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It is not worth it using a short suffix that is semantically only close to what you are trying to express, for a concept used that rarely. You could invent a new suffix that describes by definition exactly what you want to say, otherwise the usage of extra syllables should be preferred over losing part of the meaning. Indifference is oftentimes used as the ...


0

The suffix "-path" (as in apathy) may have this meaning, but I can't think of any other examples right now besides "sociopath" (one who doesn't care about society), and possibly also "psychopath". Clearly, the suffix can also have other meanings, as in "homoeopath" and "naturopath", but in some cases, I think it may have the meaning you're looking for.


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-apathic A slightly lighter-weight version of @EricKigathi's -apathetic. -pathic, suffix meaning affected by —The Free Dictionary (citing Mosby's Medical Dictionary, 2009( apathic, without sensation or feeling. —The Free Dictionary (citing Saunders Comprehensive Veterinary Dictionary, 2007) apathic, synonym of apathetic ...


3

Not the best choice suggested here, but one might use -**ambivalent**: ▸adjective: feeling two different things about someone or something at the same time, for example that you like them and dislike them ▸ adjective: uncertain or unable to decide about what course to follow ("Was ambivalent about having children") ▸ adjective: ...


2

I'd also propose -apathetic Apathetic (adj): Showing or feeling no interest, enthusiasm, or concern Apathy derives from French apathie, via Latin from Greek apatheia, from apathēs without feeling, from a- without + pathos suffering. Example usage: Ailurophilic Loves Cats Ailuroapathetic Is unconcerned about or indifferent to cats


15

If an english suffix would fit, I would suggest -indifferent as in: techno-indifferent, arachno-indifferent, agora-indifferent, homo-indifferent…


74

I propose '-meh' Arachnophobe Arachnophile Arachnomeh In the right tone of voice, I think that could work. Meh, Wikipedia Meh is an interjection used as an expression of indifference or boredom. It may also mean "be it as it may". It is often regarded as a verbal shrug of the shoulders


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"Don't care" means one has no heart for something, it is not usually synonymous with "unfamiliar" or "innocent". It connotes veiled disdain for a given topic, making -nostic & -neutral & -middle (Gr. -meso) too gentle, and -phobic insincere. The prefix "anti-" seems more correct than any available suffix. The most appropriate term in Greek: ...


31

It seems you are looking for a concise, easily understandable term for someone who is neither a -phile nor a -phobe. I would suggest the suffix -neutral. It may be more of an adjective than a noun, but it can be pressed into service as a noun by ellipsis. Thus: Which of the following describes you best? I am a technophile I am a technophobe ...


174

I am not aware of a suffix per se with that meaning, but I sometimes see the idea expressed by forming a pairing with the word agnostic. Although the first meaning of this word is specifically about religious belief, it can also be used in a more general sense: a person who is unwilling to commit to an opinion about something (Merriam-Webster) ...


133

As far as I know, no. We could make one up, here. "-phile" and "-phobe" are derived from the greek words "philia" (love) and "phobos" (fear), so we'd want to look for an greek word meaning "indifference", I think. "adiaphoria" looks like an early contender, being what Google translate comes back with for "indifference". There is already a philosophical ...


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A very common word "better" (which can be a noun as well as an adjective, adverb and verb) follows the same pattern. Conversely "Peter" (name) and "peter" (verb as in "peter out") are pronounced differently. Under this pattern, "*beter" would then be a homophone for "beater" (also "*seter" & "seater"). The vast majority of words ending "--eter" have ...


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Yes. -age is a suffix added to form garage,mirage,barrage Refer http://www.dictionary.com/browse/-age -age means (1) a collection, set or a group {garage- a place for housing motor vehicles} (2) a process or action or the result of an action {mirage - an optical illusion created due to atmospheric conditions like appearance of sheet of water in a hot ...


13

I'd have to partly disagree with DavePhD. There are at least three adjectival forms of the verb "emit". Emissive is used to the abstract concept of emission, as in the "emissive power" example given; however "radiation" in the OP's question would normally be described as "emitted", particularly in the concrete sense of describing a past event, so: The ...


4

emissive: having the power to radiate something, especially light, heat, or radiation For example, from A Textbook on Heat Transfer, page 109: The total hemispherical emissivity of a surface is the ratio of the total hemispherical emissive power of the surface to the total hemispherical emissive power of a black surface at the same temperature ...


2

"coding serb" is confusing as a title (eg a nickname) because it has multiple meanings: it could mean a) "someone who is programming for the serb programming language" (this may or may not exist but the phrase can be parsed this way regardless) - like "coding javascript". b) "a serb, ie someone from Serbia, who is coding at the moment", which i assume is ...



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