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Note how the original is constructed: Neither of these objections applies to the version of contractualism that I am defending. The general specification of the scope of morality which it implies seems to me to be this: morality applies to a being if the notion of justification to a being of that kind makes sense. The author is dealing with some ...


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It seems that you have a very good ear for colloquial English. I wish my ear for the languages I've studied was as good. The grammatical construction you're asking about is the "predicate nominative" -- and as you already noted, it is very common to use the objective case even when the subjective is called for. To look at your specific examples: "They ...


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Your instinct is a good one. You may hear "Yes, this is she," if you call a professional office, but most American speakers would say "This is Mary" or, "Speaking" to avoid sounding stuffy. "Hey, it's me," is a given, due to the informality of hey, probably. "They believed that the thief was I," would probably be avoided by saying, "They believed that I ...


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Wolves, hunted to extinction in Wyoming and Montana in the twentieth century, occupy a vital place in the natural cycle of the area. A straightforward test for subject-hood is to make a yes/no question and see what inverts with the auxiliary verb: Do [Wolves, hunted to extinction in Wyoming and Montana in the twentieth century] occupy a vital place in ...


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There is absolutely no reason why let should not be used with an inanimate subject — just as enable or allow can be. Let is a synonym, after all; if an inanimate object can allow something, then it can let it happen, too. There may be an issue where let is used in its archaic/obsolescent sense of hinder (the tennis call of "Let!" is used when the ball ...



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