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63

Origin The suffix -ic comes from Greek -ikos, while -ical is a combination of -ic and the French suffix -al. Originally, -al was suffixed to scientific nouns ending in -ics, e.g. mathematics - mathematical. Eventually, the -ical portion of those words was reanalyzed as being a single unit. This is what Marchand (1969) had to say about -ic vs. -ical at ...


58

The two -ing's are actually not the same etymologically. One developed from Proto-Germanic *-ungō, which has survived in contemporary German (packaging — Verpackung). The other -ing developed from Old English -ende, from Proto-Germanic *-andz — again, compare contemporary German (singing — singend) — and goes back to the Proto-Indo-European *-nt- (cf. Greek ...


46

-ess is, in fact, a feminine suffix. The male or neuter form (English tends to conflate the two) would be tempter. As a note, the title The Tempter, with capital letters, is given to the Devil. A person who tempts in a sexual fashion might be called a seducer (seductress if female).


41

I think you may be looking for protege: protege — a person who receives support and protection from an influential patron who furthers the protege's career


37

People say orientated because they hear the word orientation and think that's the verb made from it. It's called a "back-formation". (See Why are "colleagues" becoming "work colleagues"?). Orientated is accepted as an alternate by most dictionaries I've seen. To orient something comes from the medieval practice of building cathedrals so that the apse, the ...


32

It stands for "(advanced) skill". There are lots of similar constructions, such as "Script-Fu", "Google-Fu", and so on. Wiktionary has an article on the suffix -fu: Etymology From kung-fu Suffix 1. (slang) Expertise; mastery. My google-fu is weak! Aragorn uses Ranger-fu to figure out that Sam and Frodo have taken a boat.


32

In some cases, an adjective has both -ic and -ical forms, with no difference in meaning. In some cases, there are two different words for two different meanings. In some cases, only one word exists. And of course, this is often historical and can change with time. In your case, there are actually differences in meaning (at least as I would use them): ...


30

Some businesses provide less experienced staff with mentors. I have heard the mentors refer to their "mentees". Wikipedia says this is a recent term.


28

All these formations are modeled after the Watergate scandal which you mentioned. That scandal, in turn, took its name from the very innocently named Watergate Complex, a group of buildings in Washington DC which happened to house the office which housed the documents that were stolen as part of the Watergate Burglaries, and thus ended up giving its name (or ...


27

There is already a word for converting something to English: Anglicization /Anglicisation (AmE/BrE) 1 : to make English in quality or characteristics 2 : to adapt (a foreign word, name, or phrase) to English usage: as a : to alter to a characteristic English form, sound, or spelling b : to convert (a name) to its English equivalent <anglicize Juan ...


26

-ship is added to a noun to establish status or condition. Indicating a state or a condition, e.g. to be in a friendship. Indicating the qualities belonging to a class of people, e.g. craftsmanship. Indicating office or profession, e.g. ambassadorship. Quote from http://www.randomhouse.com/wotd/index.pperl?date=19990225: The suffix -ship has been ...


26

Google Ngrams shows that updatable is currently much more prevalent:


26

A mythological creature called succubus is described as the ultimate temptress, using sexual seduction to lure its prey. The male counterpart, incubus, similarly uses sexual seduction to lure in prey. These terms can be used to describe seductive people whose ultimate goal is self-serving or else makes no consideration for the wellbeing of the person being ...


25

There is no universal affix in English equivalent to the German suffix behaftet. Instead, there are two different ways to form this kind of adjective in English. The suffix -ful suggests that the noun modified has the quality in question in abundance. It is a limited suffix that can be used only with certain words: hopeful, but not hungerful. The past ...


24

The Online Etymology Dictionary explains the unusual spelling: late 13c., from Middle English fier “fire” (see fire (n.)) + -y (2). The spelling is a relic of one of the attempts to render Old English “y” in fyr in a changing system of vowel sounds. Words like miry (late 14c.) and wiry (1580s) have later origins and different etymology, so they don’t ...


