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190

I am not aware of a suffix per se with that meaning, but I sometimes see the idea expressed by forming a pairing with the word agnostic. Although the first meaning of this word is specifically about religious belief, it can also be used in a more general sense: a person who is unwilling to commit to an opinion about something (Merriam-Webster) ...


153

As far as I know, no. We could make one up, here. "-phile" and "-phobe" are derived from the greek words "philia" (love) and "phobos" (fear), so we'd want to look for an greek word meaning "indifference", I think. "adiaphoria" looks like an early contender, being what Google translate comes back with for "indifference". There is already a philosophical ...


82

I propose '-meh' Arachnophobe Arachnophile Arachnomeh In the right tone of voice, I think that could work. Meh, Wikipedia Meh is an interjection used as an expression of indifference or boredom. It may also mean "be it as it may". It is often regarded as a verbal shrug of the shoulders


74

Origin The suffix -ic comes from Greek -ikos, while -ical is a combination of -ic and the French suffix -al. Originally, -al was suffixed to scientific nouns ending in -ics, e.g. mathematics - mathematical. Eventually, the -ical portion of those words was reanalyzed as being a single unit. This is what Marchand (1969) had to say about -ic vs. -ical at ...


59

The two -ing's are actually not the same etymologically. One developed from Proto-Germanic *-ungō, which has survived in contemporary German (packaging — Verpackung). The other -ing developed from Old English -ende, from Proto-Germanic *-andz — again, compare contemporary German (singing — singend) — and goes back to the Proto-Indo-European *-nt- (cf. Greek -...


52

People say orientated because they hear the word orientation and think that's the verb made from it. It's called a "back-formation". (See Why are "colleagues" becoming "work colleagues"?). Orientated is accepted as an alternate by most dictionaries I've seen. To orient something comes from the medieval practice of building cathedrals so that the apse, the ...


47

-ess is, in fact, a feminine suffix. The male or neuter form (English tends to conflate the two) would be tempter. As a note, the title The Tempter, with capital letters, is given to the Devil. A person who tempts in a sexual fashion might be called a seducer (seductress if female).


44

I think you may be looking for protege: protege — a person who receives support and protection from an influential patron who furthers the protege's career


44

Phobia: (Etymonline): "irrational fear, horror, aversion," 1786, perhaps on model of similar use in French, abstracted from compounds in -phobia, from Greek -phobia, from phobos "fear, panic fear, terror, outward show of fear; object of fear or terror," originally "flight" (still the only sense in Homer), but it became the common word for "fear" via ...


37

It appears that I probably draw a finer distinction here than others may, but the good thing is that for those that say the two are interchangeable, my usage will seem unremarkable, and for those that care, my usage will seem consistent. I use extendable in cases where it means the opposite of retractable. In other words, a telescoping wand is extendable, ...


36

The root word drama fits: "This is due to the drama of the day." Drama 3 a : a state, situation, or series of events involving interesting or intense conflict of forces b : dramatic state, effect, or quality - the drama of the courtroom proceedings - M-W


35

It seems you are looking for a concise, easily understandable term for someone who is neither a -phile nor a -phobe. I would suggest the suffix -neutral. It may be more of an adjective than a noun, but it can be pressed into service as a noun by ellipsis. Thus: Which of the following describes you best? I am a technophile I am a technophobe ...


34

It stands for "(advanced) skill". There are lots of similar constructions, such as "Script-Fu", "Google-Fu", and so on. Wiktionary has an article on the suffix -fu: Etymology From kung-fu Suffix 1. (slang) Expertise; mastery. My google-fu is weak! Aragorn uses Ranger-fu to figure out that Sam and Frodo have taken a boat.


33

Google Ngrams shows that updatable is currently much more prevalent:


33

The key element of a phobia as a mental disorder is its irrationality. No one will claim that you're suffering from pyrophobia if you run out of a burning building. Calling a particular prejudice a phobia is an attempt to call out the irrational component of that prejudice. There is a parallel to "homophobia" in descriptions of prejudice against black ...


