iatro-, "physician, medicine" + Greek misos, "hatred"; from miseo, "I hate" So it is clear that iatromisia is somehow different from iatrophobia (which is an abnormal or irrational fear of doctors or going to the doctor). logomisia: from Greek ...


5

What about averse? adj. Having a feeling of opposition, distaste, or aversion; strongly disinclined For example, you could say "He was averse to new technology, but hand-wrote long letters to all his friends every Sunday." This doesn't mean he was afraid of computers, but just didn't like them. I could swear I've also seen "averse" used similarly to a ...


2

Some sources distinguish between "barbarisms" and "solecisms", using the former for errors in morphology and the latter for errors in syntax. So, using a nonstandard prefix would be a "barbarism". Insofar as "barbarism" is especially used for intrusions of one language into another, unliterate is a pretty good example (since Latinate roots usually prefer ...


2

It's not a rule of English grammar that you can add -ee to any verb to describe the subject. It should be seen more as a common approach to creating a new word. Like any new word, or neologism, the resulting word still needs to be accepted by the community: many new words fail and die because people just don't like them. You will find that in some cases,...


1

"Or" normally occurs in the spelling of Latin roots The British English practice of using the spelling "our" in some words where Americans use "or" usually reflects sound changes that occurred between Latin and French (in Modern French, as Peter Shor mentions in a comment, the "ou" has often changed further to "eu"). Therefore, we would expect to see "or" ...


2

British English spelling is — or has been — more variable than one might imagine. (Microsoft Word’s spelling dictionary and its ilk seem currently to be forcing a standardization — or ‘standardisation’, as it would have me write.) Using individually compiled printed dictionaries as reference, here are some relevant extracts from Chambers and the Oxford ...


0

My dictionary, Gyldendal's Red Dictionary translates from Danish to British English and vice versa and is the most reliable one in Denmark (which is very reliable, even though Denmark is a small country). It knows the word "favourable" and not the word "favorable". And it spells "vaporize" as so, just like the American spelling. Cambridge on the other hand ...


4

Michael Quinion, Ologies and Isms: Word Beginnings and Endings (2002) suggests that words taking the suffix -phile can be sorted into a number of subgroups within the philos-related family: -phile Also -phil, -philia, -phily, -philic, and -philous. Lover of or enthusiast for, having an affinity with a given thing. {Greek philos, loving.} Several ...



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