Tag Info

New answers tagged

4

-tude : is a common suffix used to form abstract nouns: syllable formed when the word-forming element -ude, making abstract nouns from adjectives and participles, is fixed to a base or to another suffix ending in -t or -te; from French -ude, from Latin -udo (stem -udin-). The equivalent of native -ness. (words ending with -tude) -tute or -ute ...


4

Came here to provide the same answer as the one Josh61 put in his comment. The answer is most certainly '-lytic' Anxiolytic Neurolysis


1

As both your research and Edwin Ashworth have pointed out, there is no reason to reject the word comic as incorrect. Ms. Doughty has significant semantic support for her choice, even if it seems like the wrong word on its face: Relating to or in the style of comedy: Contrary to the noble traditions of British judicial tradition, Yvonne, the narrator ...


1

In the Viking Old Norse language and in present-day Scandinavian languages, "the" is represented by adding "en" to the end of the word. Olden seems to come from this usage, so "in olden days" has the same meaning as "in the old days." You would not say "in the olden days" because "the" is already represented by "en." Even though this is English and not ...


1

It does seem that your proposition is by and large correct. One can think of a variety of exceptions, but it generally seems to hold that where you find an ...ism, there will usually be an ...ist! But not all followers of something are ...ists, some are ...ites e.g Luddites (I've never heard Luddism used, though). Adherents of Nazism are plain Nazis. ...


1

No - counter example: Catholicism => Catholic but not Catholicist


0

Another suffix option is -ite, as in Luddite (or Reaganite); two others are -eer and -er, as in free marketeer and free marketer (both of these free market–based examples are listed in Merriam-Webster's Eleventh Collegiate Dictionary); and two more are -ic, as in agnostic, and -c, as in hypochondriac. The only ending that strikes me as being truly ...


2

There are likely several factors that determine the choice between the two suffixes -ian and -ist. Some of these, such as the word root and the resulting sound, have already been mentioned. Another one is a slight difference in meaning: both tend to convey the notion of expertise. The difference is that -ian tends to communicate something more comprehensive, ...



Top 50 recent answers are included