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29

A pawn can be somebody who's being pushed around, or used for somebody else's benefit, often without being aware of it: a person, group, etc, manipulated by another


18

Patsy. Although this is specific to accountability being transferred unfairly, as in someone taking the blame for someone else's crime. Sucker. This is pretty good for many cases. Neither apply to a romantic relationship, though. If that's what you're looking for.


14

Perhaps doormat, as in "(s)he's walking all over you".


8

That depends on what you want to say. If you are talking about politics in general, use the singular: Politics both fascinates and repulses him. If, however, you are referring to specific politics, for example those of a person, use the plural: John's politics both fascinate and repulse him. This is because politics can mean different things. The ...


7

A tool--one that is used or manipulated by another. e.g. 'Anastasius was a willing tool of the Roman Empire.


6

They also have an article entitled "California Chrome permitted to use nasal strip in Belmont Stakes", suggesting that it's the horse that will not be prevented, and as such has an even greater implication of volition. There are some uses of use that are clearly not implying volition on the part of the subject. Plants use photosynthesis. Webservers ...


6

There is cat's-paw as a noun. It has the sense of being exploited. A person used by another as a dupe or tool. The etymology of this term suggests an interesting story about how a monkey tricks a cat by using the cat: Cat's paw (1769, but cat's foot in the same sense, 1590s) refers to old folk tale in which the monkey tricks the cat into pawing ...


5

Dog, tower, t-shirt, and kingdom are the grammatical subjects of the main verbs of these four sentences—what is, stands, was, and lies—and thus of the sentences themselves.


5

In Old English, thou was used for addressing one person and ye for more than one, both as clause subject. Thee and you were used as object. During the Middle English period, ye/you came to be used as a polite singular form alongside thou/thee. During Early Modern English, the distinction between subject and object uses of ye and you gradually disappeared. ...


5

It is commonly asserted that the subject of a sentence is the noun or pronoun that does something or exists in a particular state of being. First, this is not true. Oh, it's commonly asserted, certainly; but that's not what Subject means. Therefore, in the sentence All but Jones are here ... Sorry, there's simply no therefore about it. You're ...


5

Consider 'Lots of cheese is good for you' vs. 'Lots of cheeses are good for you.' The 'is' and 'are' cannot be interchanged. Evidently the plurality of 'lots of X' is determined by X, not by 'lots.' Whether this rule 'makes sense' is another question, but so long as it holds, there is no contradiction with the other rule you described as applied to your ...


4

The conjunction and introduces a new independent clause, opening with the phrase in doing so and with we as its subject. However the subject we is not the same as the implied subject of the doing, resulting in a classic example of a dangling participle. The OP's sentence is not as egregious as the following similar constructions found in a quick internet ...


4

While subject-verb is the more natural order for English, the inversion to verb-subject can be used in certain situations. To better understand this, consider these sentences, all of which could be considered valid (some more acceptable than others): S1: John jumps as high as Jim jumps high. (This is technically valid grammar but not acceptable style. ...


4

This is really not about Raising or Equi; let's look at at the sentences: She was last to arrive. They were the last to arrive. There are a couple of irrelevant differences between them. - Sentence (2) uses the last, while (1) uses no article (both versions are grammatical here) - Sentence (1) has a singular subject and verb, while (2) has plurals. ...


4

Subjects are inferred in practically every untensed subordinate clause (i.e, gerunds and infinitives). In the following sentences, what is the subject of the infinitive to take out? How can you tell? Bill told me to take out the garbage. Bill promised me to take out the garbage. I was told by Bill to take out the garbage. I don't want to take out the ...


4

This is an interesting question. In the Original Poster's sentence she is indeed the nominative case pronoun. It is also true that we associate this case marking with the subjects of finite verbs - such as the verb is in the original example. However, occasionally we find nominative case pronouns in non-subject positions. Here she is in fact not the subject ...


4

Sentence 3: Existential Subjects: Words, Phrases and Functions [A Comparison of Sentences and analysis of Sentences 1 & 2 forthcoming] There's one biscuit left. So now the burning question is: What is the subject of this existential sentence? This isn't as easy as it looks. If we want to answer this question we need to really understand what a ...


4

There is my biscuit. My biscuit is there. There is one biscuit left. (1) and (2) are locatives, and there is a locative adverb indicating the location of the biscuit. The structure is identical, but (1) is transformed from (2). Locative sentences can do that: My sister is over there, by the weeping willow. Over there, by the weeping ...


3

There is nothing ungrammatical about the second sentence. More specifically, there is no participial phrase in the second sentence: there is a subordinate clause followed by a main clause. In the subordinate clause, “When he arrived”, ‘he’ is very clearly the subject; in the main clause, “his friends met him at the station”, the subject is equally clearly ...


3

Inversion is not at all unusual, though not mandatory, with the similar-looking I often take the train to work on Saturday – as does John. I often take the train to work on Saturday – as John does. This may well be influencing your questionable sentence. I often take the same train to work as John does. (I'd prefer 'that' here, but Swan ...


3

Taking your example: "[This is the] man who the authorities refused to admit existed," you have correctly identified that you want to look at the variation "The authorities refused to admit he existed." In that variation "he" is a subject of a clause. "Whom" is used for as a pronoun for the object of the dependent clause, not when the clause itself is the ...


3

(You) [SUBJECT] show [VERB] me [INDIRECT OBJECT] that photo [DIRECT OBJECT]


3

Indeed the entire clause 'All but Jones' is the subject. I think this contains a good explanation as to why. (What he had already forgotten about computer repair could fill whole volumes. —the simple subject is not "computer repair," nor is it "what he had forgotten," nor is it "he." Ask what it is that "could fill whole volumes." Your answer should be ...


3

No, it's not grammatically correct, which is how it's different from I am to be blamed., which is. You might use it if you heard that the news media were going to publish a story blaming you. But it you wanted to state something was your fault, you wouldn't say that, you'd say blame me or it's my fault. I myself am to be blamed is grammatically correct ...


2

1.) Which is the best choice for the blank? 2.) What is the best choice that you have made? Which are the subjects in the above respectively? Yes, "Which" and "What" can be considered to be the grammatical subjects. It is also reasonable to consider that the noun phrases headed by the word "choice" are the grammatical subjects. . LONG ...


2

First, subject and verb were "transposed", not "replaced". As the answers to your other post mention, this transposition tends to de-emphasize the verb and emphasize the subject. One place were we always do it is "So do I." "So I do" means something different: I have vanilla ice cream on my shirt. So do I. Here I am saying that I also have vanilla ice ...


2

There are a lot of different types of subject-verb inversion and subject-auxiliary inversion in English. I mention "subject-verb" and "subject-auxiliary" inversion separately, because inversion is much more common with auxiliaries than with other verbs. They also differ in how acceptable different people would find them, but this is an example of ...


2

Thanks to Prof. John Lawler for the very useful comments. When I look at it as a question of a hypernym for subject and object in English grammar, the closest that I can find is the concept of case, as currently defined, if not taught. ODO (accessed UTC 07:01 today) explains (with English examples): Nouns and pronouns can be used as the subject ...


2

I believe the word you are looking for is "case." Pronouns come in three cases: subjective, objective and possessive. With the exception of pronouns, word order, rather than changes in the word, usually identify the case.


2

I would probably say either "I go to the cinema with my friends every weekend" or "I go to the cinema every weekend with my friends."



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