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7

If you want to know when you can omit that it is essential that you first understand the different functions of the word. In your examples, the that in the following sentences introduces an object clause: I recommend that you take my advice. I know that you are correct. Similar examples are: I hope that you have a happy Christmas. I ...


5

In Old English, thou was used for addressing one person and ye for more than one, both as clause subject. Thee and you were used as object. During the Middle English period, ye/you came to be used as a polite singular form alongside thou/thee. During Early Modern English, the distinction between subject and object uses of ye and you gradually disappeared. ...


5

The sentence contains an example of a dangling modifier. Here is the opening text of the Wikipedia article of the same name: A dangling modifier (a specific case of which is the dangling participle) is an ambiguous grammatical construct, often considered an error in prescriptivist accounts of English, whereby a grammatical modifier could be ...


5

As you say, it's a sentence fragment. It doesn't really matter which you choose, the choice is more a matter of style, than of correctness. But we can look at what would be usual. If you change the context, and say you're trying to identify an unknown person, and you have a bunch of photos. Would you say *"Here's another one of bob and he."? I certainly ...


4

In the first sentence, you are talking about two things, the number of students and the number of teachers. Let's call them A and B as a shorthand. A and B is decreasing A and B are decreasing The second form is obviously correct: The number of students and the number of teachers are decreasing day by day in the school. In your second ...


4

"Subject", although not necessarily wrong, doesn't really work here unless you're talking about someone in a medical trial or someone who is "subject" to someone else. I think "one" sounds best, although "persons" could be okay. As a pointer, the third person plural reflexive pronoun "themselves" is incompatible with the indefinite pronoun "one". You have ...


4

The conjunction and introduces a new independent clause, opening with the phrase in doing so and with we as its subject. However the subject we is not the same as the implied subject of the doing, resulting in a classic example of a dangling participle. The OP's sentence is not as egregious as the following similar constructions found in a quick internet ...


3

The question is the subject of that sentence. It's an inverted sentence, meaning that the subject follows the predicate. You can rewrite it like this without any changes: The pertinent question is whether or not to bomb Syria. EDIT: See here for more information on these types of sentences.


3

Inversion is not at all unusual, though not mandatory, with the similar-looking I often take the train to work on Saturday – as does John. I often take the train to work on Saturday – as John does. This may well be influencing your questionable sentence. I often take the same train to work as John does. (I'd prefer 'that' here, but Swan ...


3

There is nothing ungrammatical about the second sentence. More specifically, there is no participial phrase in the second sentence: there is a subordinate clause followed by a main clause. In the subordinate clause, “When he arrived”, ‘he’ is very clearly the subject; in the main clause, “his friends met him at the station”, the subject is equally clearly ...


3

The subject of the sentence is not the person Michael, nor is it the person Susan, nor is it even the combination of these two people. The subject of the sentence is a grammatical constituent and it consists of words. In this case, those words are "Either Michael or Susan". Of course, we know that these words have meaning, but if you replace them with ...


2

No, not unless you change the sentence to something like: Talk about a prescient economist! In the sentence as it stands, you should use prescience, since prescience is a noun. Question: What do you have? Answer: prescience. Example: He demonstrated an uncanny prescience regarding market trends in the near future. (Here, the word prescience ...


2

English is a middle language when it comes to precision of expression—more accommodating of precision than German (for example) but less so than French. You are right that "get back to work" is a dangling element in your sentence. Usual English convention is to fix dangling elements in one way or another, but exceptions abound. For example, The ...


2

Most readers of the sentence "You should tell him to get up and get back to work" would interpret that to mean You should tell him that he should get up and he should get back to work. Your question supposes that the phrase get back to work is a clause that needs a subject. However the full phrase is actually to get back to work. The sentence as ...


2

You simply need to decide whether “a number of people” should itself be construed to be singular or plural. Compare these two example sentences to find the right answer: A number of people has come to the same realization. A number of people have come to the same realization. Which one of those is right? It is clear that only have works ...


