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7

This is an example of pro drop (short for pronoun dropping). Some languages, like Spanish, pretty much mandate it. Such languages are called pro-drop languages. In English, most grammarians would probably consider it ungrammatical, but it's pretty standard in informal speech. Regarding its occurrence in English, Wikipedia writes: English is ...


4

There are grammatical restrictions on the use of pronouns when they occur within the same sentence as co-referential noun phrases. A pronoun can co-refer with another normal noun phrase if either: it occurs after the other noun phrase or it occurs lower down in the syntactic tree than the other noun phrase. This last point means that a pronoun in a ...


3

No. All the semicolons should be commas. See this wonderfully handy resource, The Punctuation Guide. Semicolons go Between independent clauses when a coordinating conjunction is omitted Between independent clauses linked by a transitional expression In lists with internal commas In elliptical constructions This sentence doesn't contain any of these ...


3

Normally, I would not recommend using the passive mode, but in this case I think the passive mode would work: When the king was on his throne, he was worshipped; on horseback, he was applauded; on his deathbed, he was prayed for; in his grave, he was wept over; but when exposed as a criminal, he was despised.


2

Are they sitting on the throne, or is the king sitting on the throne? Is the king on horseback, or are they on horseback? This is a little bit unclear, but it's not grammatically incorrect. The context makes it a little more obvious, but you might want to rewrite these sentences to remove all of the ambiguity. "When the king was on his throne, they ...


2

All of the sentences have a dangling participle. For example, in the first sentence the modifying first part "On the throne" relates to "the king", but that is not the subject of the second part of the sentence. What your first sentence means as it is written now is that "they" are on the throne worshipping the king. Similarly in the next sentence "they" ...


1

The rule you've cited actually doesn't apply to the example sentence, which happens to be correct. In the case of your example, the plural verb is appropriate since the subject is plural--multiple subjects connected with and.



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