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To complete the accepted answer, I found a similar, but more extensive information in Oxford dictionaries -> Plural of nouns: Nouns ending in -o can add either -s or -es in the plural, and some can be spelled either way. As a general rule, most nouns ending in -o add -s to make the plural: singular plural -------------------- solo solos ...


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As noted in another answer, utilisability may be some kind of jargon or marketing term. (Although I doubt it.) In common usage, deriving utilisability from utilisable would an example of overgeneralization. A noun with the intended meaning already exists: utility.


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There is no system in adjectives with the suffix -al. I once had a closer look at adjectives in -ic/ical. You find a variety of types. Type: historical/historic historical is the normal word, historic has a special meaning. Type: geometric/geometrical Both forms are used Type: logic/logical Logic is the noun, logical the adjective Type: practical ...


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These sites might help: http://grammarist.com/usage/historic-historical/ http://grammarist.com/spelling/metaphoric-metaphorical/ Some of these types of pairs undergo differentiation whereby they develop slightly different meanings (e.g. historic/historical). Others don't (e.g. metaphoric/metaphorical).


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(in)corrigible dirigible erigible (able to be erected) exigible (able to be charged) (in)eligible exigible (able to be required) (un)intelligible (non)negligible


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The answer is No. Firstly I think your surmise is too general. Only sentient beings can have that suffix. We wouldn't say that a nail is a hammeree. The suffix 'ee' comes from French. Initially only adopted French words used it, e.g. fiancée (fr.) becomes fiancee (eng.) The usage has spread but I think there's a limit. For example take the English verb ...


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We are the questionees Yes, but not all verbs can be treated this way. Only transitive verbs But you are correct. If you want to refer to the object of the transitive verb with only one word, then yes, all you need to do is add -ee update and only with living beings Page 381


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There is a limited and relative short list of adjectives with -ly as in stately, elderly, deadly, otherwordly, friendly, brotherly -ly was originaly a suffix that formed adjectives from nouns and other word classes. This suffix is connected with the adjective like. Today -ly is used as suffix for adverbs of manner. It is no use forming new adjectives ...


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I can think of a few examples of adding -ly to a verb and getting an adjective (comely, maybe shapely), adding -ly to a noun and getting an adjective (portly), or adding -ly to an adjective and getting another adjective (sickly), but I don't think there's a rule behind it, and I certainly wouldn't stick -ly onto verbs haphazardly and expect an adjective.


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The past or present participle of many verbs may act as an adjective; such an adjective may take the -ly suffix to be employed as an adverb. Prof. Sartorius' lectures interest me. They are so interesting. He speaks interestingly. Grichuk's voice broke. He spoke in a broken voice. He spoke brokenly. But creating new words this way is ...



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