Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

4

Not all verbs need an object. Change can take an object, but it does not need one. Compare the transitive: John has changed his house. He redecorated it. with the intransitive: John has changed. Becoming a father made him mature. So you do not need a object with change. Something or someone can change, meaning that they become (something) ...


2

I don't know about "correct", but they're grammatical. They're called accusative-ing or ACC-ing complements (by analogy to possessive-ing or POSS-ing complements, with which they seem to alternate).


2

What is there to eat? The subject is clearly what. Fairly recently, some linguists have chosen to call there the subject in simple existential sentences, like this: There is one person in the room. But this causes problems, as in your example. The main reasons why they seem to want to label there the subject are that it is the first word in a ...


1

In general use, the current weather conditions are becoming different. Perhaps the temperature is dropping or it has begun (or stopped) raining. This phrase might also be used in a discussion about global warming, which would mean a broader time frame. "The weather is changing, summers are becoming hotter and the ice caps are melting."


1

In The weather changed, the verb change is being used intransitively. That means it does not take a direct object. Change can also be used transitively as in I just changed a wheel on the car.


1

No, neither one. Here is a clause: "The man runs". Here is what happens when I try to use it as a subject: *"The man runs surprises us." No good. Here is a noun: "man". Here is what happens when I try to use it as a subject: *"Man runs." No good. For a subject, you need a noun phrase. You can make a noun phrase from the noun "man" by adding a ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible