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5

According to the Oxford Online English Dictionary, definition 2.1: Attain or extend to (a specified point, level, or condition): unemployment reached a peak in 1933 [NO OBJECT]: in its native habitat it will reach to about 6 m in height Attain certainly can mean both directions, so I think it can technically be used in that fashion. As far ...


3

The correct formulation would be "people who have other opinions." "Who" because it is the subject performing the action ("whom" is only used as an object, e.g., "those about whom we have opinions"), and "have" because it's the proper conjugation for a plural subject like "people," the antecedent that "who" refers to.


3

Though the underlying word picture of reach is extending or stretching out, it has embraced metaphoric applications for a long time: Old English ræcan, reccan "reach out, stretch out, extend, hold forth," also "succeed in touching, succeed in striking; address, speak to," also "offer, present, give, grant," from West Germanic *raikjan ...


2

I'd go along with Joe's suggestion and use "sometimes shrinking to...". It follows naturally from "highly compressed", I'd say.


1

Because you are referring to a solitary member of a group for the subject, the singular conjugation of "to think" is correct. In this case the reference to the group of three is adjectival to the one member. While I know it might sound strange, to an American ear it is fine.


1

The sentence type "There is + noun/ There are + noun plural" contains no object. "There is a man at the door" is the same as "A man is at the door". There are various views about the sentence parts "there" and "man". Some say "there" is an adverb and "man" the subject with a special position, some say "there" is the subject. Actually such questions are of ...


1

"Sky" is the object of the preposition "in." There is no direct object in the sentence. The verb "to be" is copulative and doesn't take objects. "Moon" is the subject.


1

Here, the compound subject consists of two singular nouns, viz., "Rohan and Sania". Therefore, the verb should be in the III person plural (they) form, which is "like" and not "likes".


1

The correct answer would be Rohan and Sania like to play card games. Compound subjects linked by and take the plural form of the verb. See this link for your reference. Rules 1, 2 and 3 will be most helpful for compound subjects


1

I would see the mentioned cases of missing subjects as simple ellipsis. Imperative - the "you" is understood as self-evident. Why look that way? - Shortening of Why should we look that way? A series of participle constructions: Put "I was" or "Imagine me" at the beginning of the sentence and it is complete. Ellipsis (omission) is not an invention of ...


1

The paragraph is written in the present progressive with an implied subject [I] and implied helping verb [am]. [I am] Running through the hallways.... This is not standard English, but it functions similarly to an imperative [You] Leave the room. The listener or reader supplies the missing, but obvious, words. A fair amount of recent fiction is written in ...


1

I definitely wouldn't say "up to". If you're making something smaller, you don't say "up". I'd have put something like "down to as little as 1/5", rather than "up to", unless you rephrase to something more like "with compression ratios up to 5:1" (since the compression ratio is higher when the end result is smaller).



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