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1

If it were me, I'd simply use a different word that is appropriate to the situation. For instance, if I were a clerk in a store and a customer wanted me to show them how to use something I was selling - say an unusual keyboard - I'd show it to them and simply refer to them as a customer, not a demonstratee. For example "I just showed that customer how to use ...


1

Error-prone. Idiot-prone. Etymonline says regarding -prone: c. 1400, "naturally inclined to something, apt, liable," from Latin pronus "bent forward, leaning forward, bent over," figuratively "inclined to, disposed," perhaps from adverbial form of pro-"before, for, instead of" (see pro-) + ending as in infernus, externus. Meaning "lying face-down" is ...


2

In conversation, you'd probably either be more specific and long-hand, or a lot more general. If the person you're talking to needs to know the details: I've been keeping my feet up (rest and elevation), using some compression and putting some ice on it. If someone's asked how you're doing, you'd probably not even give them the acronym. Oh, you ...


11

There is no rule about this. Many times a short acronym takes an apostrophe: The bouncer is ID'ing people. but you're as likely to see The bouncer is IDing people. Your example is a bit different, and personally I'd go with I'm just RICEing it. In this case, the "E" has an actual meaning and should, IMO, be kept. "RICing" could be construed ...


3

Since you can't actually do all four at once, i'd say I'm elevating it or compressing it, etc. I'm treating it using the rice technique


2

It is possible (but not certain) that father, mother and brother share a suffix: compare Latin pater, mater and frater. I don't know that anybody has a convincing answer for what this suffix may mean - or more to the point, what the roots without the suffix might mean. Other and another, though, do share a suffix meaning "one of two", also seen in English ...


4

Anything is a word if people use it. English does not have an authority on what is or isn't a "real" word. Since "findability" does have attestation, it is a word. This is totally separate from whether it's a good word, of course. But that usually depends on the context in which you plan to use it.


1

In 2013, I attended a meeting with my work group. One announcement my boss made was, more or less: OK guys, findability. If you're gonna be away from your desk for more than a half-hour, put a sticky note on your door.


3

There are a large number of words pronounced with a long vowel before -ic. However, there are some rules that can help predict when a word will be an exception to the shortening rule. For many of the less predictable words, both pronunciations are recorded in dictionaries. Sources I've found that mention both the shortening rule and some exceptions to it: ...



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