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First, define the word chance in proper context. Chance is often associated with luck or fortune, but in this case it refers to a single probability or possibility. Next, expand the abbreviated sentence more fully. "There's no chance" expands to "There is not a chance" Finally, connect the proper contextual definition with the expanded sentence. "There is ...


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There’s no chance she will change her mind. There is no chance that she will change her mind. ---> There exists no chance that she will change her mind. ---> No chance exists that she will change her mind.


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"There's no chance" is the second independent clause. "Chance" is the subject and "is," the verb. The subordinate clause "[that] she will change her mind" is the complement of the verb in the main clause. In other words No chance = that she will change her mind


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She will not change her mind. In other words, the probability (the chance) that she changes her mind is 0%.


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No. It does not sound weird, but you should bear in mind that the active voice is preferable over the passive voice: When Apple releases the iPhone 6 is preferable to When the iPhone 6 is released Also note, however, that the colloquial "they" in your example A makes it informal and, in the context of formal writing, makes it inferior to ...


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Usage guides have criticized dangling modifiers for generations, primarily because constructions that use dangling modifiers don't make sense when read literally as establishing a structural connection between the modifier and the nearest subject. Strunk & White, The Elements of Style, for example, addresses dangling modifiers in the last of its eleven ...


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Generally speaking, a dependent clause needs to be as close as possible to the word or phrase that it modifies. The word as used in this manner introduces a clause that modifies the subject of the sentence. In the first example, which is correct, the phrase as a web developer applies to the immediately adjacent subject of the sentence, I. This makes sense ...


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As a web developer is prepositional phrase being used adjectively. Phrases like this should be as close to the noun it's modifying as possible. Most people will figure out "developer" is logically associated w/the only singular pronoun (me), but if you're looking to be grammatically correct, then the first sentence is on point.


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Taken literally, the second sentence is nonsense, but there's no ambiguity and anyone knows what the sentence means. Constructions like this are best avoided in formal writing, but in informal use, the meaning is perfectly clear, precisely because the literal meaning is nonsense. The only thing that the modifier can sensibly refer to is the object "me." ...


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I can think of a specific name. Basically, Talking too much when making a clause before the verb Heard about something like that in my 6th grade English class. Hope this helps!


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If I may offer my 2p worth, this whole sentence seems extremely convoluted. Firstly, the first sentence in your text The skulls of every human being have 22 bones is incorrect. It implies that if you total up all the bones in all the skulls of every human being, you will have 22 bones. It should read The skull of every human being has 22 bones ...


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Consider what happens when the herd is sleeping. This doesn't mean that every cow is asleep, merely that sleep is the herd's current activity. Doing the same thing at the same time is the whole point of a herd. If a cow decides to travel while others are eating, it stops being a part of the herd--the herd is still eating.



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