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9

These types of sentences are referred to as presentational constructions. They consist exclusively of intransitive verbs: *There ate John a lion. (ungrammatical, transitive verb) The verbs that allow this kind of usage quite often take no Complement at all. If we have a very big, often indefinite, Subject and there is no Complement of the verb, such ...


7

It is of no use at all to users of a language as users. You can use a language your entire life without knowing what a Subject is, just like you can live your entire life without knowing anything about metabolism. But teachers trying to explain to a learner why a particular expression is wrong or why a particular expression requires a different form, or ...


5

The 'sentence' you asked about has no overall subject. It’s an example of artistic license where the rules of grammar get broken, not due to grammatical incompetence, but for some literary reason, typically resulting in fragments of a sentence being used, as your quote demonstrates. The result here is that the sequence you asked about is not actually a ...


5

According to the Oxford Online English Dictionary, definition 2.1: Attain or extend to (a specified point, level, or condition): unemployment reached a peak in 1933 [NO OBJECT]: in its native habitat it will reach to about 6 m in height Attain certainly can mean both directions, so I think it can technically be used in that fashion. As far ...


4

This is one of the big differences between tensed and untensed subordinate clauses. There are two untensed types -- infinitive clauses and gerund clauses -- and both can often appear without subjects, but only by one of the various rules that achieve that effect. The subjects, even if they aren't present, are still understood, and they aren't always the ...


4

Subject: the person or thing that performs the action or incorporates the action expressed by the verb, or is in the condition indicated by the verb. While it seems the subject initiates the action (especially with transitive verbs) the verb requires a "subject" to carry out or perform the action, hence the "subject" is submitting to the "verb" or let's say, ...


4

Note that I've expanded the quote to include some more context to make it clear that Faulkner is quoting someone relating an incident. Faulkner is reproducing the patterns of somewhat-convoluted speech. The main clause of the direct speech is That was it which is followed by two fragments punctuated like sentences that form an appositive to "it," ...


4

For migrant birds, which habitats are suitable during the non-breeding season influences habitat availability, population resilience to habitat loss, and ultimately survival. This is a sentence from a piece of technical academic writing from the Journal of Avian Biology. The sentence is perfectly grammatical and also makes sense. The structure of the ...


4

I think that with BE we're probably better off subordinating the syntactics to the pragmatics and thinking of the two arguments on either side of the verb as something more like Topic and Comment, which are structurally assigned the syntactic roles Subject and Complement. In that sort of context there's no problem with seeing a locative as de facto Subject: ...


4

First, is it a grammatically correct sentence?  Yes.  This type of sentence is very common.  As Greg Lee mentions, there are several different theories of English grammar, and different theories may label the parts of this sentence in different ways.  In the framework that I use, "to call" is an infinitive and infinitives do not ...


3

Short answer If the phrase that is being fronted is a Complement of the verb, then it is often best to use Subject-dependent inversion, and if you don't your sentence may sound ungrammatical. If the fronted element is an Adjunct instead of a Complement, the inversion is not necessary. It will generally not give good results if the phrase that has been ...


3

My confusion is that since the verb that follows the relative pronoun must agree in number with the word that comes immediately before the relative pronoun, if "blocks" are plural, then it must use "weigh" which contradicts with "each". In your sentence, "each" is not used as a pronoun, but rather as and adverb meaning the same thing as "apiece". ...


3

The idea of the term subject in grammar is that which is placed under something. Object means that which is placed on top of something. If you see the verb of a sentence as the central word the subject is placed under the verb and the object is placed on top of the verb. So you get a model of the sentence structure where the sentence parts are arranged ...


3

Subjects are noun phrases, and usually have more than one word in them, but they can be just one word, if there are no modifiers. Subject is a grammatical concept restricted to languages with nominative-accusative systems, like most Indo-European languages. Languages like Basque, Georgian, Quiché, or Pitjantjatjara, which have absolutive-ergative systems, ...


3

Though the underlying word picture of reach is extending or stretching out, it has embraced metaphoric applications for a long time: Old English ræcan, reccan "reach out, stretch out, extend, hold forth," also "succeed in touching, succeed in striking; address, speak to," also "offer, present, give, grant," from West Germanic *raikjan ...


3

The correct formulation would be "people who have other opinions." "Who" because it is the subject performing the action ("whom" is only used as an object, e.g., "those about whom we have opinions"), and "have" because it's the proper conjugation for a plural subject like "people," the antecedent that "who" refers to.


3

Consider what happens when the herd is sleeping. This doesn't mean that every cow is asleep, merely that sleep is the herd's current activity. Doing the same thing at the same time is the whole point of a herd. If a cow decides to travel while others are eating, it stops being a part of the herd--the herd is still eating.


2

Taken literally, the second sentence is nonsense, but there's no ambiguity and anyone knows what the sentence means. Constructions like this are best avoided in formal writing, but in informal use, the meaning is perfectly clear, precisely because the literal meaning is nonsense. The only thing that the modifier can sensibly refer to is the object "me." ...


2

As a web developer is prepositional phrase being used adjectively. Phrases like this should be as close to the noun it's modifying as possible. Most people will figure out "developer" is logically associated w/the only singular pronoun (me), but if you're looking to be grammatically correct, then the first sentence is on point.


2

I'd go along with Joe's suggestion and use "sometimes shrinking to...". It follows naturally from "highly compressed", I'd say.


2

The presence of the word "And" as the commencement of your second sentence is a clue that far more brutal editing is warranted to regain a leash-hold on the meaning you intend to convey. A single mat provides an effective fall break. Adjacent mats can be linked together to provide an effective fall break over a larger contiguous area.


2

Drop the 'in'. It looks like you were editing and 'in a series' got moved out of the prepositional phrase. But keep editing: 'Linked' appears twice and is redundant. 'Series' only applies if there is a large horizontal velocity. "The mat is an effective fall break. Adjacent linked mats can extend the safe landing zone."


2

All my cigarettes lit Not all my cigarettes lit. The first sentence is a positive polarity declarative sentence. The Subject of the sentence is the noun phrase all my cigarettes. In the second sentence the predeterminer all has been negated by the adverb not. This is comparable to the use of the adverb almost in Almost all my cigarettes lit. ...


2

It depends on what you mean by "correct". The most formal English version would be: To whom do you want to talk? This is because in very formal English it is wrong to split a preposition from its object. But nobody actually talks like that in spoken English. Although your "Whom" is technically the correct word in this case, nobody really talks like that ...


2

According to Longman English Grammar there are three possibilities for questions of the type Who were you talking to? 1 Who were you talking to? - The normal variant where "whom" has been reduced to "who". 2 Whom were you talking to? - Also possible. Less frequent. 3 To whom were you talking to? -This is very formal. You can find this question form in ...


2

Yes, it’s acceptable in informal speech. Given a phrase like “Me and my friend went to the movies”, I tend to think of “me and my friend” not as a subject but rather as a topicaliser, a natural shortening of “Me and my friend, we went to the movies”. Topicalisation can be introduced explicitly with prepositions like “as for” or “speaking of”, but in ...


2

The sentence suggested by your teacher is incorrect. This creates two independent clauses pushed together without any conjunction. A comma cannot fix this because it will create a comma splice, "Then he saw the brother, he thought he was dead." Think of this sentence: "Then he ate the cake, he enjoyed it very much." People make the mistake of joining ...


2

The comment by deadrat is correct in saying that but acts as a preposition, synonymous with except in this instance. Everyone likes you but her. Everyone likes you except her. If you want to see it act as a subject, you would need a verb. At that point, but becomes a conjugation and the start of a clause. Everyone likes you, but she doesn't. ...


2

The it in "What is it that makes us happy?" is called syntactic expletive which is also known as dummy pronoun (or dummy it): It is a word that performs a syntactic role but contributes nothing to meaning. It is also called cleft sentence and you can visit the link for further study. As the below quote indicates, the role of "it" is controversial ...



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