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41

You and ye used to be the plural forms of the second person pronoun. You was the accusative form, and ye was the nominative form. Because of this, you still conjugates verbs in the plural form even when it is singular; that is, you are is correct even if you is only referring to one person. Thee and thou used to be the singular forms. Thou was the ...


29

A pawn can be somebody who's being pushed around, or used for somebody else's benefit, often without being aware of it: a person, group, etc, manipulated by another


25

You're right that it depends on the rest of the phrase (subject or object): "My wife and I are eating an apple" is correct because "my wife and I" is the subject of the sentence. You could replace "my wife and I" with "we". "You can see my wife and me in this picture" is correct because "my wife and me" is the object of the sentence. You could replace "my ...


18

Patsy. Although this is specific to accountability being transferred unfairly, as in someone taking the blame for someone else's crime. Sucker. This is pretty good for many cases. Neither apply to a romantic relationship, though. If that's what you're looking for.


17

This is due to a phenomenon that occurs in intimate conversational spoken English called "Conversational Deletion". It was discussed and exemplified quite thoroughly in a 1974 PhD dissertation in linguistics at the University of Michigan that I had the honor of directing. Thrasher, Randolph H. Jr. 1974. Shouldn't Ignore These Strings: A Study of ...


14

Perhaps doormat, as in "(s)he's walking all over you".


13

You is the plural. Thou is the singular form of you. Thou has now disappeared from common use and is used only to address God. The process resulting in the use of the singular pronoun to express intimacy and the plural pronoun to mark respect or social distance is termed T-V_distinction, after the Latin tu and vos and is found is many languages, ...


12

The rules you were taught are artificial. It is very rare to hear "as I" used in the way you have it in your examples out in the wild. It may be correct according to prescriptive English grammar, but it is not idiomatic to the language until you add the extra bits. One would say either: She is smarter than me. or She is smarter than I am. The ...


12

Whom would be wrong in your example; it should be who. The reason is that a relative pronoun functions as part of the relative clause, not of the main clause. Don't let the question mark fool you: who is a relative pronoun here, not an interrogative one. Are you comfortable with [the person] who he is? This shows the structure of your sentence a ...


12

"I and someone are interested" is grammatically correct. It is the convention in English that when you list several people including yourself, you put yourself last, so you really should say "Someone and I are interested." "Someone and I" is the subject of the sentence, so you should use the subjective case "I" rather than the objective "me". "Someone and I" ...


11

'You" was originally plural, "thou" was the singular. There was a shift to using the plural as the polite form, eg. monarchs say 'we' for I, so gradually the 'you' plural began to be used by everybody. Exceptions are/were Quakers who stuck to the thee/thou since they didn't recognise anyone as better than each other and people from Yorkshire who didn't ...


10

To expand on the other answers, there is nothing special about interesting vs interested. I am interested in X. — X is interesting to me. I am excited about X. — X is exciting to me. I am worried about X. — X is worrying to me. I am horrified by X. — X is horrifying to me. I am surprised by X. — X is surprising to me. I am puzzled by X. — X ...


10

Some languages are subject-drop languages, but English is considered a subject-obligatory language. The sentence as it stands is non standard. It's the type of telegraphic language you might see in a text message.


9

"You" sounds wrong and "your" awkward. Turn it around: I came across "Charlie Manson reconsidered" by you and Mr. X.


9

Forgetting for a moment about the technicalities of whether it is a subject or an object, if you use the rule of thumb of trying he/him it is clear that it should be "he is entitled" not "him is entitled". As such it should be "who".


9

Things is the subject, while such as this is a phrase which modifies things. Take out the such as this to determine subject-verb agreement: Things make me happy. Then put such as this back in: Things such as this make me happy. That is the only correct option.


8

"Are" is correct for most compound subjects, except for singular meanings (i.e. mac and cheese is) and alternative subjects (you or your wife is -- you or your friends are, though -- matches subject closest to the verb). Yay for style manuals.


8

Your sentence is grammatical as it stands, and having a single subject with two conjoined verb phrases is common in all forms of writing and understandable in general. However, the problem with easily parsing your particular sentence stems from the fact that results can be both a 3rd person singular form of a verb (as you intend) or the plural form of the ...


8

In the English language we have only vestiges of case, like the nominative and the accusative that you mention. You can find them in pronouns: Nominative: I, you, he, she, it, we, you, they. Accusative: me, you, him, her, it, us, you, them. The nominative case is used for the subject of the verb, i.e. the word which denotes who/what does what the verb ...


7

Generally, the rule used in English for pronouns is that you always use the objective form of a pronoun, unless the pronoun is the subject of a verb. If it’s the subject of a verb, then you use the subjective form (I, you, he, she, it, we, they). In all other cases—as the object of a verb, as the object of a preposition, or non-sententially—use the objective ...


7

English has is a zero-marked valency transformation which allows the object of many verbs to be used as a subject, with the object unspecified. He burned down the house. The house burned down. Or: The sun melted the ice. The ice melted. Note that this is not the passive! The passive voice in English is formed with be + PP, eg: The ...


7

A tool--one that is used or manipulated by another. e.g. 'Anastasius was a willing tool of the Roman Empire.


7

First, note that "x is y" is not always logically equivalent to "y is x". For example, "Fools are my friends" is different from "My friends are fools" (because the first allows wise men to be my friends too, whereas the second does not); "All men are mortals" is very different from "Mortals are all men" :-) That said, sometimes there is an equivalence, and ...


7

In this example, it should definitely be who. A single word question like that is typically seen, grammatically, as an ellipsis for a full-sentence version, as you say. But elided words/phrases are almost always things which have already just been said, so following “He ate the entire cake,” the natural ellipsis would be “Who [ate the entire cake]?”, not ...


7

There is a style of English speaking which drops subject pronouns, which I associate (perhaps wrongly) with Colonel Blimp-type figures. Something like: Went up to town this morning. Met Caruthers at the club. Just got back from Africa. Ate a well lubricated lunch together for old times' sake. Am now coming home by train. It is not standard English, ...


7

I think your Person 2 is supposed to say that the subject of the verb "involve" is "adverse reactions." I agree with the example that tchrist says, although the "Person 2" example wouldn't make sense. I think you should edit your question title to ask for the subject of the verb, because the subject of the sentence is obviously "food allergies." And ...


7

In “The average bundle price paid was a little over $8”, price or bundle price is the subject and was is the verb. Average modifies bundle price or bundle price paid. In any case, “average bundle price paid” is a noun phrase forming the subject of the sentence.


6

There is cat's-paw as a noun. It has the sense of being exploited. A person used by another as a dupe or tool. The etymology of this term suggests an interesting story about how a monkey tricks a cat by using the cat: Cat's paw (1769, but cat's foot in the same sense, 1590s) refers to old folk tale in which the monkey tricks the cat into pawing ...



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