23

Temptress / Feminine; Tempter / Masculine OP also requests a description of "a man who entices others into making bad decisions" Such an individual is sometimes referred to as a “Svengali” svengali n.: A person who manipulates or controls another, especially by force of personality for malicious purposes. See, the Free Dictionary ...


22

It appears that I probably draw a finer distinction here than others may, but the good thing is that for those that say the two are interchangeable, my usage will seem unremarkable, and for those that care, my usage will seem consistent. I use extendable in cases where it means the opposite of retractable. In other words, a telescoping wand is extendable, ...


20

As reported on Etymonline: Old English yrþling "plowman" (see earth + -ling); the sense of "inhabitant of the earth" is from 1590s. Earthman was originally (1860) "a demon who lives in the earth;" science fiction sense of "inhabitant of the planet Earth" first attested 1949 in writing of Robert Heinlein. Earlier in this sense was earthite (1825). ...


19

The suffix -ish comes from Old English -isc and is a diminutive. So it means the word is lessened in intensity. Normalish (while not a proper word) means a bit normal. Yellowish means the thing is a bit yellow. Smallish means something is small, but not overly so.


18

The two etymologies are different. In thesaurus, the -saurus isn’t a suffix. It’s part of the word. The word actually comes from the Greek word thēsaurós, which means treasure or treasury. In tyrannosaurus, the origin is from the Greek words turannos, which means tyrant, plus the word sauros, which means lizard.


18

The OED (1st edition—another answer supplies a more recent treatment) regards this as a (usually Scots) variant of older -a, both being common tags on the rhyming words in popular ballads (-o from 1727, -a from 1567). See this and this for examples. Note that the convention is only to record the extra syllable in the first stanza, no doubt to save the ...


18

The stem of the Greek noun erôs "love, desire" is normally erôt-, not er-. So it should be erotogenic or erotogenous in English. Cf. phôs, phôt- "light", as in photograph, not *phograph; erotic, not *eric. That said, there are forms in Greek that use erô- and era- as stems, like the verb eraô/erô. It's just that er(a)- is the ultimate root of all these ...


17

The c is pronounced like k except when it comes before i or e: then it is pronounced like s. In service, c comes before e, so that it is pronounced s. If we add -able, we should normally remove the e, as you said; but then we'd get servicable. Because c before a is pronounced k, the sound of the word would change profoundly; that is undesirable, which is why ...


16

Your Google-fu probably fails because the suffix is "-ior", not -"erior". For example, there are the words "excelsior", "senior", "junior". The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology says: -ior formerly also -iour — F. -ieur, † -iour — L. iōrem, nom. -ior, suffix of compar. of adj., as in anterior, exterior, inferior, interior, junior, ...


16

This is similar to the relation between “while” and “whilst”, or between “amid” and “amidst”. As with "whilst", "amongst" is: chiefly British "while using whilst runs the risk of sounding pretentious, it can sometimes add a literary or ironically formal note to a piece of writing" [American Heritage Guide] "The general consensus among scholars of English ...


16

What you are asking about is morphological productivity of English suffixes. Productivity in this sense means using morphemes to coin new words. (It just so happens my thesis deals with morphological productivity!) There are a number of different aspects of the language system that influence productivity and the makeup of the lexicon. Synchronic change ...


16

EDIT: References provided at the bottom. The short answer is nemetic. Longer answer follows. In English, nouns of Greek origin that end in -esis regularly form corresponding adjectives that end in -etic: antithesis, antithetic; diuresis, diuretic; emesis, emetic; genesis, genetic; kinesis, kinetic; mimesis, mimetic; synthesis, synthetic; tmesis, ...


16

I suspect because the phrase was only needed for women and widower is a much later literary invention. Widow had a lot of legal implications for property, titles and so on — if the survivor was a woman these got complicated before women had as many rights. If the survivor was a man in the middle ages it didn't really make much difference — he ...


16

For the hardcore etymologists who don't feel like looking this up and to complement the top answer, here's the etymologies of (-)ship from Dictionary.com. ship: before 900; (noun) Middle English; Old English scip; cognate with Dutch schip, German Schiff, Old Norse, Gothic skip; (v.) Middle English s ( c ) hip ( p ) en, derivative of the noun ...



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