2

People will understand what you mean, but the only context in which you'll see it is a hastily written note or text message. In spoken English people would say "I'm ...". In some dialects this may sound like "Ahm", but it still means "I'm". It would definitely look like an error in a formal context. You might encounter it spoken in a police or similar ...


2

Having been up all night is a perfectly good subject for a verb, and if that is all you are asking the question would fit better on ELL. What is not quite so certain, and what makes it interesting, is whether the verb should be makes rather than made. If you are referring to last night, then Having been up all night is making me tired is an ...


2

Bing dictionary calls a transcript (definition 2): student's academic history: an official document showing the educational work of a student in a school or college If you focus on the transcript as a document, like a passport or a driver's license, then the student holds the document. But unlike a document, transcripts can have many official versions. ...


2

First, subject and verb were "transposed", not "replaced". As the answers to your other post mention, this transposition tends to de-emphasize the verb and emphasize the subject. One place were we always do it is "So do I." "So I do" means something different: I have vanilla ice cream on my shirt. So do I. Here I am saying that I also have vanilla ice ...


2

There are a lot of different types of subject-verb inversion and subject-auxiliary inversion in English. I mention "subject-verb" and "subject-auxiliary" inversion separately, because inversion is much more common with auxiliaries than with other verbs. They also differ in how acceptable different people would find them, but this is an example of ...


2

Thanks to Prof. John Lawler for the very useful comments. When I look at it as a question of a hypernym for subject and object in English grammar, the closest that I can find is the concept of case, as currently defined, if not taught. ODO (accessed UTC 07:01 today) explains (with English examples): Nouns and pronouns can be used as the subject ...


1

Notice that you give different types of construction in your examples. In the book that is required etc that is a relative pronoun (= French lequel). In recommend that you take etc that is a subordinator (= French que). Wikipedia comments: Because of the omission of function words, the use of reduced relative clauses, particularly when nested, can ...


1

Although the Question is framed in a somewhat misleading way by the title, what you have are examples involving compound prepositions, e.g. "next to". To take the first example, "next to the cinema" is an adjectival prepositional phrase modifying the noun "house", telling us which house. In the alternative version the meaning is expressed differently, ...


1

Oh for gosh sakes, call off the Pied Piper already! You just really just want: It must be him you enjoy doing your assignments with, not me. Anything else is overkill in varying degrees. If you’re just dying to stick a whom in there to pair with your him, put it here: It must be him whom you most enjoy working with, not me. But even with that ...


1

The sentence is both grammatical and logical. The speaker is evaluating something, buying cookies (which is a gerund phrase used as a noun). She is determining that the act of buying cookies will not accomplish something. It has the same logic as He is hungry. Eating will solve that. This means His eating will solve that. This is functionally ...


1

How many people are [doing] night shift tonight? One person is [doing] night shift tonight. Michael or Susan will be doing the night shift - not both of them. So the subject is singular. To address the comment from @RegDwighт, one could rephrase the sentence as Either Michael or Susan has to do night shift tonight.. There the use of has rather than have ...


1

You're on the right track when you use the term implied, because the subject of the sentence is the implied you, even though the word you is not in the sentence. This answer, by the way, is from a non-grammarian. The sentence as it is is in the imperative mode, which we use to give commands or make requests. You could expand the sentence and not change ...


1

You can tell that the subject is you because of the way the reflexive works. Only transitive verbs can take objects, and when the subject is the same as the object of a transitive verb, one has to use the reflexive pronoun (the ones that end in -self/selves). That's the rule; anything else produce ungrammaticality [an asterisk * before a sentence marks ...


1

If you want to communicate that John and Becky both possess the same knowledge (i.e., you're referring to the idea that they both possess knowledge about English grammar), then you'd add an apostrophe onto just the last person listed (e.g., John and Becky's knowledge). If you want to communicate that John and Becky possess different knowledge (i.e., you're ...



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