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Silenus's suggestion of nyctophyte is very good. I was looking to see if there are any alternatives, and found the following words: scotophyte (from Greek skotos "darkness"): a plant living in darkness (English Word Information) sciophyte, also spelled sciaphyte, skiophyte (from Greek skia "shadow, shade"; according to the Oxford English Dictionary, ...


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If you google nyctophyte you'll see that at least one other person (here) has used this term to describe flowers that thrive in darkness (for example, underground in caves). But the neologism noctophyte works too since "nocto-" is an acceptable prefix meaning night (here). Although see the caveats of @sumelic in the comments below.


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The Oxford Dictionary of American Usage and Style (2000) says: Other variant adjectives, though, are merely duplicative. Typical examples are extendable, extendible, and extensible. The first of these is now prevalent in AmE (though labeled obsolete in the OED). Extensible was, through the mid-20th century, the most common form, but today it trails ...


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It stems from the Latin term "convertibilis", which means changeable. The term "convertible" is Old French, dating back to the 13th-14th century. I'd imagine they kept the i because it was more familiar with the original term.


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A suffix can 'cast' a word from one syntax to another. Each has a different use (v->n, v->adj, n->adj, ...) and some add a nuance, although there are redundancies. For casting a noun to an adj, you could add 'ful', 'al', 'ic', 'y', or even 'ical'. It is a quirk of etymology as to which is right.


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There is a very basic 3rd grade rule of pronunciation that most people have internalized, even if they don't know it: The vowel of an "open" syllable is pronounced "long" while the vowel of a "closed" syllable is pronounced "short". Like most "rules" of English this one is honored by being frequently dishonored, but it still carries some weight. Thus ...


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I think there are several heuristics you can use: Pronunciation The pronunciation seems to me like it could go either way for metalium, but not for metallium, as I said in the comments beneath Dan's answer and Armen Ծիրունյան's answer . For example, the word nobelium is pronounced both as /noʊˈbɛlɪəm/ "no-BELL-ium" and as /noʊˈbiːlɪəm/ "no-BEE-lium." The ...


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One approach might be to decide how you want your word to sound. Of course, anything can be learned, but the default idiomatic pronunciation for a vowel preceding 'lium' is different to the same vowel preceding 'llium'. Reading metalium for the first time I might say - /mɛteɪlɪəm/ (cf. alias - /ˈeɪlɪəs/) Reading metallium for the first time I would say - ...


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There are very few words in English that end in -lium (enter *lium in pattern). The closest analogy to the non-existent metal(l)ium would be Nobel -> Nobelium So I'd say the l has no reason to be doubled in Metalium either.



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