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Of course we can only imagine what the rest of the title is, which means if we can come up with something that finishes the sentence and is proper, then the answer is yes, both can be used. Consider a sports headline: Who are doing best on the front nine? referring to more than one, ie. the leaderboard. or, Who are doing the most to deliver ...


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It depends. If 'Who' is being used in a plural sense then 'are' is needed (e.g. Who are those people?) otherwise 'is' is used if it is being used in a singular sense (e.g. Who is this person?)


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DON'T BIN THAT BOOK JUST YET!!! I don't know, but I hope, that the author is referring to the locative preposition there meaning in that place and not the dummy subject there which occurs in existential constructions and which has no meaning at all. I think we can safely assume that she is, because she includes the locative preposition here in the same ...


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There is food left. Food is a mass noun that does not have a plural sense the way people does. There are no discrete individuals in the concept of food (even though individual items could be intuited, such as steaks, ears of corn, etc.). The sense of the sentence is there is food left. Lots of serves as a modifier of food, rather than of food being a ...


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Consider 'Lots of cheese is good for you' vs. 'Lots of cheeses are good for you.' The 'is' and 'are' cannot be interchanged. Evidently the plurality of 'lots of X' is determined by X, not by 'lots.' Whether this rule 'makes sense' is another question, but so long as it holds, there is no contradiction with the other rule you described as applied to your ...


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If you take 's to be a normal copular, then what is a subject-complement. e.g. What is a car? What is your name? Both a car and your name are subjects, similarly to how subject-auxiliary inversion works. However I would argue that such analysis is incorrect, as "what's the matter?" has become idiomatic and simply means "what's wrong?". So you can, ...


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It's raining, it's pouring, the old man is snoring. It's the most wonderful time of the year." It's plain to see... To what does it refer? It when used this way is often a dummy word. It is semantically empty. Since you used extraposition, you might be aware of this. It often generates discontinuities. According to Mirriam Webster, it is ...


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Since the sentence can be reduced to: It is plain to see. Whatever it refers to is plain to see, and what is plain to see in your sentence is that you don't like dogs. Therefore the the proper parse is your second option: That you don't like dogs is plain to see. Changing plain to easy does not affect the result: That you don't like dogs ...



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