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41

You and ye used to be the plural forms of the second person pronoun. You was the accusative form, and ye was the nominative form. Because of this, you still conjugates verbs in the plural form even when it is singular; that is, you are is correct even if you is only referring to one person. Thee and thou used to be the singular forms. Thou was the ...


22

You're right that it depends on the rest of the phrase (subject or object): "My wife and I are eating an apple" is correct because "my wife and I" is the subject of the sentence. You could replace "my wife and I" with "we". "You can see my wife and me in this picture" is correct because "my wife and me" is the object of the sentence. You could replace "my ...


16

This is due to a phenomenon that occurs in intimate conversational spoken English called "Conversational Deletion". It was discussed and exemplified quite thoroughly in a 1974 PhD dissertation in linguistics at the University of Michigan that I had the honor of directing. Thrasher, Randolph H. Jr. 1974. Shouldn't Ignore These Strings: A Study of ...


13

You is the plural. Thou is the singular form of you. Thou has now disappeared from common use and is used only to address God. The process resulting in the use of the singular pronoun to express intimacy and the plural pronoun to mark respect or social distance is termed T-V_distinction, after the Latin tu and vos and is found is many languages, ...


12

The rules you were taught are artificial. It is very rare to hear "as I" used in the way you have it in your examples out in the wild. It may be correct according to prescriptive English grammar, but it is not idiomatic to the language until you add the extra bits. One would say either: She is smarter than me. or She is smarter than I am. The ...


12

Whom would be wrong in your example; it should be who. The reason is that a relative pronoun functions as part of the relative clause, not of the main clause. Don't let the question mark fool you: who is a relative pronoun here, not an interrogative one. Are you comfortable with [the person] who he is? This shows the structure of your sentence a ...


12

"I and someone are interested" is grammatically correct. It is the convention in English that when you list several people including yourself, you put yourself last, so you really should say "Someone and I are interested." "Someone and I" is the subject of the sentence, so you should use the subjective case "I" rather than the objective "me". "Someone and I" ...


11

'You" was originally plural, "thou" was the singular. There was a shift to using the plural as the polite form, eg. monarchs say 'we' for I, so gradually the 'you' plural began to be used by everybody. Exceptions are/were Quakers who stuck to the thee/thou since they didn't recognise anyone as better than each other and people from Yorkshire who didn't ...


10

To expand on the other answers, there is nothing special about interesting vs interested. I am interested in X. — X is interesting to me. I am excited about X. — X is exciting to me. I am worried about X. — X is worrying to me. I am horrified by X. — X is horrifying to me. I am surprised by X. — X is surprising to me. I am puzzled by X. — X ...


9

Things is the subject, while such as this is a phrase which modifies things. Take out the such as this to determine subject-verb agreement: Things make me happy. Then put such as this back in: Things such as this make me happy. That is the only correct option.


8

Your sentence is grammatical as it stands, and having a single subject with two conjoined verb phrases is common in all forms of writing and understandable in general. However, the problem with easily parsing your particular sentence stems from the fact that results can be both a 3rd person singular form of a verb (as you intend) or the plural form of the ...


8

In the English language we have only vestiges of case, like the nominative and the accusative that you mention. You can find them in pronouns: Nominative: I, you, he, she, it, we, you, they. Accusative: me, you, him, her, it, us, you, them. The nominative case is used for the subject of the verb, i.e. the word which denotes who/what does what the verb ...


7

Generally, the rule used in English for pronouns is that you always use the objective form of a pronoun, unless the pronoun is the subject of a verb. If it’s the subject of a verb, then you use the subjective form (I, you, he, she, it, we, they). In all other cases—as the object of a verb, as the object of a preposition, or non-sententially—use the objective ...


7

First, note that "x is y" is not always logically equivalent to "y is x". For example, "Fools are my friends" is different from "My friends are fools" (because the first allows wise men to be my friends too, whereas the second does not); "All men are mortals" is very different from "Mortals are all men" :-) That said, sometimes there is an equivalence, and ...


7

In this example, it should definitely be who. A single word question like that is typically seen, grammatically, as an ellipsis for a full-sentence version, as you say. But elided words/phrases are almost always things which have already just been said, so following “He ate the entire cake,” the natural ellipsis would be “Who [ate the entire cake]?”, not ...


7

There is a style of English speaking which drops subject pronouns, which I associate (perhaps wrongly) with Colonel Blimp-type figures. Something like: Went up to town this morning. Met Caruthers at the club. Just got back from Africa. Ate a well lubricated lunch together for old times' sake. Am now coming home by train. It is not standard English, ...


7

I think your Person 2 is supposed to say that the subject of the verb "involve" is "adverse reactions." I agree with the example that tchrist says, although the "Person 2" example wouldn't make sense. I think you should edit your question title to ask for the subject of the verb, because the subject of the sentence is obviously "food allergies." And ...


7

In “The average bundle price paid was a little over $8”, price or bundle price is the subject and was is the verb. Average modifies bundle price or bundle price paid. In any case, “average bundle price paid” is a noun phrase forming the subject of the sentence.


7

English has is a zero-marked valency transformation which allows the object of many verbs to be used as a subject, with the object unspecified. He burned down the house. The house burned down. Or: The sun melted the ice. The ice melted. Note that this is not the passive! The passive voice in English is formed with be + PP, eg: The ...


7

If you want to know when you can omit that it is essential that you first understand the different functions of the word. In your examples, the that in the following sentences introduces an object clause: I recommend that you take my advice. I know that you are correct. Similar examples are: I hope that you have a happy Christmas. I ...


6

Let me add one possibility no one has mentioned: an appositive. Bill and Mark, they’re good chaps. Me, I’m thinking of staying. Me myself, I’m thinking of staying. Your father and me, we’re thinking of staying. My partners and me, we’re interested in investing in your product. All those are grammatical. The first part of the appositive is not even in ...


6

To add to the other answers, a trick for the native speaker to see whether to use "I" or "me" in a sentence is to take away the "someone" from the sentence and see which option sounds best. Do we say My partners and I are interested in investing in your product, or My partners and me are interested in investing in your product? Take away "My ...


6

In Standard English, formal agreement requires the plural keep. That’s because the head word in the noun phrase a lot of people is people, which is plural. The interrupting clause especially this one psychoanalyst guy they have here makes no difference. However, ‘The Catcher in the Rye’ is not written in Standard English. It is written in the dialect of an ...


6

The choice is not between him and me and he and I, but between him and me and his and my. But in any case, this sounds like a fabricated sentence unlikely to occur in the normal speech of native speakers. Apart from anything else, there's something wrong with the syntax. It looks as if you want the simple occurrence to be the subject of the sentence. If so, ...


5

Some languages have less noun/pronoun inflection than English (Chinese languages, for example), and some languages have more inflection (Latin, for example). The answer to your "why" question is that this is simply how the English language developed. You can trace similarities between English and other Germanic languages, and you can look at the history of ...


5

The version with it is the one most style guides will probably recommend. The other version is also acceptable, but it is probably considered less formal and less traditional by most. You will probably hear that one more often in casual speech. To analyse the sentence, it helps if we transform the relative clause into a main clause and see how it works ...


5

"..whose job is to..." indicates that you're talking about a primary purpose of the person's job, whereas "...whose job it is to..." doesn't necessarily mean it's the primary purpose of their job (though it can be) but just that performing that particular task is that person's responsibility. For example, in the case of the window-washers, if their ...



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