32

In some cases, an adjective has both -ic and -ical forms, with no difference in meaning. In some cases, there are two different words for two different meanings. In some cases, only one word exists. And of course, this is often historical and can change with time. In your case, there are actually differences in meaning (at least as I would use them): ...


32

Some businesses provide less experienced staff with mentors. I have heard the mentors refer to their "mentees". Wikipedia says this is a recent term.


31

General principle: Latin plural endings go with Latin singular endings The plural of the Latin word matrix is matrices, and the plural of the Latin word index is indices. We took the singular forms of these words from Latin unchanged, and the same goes for the plural forms (unchanged in the spelling, anyway; the pronunciation has been anglicized). However, ...


29

There is already a word for converting something to English: Anglicization /Anglicisation (AmE/BrE) 1 : to make English in quality or characteristics 2 : to adapt (a foreign word, name, or phrase) to English usage: as a : to alter to a characteristic English form, sound, or spelling b : to convert (a name) to its English equivalent <anglicize Juan ...


28

All these formations are modeled after the Watergate scandal which you mentioned. That scandal, in turn, took its name from the very innocently named Watergate Complex, a group of buildings in Washington DC which happened to house the office which housed the documents that were stolen as part of the Watergate Burglaries, and thus ended up giving its name (or ...


27

-ship is added to a noun to establish status or condition. Indicating a state or a condition, e.g. to be in a friendship. Indicating the qualities belonging to a class of people, e.g. craftsmanship. Indicating office or profession, e.g. ambassadorship. Quote from http://www.randomhouse.com/wotd/index.pperl?date=19990225: The suffix -ship has been ...


26

There is no universal affix in English equivalent to the German suffix behaftet. Instead, there are two different ways to form this kind of adjective in English. The suffix -ful suggests that the noun modified has the quality in question in abundance. It is a limited suffix that can be used only with certain words: hopeful, but not hungerful. The past ...


26

A mythological creature called succubus is described as the ultimate temptress, using sexual seduction to lure its prey. The male counterpart, incubus, similarly uses sexual seduction to lure in prey. These terms can be used to describe seductive people whose ultimate goal is self-serving or else makes no consideration for the wellbeing of the person being ...


26

If a word ends in -exia, such as dyslexia, anorexia and pyrexia does this imply anything about the word itself? It doesn't necessarily imply something about the word. Josh61's answer (which you should read, and which I won't copy here) gives an excellent explanation of the suffix "-exia," used in the word "pyrexia" and also for some other medical ...


24

I've always seen falsy and truthy. Falsey is a perfectly acceptable alternative and gives me just as many search results. The word is unfortunately too new to provide good sources. The ECMAScript Language Specification uses “⟦ToBoolean⟧” to refer to the interpretation of of non-Boolean values as Booleans, but makes no use of truthy or falsy. These terms are ...


24

The Online Etymology Dictionary explains the unusual spelling: late 13c., from Middle English fier “fire” (see fire (n.)) + -y (2). The spelling is a relic of one of the attempts to render Old English “y” in fyr in a changing system of vowel sounds. Words like miry (late 14c.) and wiry (1580s) have later origins and different etymology, so they don’t ...


20

This is similar to the relation between “while” and “whilst”, or between “amid” and “amidst”. As with "whilst", "amongst" is: chiefly British "while using whilst runs the risk of sounding pretentious, it can sometimes add a literary or ironically formal note to a piece of writing" [American Heritage Guide] "The general consensus among scholars of English ...


20

As reported on Etymonline: Old English yrþling "plowman" (see earth + -ling); the sense of "inhabitant of the earth" is from 1590s. Earthman was originally (1860) "a demon who lives in the earth;" science fiction sense of "inhabitant of the planet Earth" first attested 1949 in writing of Robert Heinlein. Earlier in this sense was earthite (1825). ...



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